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Ramont, Niedringhous, Comprehensive Nursing Care 2nd Edition Update Test

Bank
Chapter 44
Question 1
Type: MCSA
The nurse instructs the client of the need to schedule a mammography. The nurse is providing what type of
chronic disease prevention?
1. Primary
2. Secondary
3. Tertiary
4. Quaternary
Correct Answer: 2
Rationale 1: Screening for disease is secondary prevention. Primary prevention is aimed at preventing a disease
from occurring. Tertiary prevention is aimed at minimizing complications.
Rationale 2: Screening for disease is secondary prevention. Primary prevention is aimed at preventing a disease
from occurring. Tertiary prevention is aimed at minimizing complications.
Rationale 3: Screening for disease is secondary prevention. Primary prevention is aimed at preventing a disease
from occurring. Tertiary prevention is aimed at minimizing complications.
Rationale 4: Screening for disease is secondary prevention. Primary prevention is aimed at preventing a disease
from occurring. Tertiary prevention is aimed at minimizing complications.
Global Rationale:
Cognitive Level: Applying
Client Need: Health Promotion and Maintenance
Client Need Sub:
Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Implementation
Learning Outcome: Name characteristics of chronic illness.
Question 2
Type: MCSA
The nurse carefully screens African-American men for hypertension because of an understanding that what factor
influences the development of chronic disease?
Ramont, Niedringhous, Comprehensive Nursing Care 2nd Edition Update Test Bank
Copyright 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.

1. Age
2. Environment
3. Cost of disability
4. Race and ethnicity
Correct Answer: 4
Rationale 1: Race and ethnicity play an important role in placing certain clients at greater risk for some
conditions, and the nurse must be careful to screen these clients to detect disease early. The African-American
male is at much greater risk for hypertension than those from other ethnic or cultural backgrounds.
Rationale 2: Race and ethnicity play an important role in placing certain clients at greater risk for some
conditions, and the nurse must be careful to screen these clients to detect disease early. The African-American
male is at much greater risk for hypertension than those from other ethnic or cultural backgrounds.
Rationale 3: Race and ethnicity play an important role in placing certain clients at greater risk for some
conditions, and the nurse must be careful to screen these clients to detect disease early. The African-American
male is at much greater risk for hypertension than those from other ethnic or cultural backgrounds.
Rationale 4: Race and ethnicity play an important role in placing certain clients at greater risk for some
conditions, and the nurse must be careful to screen these clients to detect disease early. The African-American
male is at much greater risk for hypertension than those from other ethnic or cultural backgrounds.
Global Rationale:
Cognitive Level: Analyzing
Client Need: Health Promotion and Maintenance
Client Need Sub:
Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Implementation
Learning Outcome: Explain factors associated with chronic illness and preventive measures.
Question 3
Type: MCMA
The nurse explains that the role of the LPN/LVN in caring for clients with chronic illnesses is: (Select all that
apply.)
Standard Text: Select all that apply.
1. Planning rehabilitation.
2. Preventing complications.
3. Delivering excellent physical care.
Ramont, Niedringhous, Comprehensive Nursing Care 2nd Edition Update Test Bank
Copyright 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.

4. Providing emotional support.


5. Encouraging independence.
Correct Answer: 2,3,4,5
Rationale 1: The LPN/LVN plays an important role in preventing further complications, delivering excellent
physical care, providing emotional support, and encouraging independence in the client who is living with a
chronic illness. Physical Therapy and the physician plan rehabilitation.
Rationale 2: The LPN/LVN plays an important role in preventing further complications, delivering excellent
physical care, providing emotional support, and encouraging independence in the client who is living with a
chronic illness. Physical Therapy and the physician plan rehabilitation.
Rationale 3: The LPN/LVN plays an important role in preventing further complications, delivering excellent
physical care, providing emotional support, and encouraging independence in the client who is living with a
chronic illness. Physical Therapy and the physician plan rehabilitation.
Rationale 4: The LPN/LVN plays an important role in preventing further complications, delivering excellent
physical care, providing emotional support, and encouraging independence in the client who is living with a
chronic illness. Physical Therapy and the physician plan rehabilitation.
Rationale 5: The LPN/LVN plays an important role in preventing further complications, delivering excellent
physical care, providing emotional support, and encouraging independence in the client who is living with a
chronic illness. Physical Therapy and the physician plan rehabilitation.
Global Rationale:
Cognitive Level: Applying
Client Need: Physiological Integrity
Client Need Sub:
Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Planning
Learning Outcome: Describe the role of the LPN/LVN in caring for chronically ill clients.
Question 4
Type: MCSA
The nurse caring for a client diagnosed with a terminal illness delivers palliative care when:
1. Providing immunizations to the client to prevent infection.
2. Providing a back massage to help the client relax and experience less pain.
3. Encouraging the client to ambulate to recover strength.
4. Teaching the client how to monitor blood glucose levels.
Ramont, Niedringhous, Comprehensive Nursing Care 2nd Edition Update Test Bank
Copyright 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.

