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NEW ACADEMIC PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION REQUEST

I.

PROGRAM NAME, DESCRIPTION AND CIP CODE


A. PROPOSED PROGRAM NAME AND DEGREE(S) TO BE OFFERED
Bachelor of Science in Bioinformatics
B. CIP CODE: 26.1103: Bioinformatics
C. DEPARTMENT/UNIT AND COLLEGE Indicate the managing dept/unit and college
for multi- interdisciplinary programs with multiple participating units/colleges.
Department: Computer Science
College: Science

II. PURPOSE AND NATURE OF PROGRAM


The Departments of Computer Science (CSC), Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (EEB), and
Molecular and Cellular Biology (MCB) propose to jointly offer a Bachelor of Science degree
in Bioinformatics.
Bioinformatics is an emerging area of interdisciplinary study that lies at the intersection of
computer science and biology that aims to apply computational techniques to manage,
analyze, and understand biological information. Technological advances in recent years
have led to an explosion in the amount of biological data being created. The large variety of
data sources, and the vast scale of the data, makes traditional approaches to data
manipulation impractical. What is required, instead, is a combination of highly sophisticated
computational algorithms and tools, together with the deep biological knowledge necessary
to apply those tools effectively. The purpose of the proposed degree program is to provide
students with the breadth of knowledge and expertise, spanning both computational and
biological domains, that they need to function effectively in this rapidly-growing area.
The organization of this degree program is motivated by the anticipated needs of the
biological sciences in the 21st century.1 It contains four emphasis areas: in Computer
Science, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Molecular and Cellular Biology, and Systems
Biology. The first three areas emphasize material from the corresponding department. All

1
National Research Council, A New Biology for the 21st Century, National Academy of Sciences,
2009: The New Biologist is not a scientist who knows a little bit about all disciplines, but a scientist with
deep knowledge in one discipline and a `working fluency in several.

emphasis areas are supported by a core set of courses focusing on material that every
bioinformaticist should know.
III. PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS List the program requirements, including minimum number
of credit hours, required courses, and any special requirements, including
subspecializations, subplans, theses, internships, etc.
The BS in Bioinformatics degree has a core curriculum in biology and computer science, and
four possible areas of emphasis: an emphasis in (i) Molecular and Cellular Biology, (ii) Ecology
and Evolutionary Biology, (iii) Computer Science, or (iv) Systems Biology. All four emphasis
areas share the same core curriculum in the first two years, and then begin specializing in the
third and fourth years. The Computer Science and Systems Biology emphasis areas also take a
more advanced mathematics and statistics sequence in their second year. The degree proceeds
by first covering the essential core curriculum of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Ecology and
Evolutionary Biology, and Computer Science, and then moves on to upper-division courses
specific to the field of bioinformatics. Students who are majors in the program take a 1-unit
seminar course in their freshman and sophomore years that gives an overview of the field of
bioinformatics, and provides majors an opportunity to get to know one another.
We describe the BS in Bioinformatics curriculum by presenting four-year plans for each of the
four emphasis areas. All specific courses listed in the plans are required for that emphasis area;
where electives are available, they are noted, and are to be selected from a list of approved
electives (provided later in Section III.A). All plans meet the University and College of Science
degree requirements with respect to general education, mathematics, foreign language, and
upper division requirements, and have a total of 120 units for the degree.
The description of the four-year plans for the emphasis areas begins on the next page.

BS in Bioinformatics: Molecular and Cellular Biology Emphasis


Year 1, Fall
CHEM 151 (General Chemistry I), 4**
MATH 122A (Calculus I), 1
MATH 122B (Calculus I), 4
CSC 127A (Introduction to Computer Science I), 4
ENGL 101 (First-Year Composition), 3**
Total 16 units

Year 1, Spring
CHEM 152 (General Chemistry II), 4**
MATH 129 (Calculus II), 3
CSC 127B (Introduction to Computer Science II), 4
CSC 190 (Seminar in Bioinformatics), 1
ENGL 102 (First-Year Composition), 3
Total 15 units

Year 2, Fall
CHEM 241A (Organic Chemistry), 3**
CHEM 243A (Organic Chemistry), 1
MATH 263 (Introduction to Statistics and
Biostatistics), 3
CSC 250 (Essential Computing for the Sciences), 3
MCB 181R (Introductory Biology I), 3
MCB 181L (Introductory Biology I), 1**

Year 2, Spring
CHEM 241B (Organic Chemistry), 3**
CHEM 243B (Organic Chemistry), 1
CSC 245 (Introduction to Discrete Structures), 4
CSC 290 (Seminar in Bioinformatics), 1
ECOL 182R (Introductory Biology II), 3
ECOL 182L (Introductory Biology II), 1
Gen Ed, 3***
Total 16 units

