By EDWARD-ISAAC DOVERE

Forest City Ratner Companies
(FCRC) formally announced late last
month that it had fulfilled its promise of
purchasing much of the property at
Atlantic Yards, limiting the use of exer-
cising eminent domain.
“We have always promised to do
everything possible to reduce the need
for eminent domain,” said FCRC
Executive Vice President James Stuckey,
who made the announcement at the May
26 hearing of the City Council’s
Economic Development Committee
attended by community supporters,
unions, and Brooklyn Borough President
Marty Markowitz.
June/Jul y 2005 • VOL. 1, I SSUE 1 A Publ i cat i on of Forest Ci t y Rat ner Compani es
Legendary broadcaster and Brooklyn
native Marv Albert, the voice of New York
sports, has joined the Nets. Beginning in
September, he will call 50 games on the
YES Network, as well as host a 13-episode
to-be-determined
show.
Albert, who grew
up in Brighton
Beach and
Manhattan Beach,
called his first games
in grade school on his
own tape recorder
he brought
to Ebbets
Field. He
is looking
forward to
calling
games again
in his home
borough.
Recently, The
Brooklyn Standard
sat down with
By EDWARD-ISAAC DOVERE
In the 20 years since Forest City Ratner
Companies (FCRC) broke ground on its
first Brooklyn project, a lot has changed. The
borough that many were once ready to write
off has exploded with development and pop-
ularity, more vital today than ever before.
The development company has had a
major hand in this transformation. Starting
with 1 Pierrepont Plaza in 1988, FCRC has
added 15 buildings to the borough. Between
the construction jobs and permanent ones at
the office space in MetroTech Center and
elsewhere, the economic benefit to Brooklyn
has been enormous. This in turn has meant
more residents and more culture, enriching
life in the borough in nearly every way.
The construction of Atlantic Yards will be
a continuation of this progress. Expected to
generate $6.1 billion over the next 30 years
Inside:
Around Brooklyn 8-9
Brooklyn Family 10
Sports 12-13
Old Brooklyn 15
CONTINUED ON PAGE 15
CONTINUED ON PAGE 3
CONTINUED ON PAGE 12
Yes!
Voice of New York
Sports Joins Nets
A listing of arts,
community events
and activities in our
borough.
What to do this
summer for kids
and families.
Preview of the
Brooklyn Cyclones’
Season.
A look into
Brooklyn’s rich
architectural
history.
BROOKLYN’S
BOOMING
Atlantic Yards Will Bring Jobs, Housing and Hoops
Atlantic Yards will create a 22-acre residential, commercial and retail neighborhood in Brooklyn.
Marv
Albert
Forest City Ratner Continues Efforts to Avoid Condemnation
www. brookl ynst andard. com
BY EDWARD-ISAAC DOVERE
F
OREST CITY RATNER COMPANIES (FCRC) MADE
a historic announcement at a press conference last
month, agreeing to dedicate 50 percent of the 4,500
rental units at Atlantic Yards to low- and middle-
income residents.
“What we have done here is huge,” said Bertha Lewis,
executive director of the Association of Community
Organizations for Reform Now (ACORN), which signed a
Memorandum of Understanding with FCRC. Mayor
Michael R. Bloomberg joined FCRC and ACORN at
Brooklyn Borough Hall to unveil details of the plan.
In attendance at the press conference were representatives
from unions such as the Carpenters, the Teamsters, 32-BJ-
SEIU, and the Plumbers. Others in attendance included
United Federation of Teachers President Randi Weingarten,
Council Members Yvette Clarke, Lew Fidler, Bill de Blasio,
Tracy Boyland, Michael Nelson, James Sanders and Kendall
Stewart, Assembly Members Joseph Lentol, Roger Green,
and Clarence Norman, and State Senators Marty Golden,
Kevin Parker and Carl Andrews.
Of those units designated as affordable housing, there
would be two- and three-bedroom apartments distributed
throughout the buildings, as well as studio and one-bedroom
apartments. Senior citizens would be given priority for 10
percent.
“This is a very good day for low- and moderate- income fam-
ilies,” Lewis said. “This team of labor, elected officials and a
visionary developer have put affordable housing back on track.”
Bloomberg, whose administration has been strongly sup-
portive of the development, expressed great excitement about
the new plans.
“This announcement is what we call in business a slam
dunk,” he said, praising the Memorandum of Understanding
for its commitment to alleviating the growing housing short-
age as the largest affordable housing development in the city.
For FCRC, the logic behind the revision was simple. The
current vacancy rate in the city is 3.2%, substantially below
the 5% benchmark that is considered an official housing
emergency. This is partly the consequence of population
growth of nearly 700,000 throughout the five boroughs
between 1990 and 2000, with only 81,000 units of new
housing created. The city’s rate of severe overcrowding,
defined as having 1.5 residents or more per room, is now six
times the national average.
Elected officials call this plan unprecedented.
“The synergy between public policy and private policy, the
synergy between public resources and private resources has
really created a new paradigm,” said State Assemblymember
Green.
He went on to thank
Ratner for “really transcending
the issue of being a developer
that is only concerned with
property imperatives and now
being concerned with moral imperatives.”
It is not just about availability, though. Price is becoming
an ever-larger drain on family incomes, with almost one in
every four New Yorkers paying more than 50% of household
income to rent and utilities. That is why the company worked
with ACORN, the Department of Housing Preservation &
Development, and the Housing Development Corporation
to provide housing for working families in Atlantic Yards.
The housing program, to be based on the New York City
average median income (AMI), will ensure that resident fam-
ilies pay no more than 30% of their income in rent. Families
making up to 160% of the AMI will be eligible for space in
these units. The units will be distributed between families
across the income range from approximately $13,000 to
$100,000 per year.
“When you bring housing, you make a community alive,”
said FCRC Executive Vice President Bruce Bender. “You’re
creating this massive movement of money going from your
pocket to the card store, from the card store to the pizzeria, to
tax dollars. There’s a whole lot of things happening that end
up in the city coffers via sales taxes, via income taxes, via busi-
ness taxes, and it just makes this whole circle go around.”
Bloomberg looked at it from a broader perspective.
“This is about helping a whole part of New York City
share in the great American Dream,” he said. “When we talk
about a city of opportunity for everybody, we mean every-
body.” ❖
“What we have done here is huge.”
— Bertha Lewis, ACORN executive director
ACORN Executve Director Bertha Lewis and
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg celebrate the
announcement of more affordable housing at
Atlantic Yards.
8FSFJOWFTUJOHJO$BSWFS'FEFSBM4BWJOHT#BOL
because we belleve ln lnvestlng ln the communlty.
Plctured from left to rlght: 8ertha Lewls, ACOPN: 1oanne Mlnlerl, Porest Clty Patner Companles: 8ruce Patner, Porest Clty Patner Companles:
Deborah wrlght, Carver Pederal Savlngs 8ank: Peverend Herbert Daughtry: and 1ames Caldwell, 8U|LD.
Porest Clty Patner has always belleved ln glvlng back to the
communlty. we belleve ln creatlng ìobs and houslng. 8etter
communltles. Soarlng opportunlty for all.
That's why we're proud to deposlt $l mllllon ln the Carver
Pederal Savlngs 8ank, the largest Afrlcan- and Carlbbean-
Amerlcan run bank ln the Unlted States.
The lnvestment was made at Carver's branch ln Atlantlc
Termlnal, a Porest Clty Patner Development.
Porest Clty Patner, Carver Pederal Savlngs 8ank and 8rooklyn÷all growlng together.
Atlantic Yards to Add More Affordable Housing
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T H E B R O O K LY N S TA N D A R D
for the city and state, the 22-acre residential and commercial
development will be created with a $3.5 billion investment.
That sort of wide-ranging economic boon is what won
the project support from Governor George Pataki, who
recently praised it for “contributing to Brooklyn’s revival.”
The centerpiece of the plan will be an arching, glass-
enclosed arena for the Nets designed by world-renowned
architect Frank Gehry. The building will seat approximately
19,000 fans for basketball and other events, and 20,500 for
concerts.
The 17 other high-rise buildings in the six-square-block
footprint bounded by Dean Street and Vanderbilt, Flatbush
and Atlantic Avenues, will provide more than 6,000 new
housing units, including 4,500 mixed-use rentals, in addi-
tion to office and retail space.
The company estimates the project will create 15,000
construction jobs and 6,000 new permanent jobs, an idea
that has already won many champions, including Mayor
Michael R. Bloomberg, who said in his January State of the
City address that it will be “the capstone of Downtown
Brooklyn’s rebirth.”
It is a rebirth Bruce Ratner and his company have been
integrally involved in since breaking ground on MetroTech
Center, the office building complex center just down the
street from Borough Hall.
“We came here in the mid-‘80s when it was difficult for
the city to attract businesses anyplace other than
Manhattan,” said FCRC Chief Operating Officer and
Executive Vice President Joanne Minieri. “We just are major
fans of Brooklyn and feel that we’ve done an awful lot to take
some of the risks in the early days, which is why it’s flourish-
ing today.”
This commitment to the borough led Ratner to lead a
$300 million bid for the Nets last year around the concept of
integrating a new home for the team into the company’s
plans.
“We now have a really unique chance to bring a business
to New York City, and to Brooklyn specifically,” Minieri
said, describing the enormous tax revenues to be collected on
everything from multi-million dollar players’ salaries to con-
cessions sold at the arena. The result will be a magnet and an
anchor for all sorts of other businesses that FCRC and oth-
ers agree will be drawn to the area.
All this aside, there is the very important matter of civic
pride.
The Brooklyn Nets will be dribbling down the court
across the street from where then-Brooklyn Dodgers owner
Walter O’Malley wanted to build a stadium for his team.
