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Engineering Undergraduate

U04523 Stress Analysis I


Tutorial Questions Semester 1 & 2, 2013-14

Department of
Mechanical
Engineering &
Mathematical
Sciences

Faculty of Technology,
Design and
Environment

Module Leader:
Dr JG Broughton

jgbroughton@brookes.ac.uk

Topic 1:

Bending Moments and Shear Force Diagrams

For the following beams draw the bending moment and shear force diagrams stating the maximum
bending moment and shear force.

Figure 1

Figure 2

Figure 3

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Figure 4

Figure 5
In figure 5 the logger weighs 102 kg and the log is 4.878m

Figure 6

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Answers:
1. Max moment = -13kNm, Max Shear Force = -7kN
2. Max moment = 10.5kNm, Max Shear Force = 7kN
3. Max moment = -8kNm, Max Shear Force = -8kN
4. Max moment = Pa, Max Shear Force = P or 2aP/b
5. Max moment = 610Nm, Max Shear Force = 500N
6. Max moment = 45kNm, Max Shear Force = -65kN

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Topic 2:

Stress Profiles

1. The 20mm diameter bar shown in Fig. Q1 is carried on simple supports and is subjected to lateral and
longitudinal forces. It is made from steel, for which the Young's Modulus is 200 GPa.
Determine an expression for the longitudinal stress at points in the critical cross-section, and draw the
corresponding stress profile. Ignore the stress concentrations at the point of contact of the forces.
If a strain gauge were positioned at Point A to measure the longitudinal strain, what value would be
indicated when the loads are applied?

[ Ans. 50 10 4 y(MPa), = 750x10 -6 ]

2. A torsion bar is made from titanium tube having an outside diameter of 50 mm and a wall thickness of
5 mm. Youngs modulus for titanium is 110 GPa; Poissions ration is 0.33.
Determine:
(a) the radial profile of the shear stress when the bar carries a torsional movement
giving maximum and minimum values.

of 5000 Nm,

(b) the corresponding stress profiles for a steel torsion bar of the same dimensions
yield stress in shear of 400 MPa, ensuring the bar does not yield.

if the steel has a

(c) the torsional load that can be carried by the titanium bar if the maximum shear
to exceed 7000 microstrain.

strain is not

(Ans. (A) 345, 276 MPa (c) 4200 Nm)

3. A cylindrical pipe having an inside diameter of 100 mm and an outside diameter of 101 mm carries a
fluid at a pressure of 50 bar.
(a) Draw the state of stress at the inner surface.
(b) What effect would a fluctuation in pressure of 5 bar have on the stress?
(Ans (a) -5, 500, 250 MPa (b) 0.5, 50, 25 MPa)
4. The bar shown in Fig. Q4 is subjected to a compressive force of 20kN acting through pins positioned
4mm above the centroidal axis. It is made from a plastic for which Young's Modulus is 20 GPa.
Determine an expression for the longitudinal stress at any point in the cross-section, and draw the
corresponding stress profile.
What values of strain will be indicated by strain gauges positioned longitudinally on the top and
bottom surfaces?
[ Ans. (55. 6 8. 23x103 y ) MPa, 130 MPa, 18.5 MPa, 6500x106 , 924x106 ]

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5. Fig. Q5 shows part of a shouldered rod made from titanium, having a tensile yield stress of 900 MPa,
an ultimate strength of 1100 MPa and a Young's Modulus of 110 GPa. It is subjected either to (a) a
tensile force of 80kN, or (b) a bending moment of 300Nm.
In each case draw the radial profile of the longitudinal stress at a section in the smaller part of the rod
and 20mm from the shoulder. Superimpose on this the corresponding approximate profile at the
section where the stress is largest.
State the maximum values of the longitudinal stresses and strains and the factor of safety based on
yielding.
[ Ans. (a) 255 MPa, 512 MPa, 4653x10 6 , 1.76 ; (b) 382 MPa, 730 MPa, 6636x10 6 , 1.23 ]