Total 14 units
Year 3, Fall
BIOC 385 (Metabolic Biochemistry), 3
PHYS 102 (Introductory Physics I), 3
PHYS 181 (Introductory Laboratory I), 1
CSC 345 (Analysis of Discrete Structures), 4
Gen Ed, 3***
Total 14 units

Year 3, Spring
PHYS 103 (Introductory Physics II), 3
PHYS 182 (Introductory Laboratory II), 1
MCB 304 (Molecular Genetics), 5
ECOL 346 (Bioinformatics), 4
Gen Ed, 3***
Total 16 units

Year 4, Fall and Spring


MCB 305 (Cellular and Developmental Biology), 4
MCB 315 (Key Concepts in Quantitative Biology), 4
Gen Ed, 12***
Foreign Language, 6****
Electives (at least 1 upper-division MCB elective), 3*
Total 29 units (for 2 semesters)
Notes
* To complete a second major in Molecular and Cellular Biology, students would need to ensure the elective courses
meet the MCB Lab, Writing-Emphasis, and Core Elective requirements.
** Honors options for these courses include ENGL 109H, MCB 181M, CHEM 105A, CHEM 105B, CHEM 106A, CHEM
106B, CHEM 242A, and CHEM 242B.
*** Students should select upper-division Tier-Two General Education courses to meet the 42 overall upper-division
units requirement.
**** Students who satisfy the second-semester foreign language proficiency requirement out of high school will
replace these foreign language units with approved upper-division electives in the program.

BS in Bioinformatics: Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Emphasis


Year 1, Fall
CHEM 151 (General Chemistry I), 4**
MATH 122A (Calculus I), 1
MATH 122B (Calculus I), 4
CSC 127A (Introduction to Computer Science I), 4
ENGL 101 (First-Year Composition), 3**
Total 16 units

Year 1, Spring
CHEM 152 (General Chemistry II), 4**
MATH 129 (Calculus II), 3
CSC 127B (Introduction to Computer Science II), 4
CSC 190 (Seminar in Bioinformatics), 1
ENGL 102 (First-Year Composition), 3
Total 15 units

Year 2, Fall
CHEM 241A (Organic Chemistry), 3**
CHEM 243A (Organic Chemistry), 1
MATH 263 (Introduction to Statistics and
Biostatistics), 3
CSC 250 (Essential Computing for the Sciences), 3
MCB 181R (Introductory Biology I), 3
MCB 181L (Introductory Biology I), 1**

Year 2, Spring
CHEM 241B (Organic Chemistry), 3**
CHEM 243B (Organic Chemistry), 1
CSC 245 (Introduction to Discrete Structures), 4
CSC 290 (Seminar in Bioinformatics), 1
ECOL 182R (Introductory Biology II), 3
ECOL 182L (Introductory Biology II), 1
Gen Ed, 3***
Total 16 units

Total 14 units
Year 3, Fall
PHYS 102 (Introductory Physics I), 3
PHYS 181 (Introductory Laboratory I), 1
CSC 345 (Analysis of Discrete Structures), 4
ECOL 320 (Genetics), 4
Gen Ed, 3***
Total 15 units

Year 3, Spring
PHYS 103 (Introductory Physics II), 3
PHYS 182 (Introductory Laboratory II), 1
ECOL 335 (Evolutionary Biology), 4
ECOL 346 (Bioinformatics), 4
Gen Ed, 3***
Total 15 units

Year 4, Fall and Spring


ECOL 302 (Ecology), 4
ECOL 465 (Phylogenetic Biology), 3
Gen Ed, 12***
Foreign Language, 6****
Electives (at least 1 upper-division EEB elective), 4*
Total 29 units (for 2 semesters)
Notes
* To complete a second major in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, students would need to ensure the elective
courses meet EEB requirements.
** Honors options for these courses include ENGL 109H, MCB 181M, CHEM 105A, CHEM 105B, CHEM 106A, CHEM
106B, CHEM 242A, and CHEM 242B.
*** Students should select upper-division Tier-Two General Education courses to meet the 42 overall upper-division
units requirement.
**** Students who have already satisfied the second-semester foreign language proficiency requirement out of high
school will replace these foreign language units with approved upper-division electives in the program.

BS in Bioinformatics: Computer Science Emphasis


Year 1, Fall
CHEM 151 (General Chemistry I), 4**
MATH 122A (Calculus I), 1
MATH 122B (Calculus I), 4
CSC 127A (Introduction to Computer Science I), 4
ENGL 101 (First-Year Composition), 3**
Total 16 units

Year 1, Spring
CHEM 152 (General Chemistry II), 4**
MATH 129 (Calculus II), 3
CSC 127B (Introduction to Computer Science II), 4
CSC 190 (Seminar in Bioinformatics), 1
ENGL 102 (First-Year Composition), 3
Total 15 units

Year 2, Fall
CHEM 241A (Organic Chemistry), 3**
CHEM 243A (Organic Chemistry), 1
MATH 254 (Introduction to Ordinary Differential
Equations), 3
CSC 250 (Essential Computing for the Sciences), 3
MCB 181R (Introductory Biology I), 3
MCB 181L (Introductory Biology I), 1**