The blocking of that plan directly resulted in O’Malley’s
decision to move the Dodgers to Los Angeles, leaving
Brooklyn without a major sports team of its own ever since.
Minieri cited the fact that there are only 30 NBA fran-
chises distributed through the country.
“For Brooklyn to have its own team really puts it right up
there as being one of the prime cities in the United States,”
she said. “It’s a recognition of what Brooklyn has come to
accomplish in its hard work over the last 15 to 20 years.”
Under a proposal by FCRC, the rail yards will eventually
be moved to a new site provided by FCRC. But with the
construction of a temporary yard at the outset, there will be
no service disruption at any phase of the construction.
“This is a part of Brooklyn that could use some help, and
it’s getting it,” Bloomberg said.
The recently released Memorandum of Understanding
(MOU) included a pledge of
$100 million each from the city
and state towards funding of
new infrastructure and street
work near the site. This cement-
ed government backing of
Atlantic Yards and the Nets
arena, long favorites of elected
officials in the city and state.
However, by substituting apartments for commercial
space, FCRC will increase the number of residential units at
the site by approximately 2,800. It will also expand the pub-
lic space from six to seven and a half acres, and include a
small boutique hotel.
In either case, the arena and four other buildings will be
completed in the first phase, expected to take three to five
“This project will really represent the real rebirth
and renaissance of our beloved borough.”
— Brooklyn Borough President Marty Markowitz
Atlantic Yards will attract new businesses to
Brooklyn.
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
New Buildings and Arena to Enhance Neighborhood
General Plan For Project
CONTINUED ON PAGE 14
Zoning Square Feet:
Arena: 850,000 ZSF
Office: 1.9 M ZSF
Residential: 5.5 M ZSF (6,000 Units)
Retail: 227,000 ZSF
Open Space: 7.4 Acres
Arena
Office
Residential
Open Space
Retail ( in base of
buildings)
Zoning Square Feet:
Arena: 850,000 ZSF
Office: 428,800 ZSF
Hotel: 187,000 ZSF
Residential: 6.8 M ZSF (7,300 Units)
Retail: 227,000 ZSF
Open Space: 7.4 Acres
Arena
Office
Hotel
Residential
Open Space
Retail ( in base of
buildings)
Expected Atlantic Yards Benefits
• 6,000 permanent jobs
• 15,000 union construction jobs
• $6.1 billion in total tax revenue for the
city and state over the next 30 years
Alternate Plan For Project
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T H E B R O O K LY N S TA N D A R D 3
By BRUCE RATNER
I hope you enjoy the first edition of The Brooklyn Standard.
Every month or so, we will try to put out a new edition
where we can provide you with updated information about
Atlantic Yards and other news and events taking place in
Brooklyn.
We are not trying to compete with daily, weekly or local
papers. Our goal is simple: to share information about Atlantic
Yards with the people of Brooklyn and to create an even greater
dialogue as we go forward.
As you know from the stories in this edition, the city and the
state signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Forest City
Ratner Companies earlier this year. That does not mark the end
of the process. It marks the beginning. In the next few months,
we will hold more public meetings and you can expect a great
deal of discussion dealing with the community benefits related
to the project and the environmental impact.
Brooklyn is our corporate home, and it’s our spiritual home.
Forest City Ratner, which is located at MetroTech in downtown
Brooklyn, has been a strong partner in the re-birth of our bor-
ough. But we understand as well that sometimes a renaissance is
more about discovering what is there than
inventing something new – and that there is
a character and drive that has always been
very much part of this borough.
Regardless, we have been working in this
great borough for years. We’re proud that
we’ve helped generate many jobs here. That’s
what we do. Yes, we build. But in doing so
we’re also generating jobs and ongoing
opportunities for our neighbors.
As a former City Consumer Affairs
Commissioner, I understand the importance
of the value of a dollar. Our city must be able
to provide housing, goods and services in an
affordable manner. That’s why we’re proud of
Atlantic Center and Atlantic Terminal, home
of Target, Marshall’s and Pathmark, one of
the top-selling supermarkets in the country.
We’re excited that the Nets are coming to Brooklyn. But this
project is about more than basketball. It’s about housing and
jobs. We’ve worked with ACORN to develop a bold plan in
which half of the 4,500 rental units will be for low-income and
working families. We’re working with BUILD on developing a
local jobs program to ensure that minority and women owned
businesses benefit from the project and that job training pro-
grams create not just promise for today but also for tomorrow
and the future. And we’ve benefited from the keen intelligence
and insight of Reverend Dr. Herbert Daughtry, Sr. in con-
tributing to New York’s first-ever Community Benefits
Agreement, a contract between our company and the commu-
nity that will be legally binding.
We know that there’s a lot of work to do on Atlantic Yards –
and that there are a lot of questions. We have an obligation to try
to answer these questions and to work with you and your neigh-
bors as we go forward. It is a testament to the vibrancy of our
borough that we have so many fine papers. We see The Brooklyn
Standard as complementing them, providing a perspective on
the state of Atlantic Yards and some of the other exciting things
happening from Sheepshead Bay to Greenpoint, Williamsburg
to the Heights, and everywhere in between.
Stay tuned and stay involved — we’re working at this
together! ❖
A Time of Excitement
The growth and success of neigh-
borhoods throughout Brooklyn are a
source of pride for all New Yorkers,
and there is no better time to wel-
come The Brooklyn Standard to this
thriving community. We are rehabili-
tating the waterfront, expanding cul-
tural and recreational resources and
laying the groundwork for exciting
economic development across the
borough. We are also preserving the
character of neighborhoods and
keeping them affordable for longtime
residents.
Recently, I announced an agree-
ment that sets aside half of the
rental units in the proposed Atlantic
Yards development for low- and
moderate-income housing. In addi-
tion to residential development, this
project will also include an arena,
commercial and retail space and 7.4
acres of open public space.
According to an economic analysis
performed earlier this year, the net
fiscal benefit for the city and state
will be extraordinary.
The Atlantic Yards plan is one
example of positive and responsible
development for the future. We are
taking what is currently a rail storage
yard and developing it for the enjoy-
ment and economic benefit of
Brooklyn residents and all New
Yorkers. Once again, I welcome The
Brooklyn Standard and look forward to
reading about this project and others
in this paper. Best of luck!
SINCERELY,
MICHAEL R. BLOOMBERG
MAYOR
Welcome to the Mix
Brooklyn is a great borough, full
of great things. And at the heart of
our proud past and dynamic future is
our rich patchwork of different peo-
ple and different voices.
With that in mind, I’m happy to
welcome The Brooklyn Standard. We’re
a boisterous, booming, opinionated
group of people, and we take our
information seriously. They’ll have
their work cut out for them joining
the mix, but I’m sure they’re up to the
task.
If there’s one thing I’ve learned
from a lifetime of living here, it’s that
there’s no shortage of exciting things
to be found. Brooklyn is a bubbling
cauldron of life and excitement, and
the fantastic Atlantic Yards project
will only increase it for decades to
come.
So for news on all that and more,
I’ll be looking to The Brooklyn
Standard to help fill me in.
Welcome to Brooklyn. We’re glad
to have you here.
MARTIN MALAVE DILAN
STATE SENATOR DISTRICT 17
letters to the editor
editorial
4 J u n e / J u l y 2 0 0 5
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T H E B R O O K LY N S TA N D A R D
editors in Chief:
Barry Baum
Scott C. Cantone
Executive Editor:
Edward-Isaac Dovere
Managing Editor:
Tom Allon
Contributors:
Deirdre Cahill, Dave Campanaro
John B. Manbeck
Production Manager:
Mark T. Stinson
Graphic Designer:
Mitchell Hoffman
Photographer:
Andrew Schwartz
Copy Editor:
Daniel S. Burnstein
Send letters to the editor:
letters@brooklynstandard.com
From left: Forest City Ratner Companies President/CEO Bruce
Ratner, Brooklyn Borough President Marty Markowitz, Rev. Dr.
Herbert Daughtry, Sr., and ACORN Executive Director Bertha Lewis
Publisher’s note
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RaisingThe Brooklyn Standard Again
In the 1800s, New York began its ascent from farmland to
one of America’s great urban centers. Those days were full of
excitement, dissent, and debate, as the City of Brooklyn and
the nation worked to find its footing.
Walt Whitman, the great Transcendentalist poet who
would soon transform American literature with Leaves of Grass,
was among those who spoke out. Though his writing career
first blossomed during his time with the Brooklyn Eagle, the
outbreak of the Civil War led him to leave his journalistic
home because it did not share his views on abolition.
Within a year, he left the city to become a nurse in
Washington during the Civil War. But before he went, he
delivered his 25-essay “Brooklyniana” series to The Brooklyn
Standard, another great newspaper of the time.
“Brooklyniana” ran from June 1861 through November
1862, and found Whitman looking back on the history of
Long Island. Now, as we look toward Brooklyn’s exciting
future, Forest City Ratner Companies has revived the venerat-
ed name of The Brooklyn Standard.
The Brooklyn of yesterday is the foundation for all we
build here. We hope this paper and our Atlantic Yards devel-
opment will help continue and expand this rich legacy, and we
look forward to The Brooklyn Standard once again being part
of our borough’s exciting mix.
A Forest City Ratner Companies Publication
Working Together for Brooklyn
By MARTY MARKOWITZ
L
IKE THE FORSYTHIAS IN SPRING at
the Botanic Garden, Brooklyn is
blooming all over. Exciting projects in
every corner of the borough are expanding
economic and cultural opportunities for all
Brooklynites, ensuring that Brooklyn
remains the best place in America to live,
work, and raise a family.