6. The plate shown in Fig. Q6 is made from the same material as that used for the rod of Question 5.
(a) Determine the tensile load that will just produce yielding.
(b) Sketch the stress profile at the critical section when the yield load is applied.
[ Ans. (a) 67kN ]

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Topic 3

Buckling of struts

1. Construct a critical end-load intensity against slenderness ratio graph for a range of pinned columns
made from a material having a Young's Modulus of 200 GPa and a yield stress of 300MPa. Use
slenderness ratios from 0 to 300.
2. A steel bar is 1.75m long and has a rectangular cross-section 38mm x 50mm. It is carried in ball joints
at each end and is subjected to axial compression. The modulus elasticity is 206 GPa and the yield stress
in compression is 228 MPa.
Determine:
(a) the critical buckling load
(b) the critical end-load intensity
(c) the minimum length for which Euler's equation may be used.
(Ans 151.4kN, 79.6MPa, 1.03m)

3. A structural component having a rectangular tubular cross-section 20mm x 30mm and a wall thickness
of 2mm is made from steel having a yield stress of 400MPa and a Youngs modulus of 200GPa. In
service it is clamped rigidly at one end and pinned at the other, and subjected to a compression load of
15kN along it's centroidal axis.
Calculate the maximum length if buckling is to be avoided.
Redesign the cross-section so that the load can be raised. A tube is required and the weight must not be
increased.
Calculate the load capacity of the new component.
(Ans 1.71m)

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4. A length of rolled steel channel is fixed rigidly at one end and is free at the other, and is subjected to
an axial load. It has a depth of 60mm and a flange width of 40mm. Both the web and flange have a
thickness of 10mm. The modulus of elasticity is 200 GPa and the yield stress is 280MPa.
Determine the length and load at which, under perfect conditions, buckling and yielding occur
simultaneously.
(Ans 500mm, 336kN)

40mm
10mm

60mm

5. A steel strut is built up of two T-sections riveted back-to-back to form a cruciform section of overall
dimensions 150mm x 220mm. The dimensions of each T-section are 150mm x 15mm x 110mm. The
ends of the strut are rigidly secured and it's effective length is 7m. Young's modulus for the steel is 210
GPa and the yield stress is 300MPa.
Calculate the maximum safe load to give a factor of safety of 5.
Rearrange the T-sections to increase the load. Calculate this load.
(Ans 287kN)
6. Show which of the equal area cross-sectional shapes in fig Q6 is the optimum to prevent buckling in a
column.

Rectangle:
Length 2m
Width 1m
Box:
Length 1.414m
Width 1.414m

Triangle:
Equal sides
Length 2.1491m

Circle:
Radius 0.798m

Fig Q6

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Topic 4:

Shear Stresses in Beams

1. The support bracket shown in Fig. Q1 is made from cast iron, for which the longitudinal stress is to be
limited to 60 MPa and the shear stress is not to exceed 40 MPa.
Calculate the maximum load F that can be carried. Ignore the stress concentrations.
Draw profiles of the longitudinal and shear stresses at the critical cross-section, ignoring the stress
concentrations.
[ Ans. F = 25kN,
60MPa,
12.5MPa ]

2. The I section beam shown in Fig. Q2 is reinforced by plates bolted to the top and bottom flanges. The
bolts are spaced at intervals of 125mm along the beam.
Calculate the largest vertical shearing force that can be carried, for (a) the unreinforced beam and
a maximum shear stress of 50 MPa, and (b) the reinforced beam if the average shear stress in the bolts is
not to exceed 90 MPa. Ignore the friction between the plates and the flanges.

[ Ans. (a) 64 kN (b) 32 kN ]

3. The beam shown in Fig. Q3 is made from steel for which the longitudinal stress is not to exceed 100
MPa and the shear stress is not to exceed 40 MPa.
Calculate the maximum load F that can be carried.
Draw the profiles of longitudinal and shearing stress at the critical cross-sections, and state the
maximum values.
-9

[ Ans. N.A. = 54.2mm, I=670 x 10 m ,

18.5kN; 100MPa, 27MPa ]

4. The beam shown in Fig. Q4 was manufactured by bonding together three pieces of wood of
rectangular cross-section.
Calculate the average shear stress in each of the two joints for the regions (1), (2) and (3) of the beam
respectively.

