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AtchisonCounty

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Atchison
October
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October
8, 8,
2015
Page7 7

Educating young women about


breast cancer
A

t the age of 12 to 15,


many young women
are experiencing the body
and life changes that
accompany adolescence. It
can be difficult to imagine
that breasts that are just
beginning to develop may
contain cancer. But such is
the reality for some girls.
The majority of women
who receive a breast cancer
diagnosis are over the age of
40. Experts at Monroe Carell
Jr. Hospital at Vanderbilt
University note that only
5 percent of breast cancer
cases are found in women
under the age of 40. However,
the hospital recently treated
a 14-year-old girl who found
a lump and learned she
had a rare form of breast
cancer called a phyllodes
tumor. In 2009, a 13-yearold from Little Rock, Ark.
found a quarter-sized lump
in her right breast, while a
19-year-old student at the

College of New Jersey was


diagnosed with cancerous
cells and underwent a
bilateral mastectomy.
Though such cases are
rare, it behooves teenage
and adolescent girls to
familiarize themselves with
the disease and be mindful
of their breast health.
Some organizations have
increased breast cancer
messages for young girls, and
it is not uncommon to find
young women participating
in runs and fundraisers
for breast cancer research.
Some organizations even
conduct
breast
cancer
workshops to educate young
women about breast health.
Dorothy Paterson of Texas,
a former Girl Scout leader
who was diagnosed with
breast cancer herself, began
conducting workshops for
Girl Scouts in 2007. The
idea isnt to scare girls
into believing they have

the disease, but rather to


increase their awareness of
changes in their bodies that
may or may not be normal.
Some
parents
worry
that educating children
about breast cancer may
cause
them
to
worry
unnecessarily,
especially
considering a young girls
risk of developing breast
cancer is so minimal.
However, others see the
importance in schooling girls
early on about a disease that
is so common. Advocates of
teaching young girls about
breast cancer often note
that any effort to help save
lives and promote health is
worthwhile.
Just as with older women,
adolescents and teens should
realize that eating healthy
foods, exercising, avoiding
alcohol and tobacco, and
maintaining annual physical
exams with a doctor are key
ways to reduce the risk for
cancer.

Data source: SEER 2007-2011 [6]


Note: Though this graph shows a rate of zero in some age groups, there are a few
cases of breast cancer in these age groups each year in the U.S. The numbers are
too small, however, to appear on the scale used here.

I Never Knew What


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Rock Port, MO 64482
660-744-6234
919 Central Avenue
Auburn, NE 68305
402-414-4293
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BRAVERY
MY

Until I Saw It In

MOM

Jeff Jones

Jones Lawn Care 660-253-0309

300 E US Highway 136 Ste 1


(660) 744-6175

The Ribbons are Pink


But should be Pink & Blue,
Women get Breast Cancer
But Men Get It Too!!

Lifetime Vision Center

Chamberlain Funeral Home


& Monuments
17479 US Hwy 136 W Rock Port, MO (660) 744-2122

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(660) 744-6393

KNOCK OUT

ether
g
o

BREAST CANCER!
Lori Jones
Atchison County Assessor
Rock Port, Missouri

315 S. Main St. Rock Port, MO


660-744-2433

Kent Fisher
Insurance
414 S. Main Rock Port, MO (660) 744-5366

Hope
Citizens Bank & Trust
101 N. Main Rock Port, MO 660-744-5333
105 S. Main Craig, MO 660-683-5333
904 State St. Mound City, MO 660-442-3800

Fight the Fight


1303 W. US Hwy 136
Rock Port, MO
(660) 744-6166

idespread use of screening mammograms has


increased the number of breast cancers found
before they cause any symptoms. Still, some breast cancers are not found by mammogram, either because the
test was not done or because, even under ideal conditions, mammograms do not find every breast cancer.

Other possible symptoms of breast cancer include:

1201 W. US HWY. 136


ROCK PORT, MO 64482

Dr. Darren Wright & Dr. Russell Crotty

Source: American Cancer Society. News release, FDA.

The most common symptom of breast cancer is a new


lump or mass. A painless, hard mass that has irregular
edges is more likely to be cancerous, but breast cancers
can be tender, soft, or rounded. They can even be painful.
For this reason, it is important to have any new breast
mass or lump or breast change checked by a health care
professional experienced in diagnosing breast diseases.

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Strength
Courage
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Signs and Symptoms of


Breast Cancer

WAS

Swelling of all or part of a breast (even if no distinct


lump is felt)
Skin irritation or dimpling
Breast or nipple pain
Nipple retraction (turning inward)
Redness, scaliness, or thickening of the nipple or
breast skin
Nipple discharge (other than breast milk)
Sometimes a breast cancer can spread to lymph nodes
under the arm or around the collar bone and cause a
lump or swelling there, even before the original tumor
in the breast tissue is large enough to be felt. Swollen
lymph nodes should also be reported to your doctor.

Although any of these symptoms can be caused by things


other than breast cancer, if you have them, they should be
reported to your doctor so that he or she can find the cause.

How can I protect Myself?


Source: American Cancer Society. News release, FDA.

ith breast cancer


statistics
rising,
everyone, man or woman
should be asking themselves,
How Can I Protect Myself
From
Breast
Cancer?
Since
early
detection
is the key, follow these
three
steps
for
early
breast cancer detection:
Annual
screening
mammography
wstarting
at age 40 or 50 is necessary.
Breast
cancer
experts
don't agree when women
need to begin getting
mammograms
because
every woman is different. If
you arent sure if you need
one, contact your doctor.

Women
in
high-risk
categories
should
have
screening
mammograms
every year and typically
start at an earlier age. MRI
or ultrasound screening
can also be given in
addition to mammograms.
If you are at a high risk
please discuss the best
approach with your doctor.
Have
your
breasts
examined not only by you
but also by a health care
provider at least once every
three years after age 20,
and every year after age 40.
These 3 things can protect
you from Breast Cancer.

THINK PINK!