From the return of Coney Island as a top
family-entertainment destination—includ-
ing the newly restored
Parachute Jump, which will
be permanently lit this
summer—to the
Greenpoint Design and
Manufacturing Center,
which creates industrial
jobs for Brooklynites, we’re
staying true to Brooklyn’s
roots. From the region’s
most popular shopping
center at Spring Creek in
East New York to the cruise ship terminal
breaking ground in Red Hook, Brooklyn is
open for business and for visitors. And from
the East Coast’s hottest new film-production
facility — Steiner Studios (aka “Hollywood
East”), at the Brooklyn Navy Yard — to the
recent opening of America’s first Jewish
Children’s Museum in Crown Heights, we’re
proving that Brooklyn is at the cutting edge.
Here in Brooklyn we have a saying for
so many positive developments: “How
sweet it is!”
But they’re just the tip of the iceberg. The
growth and revitalization of Brooklyn’s eco-
nomic and cultural communities means that
increasingly, there’s never any reason to leave
Brooklyn — to shop, to eat, to work, to visit
a museum or theater, or to have fun with the
kids. The big retail players like Ikea, Whole
Foods, and Fairway are discovering
Brooklyn. But that’s not stopping our
vibrant, flourish-
ing local businesses
on commercial
strips in every
neighborhood.
We’re creating jobs
for Brooklynites of
every income level
and every skill
level, including
our young people,
who need entry-
level jobs offering the opportunity for train-
ing, advancement, and promotion.
The spectacular Atlantic Yards develop-
ment will mark the return to Brooklyn of a
major-league sports team, the New Jersey
Nets—soon to be the Brooklyn Nets. It will
create thousands of new jobs and thousands
of units of affordable housing, in a project
designed by renowned architect Frank Gehry.
Also stay tuned for news about the Initiative
for a Competitive Brooklyn, an innovative
borough-wide plan to create new jobs in our
fastest-growing industries. As New York
City’s cultural capital, Brooklyn’s artists, writ-
ers, architects, and actors are producing
works that reflect our unrivaled diversity.
Nowhere in America boasts more character
— or more characters — than Brooklyn,
which guarantees that there will never be a
shortage of material for our creative commu-
nity. With long-standing institutions like the
Brooklyn Museum, the Brooklyn Academy
of Music, and the Brooklyn Children’s
Museum joined by the next wave of arts
venues like St. Ann’s, the galleries of
Williamsburg, Clinton Hill and Red Hook,
and the planned Theater for a New Audience
in the BAM Cultural District, it’s clear that
the center of New York’s cultural universe has
shifted to Brooklyn.
All this activity also means that more visi-
tors will come here to see the world — and
stay in Brooklyn. Our historic, vibrant neigh-
borhoods, our beautiful houses of worship,
our distinctive cultural attractions, our
unique ethnic mix, and our delicious restau-
rants will make Brooklyn the destination of
choice for national and international tourists.
And, they’ll have a chance to experience
Brooklynites’ long-standing reputation for
being reserved, subtle, and polite. Then if they
want to take a day trip to Manhattan – OK!
It all adds up to one great thing: There are
two kinds of people in this world today:
Brooklynites, and Brooklyn wannabes! ❖
Marty Markowitz has been the Borough
President of Brooklyn since 2001.
By REV. DR. HERBERT DAUGHTRY, SR.
“Where There is no Vision, the People Perish”
Prov. 29:18
W
HILE THE SCRIPTURE GIVES US
the dire consequences when there is
no vision, implied is the converse;
when there is a vision, the people prosper.
Once upon a time, crime, blight and
deterioration threatened to turn downtown
Brooklyn into ghost town, USA.
Fortunately, rather than walking away from
the area, some companies invested, bringing
a new feel to an old part of town, and with it
new hope. Forest City Ratner Companies,
which makes its home in Brooklyn, built not
just structures in what is now MetroTech,
but new hope, creating jobs and economic
vitality. It is hard to believe what the area
once was.
Now in progress is another vision. The
transformation of a 22-acre stretch of land in
downtown Brooklyn that consists primarily
of old railroad tracks and trains, vacant lots
and dilapidated buildings, bound by two
thoroughfares, Atlantic and Flatbush
Avenues. For 20 years, the open railyard has
appeared as a giant scar dividing two neigh-
borhoods.
Now, with Atlantic Yards, there’s new
promise, a development that will create
much needed housing, and open space and a
home for the Brooklyn Nets. The rental
buildings will have an unprecedented 50%
for low- to moderate-income families. In
addition, quality-of-life facilities, including
an intergenerational complex, consisting of
senior citizens, day care, youth and health
centers; community benefits from the arena;
and a children’s zone. There will be 6,000
permanent jobs and 15,000 construction
jobs, a project labor agreement guaranteeing
a percentage of union jobs for minorities and
women, opportunities for minority- and
women-owned businesses as well as new
developers.
All of the above is to be contained in a
legally binding community benefits agree-
ment. Inarguably, the comprehensiveness
and diversity of Atlantic Yards for communi-
ty enhancement and participation is
unprecedented. But there is still more. It is
projected that Atlantic Yards will generate
$6.1 billion in new tax revenue for the city
and state over the next three decades. This is
new funding to help build schools and safer
streets. And to add dessert to the unsur-
passed goodies, there will be six acres of
green space — a place to sit for a quiet
moment or walk among grass, trees and
flowers.
From whence came this vision? On
Monday, April 25, Mr. Bruce Ratner, presi-
dent and CEO of Forest City Ratner, and
Mr. Randall Touré, vice president, visited the
Alonzo Daughtry Memorial Day Care
Center — a state of the art center named
after my father and directed by my wife.
Mr. Ratner had the colossal challenge of
speaking to three separate classes of chil-
dren and staff, ranging in age from two to
12 years old. We all wondered how he
would rise to the task. His sharp eyes spied
building blocks in the corner of one of the
classrooms. He had the material for his
remarks and that would hold the interest of
the children and staff. Relaxed, smiling
and seated on a child’s chair, in his custom-
ary, humble, winsome manner, he spoke of
his childhood.
He said that when he was a child he loved
to build things with building blocks. He
went to school to become a lawyer. But
building things is what he loved so he
became a developer. “Being a developer is
like building things with blocks,” he said.
Then, pointing to the Atlantic Yards
drawings that had been brought along,
he said: “These will be made from build-
ing blocks, that’s all, just building
blocks. If, while you are children, you
can build little things with building
blocks when you are grown up you can
build big things with big blocks.” He
continued, “What do you need to build
things? You need building blocks. You
need huge machines. You need to have
knowledge about what you want to
build. You need to have people to help
you. You need to have a vision. And
you need to see in your mind what you
want to build.”
His remarks were well received. He held
the children and staff ’s attention. Their
interest was evident from the questions they
asked. It was a great learning experience that
made an indelible mark upon the minds of
all, especially the children.
The lesson, just as children can dream,
adults can too. But the dream must not be
just about structures, but about building
opportunities and lives. A building block is a
toy for a child but also a metaphor for life –
with one block at a time we can construct a
better city if we work together. ❖
Reverend Dr. Herbert Daughtry, Sr., is
Minister of the House of the Lord Church.
The Building Blocks of Life
Marty Markowitz, Brooklyn Borough
President
Rev. Dr. Herbert Daughtry, Sr.
op-ed
Here in Brooklyn we
have a saying for so
many positive
developments: “How
sweet it is!”
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T H E B R O O K LY N S TA N D A R D 5
The Blossoming of Our Borough
By STATE SENATOR MARTIN J. GOLDEN
Buckle your seatbelts and hold onto your hats, because
Brooklyn is on the move.
Yes, the borough that famously lost the Dodgers in
1957—and its soul with them, some mistakenly said—a half
century later is poised to reach new heights of greatness.
You can feel it on the streets, you can sense it in its peo-
ple, and you can see it in economic investment projects all
over the borough. Make no mistake about it: Brooklyn is
back. And we’ve only just begun.
Just 20 years ago, at the mention of its name, many would
shake their heads sadly for what Brooklyn had lost.
Today, they see opportunity. They see a talented, educat-
ed workforce, a solid trans-
portation infrastructure, and
some of the most diverse and
vibrant communities in
America. But most impor-
tantly, they see in its residents
clear-eyed confidence in the
future—even a touch of that
old Brooklyn swagger.
The result? Where does one start?
Real estate values are at historic highs because people
want to live here. Businesses are relocating in droves to
become part of the Brooklyn renaissance. World-class cruise
ship lines are eyeing our waterfront as a home port.
A top NBA franchise is relocating to Brooklyn, bringing
with it $2.5 billion state-of-the-art entertainment facilities,
2.1 million-square-feet of office space, affordable housing
and spectacular community amenities. And bio-tech compa-
nies and other high-growth industries are planning to call the
massive Brooklyn Army Terminal in Sunset Park home.
Brooklynites soon will be able to enjoy the long-envi-
sioned Brooklyn Bridge Park, stretching from Red Hook to
DUMBO, with stunning views of downtown Manhattan.
And these are just a few of the marquis developments in
our borough. In every Brooklyn community, one can sense
excitement and progress. Once-shuttered storefronts are now
open for business in every neighborhood, most markedly in
places like Crown Heights and East New York, where devas-
tation from crime and drugs a decade ago are giving way to
industry and optimism. Coney Island, which suffered
decades of decline, has once again become a destination area,
and not just on hot summer days.
The impact of Brooklyn’s turnaround is only beginning.
Economic investment in our borough today, if we support it,
will bring tens of thousands of new jobs here in the decades
ahead—good paying jobs in emerg-
ing industries, like health care, tech-
nology, light industry, and enter-
tainment. It will lay the foundation
for a 21st Century Brooklyn that
could be one of the great urban suc-
cess stories in American history.