[ Ans. N . A.68.3mm, I x 8.63x10 6 m 4 ; a 1 869kPa, 2 97, 3 825kPa,


(b) 1 731kPa, 2 81, 3 689kPa]

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Topic 5:
1.

Stress Transformations

For each of the three states of stress given in the table calculate:
i)
ii)
iii)

normal and shear components when measured from X is 30, -20


principal stress components and principal directions
maximum shear stress components and the associated normal stress components and their
directions

For each of the values of show that (x + y) = (x + y)


Illustrate the original components and all answers using cube diagrams.
The variation of stress components as changes can be visualized using the "Stress" computer
program in the laboratory.

(a)
100
50
20

x (MPa)
y (MPa)
xy (MPa)

(ANS (a)

2.

(b)
200
300
-100

(c)
50
-50
50

See attached graph (b) (i) 138, 362, -6.7; 276, 224, -109 MPa. (ii) 138 MPa at 31.7, 362
MPa. (iii) -112 MPa at -13,3, 250 MPa. (c) (i) 68, -68, -18; 6, -6, 70 MPa (approx) (ii)
70.7 MPa at 22.5o, -70.7 MPa (iii) -70.7 MPa at 67.5o, 0)

The shaft shown on Fig Q 2 has a diameter of 17.5mm and is subjected to a twisting
of 100 Nm.

moment

Calculate:
(a) the shear stress in the surface, relative to the Z, axes
(b) the corresponding principal stresses and their directions.
Illustate the answers using cube diagrams.
(Ans

see Fig Q 2)

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3.

A cylindrical bar 20 mm in diameter is subjected to a twisting moment of 120 Nm and


bending moment of 80 Nm.

Calculate for the point where the bending stress is largest:


(a) the normal and shear stress relative to the longitudinal and circumferential axes.
(b) the corresponding principal stresses and their directions.
(c) the corresponding maximum shear stresses and the associated normal stresses.
Illustrate the answers using cube diagrams.
(Ans

4.

see Fig Q 3)

For each of the two states of strain given in the table, calculate:
(i)

the principal strain components and the principal directions

(ii)

the maximum shear strain components and the associated normal strain components and
their directions.

For each value of show that (x + y) = (x + y)


Illustrate the original components and all answers using cube diagrams.
The variation of strain components as changes can be visualized using the
"Strain" computer program in the laboratory

x (microstrain)

(a)
-1500

(b)
400

y (microstrain)

1000

800

xy (microstrain)

800

-1000

(ANS (a) (i) -1562 at -8.9, 1062. (ii) 2625 at 36.1, -250. (b) (i) 1139 at 34.1, 61. (ii) 1078 at 79.1,
600.)
5.

An element of a rectangular grid marked on the surface of an aluminium plate is shown in Fig Q 5
(a) in the unloaded and loaded conditions. The corresponding element of a finer grid on a plastic
plate is shown in Fig Q 5 (b). Young's modulus for the aluminium is 70 GPa, and Poisson's ratio
is 0.33. The values for the plastic are 1 GPa and 0.37 respectively.
Calculate x, y, z, xy, x, y, xy and illustrate these strain and stress states on cube
diagrams. Note that there is no stress on the surface of the plates, and that the strain z normal to
the surface cannot be calculated until the stresses have been determined.
(Ans (a) 3000, -1500, -740, 3490 microstrain; 197, -40, 0, 91 MPa.
(b) 3330, 15000, -10770, 5000 microstrain; 10.3, 18.8, 0, 1.8 MPa)

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6.