Year 2, Spring
CHEM 241B (Organic Chemistry), 3**
CHEM 243B (Organic Chemistry), 1
MATH 363 (Introduction to Statistical Methods), 3
CSC 245 (Introduction to Discrete Structures), 4
CSC 290 (Seminar in Bioinformatics), 1
ECOL 182R (Introductory Biology II), 3
ECOL 182L (Introductory Biology II), 1
Total 16 units

Total 14 units
Year 3, Fall
CSC 345 (Analysis of Discrete Structures), 4
MCB 304 (Molecular Genetics), 5;
or ECOL 320 (Genetics), 4
Gen Ed, 6***

Year 3, Spring
CSC 445 (Introduction to Algorithms), 3
MCB 305 (Cellular and Developmental Biology), 4;
or ECOL 335 (Evolutionary Biology), 4
ECOL 346 (Bioinformatics), 4
Gen Ed, 6***
Total 17 units

Total 14-15 units

Year 4, Fall and Spring


CSC 450 (Algorithms in Bioinformatics), 3
Gen Ed, 9***
Foreign Language, 6****
Electives (including at least 2 upper-division Computer Science electives), 9-10
Total 27-28 units (for 2 semesters)

Notes
** Honors options for these courses include ENGL 109H, MCB 181M, CHEM 105A, CHEM 105B, CHEM 106A, CHEM
106B, CHEM 242A, and CHEM 242B.
*** Students should select upper-division Tier-Two General Education courses to meet the 42 overall upper-division
units requirement.
**** Students who have already satisfied the second-semester foreign language proficiency requirement out of high
school will replace these foreign language units with approved upper-division electives in the program.

BS in Bioinformatics: Systems Biology Emphasis


Year 1, Fall
CHEM 151 (General Chemistry I), 4**
MATH 122A (Calculus I), 1
MATH 122B (Calculus I), 4
CSC 127A (Introduction to Computer Science I), 4
ENGL 101 (First-Year Composition), 3**
Total 16 units

Year 1, Spring
CHEM 152 (General Chemistry II), 4**
MATH 129 (Calculus II), 3
CSC 127B (Introduction to Computer Science II), 4
CSC 190 (Seminar in Bioinformatics), 1
ENGL 102 (First-Year Composition), 3
Total 15 units

Year 2, Fall
CHEM 241A (Organic Chemistry), 3**
CHEM 243A (Organic Chemistry), 1
MATH 254 (Introduction to Ordinary Differential
Equations), 3
CSC 250 (Essential Computing for the Sciences), 3
MCB 181R (Introductory Biology I), 3
MCB 181L (Introductory Biology I), 1**

Year 2, Spring
CHEM 241B (Organic Chemistry), 3**
CHEM 243B (Organic Chemistry), 1
MATH 363 (Introduction to Statistical Methods), 3
CSC 245 (Introduction to Discrete Structures), 4
CSC 290 (Seminar in Bioinformatics), 1
ECOL 182R (Introductory Biology II), 3
ECOL 182L (Introductory Biology II), 1
Total 16 units

Total 14 units
Year 3, Fall
BIOC 385 (Metabolic Biochemistry), 3
CSC 345 (Analysis of Discrete Structures), 4
ECOL 302 (Ecology), 4
Gen Ed, 3***
Total 14 units

Year 3, Spring
MCB 304 (Molecular Genetics), 5
ECOL 346 (Bioinformatics), 4
Gen Ed, 6***
Total 15 units

Year 4, Fall and Spring


ECOL 335 (Evolutionary Biology), 4
MCB 305 (Cellular and Developmental Biology), 4
MCB 480 (Introduction to Systems Biology), 3
Gen Ed, 12***
Electives (including at least 1 upper-division MCB or EEB elective), 7*
Total 30 units (for 2 semesters)
Notes
* To complete a second major in Molecular and Cellular Biology, or Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, students would
need to add 2 semesters of physics (PHYS 102, 181, 103, and 182), and additional MCB or EEB electives to meet the
respective MCB or EEB requirements. Students who have not already satisfied the second-semester foreign language
proficiency requirement out of high school will replace some of these elective units with foreign language units.
** Honors options for these courses include ENGL 109H, MCB 181M, CHEM 105A, CHEM 105B, CHEM 106A, CHEM
106B, CHEM 242A, and CHEM 242B.
*** Students should select upper-division Tier-Two General Education courses to meet the 42 overall upper-division
units requirement.