Forward-thinking legislators and
community leaders should seize the opportunities we have
now by encouraging these investments in our borough’s
future. We have momentum on our side, and we must press
the advantage while we do. Industries looking to develop
here will go elsewhere if we do not aggressively court them.
When the Dodgers left Brooklyn, they left the door ajar.
Thousands of well-paying jobs followed them out of the bor-
ough in the last half of the 20th Century. Manufacturing
companies, once king in Kings, slipped away, one-by-one, to
friendlier tax climes. The effect was devastating to Brooklyn
families who relied on those jobs to put bread on the table.
Today, we have the opportunity to turn that all around, to
return Brooklyn to economic preeminence and bring back
the jobs that will allow families to thrive right here at home.
And Brooklyn’s letters proudly emblazoned across an NBA
jersey will help usher them in.
For too long, Brooklyn was known for what it once was.
No more. We are seen again today for what we are and what
we are positioned to become. Brooklyn believes in Brooklyn
again. And so, evidently, does the rest of the world. ❖
State Senator Marty Golden (R-C), born and raised in
Brooklyn, represents the 22nd Senate District in southwest Brooklyn.
21st Century Brooklyn, a Borough On the Move
By DR. FRANK MACCHIAROLA
When I was growing up in Brooklyn, my parents dreamed
of sending me, their first son, to college. I wonder sometimes
if they ever imagined that I’d not only do that, but go on to
earn a Ph.D. and become a college professor—and now col-
lege president. They couldn’t have guessed I would have had,
and continue to have such an exciting career in education and
government, working to help children of all ages.
For me, it started at St. Francis College. My bachelor’s
degree was the first step, the first door opener, that allowed all
the others that followed. Now as the leader of St. Francis, I
know it is just one part of a web of colleges and universities in
our borough that grows more dynamic every day.
And there couldn’t be anything more exciting for
Brooklyn.
This borough is the home to immigrants from all across
the world who have arrived in this country eager for a new
start. It is the home to the young and the talented who have
chosen Brooklyn as their home because they know there is no
greater community to be a part of. But most importantly, it is
the home to dreamers—all of us, looking to the future to
make life better for themselves, their children, and for every-
one else.
After a lifetime in education and educational policy, I have
a sense of what type of person makes the best student. There
is no question Brooklyn is teeming with them. And with
downtown the center of everything else, it’s no surprise that
this is where you’ll find some of the best colleges and univer-
sities around.
My college, St. Francis, stands out as an urban college
reaching out to the city’s multi-racial and ethnically-varied
population while including an emphasis on the values of
Catholicism. I love and value my work here, and think that
we are continuing to fulfill that important mission that I
enjoyed while here as a student. With a mission dating back
more than 145 years, today St. Francis College offers 37 bac-
calaureate majors, with numerous internship opportunities,
and NCAA Division I athletics. St. Francis College was and
continues to be the Small College of Big Dreams and com-
mitted to its home in downtown Brooklyn. This Fall, the col-
lege will open its newly constructed, 35,000 square-foot aca-
demic center on Remsen Street.
But different students have different needs—especially in
such a diverse community as ours—and the wonderful thing
about Brooklyn is that it overflows with opportunities to pro-
vide for them all.
At the entrance of the Brooklyn Bridge are two vital insti-
tutions not only to downtown Brooklyn, but to the world:
The City University of New York’s College of Technology and
Polytechnic University. City Tech is the largest public senior
college of technology in the Northeast and the only one in
CUNY. Across the street from City Tech is Polytechnic
University: it’s New York’s premier center for science and
technology education and research. As we move deeper into
the digital age and whatever lays beyond, having this extraor-
dinary institution in the midst of Brooklyn will only become
more important. Already, it has drawn faculty and students
from around the country and around the world, building on
Brooklyn’s character and adding wonderfully to it.
Then there’s the Brooklyn campus of Long Island
University. Exposing thousands of students from all walks of
life to a tremendous number of academic programs, it can still
balance offering small classes and being one of the nation’s
largest private universities. There aren’t too many schools that
could say that.
And we make our doctors and lawyers, too. Brooklyn Law
and the SUNY Downstate Medical Center both do fantastic
work year-round, and have produced some of the more
impressive alumni the city has to offer. They’re helping make
up another important element of our borough.
There are more, of course. Brooklyn is a rich cornucopia of
everything, but the driving engine to it all is its higher educa-
tion, and that’s why I’m proud to be part of the community, but
even prouder of the community itself. As great as it is now,
though, that’s not the best part—education builds towards the
future, and with a community like ours, having access to
schools like these, the future of Brooklyn is as bright as it gets!❖
Frank Macchiarola is the president of St. Francis College in
Brooklyn. He is the former chancellor of New York’s Board of Education.
Throughout the Borough, Brooklyn Hits the Books
State Senator Marty Golden
St. Francis College President Frank Macchiarola
op-ed
Make no mistake about it:
Brooklyn is back.
And we’ve only just begun.
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T H E B R O O K LY N S TA N D A R D
Delight the senses with thousands of blooming roses during June is
Rose Month, a month-long celebration honoring the romance,
beauty, and history of the rose at Brooklyn Botanic Garden’s
Cranford Rose Garden. The Cranford Rose Garden offers a
unique, hands-on education about the history and develop-
ment of the rose for over seventy-five years and continues to
inspire the viewing public with an extraordinary collection of
over 5,000 plants and 1,400 different
kinds of roses. Brooklyn Botanic
Garden’s Cranford Rose
Garden preserves the rich
and vast legacy of the rose
with garden beds beauti-
fully interwoven with
history, where modern
hybrids thrive alongside
old garden ancestors in the
heart of Brooklyn. Discover
the intrigue, mystery, romance,
and history of the rose during
Brooklyn Botanic Garden’s June is Rose
Month.
All month long, participate in classes, programs, and activities for the
whole family. And all events are free with garden admission!
JUNE IS ROSE MONTH GARDEN-GUIDED
TOUR
Saturdays and Sundays at 3 PM in front of
Visitor Center.
Take a Garden Guided tour of Brooklyn Botanic
Garden’s Cranford Rose Garden, a charming por-
trait of America’s most popular flower.
SEASONAL HIGHLIGHTS GUIDED TOUR
Saturdays and Sundays at 1 PM in front of
Visitor Center.
Indulge in the Garden’s display of perennials
and annuals, violets and poppies, blooming
rosebushes, and the fragrant Herb Garden.
SELF-GUIDED TOURS
Pick up a brochure at the admission gates or
the Visitor Center and see why artists and
poets have been immortalizing this enchanti-
ng flower for centuries.
GARDENER’S RESOURCE CENTER
Rose enthusiasts can find answers to all
their rose questions.
EVERYTHING ROSES
Visit the Everything Roses shop
within the Garden Gift Shop.
THE SECRET GARDEN:
A WOMAN’S VIEW
(Professional Women
Photographers)
A new exhibition representing the
work of several members of the
New York–based Professional
Women Photographers opens The
Steinhardt Conservatory Gallery. On
display will be several women’s magni-
fied views of the secret treasures “hidden”
within a garden.
Ongoing
PHOTOGRAPHS OF BROOKLYN
—Featuring photographs of
Lucille Fornasieri-Gold and
Philippe Dollo.
Brooklyn Public
Library, Central
Library, Grand
Lobby. (Through
June 26.)
EL-VIEWS BY
MARIA DOMINGUEZ
— In September 2002
the MTA Arts in Transit
Program permanently
installed 16 panels of brilliant
stained glass windows at
Chauncey Street Station in
Brooklyn. These are the original
paintings that visual artist Maria
Dominguez created and were
then translated into glass.
Brooklyn Public Library, Central
Library, Lobby Gallery.
(Through June 26.)
June 17
EXHIBIT TOUR —
“Brooklyn Works:
400 Years of Making
a Living in
Brooklyn.” Walk
through the
Historical
Society’s core,
interactive exhibit
that chronicles the
lives of the people
of Brooklyn. Learn
about their occupa-
tions, their chal-
lenges, their
resilience, and how
Brooklyn’s workforce
has contributed to shap-
ing the nation. Free with
admission. 3 PM. Brooklyn
Historical Society. (Also July 3.)
June 18
BOAT TOUR — Brooklyn’s
Working Waterfront. A series of
guided boat tours along the East
River waterfront every Saturday
this season. Reservations are
strongly suggested for the one-
hour tour. All dates rain or shine.
Call (212) 742-1969. Passenger
pick-up from South Street Seaport
at 11 AM and Fulton Ferry
Landing in Brooklyn at 11:05 AM,
with drop-off at both locations.
Brooklyn Historical Society. (Also
June 25, July 2, July 9, and July
16.)
BROOKLYN CONSERVATORY
COMMUNITY ORCHESTRA —
The Conservatory’s orchestra will
perform works by Griffes,
Herrman and Schubert. Featuring
soloist Helen Richman. Concert
will be held at Old First Reformed
Church, at the corner of Carroll
Street and Seventh Avenue. $5
donation at the door. 8 PM.
Brooklyn Conservatory of Music.
June 19
THE VILLAGE VOICE BEST OF
2004 —Star Spangled to Death
(2004), introduced by director
Ken Jacobs. 3PM BAM.
June 20
A TREASURY OF NEAPOLITAN
SONGS BY ANTONIO AND
ALBA — 1:30 PM. Brooklyn
Public Library, Dyker branch.