For each of the two states of strain given in question 4, calculate the state of stress relative to the
x,y axes and the two sets of x, y axes. The material for (a) is a filled epoxy, for which E = 20
GPa and = 0.37. The material for (b) is aluminium for which = 72 GPa and = 0.33

ANS in MPa
x
-26.2
53.7

(a)
(b)

7.

y
10.3
75.3

xy
5.8
-27.1

11.2
94

2
-27.1
35.3

19.2
29.2

-7.9
64.5

The two sets of measurements given in the table were taken from rectangular rosettes of strain
gauges bonded to an aluminium surface, for which Young's modulus is 71 GPa and Poisson's ratio
is 0.33.
For each set of values calculate:
(i)

shear strain and stress components relative to the x, y axes

(ii)

principal strains and stress components and their directions relative to x

(ii)

maximum shear strain and stress components and their orientation relative to x

Illustrate these strain and stress components on cube diagrams


Values of strain can be checked using the "Rec.Ros" computer program in the laboratory.
(a)
-500
1000
500

x (microstrain)
45 (microstrain)
y (microstrain)

(b)
300
-1500
900

ANS in microstrain, MPa and degrees.

(b)
(a)

xy
-4200
2000

xy
-112
53

1
2721
1118

-49.1
58.3

2
-1521
-1118

1
177
60

2
-50
-60

-4243
2237

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-4.1
13.3

-113
60

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61.8

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Topic 6:
1.

Yield

A cylindrical pressure vessel having an outside diameter of 1m is made from 10mm


thick steel plate, for which the yield stress in uniaxial tension is 270MPa.
Determine expressions for the principal stresses in the wall of the vessel, and calculate
the value of the internal pressure at which yielding can be expected to occur.
(Ans 5.4MPa Tresca, 6.2MPa von Mises)

2.

A torque of 3160Nm is transmitted by a cylindrical tube having an outside diameter of


104mm and a wall thickness of 2mm. The material has a yield stress in uniaxial
tension of 245MPa.
Calculate:
(i)
the maximum shear stress at the outside radius
(ii)
the corresponding principal stresses
(iii) the corresponding equivalent uniaxial stress based on the Tresca and von Mises
criteria
(iv)
the factor of safety based on yielding.
(Ans. 98.5MPa; 98.5MPa; 197MPa; 121MPa; 1.2, 2.0)

3.

A 12mm diameter drill is used in a chuck as shown in Fig. Q3; the material has a yield
stress of 900MPa. During the drilling operation an axial force of 6.78kN and a
twisting moment of 27.2Nm act on the drill. But at the instant illustrated a horizontal
force of 68N is accidentally applied to the plate being drilled.
Calculate:
(i)
the principal stresses at the point where the stress magnitude is largest
(ii)
the corresponding equivalent uniaxial stress using the Tresca and von Mises
criteria
(iii) the factor of safety based on yielding.
(Ans. (i) 40MPa, -160MPa, O
(ii) 200MPa Tresca, 183MPa von Mises
(iii) 4.5, 4.9)

4.

A cylindrical pressure vessel has a length of 400mm, an outside diameter of 152mm


and a wall thickness of 5mm. The material has a yield stress in uniaxial tension of
220MPa. The tube is subjected to an internal pressure of 6MPa and a twisting moment
of 7kNm.
Calculate:
(i)
the principal stresses at the outside surface
(ii)
the corresponding equivalent uniaxial stress using the Tresca and von Mises
criteria
(iii) the factor of safety based on yielding
(Ans. (I) 111.5MPa, 16.3MPa, O
(ii) 111.5MPa Tresca, 104.3MPa von Mises
(iii) 1.97, 2.1)

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5.

A closed cylindrical pressure vessel, shown in Fig. Q5, is made of an aluminium alloy
that has a Youngs modulus of 70 GPa, a Poissons ratio of 0.33 and a yield strength of
800 MPa. The internal diameter of the vessel is 96 mm and the outside diameter
100mm. It is held in a cradle which has rigid simple supports 300 mm apart at either
end of the cylinder and a rigid simple contact at the mid point of the cylinder acting on
the top surface.
When the cylinder is filled with pressure the supports and contact of the cradle cause
the vessel to bend but do not prevent its free expansion. Any effects on the radial and
circumferental stress due to the supports, contact or closed ends of the cylinder can be
ignored.
(a) Calculate the maximum increase in diameter of the pressure vessel given
that the maximum deflection due to bending of a simply supported beam
PL3
with a centrally applied load is v
and the maximum force the
48EI
cradle can withstand at the supports or contact is 70kN.
(b) What internal pressure would be necessary to give the increase of diameter
found in part a.
(c) Using Von mises and Tresca find the stress at which the cylindrical
pressure vessel would fail and calculate the factors of safety.