A. CURRENT COURSES AND EXISTING PROGRAMS -- List current courses and existing
university programs which will give strengths to the proposed program.
The degree curriculum builds upon existing strengths in the Molecular and Cellular
Biology, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, and Computer Science programs. Courses
currently taught by these programs that are in the core curriculum of the Bioinformatics
BS include the following:
CSC 127A (Introduction to Computer Science I), 4
CSC 127B (Introduction to Computer Science II), 4
CSC 245 (Introduction to Discrete Structures), 4
CSC 345 (Analysis of Discrete Structures), 4
CSC 445 (Introduction to Algorithms), 3
CSC 450 (Algorithms in Bioinformatics), 3
ECOL 182R and 182L (Introductory Biology II), 4
ECOL 302 (Ecology), 4
ECOL 320 (Genetics), 4
ECOL 326 (Genomics), 3
ECOL 335 (Evolutionary Biology), 4
ECOL 346 (Bioinformatics), 4
ECOL 465 (Phylogenetic Biology), 3
MCB 181R and 181L (Introductory Biology I), 4
MCB 304 (Molecular Genetics), 5
MCB 305 (Cellular and Developmental Biology), 4
MCB 315 (Key Concepts in Quantitative Biology), 4
MCB 480 (Introduction to Systems Biology), 3

(Note: ECOL 346, Bioinformatics, will become a 4-unit course beginning Spring 2014.)
Other existing courses that provide electives for the degree include the following:
ABE 416
BIOC 385
CSC 337
CSC 352
CSC 372
CSC 422
CSC 436
CSC 460
ECOL 345
ECOL 409
ECOL 426
ISTA 420
ISTA 421
ISTA 454
PHIL 321

Statistical Bioinformatics and Genomic Analysis


Metabolic Biochemistry
Web Programming
Systems Programming and Unix
Comparative Programming Languages
Introduction to Parallel and Distributed Programming
Software Engineering
Database Systems
Biodiversity and the Tree of Life
Evolution of Infectious Diseases
Population Genetics
Applied Cyberinfrastructure Concepts to Enable Extreme Science
Introduction to Machine Learning
Informatics in Biology
Medical Ethics

B. NEW COURSES NEEDED -- List any new courses which must be added to initiate the
program; include a course prefix, number, title, catalog description and number of
units for each of these courses.
The degree program has two new required courses that are not currently offered at the
University: CSC 250 (Essential Computing for the Sciences), and CSC 190/290 (Seminar in
Bioinformatics), both of which are described below. The course CSC 250 would become
a prerequisite for the core bioinformatics course in the degree that is currently taught at
the University: ECOL 346 (Bioinformatics). CSC 250 has no prerequisites, but its content
does require some academic maturity, and hence it is numbered at the 200-level. The
course CSC 190/290 is a freshman and sophomore seminar-style course that introduces
students who are majors in the program to the field of bioinformatics.
CSC 190/290, Seminar in Bioinformatics (1 unit). Prerequisites and corequisites: none. This
seminar-style course provides an overview of and introduction to the field of bioinformatics.
Talks by faculty who do research in bioinformatics and computational biology, as well as by
scientists from the biotechnology industry, give a sense of the current directions in the field.
CSC 250, Essential Computing for the Sciences (3 units). Prerequisites and corequisites:
none. This course teaches essential computational skills for students in scientific disciplines,
such as bioinformatics, biology, chemistry, and physics. The content focuses on three
computational skills: (i) basic programming in a scripting language such as Python, and
knowledge of supported data structures; (ii) facility with the UNIX operating system
environment, including file structure, regular expressions, and job control; and (iii) essential
database skills, including database accession and interfacing through the SQL query
language.

C. REQUIREMENTS FOR ACCREDITATION -- Describe the requirements for


accreditation if the program will seek to become accredited. Assess the eligibility of
the proposed program for accreditation.
No program accreditation will be sought.

D. DISTANCE LEARNING Indicate whether this program will be offered via distance
learning and which courses are available via distance learning.
The program will not be offered via distance learning.

IV.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES AND ASSESSMENT


A.

STUDENT OUTCOMES -- Describe what students should know, understand,


and/or be able to do at the conclusion of this program of study.

Graduates of the BS in Bioinformatics program would: (i) have a breadth of competency


in both Computer Science, and Molecular and Cellular Biology or Ecology and
Evolutionary Biology, from having completed the basic core curriculum in both
disciplines; (ii) have achieved depth in one of these disciplines through the coursework
in their chosen emphasis area; and (iii) have completed advanced training in
bioinformatics through specialized courses in the major such as ECOL 346
(Bioinformatics), CSC 450 (Algorithms in Bioinformatics), and MCB 408 (Introduction to
Systems Biology). This is congruent with the view from the National Research Council
report2 that states, The New Biologist is not a scientist who knows a little about all
disciplines, but a scientist with deep knowledge in one discipline and a `working fluency
in several.
All graduates would be fluent in computer programming, and have a well-grounded
knowledge of computer science up through data structures and fundamental
algorithms; would have vital knowledge of biology from the molecular level, to the
genomic level, up through the cellular level, and a sound understanding of evolution and
genetics; and would have basic essential skills in chemistry, mathematics, and statistics.
Depending on their emphasis area, students would have further knowledge in algorithm
design, biochemistry, quantitative biology, and systems biology. Graduates with an
emphasis in Molecular and Cellular Biology, or Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, would
be informed users of bioinformatics software tools, be able to process and transform
the output from analyses using such tools, and have the domain knowledge necessary to
evaluate the biological validity of the results. Graduates with an emphasis in Computer
Science would be able to develop new bioinformatics tools and analysis methods, and
have the core biological knowledge to be effective in interactions with teams involving
biologists and domain experts.
Students with a BS in Bioinformatics, furthermore, will be well-prepared to go on for
graduate study in bioinformatics with no deficiencies.
B.