A listing of
arts, community events and
activities in our borough
Around
direc
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JUNE IS ROSE MONTH
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June 22
THE VILLAGE VOICE BEST OF
2004 —Facing Windows (2003)
with Cinemachat with film critic
and historian Elliott Stein after
the 6:50 show. 4:30, 6:50, 9:30
PM. BAM.
June 23
PASSPORT TO SUMMER — A
Night in Havana. (Ticketed
fundraiser). Cuban music will cre-
ate an enchanting soundscape for
guests sipping cocktails and
strolling through our magnificent
gardens at sunset. Includes a lavish
supper and the chance to win fab-
ulous prizes from our raffle and
silent auction. After the sun goes
down, D.J. David Medina will
turn up the tempo. Plus, all guests
will receive a goodie bag with gifts
from Jason Organics, Godiva
Chocolates, Green Mountain
Coffee Roasters, Kenneth Cole
Reaction, and Time Out New
York. All tickets must be pur-
chased in advance. 6-10:30 PM.
Brooklyn Botanic Gardens.
June 24
EXHIBIT TOUR — “Dodgers
Do It! Celebrating Brooklyn’s Big
Win!” Come learn how the histo-
ry of baseball connects so deeply
to the social history of Brooklyn
and take a journey back in time in
this interactive exhibit to baseball
circa 1955 with live game-day
radio broadcasts, the actual pen-
nant that flew over right center
field, and the uniforms and equip-
ment from baseball’s golden age in
this docent-guided tour. Free with
admission. 3 PM. Brooklyn
Historical Society. (Also July 8.)
June 25
JIM NYODO CONCERT — A
memorial tribute to one of the
most famous shakuhachi (bamboo
flute) masters in the A.T. White
Memorial Amphitheater. The con-
cert will be performed by Ronnie
Nyogetsu Seldin and members of
Kisuian Shakuhachi Dojo. 11 AM.
Brooklyn Botanic Gardens.
June 25 - 26
COLORS OF THE CARIBBEAN
— All weekend long the New
York Aquarium will focus on the
beauty of the Caribbean and its
wildlife, centered around the new
Glover’s Reef exhibit. There will
be opportunities to learn about
conservation efforts at the reef, in
addition to Caribbean music and
many other activities.
June 26
WALKING TOUR — Coney
Island. Learn about the rich histo-
ry and the exciting present of
Brooklyn’s most fabled neighbor-
hood. Guide: Author, teacher, and
historian Francis Morrone. Meet
in front of Nathan’s Famous, Surf
and Stillwell Avenues. Wear com-
fortable walking shoes. 2 PM.
Brooklyn Historical Society.
June 28
AFRO-CARIBBEAN MUSIC
WITH DANCE WITH CONROY
WARREN — 3 PM. Brooklyn
Public Library, Arlington branch.
June 29
ADULT SUMMER READING
PROGRAM — Author talk by
Elizabeth Gaffney, author of
“Metropolis” and Darin Strauss,
author of “The Real McCoy.” 7
PM. Brooklyn Public Library,
Central Library branch, Second
Floor Meeting Room.
PAOLA CORSO READS FROM
HER POETRY AND FICTION —
Brooklyn Public Library, New
Utrecht branch. 3:30 PM.
July 6
POETRY SERIES — Walt
Whitman Sesquicentennial Series.
Join a generous host of richly
diverse New York poets for a com-
plete reading of “Leaves of Grass.”
Free with admission. 6:30 PM.
Brooklyn Historical Society. (Also
July 13.)
July 9
SCENT-SATIONAL GARDEN
STROLL — This summer, take a
self-guided walk through the
Brooklyn Botanic Garden using
your sense of smell as the Gardens
highlight their most fragrant plants
as part of the 50th-anniversary cel-
ebration of the Alice Recknagel
Ireys Fragrance Garden. Guided
tours every Saturday and Sunday at
1:00 PM and 3:00 PM through
September 4.
July 10
MEET BROOKLYN AUTHORS —
“Brooklyn Remembered —The
1955 Days of the Dodgers” by
Maury Allen. The author of more
than 30 books on baseball and a
sportswriter for nearly half a cen-
tury, Allen interviewed all 11 sur-
viving members of that historic
team for “Brooklyn
Remembered.” Allen will be sign-
ing copies of his book after the
lecture, which will be available for
sale at this event. Free with admis-
sion, no reservations necessary. 2
PM. Brooklyn Historical Society.
July 13
AUTHOR TALK — Gammy
Singer, author of “A Landlord’s
Tale.” 6:30 PM. Central Library,
DeKalb branch.
BAMCINÉMATEK PRESENTS
HAUNTING DOUGLAS WITH
THE COST OF LIVING —
Leanne Pooley’s film “Haunting
Douglas,” is a sexually frank por-
trait of Douglas Wright, world-
renowned artist and star of the
Paul Taylor Company, who strug-
gles to exorcise demons he cannot
dance away. Lloyd Newsom’s
“The Cost of Living” is pure
dance cinema featuring the
incredible legless dancer David
Toole. Followed by a cinemachat
with film critic Elliott Stein,
dance critic Elizabeth Zimmer,
and curator Joanna Ney. 7PM.
BAMcinématek, BAM.
July 15
WALKING TOUR — Brooklyn
Historical Society and Our
Brooklyn Heights Neighborhood.
Take a walk through the streets of
this distinct historic district and
visit sites that reflect our rich
architectural heritage and the
unique stories of New York’s past,
including the Brooklyn Heights
Promenade (1950s), St. George
Hotel (1885), and Plymouth
Church of the Pilgrims (1849).
Meet in BHS lobby, tour will last
approximately 45 minutes. Free
with admission, no pre-paid reser-
vations necessary. 3 PM. Brooklyn
Historical Society.
A new version of the
classic Euripides play
ected by Tony Harrison,
and starring Vanessa
Redgrave. Brooklyn
Academy of Music.
June 17-18, 21-25 at
30PM, June 18 & 25 at
2PM, and June 19 & 26
at 3PM.
une 17
HECUBA
Darin Strauss
Elizabeth Gaffney
Photograph by
Lucille Fornasieri-Gold
Brooklyn Botanic Gardens
1000 Washington Avenue
(718) 623-7200
Brooklyn Public Library
(Various branches)
Central Library
Grand Army Plaza
718-230-2100
Brooklyn Conservatory of Music
58 Seventh Avenue
(718) 622-3300
Brooklyn Historical Society
28 Pierrepont Street
(718) 222-4111
New York Aquarium
located on Surf Avenue & West 8th
(718) 265-FISH
Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM)
30 Lafayette Avenue
(718) 636-4100
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Alice Recknagel Fragrance Garden at the Botanic Garden
Ongoing
Wildlife Theater — Local
theatergoers, animal lovers,
and Wildlife Theater regulars
are invited to the theater sea-
son at Prospect Park Zoo, which
will run from Memorial Day
weekend to Labor Day week-
end. Saturdays-Mondays in
June, and Thursdays-Mondays in
July. Prospect Park Zoo.
Glover’s Reef and
Bathysphere exhibits —
The New York Aquarium kicked
off summer with two new
exhibits, Glover’s Reef and the
Bathysphere. Glover’s Reef is a
150,000 gallon exhibit teeming
with marine life found in the
ocean off the coast of Belize.
The Bathysphere is the actual
unit used by William Beebe
and Otis Barton in 1934 to
establish a new deep-sea div-
ing record for that time.
access/ABILITY exhibit —
at the Brooklyn Children’s
Museum. Raise your awareness
of disability!
June 17
Musical Storyteller — Jody
Prusan. 11 AM. Brooklyn Public
Library, Greenpoint branch.
June 18 – 19
Father’s Day Celebration
—Bring Dad to the Aquarium!
While you are here you can
learn all about dads in the
ocean, and participate in the
special activities planned
throughout both days. New
York Aquarium.
Early Learner Workshop
— Yes I Can! Explore the new
exhibit, access/ABILITY and dis-
cover the interesting ways
people with disabilities do
everyday tasks. Play games to
challenge your physical and
artistic skills. Pre-registration
required. (Ages 2-5.) 11 AM.
Brooklyn Children’s Museum.
June 18
Father’s Day Cards —
Honor your father and other
important men in your life.
Share a favorite story about
your dad and create a special
card to give as a gift. (All
ages.) 2 PM. Brooklyn
Children’s Museum.
Butterfly Myths and
Legends — Flitter into the
magical realm of butterflies.
Explore an international array
of myths and legends incorpo-
rating these beautiful insects.
Search for living specimens in
the garden and paint your own
colorful butterfly to take home.
(Ages 5+) 3 PM. Brooklyn
Children’s Museum.
June 19 & 26
X-plorers Club — Drawing
the Museum. Sharpen your
pencil and start drawing! Learn
basic and advanced drawing
techniques from a professional
artist. Try to sketch an array of
Museum objects from all over
the world. (Ages 8+) 2:30 PM.
Brooklyn Children’s Museum.
June 21
Third Tuesdays for Teens
— Hair Beading. 3:30 PM.
Brooklyn Public Library, Red
Hook branch.
June 25
Museum Team Presents
— Instrument Creations.
Discover an array of interesting
instruments from the Museum’s
collection. Make your own
musical masterpiece using
recycled materials and go on a
scavenger hunt in the Music
Mix gallery. (Ages 5+) 2 PM.
Brooklyn Children’s Museum.
June 29
Music for Homemade
Instruments with Skip
LaPlante — 3 PM. Brooklyn
Public Library, Bay Ridge branch.
June 30
Tales for Tots — Hear tales
from around the world, sing
songs, and get moving to
music. (Ages 5 and under.) 11
AM & 2:30 PM. Brooklyn
Children’s Museum.
July 1, 2, 3
Blooming Babies
Weekend — Let’s Count!