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150mm

Fig Q5
mm 100mm

300mm

Fig Q5

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Block 7: Beam Deflection and Strength


1.
The two beams shown in Fig.Q1 are made from aluminium tube of rectangular crosssection,
having a vertical height of 50mm, a horizontal width of 30mm and a wall thickness of 3mm. The yield
stress in tension is 200MPa; Young's modulus is 71GPa.
Determine for each beam:
i.
an expression for the bending moment at every point in the beam and draw the
moment diagram
ii.

the maximum vertical movement

iii.

the maximum bending moment

iv.

the maximum longitudinal stress

v.

the factor of safety based on the yield stress.

bending

Show the necessary position and orientation of a strain gauge if it is to measure the maximum
strain in the beam. What strain will be indicated when the loading is applied
(Ans. (a) (ii) 5.5mm, iii 1000 Nm,(iv)176 MPa, (v)114
. ; 2480 x10 6

(b)(ii ) 0.88mmat x 258mm,(iii )400 Nm,(iv )70.4MPa,(v)2.84;992 x10 6 )


2.
A 16mm diameter rod is supported and loaded as shown in Fig.Q2(a) and Fig.Q2(b).
made from steel having a Youngs modulus of 208GPa.

It is

For each beam:


i.

determine an expression for the bending moment at every point in the beam

ii.

draw the bending moment diagram

iii.

determine an expression for the deflexion curve

iv.

draw the deflexion curve and state the maximum deflexion

v.

calculate the maximum longitudinal stress

vi
state where a strain gauge should be positioned to measure the largest
longitudinal tensile strain

( Ans. (a)

(b)

(i)M 2400 x 6000 x 2 ( Nm), (iii )v (597 x 3 746 x 4 47.8 x) 10 3 (m)


(iv ) 6.0mm(v)596MPa

(i )M 800 x 6000 x 2 4000 x 0.24 ( Nm)


(iii )v (199 x 3 746 x 4 995 x 0.24 3 1.14 x) 10 3 (m)
(iv ) 2.75mm(v)382 MPa )

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3.

Each of the three beams shown in Fig Q.3 has been provided with supports
imposing more
constraints on movement than the minimum necessary to achieve static equilibrium. The built
in supports prevent all lateral movements
and rotations, but do not resist longitudinal
movement. Beam (a) has a simple support at the right hand end which does not move vertically.
The right hand
support for beam (b) prevents a change of slope but does not exert a vertical
force.
Each beam is made from titanium, for which Youngs modulus is 106GPa and
the yield stress
in 780MPa. The cross-section is square and tubular, having
outside dimensions of 12mm
and a wall thickness of 1.5mm. Loading is
parallel to the sides and acts through the centroid.
For each beam:
i. calculate the support forces and moments
ii. determine an expression for the bending moment at every point in the beam and draw the
bending moment diagram
iii. determine an expression for the deflexion curve; draw the curve and state the maximum value
iv. calculate the maximum longitudinal stress and the factor of safety based on the yield stress
v. state where a strain gauge should be positioned to measure the largest longitudinal strain.
(Ans.) (a)

(b)

(i)2500 N ,1500 N , 100 Nm(ii )M 100 2500 x 10 4 x 2 ( Nm),M 100 Nm


(iii )v 0.4 x 2 3.33x 3 6.67 x 4 (m),v 1.39mmat z116mm(iv )508MPa,1.54

(i)2000, 150 Nm,50 Nm (ii )M 150 2000 x 2000 x 0.1 ( Nm),


M 150 Nm(iii )v 0.6 x 2 2.67 x 3 2.67 x 0.1 3 (m),
v 5.33mmat x 200mm(iv )763MPa,1.02

(c )

(i )3000 N , 116.7 Nm (ii )M 116.7 3000 x10000 x 2 2000 x 0.1 ( Nm),


M 116.7 Nm (iii )v 0.467 x 2 4 x 3 6.667 x 4 2.667 x 0.1 3 (m)
v 1.33mm at x 100mm (iv ) 593MPa,1.32)

4.