STUDENT ASSESSMENT -- Provide a plan for assessing intended student


outcomes while the students are in the program and after they have completed
the degree.

The curriculum across all emphasis areas is common in the first year, while in the second
year students with an emphasis in Computer Science or Systems Biology take a more
2
2009.

National Research Council, A New Biology for the 21st Century, National Academy of Sciences,

advanced mathematics and statistics sequence. Students in the BS will be assessed and
advised toward the end of their second semester on whether to continue with the
MATH 254 (Ordinary Differential Equations) and MATH 363 (Statistical Methods)
sequence, or conclude with MATH 129 (Calculus II) and take the less calculus-intensive
statistics course MATH 263 (Introduction to Statistics and Biostatistics). Similarly
students will be assessed and advised in their fourth semester on which emphasis area
they will choose for their third and fourth years.
Student outcomes will be assessed through a combination of reviewing student
performance in courses, feedback provided by students, and career opportunities
available to students (such as graduate school and job offers). We will consult with UAs
Office of Instruction and Assessment (OIA) for feedback on our assessment efforts.
Student performance We will monitor student performance, e.g., in the form of drop
rates for individual courses, student GPAs, and retention rates for the program as a
whole, to assess the content, structure, and difficulty level of individual courses as well
as their relationship to each other.
Student feedback We will solicit feedback from students regarding both the courses
and the program as a whole. We will conduct exit interviews with graduating students
to obtain a retrospective assessment of their coursework as well as the BS program
overall.
Career opportunities We will use UA Career Services survey data to track, to the extent
possible, the fraction of our students who go on to pursue graduate degrees in this or
related disciplines as well as the fraction of students getting job offers on graduation.

V.

STATE'S NEED FOR THE PROGRAM


A.

HOW DOES THIS PROGRAM FULFILL THE NEEDS OF THE STATE OF ARIZONA
AND THE REGION? -- Explain.

In the ten years since the Arizona Bioscience Roadmap of 2002,3 Arizona has invested a
great deal in the biosciences and has become a national leader in this area.4 It is natural
and timely to ask what needs to be done to continue and reinforce this leadership into
the coming decades. A study by the National Research Council states that a strong

3 Battelle Memorial Institute. Platform for Progress: Arizona's Bioscience Roadmap. (Prepared for the
Flinn Foundation.) December 2002.
www.flinnscholars.org/file/arizona_biosci_roadmap_revised_540.pdf.
4 The Flinn Foundation. Distance Traveled: The Bioscience Roadmap Turns 10. 2011 Progress on
Arizona's Bioscience Roadmap. http://www.flinn.org/file/2011_progress_brochure.pdf.

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integration of the biosciences and the information sciences is crucial for this.5 The
proposed Bioinformatics degree program aims to provide this integration and prepare
students with the training and skills to be productive in the biosciences workplace of the
21st century.
This degree will prepare students for graduate studies in either a bioinformatics-related
field or in a traditional discipline, as well as for immediate entry into the job market.
Some career opportunities in related fields are:

Life sciences: scientific curator, gene analyst, protein analyst, phylogeneticist,


computational biologist, research scientist/associate.
Computer science and engineering: database programmer, bioinformatics software
developer, network administrator/analyst.
Applied science: molecular modeler or structure or biomechanics analyst,
biostatistician.
Pharmaceutical science: cheminformatician, pharmacogeneticist, research
scientist/associate.

B.

IS THERE SUFFICIENT STUDENT DEMAND FOR THE PROGRAM? -- Explain and


please answer the following questions.
1.

What is the anticipated student enrollment for this program? (Please


utilize the following tabular format).

5-YEAR PROJECTED ANNUAL ENROLLMENT


1st Year
2nd Year
3rd Year
4th Year
Number of Majors
10
25
40
60

2.

5th Year
100

What is the local, regional and national need for this program? Provide
market analysis data or similar evidence of the need for this program.
Include an assessment of the employment opportunities for graduates of
the program during the next three years.

While employment in this sector, like most other sectors, has been hit by the
recession and the slow economic recovery, there are indications that job growth
in this area is picking up. An industry study of the bioinformatics market outlook
to 2015 states:
During the past decade, the bioinformatics market has significantly evolved
across the globe on the back of the rising genomics industry. The increasing
application of genomics in biotech and pharmaceutical research and
5 National Research Council, A New Biology for the 21st Century, National Academy of Sciences, 2009.