Hear stories and songs about
numbers and see a real abacus
and other counting tools. Make
your own textured number col-
lage to take home. (Ages 18
mos. – 2 yrs.) 11 AM – 12 PM.
Brooklyn Children’s Museum.
July 7
First Thursday Presents
— The Power of Me. Honor the
special qualities that make you
unique. Enjoy a reading of
“It’s Okay to be
Different.” Create your own
paper doll to celebrate your
personality and abilities. (Ages
6+) 3-4:30 PM. Brooklyn
Children’s Museum.
KidsFilmFest — Brooklyn
International Film Festival pre-
sents a variety of fun films and
shorts from around the world.
(All ages.) 3 PM. Brooklyn
Children’s Museum.
July 8
City Parks Foundation
Presents — Imagination in
Motion. Embark on an imagina-
tive journey with energizing
performers, Mime X Two. This
performance will take place in
Brower Park, located next to
the Museum. (All ages.) 11
AM. Brooklyn Children’s
Museum.
Free Friday Rooftop Jam
— International Garifuna Band.
Discover the exotic sounds and
beats of the Garifuna people of
the Caribbean, South and
Central America. Hear a melodi-
ous blending of diverse cultures
and interesting instruments,
including turtle shells, drums,
and maracas. (All ages.) 6:30
PM. Brooklyn Children’s
Museum.
July 9 & 10
Family Science Workshop
— Bees and Blossoms. Explore
the delicate relationship
between bees and
flowers. Uncover which pat-
terns bees find most attractive
and design your own attention-
getting blossom. Plant your flo-
ral creation in the garden in
the hope of luring a bee. (Ages
5+) 3-5 PM. Brooklyn Children’s
Museum.
July 10
Planet Brooklyn — Star
Gazing. Listen to a Japanese
myth about star-crossed lovers
and discover how their story
inspired a colorful
festival. Write your own wish
to the stars. (Ages 6+) 3-4:30
PM. Brooklyn Children’s
Museum.
July 15
Free Friday Rooftop Jam —
Los Calientes. Summer’s hot
and so are Los Calientes!
Discover the spicy sounds and
fascinating origins of Puerto
Rican salsa music. Embark on a
musical adventure and see tra-
ditional rhythm instruments. (All
ages.) 6:30 PM. Brooklyn
Children’s Museum.
As Brooklyn grows, so do
the number of families and
children making their homes
here. And from every corner
of the borough, the muse-
ums, libraries, and other
institutions are responding,
teeming with opportunities
for children of all ages. Have
fun, learn new things, and
make lasting memories—this
is what it means to grow up in
the city’s most vibrant bor-
ough.
Father’s Day on June 19th
brings so much to do, from
making cards at the Brooklyn
Children’s Museum to the
whole weekend of special
events at the New York
Aquarium.
Check out the regular
shows at the Prospect Park
Zoo’s Wildlife Theater, for
fun and entertainment while
learning about the animals at
the zoo and around the
world.
Interested in learning
more about other cultures?
Head over to the New York
Aquarium for a celebration of
all things Caribbean centered
around its newest exhibit
about Belize’s Glover’s Reef.
Remember the exhibits,
like the access/ABILITY
exhibit that opened May 28
at the Children’s Museum, or
the many opportunities to
learn about the borough’s
past—including the
Dodgers—at the Historical
Society. Learn about
Brooklyn and the world,
either on your own or with
one of their tours.
And if all that activity is
wearing you out, pay close
attention to the Brooklyn
Public Library’s events all
month long and throughout
the summer encouraging kids
and adults alike to spend the
warmer months catching up
on their reading.
10 J u n e / J u l y 2 0 0 5
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T H E B R O O K LY N S TA N D A R D
The ongoing access/ABILITY exhibit at the Brooklyn Children’s Museum.
Brooklyn Children’s
Museum
145 Brooklyn Avenue
718-735-4400
Brooklyn Conservatory
of Music
58 Seventh Avenue
(718) 622-3300
Brooklyn Historical
Society
28 Pierrepont Street
(718) 222-4111
Brooklyn Botanic
Gardens
1000 Washington
Avenue
(718) 623-7200
New York Aquarium
Surf Avenue & West 8th
(718) 265-FISH
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June/July
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T H E B R O O K LY N S TA N D A R D 11
The Royal Shakespeare Company
Vanessa Redgrave
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BAM
Hecuba
“...marvelously combines
contemporary resonance
and classical style.”—GUARDIAN (UK)
HECUBA
BY EURIPIDES
IN A NEW VERSION BY TONY HARRISON
11 performances only!
JUNE 17—26
BAM HOWARD GILMAN OPERA HOUSE
PETER JAY SHARP BUILDING
30 LAFAYETTE AVE
$30, 45, 65, 85
BAM.org / 718.636.4100
BROOKLYN ACADEMY OF MUSIC
LEADERSHIP SUPPORT: Diane and Adam E. Max
PRESENTING SPONSOR:
Albert to talk about growing up here, the
Dodgers, the importance of basketball in the
borough, and the Nets’ prospects for the next
few seasons.
What do you remember about
the Dodgers in Brooklyn?
As a kid, I worked for the Dodgers in a
summer job as an office boy and in the
ticket department. I would receive two
passes to the broadcast booth overhang. I
knew I wanted to be a broadcaster from
the third grade on, [so] I would go to
almost every game at Ebbets Field and
bring my tape recorders and I would bring
people with me and we would do the game
on tape, and I’d have my color commenta-
tor—usually [my brother] Al or a friend.
What did the other people in
the booth think of that?
We’d get them crazy. We’d be yelling,
screaming away doing play-by-play which
was awful, and actually they complained. I
remember I was marched into one of the vice
presidents’ office and told I couldn’t do it
anymore [in the booth]. They put me down
on the right field line somewhere, all the way
in the corner. Which was fine—I could
absolutely understand that we were a bit over
the top with our enthusiastic style.
How do you feel about coming
back to broadcast in Brooklyn?
It’s thrilling—that was such an attractive
part of the whole scenario. I still love Brooklyn.
Once a year I take my kids back to Brighton
Beach, Manhattan Beach, and Coney Island
because I grew up in Brighton Beach and
Manhattan Beach, just for a little tour—the
schoolyard, the old house—we usually go to a
Cyclones game. To me, it’s my roots and I just
love everything about growing up in that area.
Why do you think basketball is
so big in Brooklyn?
It’s a New York game and it’s a Brooklyn
game. It’s a tremendous schoolyard sport.
You don’t need equipment, you can just show
up and play. All you need is the ball and the
basket, and the baskets are everywhere.
Do you remember seeing any
of the old basketball stars playing
in Brooklyn?
Growing up where I did (Manhattan
Beach) I wasn’t good enough to play in the
famed Basket Number One, but all the great
players would come there, from Connie
Hawkins to Art Heyman to Roger Brown.
They’d all assemble on this Basket Number
One and we would just watch. It was incredi-
ble, just incredible talent that has come out of
Brooklyn, and I think it’s still the case.
What do you think being in
Brooklyn will mean for the Nets?
I think they’re going to do extremely well.
First of all, the arena is going to be beautiful.
I have great confidence in the
organization with Rod Thorn as
president and the coaching staff.
They’ve done a great job in recent
years, obviously went to the finals
two straight years. You take a look
at the size of the population and the fact that
there is not a “major league” franchise in
Brooklyn, I think it’s going to be a huge hit,
I think that it’s going to be sensational. It’s
just made to order to have a NBA franchise
here.
Will Knicks fans convert to
being Nets fans?
I hope so. But I would think so because
that’s usually what happens—I saw it in
hockey doing the Rangers for so many years
and then I lived on Long Island at that
time, [with] the Islanders. I see the same
thing happening.
What do the Nets need to win
the championship, now that they
have Richard Jefferson, Vince
Carter, and Jason Kidd together?
I think that they know they have to add
a big man. That’s a pretty impressive three-
some there, that’s an unbelievable group.
But they must have a big man. He doesn’t
have to be a huge star, but it has to be a
rebounder who runs the floor. I have great
confidence that Rod Thorn will come up
with that person.
Will having the team in Brooklyn
attract more free agents?
I think so—they’ll look at the arena,
they’ll look at the practice facility, look hope-
fully at the success of the team. I think it will
be a very attractive franchise—the team has
to be successful, but Brooklyn helps also.
What’s been the highlight of
your career so far?
There are so many great moments in
the earlier days of the Knicks—and you
probably are affected by those first memo-
ries—I’d have to go back to the champi-
onship years, ‘69-‘70, the first champi-
onship. That was such a wonderful group
of guys—Willis Reed and Walt Frazier,
and Bill Bradley and Dave DeBusschere
and Dick B1arnett, it was very unusual. It
was almost like the old Brooklyn Dodgers,
it was a terrific team. It was a team con-
cept, it was a very smart group, and there
were some thrilling moments—obviously
Willis Reed hobbling out onto the Garden
court, Game 7, when no one thought he
would play.
Was it the best team you’ve
seen in action?
Doing the Olympics, doing the Dream
Team in 1992, that was a huge thrill, just to
see that group together. I mean, the games
were blow-outs, but just to see the first time
they walked on the floor, to see probably the
greatest group of athletes in any sport of all
time together was wonderful.
What’s the greatest change in
the game since you started
announcing?
I look more at the enormity of what’s
happened in terms of the popularity of the
game as the biggest change. I mean, it’s so
huge worldwide—several years ago we did a
couple of pre-season games in Japan, and
they knew every player—they’re calling out
names of guys that are tenth or eleventh men
on the roster, they’re so into it, wearing jer-
seys everywhere with the names.
What made you want to sign on
with the Nets?