The diving board shown in Fig Q4 has been designed for people upto 20 stone in mass (Weight =
1246 N). The board is made out of Glass Reinforced Plastic with a Youngs Modulus of 20 GPa, a
yield strength of 80 MPa and a weight of 744.2 N. For a 20 stone person standing stationary 150
mm from the right hand end of the board find:
a) the reactions and moments acting on the board
b) the maximum deflection of the board
c) the position of maximum moment
d) the maximum stress and the factor of safety for the board.

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Fig Q3

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610 mm

2440 mm
50 mm
150 mm
610 mm

Cross Section

Fig Q4

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Topic 8: Strain Energy


1.

The bar shown in Fig.Q1 is made from aluminium having a Youngs modulus of 70 GPa and is
loaded in tension along its centroidal axis.
Calculate, ignoring stress concentrations:
(a)
(b)

the strain energy stored when the load is applied


the corresponding maximum longitudinal stress.
(Ans. (a) 54.6J

2.

(b) 191 MPa)

The simple pinned structure shown in Fig.Q2 is subjected to a vertically downward force at joint
C. It is made from aluminium having a Youngs modulus of 70 GPa. Except at the joints, the
cross-sectional areas of the members are:
AB

100 mm2, AC 100 mm2, BC 200 mm2

Calculate, ignoring the changes in section at the joints:


(a)
(b)

the strain energy stored when the load is applied


the corresponding maximum longitudinal stress and say where it occurs.
Why has a larger area been used for member BC?
(Ans. (a) 7.86J

3.

(b) 120 MPa)

The simple pinned structure shown in Fig.Q3 is subjected to a horizontal force at joint C. It is
made from cast iron having a Youngs modulus of 90 GPa. Except at the joints, the crosssectional areas of the members are: AB 250mm2, AC 500mm2,
BC 1000 mm2.
Calculate, ignoring the changes in section at the joints:
(a)
(b)

the strain energy stored when the load is applied


the corresponding maximum longitudinal stress and say where it occurs.
(Ans. (a) 0.87 J

(b) 22.4 MPa)

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4.

The beam shown in Fig.Q4 is supported as a cantilever and is subjected to a vertically downward
force near the right hand end. It is made from steel having a Youngs modulus of 210 GPa.
Draw the bending moment diagram and calculate, ignoring stress concentrations:
(a)
(b)

the strain energy stored when the load is applied


the corresponding maximum longitudinal stress, stating precisely where it occurs.
(Ans. (a) 1.41 J

5.

(b) 354 MPa)

The beam shown in Fig.Q5 is simply supported near its ends, and is subjected to two equal
upward forces so that the loading of the beam is symmetrical. The material is 10 mm thick epoxy
having a Youngs modulus of 3 GPa.
Draw the bending moment diagram and calculate, ignoring stress concentrations:
(a)
(b)

the strain energy stored when the load is applied


the corresponding maximum longitudinal stress, stating precisely where it occurs.
(Ans. (a) 0.164 J

6.

(b) 6 MPa)

The component shown in Fig.Q6 is supported rigidly at B and subjected to a horizontal force at A.
It is made from brass tubing having an outside diameter of
36 mm and an inside diameter of 30 mm; the Youngs modulus is 110 GPa.
Draw free-body diagrams for AC and CB, and calculate, ignoring stress concentrations:
(a)
(b)

the strain energy stored when the load is applied


the corresponding maximum longitudinal stress, stating precisely where it occurs.
(Ans. (a) 1.64 J

7.