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development has created a huge commercial market for bioinformatics


worldwide. As per our latest research reports estimation, the global
bioinformatics market, which reached the mark of around US $3 Billion in 2010,
will expand at a CAGR of around 25% during 2012-2015 as the declining cost of
human genome sequencing and increasing public and private sector investment
will give a significant boost to the industry.6

We expect that the growth in markets will be accompanied by a corresponding


growth in jobs. Initial signs suggest that this is happening, e.g., a search of job
trends at www.simplyhired.com, a job postings website, indicates a 224%
increase in Bioinformatics jobs from December 2010 to May 2012.7 A Battelle
study of demand for bioscience workers in Arizona8 indicates that 71% of the
jobs in health/bio-informatics will require at least a BS degree, and 19% requiring
a more advanced degree, indicating employer demand for students with this
degree.
3.

Beginning with the first year in which degrees will be awarded, what is
the anticipated number of degrees that will be awarded each year for the
first five years? (Please utilize the following tabular format).

PROJECTED DEGREES AWARDED ANNUALLY


1st Year
2nd Year
3rd Year
4th Year
Number of Degrees
7
15
25
35

5th Year
50

IV.
APPROPRIATENESS FOR THE UNIVERSITY -- Explain how the proposed program is
consistent with the University mission and strategic direction statements of the university and
why the university is the most appropriate location within the Arizona University System for the
program.
The new BS in Bioinformatics degree is directly aligned with the strategic plan and mission of
the University. As the most recent strategic plan9 for the University states in its Executive
Summary, two of the ten emphasis areas listed under strategic directions are (i) biosciences and
biotechnology, and (ii) biomedical and behavioral health. The discipline of bioinformatics
directly impacts both of these two areas, as bioinformatics faculty perform research in the
biosciences and biotechnology, often with biomedical applications, and graduates will go on in
their employment to work in the biosciences and biomedicine, and develop new biotechnology.
6 ReportLinker.com. Bioinformatics Market Outlook to 2015.
http://www.reportlinker.com/p0795432-summary/Bioinformatics-Market-Outlook-to.html.
7 Simplyhired.com. Bioinformatics job trends. http://www.simplyhired.com/a/jobtrends/trend/qbioinformatics.
8 Battelle Foundation. Arizona Bioscience Workforce Strategy: Preparing for the Future. Oct. 2003.
9 University of Arizona, Five-Year Strategic Plan: Expanding our Vision, Deepening our Roots, 20122016.

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The University of Arizona is a Research I institution well known for its emphasis on
interdisciplinary programs, with a premier record of research excellence such as the iPlant
Collaborative, a five-year, $50 million National Science Foundation-funded center for
cyberinfrastructure in the plant sciences. Health sciences at the University of Arizona,
furthermore, has underway a new initiative in big data and biomedical informatics, which can
greatly leverage faculty and students in bioinformatics.

V.

EXISTING PROGRAMS WITHIN THE ARIZONA UNIVERSITY SYSTEM


A.

Arizona University System -- List all programs with the same CIP code definition
at the same academic level (Bachelor's, Master's, Doctoral) currently offered in
the Arizona University System. (Please utilize the following tabular format).

CIP
CODE1

PROGRAM

LOCATION
University & Site

PROGRAM
ACCREDITATION?
YES/NO

1
2
1

Contact Patti King (pattik@email.arizona.edu or 621-4107) for CIP Code information.


[Patti King will fill this out when the application is received]

VI.

EXPECTED FACULTY AND RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS


A.

FACULTY
1.

Current Faculty -- List the name, rank, highest degree, primary


department and estimate of the level of involvement of all current faculty
members who will participate in the program. If proposed program is at
the graduate level, also list the number of master's theses and doctoral
dissertations each of these faculty members have directed to completion.
Attach a brief vita for each faculty member listed.