I have such great respect for Bruce Ratner
and I’ve known Rod Thorn for years. Also, the
coaching staff, the YES network—I just have
tremendous respect for all these people. It’s a
wonderful opportunity, and I am thrilled about
it, I’m so excited. Let’s get the season started.
A League of Her Own
Marv Albert
Brooklyn Native Marv Albert Speaks
Continued from page 1
12 J u n e / J u l y 2 0 0 5
|
T H E B R O O K LY N S TA N D A R D
“It’s just made to order to have
an NBA franchise here.”
By TOM ALLON
I
T WAS ANOTHER WHOPPING SEASON FOR THE
James Madison High School varsity girls softball team.
Winners of their division four out of the past five years,
the Lady Knights dominated the Brooklyn A league
this season to get to the winner’s bracket game with a 4-2 win
over Francis Lewis June 2nd.
But that was the end of the road for Madison, which fell
to the Tottenville Pirates, the defending champions in the
Public Schools Athletic League (PSAL) 6-0 on June 6.
One of the highlights of the Madison season was the
overall play of Nicole Grilli, number 58, whom Coach Bill
Dumont said was a major contributor to the team’s domina-
tion.
“She’s the captain and she really drives the team. I would
say that Nicole’s probably the heart of Madison,” Dumont
said.
Grilli, 17, rode a 0.15 ERA and 115 strikeouts to a 15-0
league record. She allowed only fifteen runs to be scored on
her watch, and just one of them was earned. Grilli has
pitched 91 innings in her league games.
Her record for the playoffs was even more impressive,
with a 0.00 ERA and 13 strikeouts in 14 innings.
“She’s put in months and months of work with pitching
clinics,” Dumont said, clearly proud of the growth he has
seen in his star player.
It was a steady rise since Grilli first joined the team as a
freshman. After a period of expected adjustment for any
blossoming player, Grilli emerged as a true force in her
sophomore year.
“She started to hit and pitch at a higher level, and it’s
gone up and up and up,” Dumont said.
Grilli was just as important when it came to hitting, with
a .383 batting average, .442 on base percentage, and a .447
slugging percentage in 47 at bats.
This had much to do with Grilli’s selection to be a mem-
ber of the PSAL Exceptional Seniors girls softball team.
But this was the last season for Grilli, who will graduate
in June. She plans to matriculate at Hunter College in the
fall to study nursing, but is still completely committed to
the game and hopes to continue pitching. The prospect of
being pushed further at the collegiate level is very exciting,
she said.
Her only regret she is that there is no professional
women’s softball league to allow her to continue in the game
after college, but she looks forward to the new opportunities
ahead. ❖
James Madison High School varsity girls softball
team, the Lady Knights.
Sports
By DAVE CAMPANARO
S
INCE THE EARLY 1900’S, THE CONEY Island
seashore has been home to some of the most exciting
and innovative enterprises in entertainment. In its
heyday, the area was a vacation destination for the rich and a
summer haven for New York’s thrill-seekers, earning us the
slogan “from June to September, Coney is the world.”
In 2001 the Brooklyn Cyclones were born, and KeySpan
Park was built, bringing a new buzz back to the area. The team
has been one of the most popular in the minor leagues through-
out its four-year history, thanks in no small part to their dis-
tinctive home field. The Cyclones have drawn over a million
fans, won a league championship, and three division titles.
Situated in the heart of Coney Island, the Brooklyn ballpark
provides one of minor league baseball’s most unique settings –
surrounded at once by both the frenetic energy of the amuse-
ment parks, and the serene tranquility of the Atlantic Ocean.
KeySpan Park was built to
embody this one-of-a-kind environ-
ment, with its multi-colored neon
rings surrounding the light towers
that help it blend in with the roller
coasters, Ferris wheels, and other
rides that light up the coastline.
Inside the ballpark, enormous
canopies represent the adjacent
beaches, and provide shade to fans in
the stands. Beachgoers are also
encouraged to walk right from their
towels to the stands, thanks to alter-
nate ticketing turnstiles and an
entrance connected directly to the
world-famous Coney Island board-
walk.
“It is our hope that fans will make
an entire day out of their Cyclones
experience,” says the team’s General
Manager, Steve Cohen. “People can
spend a day at the beach, then walk
right up to the ballpark for a game,
before finishing the night with a ride
on the Cyclone or Wonder Wheel.”
From the seats, massive landmarks are visible beyond the
ballpark’s walls, adding to the carnival-like atmosphere. The
Cyclone roller coaster, the Wonder Wheel, and the Astrotower
are visible beyond the left field wall, and the screams of their
riders can be heard throughout each game.
Towering over the right field corner is perhaps
the borough’s most identifiable structure – the
260-foot Parachute Jump, brought to the
boardwalk from the 1939 World’s Fair. Ever-
looming above the action on the field, the
Parachute Jump can be seen throughout New
York, and serves as a beacon for fans heading
towards the ballpark.
Setting the tone inside KeySpan Park is the non-stop
entertainment – the games, contests, mascots, and kids activ-
ities that make a night out about much more than just the
game. Giant seagulls (Sandy and Pee Wee) patrol the stands,
“Beach Bums” excite the crowd, caped hot dogs race from
the bullpen to home plate, children get their faces painted,
adults test their pitch speed – an overall energy permeates the
ballpark, aided by the more than 8,000 fans that pack the
seats every night.
The Cyclones have shattered Short-Season, and New York-
Penn League records, and have ranked alongside the top-selling
teams in the country in both merchandise and attendance.
Recently, Baseball America named the park the Best Short-
Season Ballpark in the country.
The nostalgia of Brooklyn baseball has combined with the
freshness of the minor leagues and a state-of-the-art ballpark to
create a phenomenon that continues to grow. The Cyclones have
brought new life back into the historic area, and once again,
“from June to September, Coney Island is the world.” ❖
Baseball on the Boardwalk
Sports
J u n e / J u l y 2 0 0 5
|
T H E B R O O K LY N S TA N D A R D 13
2004 first baseman Jim Burt takes a swing.
June-July
Schedule
Home games in blue
“People can spend a day at the beach, then
walk right up to the ballpark for a game,
before finishing the night with a ride on
the Cyclone or Wonder Wheel.”
years, done entirely with union labor. The
whole project should be done within a
decade—though the FCRC plans are to con-
tain all construction work within each phase
to minimize the impact on people already
living and working in the neighborhood.
“For a project this big what you don’t
want it to be is a construction site in which
it becomes restrictive to go in and out of,”
FCRC Executive Vice President for
Government and Public Affairs Bruce
Bender said. “When it looks incomplete,
you’re afraid to go there, you’re afraid to
kind of partake in what’s happening. Also,
you want to be a good neighbor.”
In the meantime, FCRC has already
begun enhancing the community. The
company deposited $1 million in Carver
Federal Savings Bank at Atlantic Terminal.
In continuing to develop the plans, FCRC
has also sought out local firms—particular-
ly those owned and managed by minori-
ties—to help move the project forward to
the next stage.
And it has encouraged all its partners to
do the same, hoping that their contribu-
tions will start a flood of new investment
and growth in the community.
Of course, as a successful company, it
never loses sight of its bottom line, Minieri
explained, but there is much more to its
corporate mission.
“The whole way that we do business and
why we do business — that is, working in
the community — is in many ways more
important to us than the dollars that we’ll
ultimately make from this project,” she
said.
Brooklyn Borough President Marty
Markowitz minced no words in describing
what he believes Atlantic Yards means for
the borough.
“This project will really represent the
real rebirth and renaissance of our beloved
borough,” he said, insisting that this sort of
development is so dynamic as to be a model
for urban renewal nationwide.
Most exciting to Markowitz, though, is
his belief that this project is just the begin-
ning. With Atlantic Yards leading the way,
Markowitz said, “there is more to come.” ❖
By EDWARD-ISAAC DOVERE
T
he Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) signed
between Forest City Ratner Companies (FCRC) and the
city and state in February was long desired by all parties
in order to establish the details of Atlantic Yards and the pub-
lic process by which the project will go through.
The MOU provides detailed information on everything
from legal arrangements to infrastructure improvements, and
lays the full groundwork for the cooperation between FCRC,
City Hall and Albany.
The city and state have made a
combined $200 million commit-
ment to the plan for infrastructure
improvements and site preparation.
But given the projected econom-
ic benefits of Atlantic Yards, Mayor
Michael R. Bloomberg said, “don’t
think of these as subsidies—this is an investment. This is
exactly what this city should be doing: investing so that down
the road we and our children and our grandchildren have a
future.”
To complete the MOU, FCRC spent many months examin-
ing and preparing details for the development deal. The result is
a MOU much more specific than the average agreement of its
type. While acknowledging that the MOU will be somewhat
malleable to allow for inevitable changes once construction is
underway, FCRC sought to outline as much as possible at the
outset.
A major plank of the agreement is FCRC’s agreement to pay
fair market value to the Metropolitan Transportation Authority
(MTA) for the air rights over the Long Island Rail Road rail
yards in order to build the
new Nets arena.
The Long Island Rail
Road tracks would be
moved by FCRC to new
yards at a nearby site.
The MOU also estab-
lishes the plan to finance
the construction of the arena through state tax-exempt bonds
which FCRC will pay back in lieu of property taxes for the
site. According to the company, this and the financial commit-
ments from the city and state were necessary to help make the
bid a reality.
14 J u n e / J u l y 2 0 0 5
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T H E B R O O K LY N S TA N D A R D
“Don’t think of these as
subsidies—this is an investment.”
— Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg
Memorandum of Understanding Released
By TOM ALLON
A
T THE CENTER OF ATLANTIC YARDS IS A NEW
Brooklyn arena, an 850,000 square-foot facility
that will be the new home of the Nets when prin-
cipal owner Bruce Ratner brings them to the bor-
ough from New Jersey.
Designed to accommodate up to 19,000 fans for basketball
and other events and 20,500 for concerts, the arena would be
part of the first phase of construction at the site. It is expected
to be complete by the start of the 2008-2009 season.
And though it will be home to the Nets, the arena will be a
year-round entertainment venue, host to everything from ice
shows and concerts to exhibitions. It will also be open to the
community for graduations, amateur athletic events, job fairs
and sports clinics.
“The arena and the team are the anchors to the project,”
said Forest City Ratner Companies Executive Vice President
for Government and Public Affairs Bruce Bender, who pre-
dicted enormous excitement will be generated by bringing a
major sports franchise to the borough. Bender said the new
Brooklyn arena will shine a worldwide spotlight on the bor-
ough’s achievements and unique sites, from the Brooklyn
Bridge to Prospect Park.
“That’s what it’s all about, that effect,” he said.
Like the rest of the complex, the arena will be designed by
Frank Gehry, and bears the distinctive, undulating mark of
the world-famous architect. Visible from both Atlantic and
Flatbush Avenues, the arena will be accessed through an
“urban room” set off from the street by the columnar sup-
ports which will raise the surrounding buildings off the
ground.
And even as the Nets are making baskets below, the roof
of the arena will be a hub of activity. Residents will have
access to landscaped amenities for relaxing and taking in the
sites of the neighborhood. The roof space will connect the
four surrounding buildings, and will also be used as a recre-
ational area.
Ground is expected to be broken next year, beginning a
development that would create 15,000 construction jobs
and 6,000 permanent jobs.
“Economic development brings forth with it a lot of things
that sustain the city,” Bender said. “That’s jobs, and jobs cre-
ate revenues, and revenues pay for city services and those ser-
vices create cultural affairs, parks, and education.” ❖
New Nets Home Will Benefit the Community, Too
“Jobs create revenues, and
revenues pay for city services and
those services create cultural
affairs, parks, and education.”
— FCRC Executive VP Bruce Bender
An artist’s rendition of Frank Gehry’s Brooklyn arena, which will be the anchor of Atlantic Yards.
Growth
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 3
By JOHN B. MANBECK
Special to The Brooklyn Standard
M
ORE THAN ANY OTHERBOROUGH,
Brooklyn is noted for its Victorian
architecture—the streets in the
north, lined with brownstone and brick row
houses, ornate town houses and interspersed
with an occasional frame structure or car-
riage house, reflect the grandeur of that age
and give us a trip through history.
The history of Brooklyn Heights begins
with a settlement of the Canarsee Indians who
established a community there named
“Ihpetonga” or “high sandy bank.” Then, ten
years after landing in Manhattan, early Dutch
settlers escaping the chaos
of New Amsterdam came
across by rowboat and ferry,
creating what historian
Kenneth Jackson called
“America’s first suburb,” a
residential community on
the palisaded bluffs.
Beyond its borders was a
vast agricultural back yard,
and Jackson writes, the
“bucolic atmosphere of Brooklyn Heights”
attracted those who wished to avoid the con-
gestion of a city.
Brooklyn developed slowly but with a pur-
pose. Six years after the first steam ferry service,
there were only seven houses dotting the
Heights. But developers soon eyed Brooklyn
Heights as an investment after the village
received a charter in 1816, and by 1841, 84
heads of household lived there, 39 of whom
worked in “the city.” In 1860, over 600 homes
had spread through the Heights.
The wooden structures in the new City of
Brooklyn were replaced by more stalwart struc-
tures over the years. When land was cheap and
plentiful, successful landowners created man-
sions. But Brooklyn achieved a popularity that
made space a premium, and the resulting
demand made the palatial homes unpractical,
so a house with narrow frontage of 25 feet and
greater depth evolved.
The row house—a
more substantial varia-
tion of the tene-
ment—arose on the
streets of Manhattan,
and then exploded to
Brooklyn. Developed
as a variation of the
popular Greek Revival
design, the houses
stucco-ed over with
reddish-brown sandstone called “Jersey free-
stone” from Passaic County, New Jersey became
castles for shipping merchants and other nou-
veau riche aristocrats.
They provided social superiority with their
raised first floor as well as more room and light
from large Italianate windows and a door tran-
som. While more cramped inside than a man-
sion, rooms still suggested spaciousness. Marble
fireplaces decorated the parlor. A dumbwaiter
moved food and supplies from the basement to
a pantry on the first floor. Front and rear parlors
were connected by a wide doorway with sliding
pocket doors to seal off a room or open a dining
room. Bathrooms were added later to the rear
corners of the house. Houses on the waterfront
used the roofs of warehouses below them to
grow lawns and flowers.
Brownstone neighborhoods prevail in
Brooklyn because the city decided not to
expand in mid-century as Manhattan did.
When steam trains were introduced, they
scared many Brooklynites with their reckless-
ness, runaway cars and smoke and sparks. So in
1860, they were banned from the City of
Brooklyn. As a result, much of northern
Brooklyn remained intact into the 20th centu-
ry, while across the river, Manhattan grew and
changed.
Brooklyn’s seclusion was destroyed by the
arrival of the subway in 1908. Wealthier home-
owners moved out, brownstones were sub-
divided and more hotels arrived: the St.
George, Towers, Bossert and Touraine.
Nonetheless, much of the brownstone aura
survived.
The sturdiness and permanence of these
structures (as well as the views from the
Heights) also attracted celebrities to these
northern communities. Thomas Wolfe,
Norman Mailer, both Henry and Arthur
Miller lived there. Over time, they were joined
by Truman Capote and Carson McCullers and
W.H. Auden, who occupied the brownstones,
frame houses and carriage houses.
When Robert Moses invaded neighbor-
hoods, he demolished brownstones through
the power of the Housing Act of 1949. Had
not the homeowners protested, all of
Columbia Heights would have been leveled.
Moses’ incursion sparked a backlash of preser-
vation which partially resulted in establishment
of the Landmarks Preservation Commission in
1965 and the first neighborhood landmarked
in the state was Brooklyn Heights, helping
ensure the sense of intimacy that surrounds
these contemporary gems of realty. ❖
John B. Manbeck is a Brooklyn historian.
Brownstones, Bluestones
Old
The houses ...
became castles for
shipping merchants
and other nouveau
riche aristocrats.
South side of Remsen between Hicks Street & The Promenade/Esplanade.
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FCRC now owns 66 of the 73 co-ops,
condominiums and owner-occupied residen-
tial units that would need to be demolished
to make room for the development. It owns
entirely 10 of the 16 residential buildings in
question. It also owns or controls 23 of the 43
commercial properties that fall within the
area. That is 91 and 54 percent of the resi-
dential and commercial property respectively.
The hearing marked the first time that
the full scope of this information has been
made public.
“We are going to look this gift horse in
the mouth and God willing like what we
see,” said Councilmember James Sanders,
Jr., the chair of the committee.
The company is continuing to work on
purchasing more property in the hopes of
avoiding condemnation entirely. Half of the
area that lays within the proposed footprint
of the development is occupied by
Metropolitan Transportation Authority
(MTA) rail yards. The MTA has issued a
Request for Proposals for the purchase of
these yards, for which FCRC plans to submit
a bid by the July 6th due date.
The hearing was heavily attended, with a
large showing by Association for
Community Organizations for Reform Now
(ACORN) members and Brooklyn Borough
President Marty Markowitz, who spoke
enthusiastically in favor of the plan. Mayor
Michael R. Bloomberg also sent representa-
tives to testify to his support of the plan. ❖
With the recent signing of the
Memorandum of Understanding that estab-
lishes a public review process for Atlantic
Yards, Forest City Ratner Companies
(FCRC) is finalizing a Community Benefits
Agreement (CBA) that would outline
arrangements between the company and
community groups.
“FCRC has always had a policy of work-
ing with the community to improve
Brooklyn,” said Randall Touré, the company’s
vice president for community affairs.
The idea of a CBA originated with the con-
struction of the Staples Center in downtown
Los Angeles. The FCRC CBA will be the first
such legally-binding agreement in New York.
The company is meeting with representa-
tives of the Brooklyn United for Innovative
Local Development (BUILD), the
Association of Community Organizations for
Reform Now (ACORN), Downtown
Brooklyn Neighborhood Alliance (DBNA),
Faith-based Communities of Brooklyn
(FBCB), First Atlantic Terminal Housing
Committee (FATHC), New York State
Association of Minority Contractors
(NYSAMC), and Public Housing
Communities (PHC), among others.
“We need economic development in our
community, we need affordable housing. We
believe that this is a golden opportunity,” said
BUILD President James E. Caldwell, who will
oversee the group’s leadership of job develop-
ment training and its role in small business
development proposed to be in the CBA.
Also of great importance to FCRC is
including workers and companies from
under-served communities. The CBA would
provide programs to promote job training
and access to union trades for women and
minorities.
The company is also in discussions to
ensure the deep involvement of businesses
owned by women and minorities, mandating
that they receive contracts for pre-construc-
tion work—including legal, design and engi-
neering—as well as construction and post-
construction opportunities. ❖
Community Benefits to Come with Development
J u n e / J u l y 2 0 0 5
|
T H E B R O O K LY N S TA N D A R D 15
BUILD President James E.
Caldwell, currently negotiating
the CBA with FCRC.
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
Efforts to avoid
condemnation
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Cold 8tone Creamer] (June 24thì º 0uitar Center
SUMMER!4!TLANTIC4ERMINAL
Corner of Atlantic Ave. and Flatoush Ave., Brookl]n