(b) 52.5 MPa)

The flat bar shown in Fig.Q7 is subjected to a tensile force applied through pins. It is made from
12 mm thick titanium having a Youngs modulus of 107 GPa.
Draw a free-body diagram for the critical region of the bar, and calculate, ignoring stress
concentrations:
(a)
(b)

the strain energy stored in the 250 mm length when the load is applied
the corresponding maximum longitudinal stress, stating where it occurs.
(Ans. (a) 6.42 J

8.

(b) 187 MPa)

For each of the components of questions 1 to 7 calculate the movement in the direction of
application of the force when it is applied without impact.
(Ans.(1) 1.82 mm, (2) 2.62 mm, (3) 0.17mm, (4) 1.41 mm, (5) 1.64 mm,
(6) 5.47 mm, (7) 0.32 mm)

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9.

The bar of question 1 is struck by a mass of 2 kg travelling at 5 mls from the left along a line
coincident with the centroidal axis.
Calculate ignoring stress concentrations:
(a)
(b)
(c)

the maximum force exerted on the bar


the corresponding compression of the bar
the maximum stress induced.
(Ans.(a)

10.

40.6 kN,

(b) 1.26 mm, (c)

129 MPa)

The bar of question 1 is attached to a rigid support at its larger end so that it hangs vertically
downwards. A mass of 2 kg, concentric with the bar, slides freely 200 mm down the 20 mm
diameter region to hit a large collar attached rigidly to its lower end.
Calculate ignoring stress concentrations:
(a)
the maximum force exerted on the bar
(b)
the corresponding extension of the bar
(c)
the maximum stress induced
(d)
the maximum stress when the bar is in its final steady-state condition, and compare this
with the value calculated in (c).
(Ans. (a) 16.1 kN,
(b) 0.49 mm, (c) 51.2 MPa,
(d) 62.5 k Pa; (c) = 826 (d)

11.

A weight of 100 N is dropped vertically 20 mm onto joint C of the structure of question 2. It


remains in contact.
Calculate ignoring the changes in section at the joints:
(a)
the maximum force applied at joint C
(b)
the corresponding vertical movement of joint C
(c)
the maximum stress induced, stating where it occurs
(d)
the maximum stress when the structure has reached the steady-state condition,
compare this with the value calculated in (c).

and

(Ans. (a) 3.13 kN,


(b) 1.37 mm, (c) 62.6 MPa,
(d) 2 MPa; (c) = 31.3 (d) )
12.

A weight of 20 N is dropped vertically 50 mm onto the beam of question 4 to hit at the point
indicated.
Calculate, ignoring stress concentrations:
(a)
the maximum force exerted on the beam, and compare this with the weight
(b)
the corresponding vertical movement at the point of contact
(c)
the maximum stress induced, stating precisely where this occurs
(d)
the maximum stress induced if the weight is applied suddenly but does not fall
contact, and compare this with the stress induced by a steady-state load
of 20 N.

Department of Mechanical Engineering & Mathematical Sciences

used

before

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(Ans. (a) 1.68 kN, 85, (b) 1.19 mm, (c) 297 MPa, (d) 7.1 MPa, 2 )
13.

The component of question 6 is used to stop a body having a weight of 30 N which moves
horizontally at constant speed to make contact at point A. The maximum longitudinal stress in the
component is not to exceed 80 MPa.
Calculate ignoring stress concentrations:
(a)
the maximum allowable speed to the body
(b)
the maximum distance travelled by the body after hitting the component at the
calculated in (a).
(Ans. (a) 1.58 m/s,

speed

(b) 8.3 mm)


N. Fellows

Department of Mechanical Engineering & Mathematical Sciences

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Faculty of Technology, Design & Environment


Oxford Brookes University
____________________________________________________________________________

Department of Mechanical Engineering & Mathematical Sciences

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Faculty of Technology, Design & Environment


Oxford Brookes University
____________________________________________________________________________

Department of Mechanical Engineering & Mathematical Sciences

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