Below is a listing of faculty from the departments of Computer Science,


Molecular and Cellular Biology, and Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, who will
participate in the new degree program.
For each faculty member, the listing gives their: (a) rank; (b) primary
department; (c) highest degree; as a brief vita, (d) the institution and year they
received their PhD for tenure-track faculty; and for their level of involvement, (e)
an estimate of the percentage of their faculty FTE that they will devote to the
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new degree program. The FTE percentage of involvement for a faculty member
was estimated from the amount of their total teaching FTE (which is generally
40% for tenure-track faculty and 80% for lecturers) that will be devoted to
teaching a course that is a required or elective course in the BS in Bioinformatics
curriculum, plus any amount of their total service FTE (generally 20% for most
faculty) that will be spent helping to administer the degree program.
While all faculty listed below have some level of involvement in the program, we
have highlighted those faculty that are expected to have a high level of
involvement (for example, through teaching a required course in the curriculum)
by following their name with an asterisk. Those faculty with the highest level of
involvement (for example, faculty who will oversee the program, and are
involved in the design and improvement of the program) are highlighted with a
double-asterisk.
Computer Science Faculty
Christian Collberg, Associate Professor, CS, PhD (U. Lund, 1992), 20%
Saumya Debray,** Professor and Head, CS, PhD (SUNY Stony Brook, 1986), 25%
Alon Efrat,* Associate Professor, CS, PhD (Tel Aviv, 1998), 20%
John Hartman, Associate Professor, CS, PhD (UC Berkeley, 1994), 20%
Patrick Homer,* Senior Lecturer, CS, PhD, 40%
John Kececioglu,** Associate Professor, CS, PhD (U. Arizona, 1991), 30%
Stephen Kobourov,* Associate Professor, CS, PhD (Johns Hopkins, 2000), 20%
David Lowenthal, Professor, CS, PhD (U. Arizona, 1996), 20%
Lester McCann,* Senior Lecturer, CS, PhD, 40%
Rick Mercer,* Senior Lecturer, CS, MS, 40%
Bongki Moon,* Professor, CS, PhD (U. Maryland, 1996), 20%
Todd Proebsting, Professor, CS, PhD (U. Wisconsin, 1992), 20%
Richard Snodgrass, Professor, CS, PhD (Carnegie Mellon, 1982), 20%

Molecular and Cellular Biology Faculty


Carol Bender, Director UBRP and BRAVO, MCB, MS (Boston U., 1973), 15%
Molly Bolger, Assistant Professor, MCB, PhD (Duke U., 2006), 23%
Andrew Capaldi,* Assistant Professor, MCB, PhD (U. Leeds, 2001), 25%
Lisa Elfring, Associate Professor, MCB, PhD (UC Santa Cruz, 1994), 25%
Johnny Fares, Associate Professor, MCB, PhD (UNC, 1995), 18%
Ryan Gutenkunst,* Assistant Professor, MCB, PhD (Cornell, 2008), 40%
Jeffrey Laney, Associate Professor, MCB, PhD (Yale, 1995), 20%
Lisa Nagy,** Associate Head and Professor, MCB, PhD (U. Washington, 1991), 30%
Joyce Schroeder, Associate Professor, MCB, PhD (UNC Chapel Hill, 1998), 40%
Tricia Serio,** Head and Professor, MCB, PhD (Yale, 1997), 5%
Frans Tax, Associate Professor, MCB, PhD (U. Washington, 1994), 41%
Ted Weinert,* Professor, MCB, PhD (Yale, 1984), 45%
Guang Yao,* Assistant Professor, MCB, PhD (U. Wisconsin-Madison, 2002), 8%
Daniela Zarnescu, Associate Professor, MCB, PhD (Penn State, 2000), 40%

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Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Faculty


Alexander Badyaev, Professor, EEB, PhD (U. Montana, 1999), 10%
Michael Barker,** Assistant Professor, EEB, PhD (Indiana U., 2009), 20%
Kevin Bonine,* Adjunct Assistant Professor, EEB, PhD (U. Wisconsin, 2001), 15%
Judith Bronstein,* Univ Distinguished Professor, EEB, PhD (U. Michigan, 1986), 15%
Peter Chesson,* Professor, EEB, PhD (U. Adelaide, 1978), 15%
Katrina Dlugosch,* Assistant Professor, EEB, PhD (UC Santa Cruz, 2006), 15%
Anna Dornhaus, Associate Professor, EEB, PhD (U. Wurzburg, 2002), 10%
Renee Duckworth, Assistant Professor, EEB, PhD (Duke U., 2006), 10%
Brian Enquist, Professor, EEB, PhD (U. New Mexico, 1998), 10%
Regis Ferriere,* Associate Professor, EEB, PhD (U. Paris, 1995), 15%
Jeremiah Hackett,* Assistant Professor, EEB, PhD (U. Iowa, 2005), 15%
Katrina Mangin, Director, Science Education Outreach, EEB, PhD (U. Arizona, 1991), 10%
Joanna Masel, Associate Professor, EEB, PhD (U. Oxford, 2001), 10%
Richard Michod, Professor and Head, EEB, PhD (U. Georgia, 1978), 10%
Michael Nachman, Professor, EEB, PhD (U. Michigan, 1990), 10%
Daniel Papaj, Professor, EEB, PhD (Duke U., 1984), 10%
Peter Reinthal,* Adjunct Associate Professor, EEB, (Duke U., 1987), 15%
Robert Robichaux,** Distinguished Professor, EEB, PhD (UC Davis, 1980), 20%
Michael Rosenzweig, Professor, EEB, PhD (U. Pennsylvania, 1966), 10%
Scott Saleska, Associate Professor, EEB, PhD (UC Berkeley, 1998), 10%
Michael Sanderson,* Professor, EEB, PhD (U. Arizona, 1989), 15%
William Schaffer,* Professor, EEB, PhD (Princeton, 1972), 15%
Matthew Sullivan,* Assistant Professor, EEB, PhD (MIT, 2004), 15%
Lawrence Venable, Professor, EEB, PhD (U. Texas, 1979), 10%
Bruce Walsh,* Professor, EEB, PhD (U. Washington, 1983), 15%
Noah Whiteman,* Assistant Professor, EEB, PhD (U. Missouri, St. Louis, 2006), 15%
Michael Worobey, Professor, EEB, PhD (U. Oxford, 2001), 10%

2.

Additional Faculty -- Describe the additional faculty needed during the


next three years for the initiation of the program and list the anticipated
schedule for addition of these faculty members.

The present faculty listed above are sufficient to initiate the BS program, and no
additional faculty are required for the program. It is anticipated, however, that
within the next three years, the University will very likely hire new faculty within
the area of bioinformatics, in order to further strengthen research programs on
campus, and such new hires in bioinformatics will be incorporated into the BS
program.
3.

Current Student and Faculty FTEs -- Give the present numbers of Student
FTE (identify number by graduate and undergraduate students) and
Faculty FTE in the department or unit in which the program will be
offered.

15

The home department for the BS in Bioinformatics program will be Computer


Science, as listed earlier. As of Fall 2012, the total number of undergraduate
student FTEs in Computer Science (counting both majors and pre-majors) is 655.
The total number of faculty FTEs in Computer Science is 15.
4.

Projected Student and Faculty FTEs -- Give the proposed numbers of


Student FTE and Faculty FTE for the next three years in the department
or unit in which the program will be offered.

We project the following estimates of faculty FTEs in the Department of


Computer Science (the home department for the program), starting from the
current academic year 2012-13 and continuing with the next three academic
years through the 2015-16 academic year: 15, 16, 17, 17.
We project the following student FTEs in the Computer Science Department,
from the current 2012-13 year through the 2015-16 year: 655, 688, 722, 758.
(This projection is based on a very conservative 5% annual rate of growth.)

B.

LIBRARY
1.

Acquisitions Needed -- Describe additional library acquisitions needed


during the next three years for the successful initiation of the program.

No new library acquisitions will be needed for the degree program. (Current
journal subscriptions are sufficient.)
C.

PHYSICAL FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT


1.

Existing Physical Facilities -- Assess the adequacy of the existing physical


facilities and equipment available to the proposed program. Include
special classrooms, laboratories, physical equipment, computer facilities,
etc.

The current physical facilities and equipment are adequate for the instructional
needs of the degree program. No new classrooms, laboratories, physical
equipment, or computer facilities are needed.
2.

Additional Facilities Required or Anticipated -- Describe physical facilities


and equipment that will be required or are anticipated during the next
three years for the proposed program.

No new physical facilities or equipment are required for the proposed degree
program.
16

D.

OTHER SUPPORT
1.

Other Support Currently Available -- Include support staff, university and


non-university assistance.

Current support staff from the Department of Computer Science include our
advising staff of Holly Brown, and Christina Dentel; and our laboratory staff of
Phil Kaslo, Eneida Lima, and Tom Lowry. Support staff from the Department of
Molecular and Cellular Biology will be Jennifer Cubeta. Support staff from the
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology will be Elizabeth Oxford.
2.

Other Support Needed, Next Three Years -- List additional staff needed
and other assistance needed for the next three years.

Over the first three years of the program, as the number of majors in the BS in
Bioinformatics degree ramps up, we anticipate a need for hiring one additional
advising staff person in the second year of the degree program.

VII.

FINANCING
A.

SUPPORTING FUNDS FROM OUTSIDE SOURCES -- List.

No supporting funds from outside sources are identified.


B.

BUDGET PROJECTIONS FORM -- Complete the budget projections form


describing the current departmental budget and estimating additional costs for
the first three years of operation for the proposed program. Please note that
these costs for each year are incremental costs, not cumulative costs.

Please see the attached budget projection form.

VIII.

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION

In other information relevant to the degree proposal, we note that the proposed curriculum for
the BS in Bioinformatics degree was developed through joint discussions among three
departments: the Department of Computer Science, the Department of Ecology and
Evolutionary Biology, and the Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology.
We anticipate that RCM from the new degree program will be distributed among these three
departments as follows:
17

Credit for SCH will be assigned according to the home department in which each course
in the degree is taught.
Credit for graduates and majors in the new degree program will be assigned to these
three departments according to the emphasis area chosen by each graduate, except
credit for graduates in the emphasis area of Systems Biology will be split equally
between the Molecular and Cellular Biology Department and the Ecology and
Evolutionary Biology Department.

During the first three years of the new program, we plan to have these three departments fully
assess the program together. In particular, in the second and third years of the program, we will
consider adding new advanced courses that have been created on campus that are relevant to
bioinformatics, to meet the evolving educational needs of the majors in the program.

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