Correct Answer: 2
Rationale 1: Palliative care is aimed at providing comfort rather than at prevention or resolution of disease. Back
massage is a palliative intervention, while immunization and glucose monitoring are preventative, and ambulation
is rehabilitative.
Rationale 2: Palliative care is aimed at providing comfort rather than at prevention or resolution of disease. Back
massage is a palliative intervention, while immunization and glucose monitoring are preventative, and ambulation
is rehabilitative.
Rationale 3: Palliative care is aimed at providing comfort rather than at prevention or resolution of disease. Back
massage is a palliative intervention, while immunization and glucose monitoring are preventative, and ambulation
is rehabilitative.
Rationale 4: Palliative care is aimed at providing comfort rather than at prevention or resolution of disease. Back
massage is a palliative intervention, while immunization and glucose monitoring are preventative, and ambulation
is rehabilitative.
Global Rationale:
Cognitive Level: Applying
Client Need: Physiological Integrity
Client Need Sub:
Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Implementation
Learning Outcome: Define terminal illness, palliative care, and hospice.
Question 5
Type: MCSA
Which of the following goals would the nurse most likely write for a client receiving palliative care?
1. Client will verbalize one or more reasons to comply with treatment regimen.
2. Client will eat at least 75% of all meals and drink 6-8 glasses of water per day.
3. Client or family will say staff is fulfilling client's wishes as much as possible.
4. Client will verbalize understanding of addiction and prevention of addiction.
Correct Answer: 3
Rationale 1: The goal of palliative care is to meet the client's basic needs and maintain comfort, both physical and
psychosocial so an appropriate goal would be to fulfill client's wishes as much as possible. Complying with a
treatment regimen is restorative care. Palliative care would dictate the client will eat or drink enough to be
comfortable, as opposed as much as is needed to maintain or restore health. The client receiving palliative care
would not need to understand addiction or prevention of addiction.
Ramont, Niedringhous, Comprehensive Nursing Care 2nd Edition Update Test Bank
Copyright 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.

Rationale 2: The goal of palliative care is to meet the client's basic needs and maintain comfort, both physical and
psychosocial so an appropriate goal would be to fulfill client's wishes as much as possible. Complying with a
treatment regimen is restorative care. Palliative care would dictate the client will eat or drink enough to be
comfortable, as opposed as much as is needed to maintain or restore health. The client receiving palliative care
would not need to understand addiction or prevention of addiction.
Rationale 3: The goal of palliative care is to meet the client's basic needs and maintain comfort, both physical and
psychosocial so an appropriate goal would be to fulfill client's wishes as much as possible. Complying with a
treatment regimen is restorative care. Palliative care would dictate the client will eat or drink enough to be
comfortable, as opposed as much as is needed to maintain or restore health. The client receiving palliative care
would not need to understand addiction or prevention of addiction.
Rationale 4: The goal of palliative care is to meet the client's basic needs and maintain comfort, both physical and
psychosocial so an appropriate goal would be to fulfill client's wishes as much as possible. Complying with a
treatment regimen is restorative care. Palliative care would dictate the client will eat or drink enough to be
comfortable, as opposed as much as is needed to maintain or restore health. The client receiving palliative care
would not need to understand addiction or prevention of addiction.
Global Rationale:
Cognitive Level: Applying
Client Need: Safe Effective Care Environment
Client Need Sub:
Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Planning
Learning Outcome: Define terminal illness, palliative care, and hospice.
Question 6
Type: MCSA
The nurse working with a terminal client would consider the client appropriate for hospice if the client had a life
expectancy of no more than:
1. One year.
2. Nine months.
3. Six months.
4. Eight weeks.
Correct Answer: 3
Rationale 1: Medicare coverage for hospice dictates a life expectancy of six months, and this is the traditional
rule of thumb for all clients, although the rule may be ignored in some circumstances.
Rationale 2: Medicare coverage for hospice dictates a life expectancy of six months, and this is the traditional
rule of thumb for all clients, although the rule may be ignored in some circumstances.
Ramont, Niedringhous, Comprehensive Nursing Care 2nd Edition Update Test Bank
Copyright 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.

Rationale 3: Medicare coverage for hospice dictates a life expectancy of six months, and this is the traditional
rule of thumb for all clients, although the rule may be ignored in some circumstances.
Rationale 4: Medicare coverage for hospice dictates a life expectancy of six months, and this is the traditional
rule of thumb for all clients, although the rule may be ignored in some circumstances.
Global Rationale:
Cognitive Level: Applying
Client Need: Safe Effective Care Environment
Client Need Sub:
Nursing/Integrated Concepts: !NP>Intervention
Learning Outcome: Identify interventions the LPN/LVN can perform in caring for the dying person and the
family.
Question 7
Type: MCSA
The client with a chronic illness asks the nurse what a "living will" is. The nurse's best response explains that this
form leaves instructions about:
1. What treatments to omit if one is unable to make these decisions.
2. Who is to make decisions if one is unable to make decisions.
3. Who is to inherit property and belongings after one has died.
4. How the costs of medical care are to be paid after one's death.
Correct Answer: 1
Rationale 1: A living will indicates which treatments the client desires and which ones should not be initiated if
the client is unable to make decisions for himself. A medical power of attorney gives the responsibility for who is
to make medical decisions for the client to the person holding this title. A living will does not address property or
belongings or financial responsibility.
Rationale 2: A living will indicates which treatments the client desires and which ones should not be initiated if
the client is unable to make decisions for himself. A medical power of attorney gives the responsibility for who is
to make medical decisions for the client to the person holding this title. A living will does not address property or
belongings or financial responsibility.
Rationale 3: A living will indicates which treatments the client desires and which ones should not be initiated if
the client is unable to make decisions for himself. A medical power of attorney gives the responsibility for who is
to make medical decisions for the client to the person holding this title. A living will does not address property or
belongings or financial responsibility.

Ramont, Niedringhous, Comprehensive Nursing Care 2nd Edition Update Test Bank
Copyright 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.

Rationale 4: A living will indicates which treatments the client desires and which ones should not be initiated if
the client is unable to make decisions for himself. A medical power of attorney gives the responsibility for who is
to make medical decisions for the client to the person holding this title. A living will does not address property or
belongings or financial responsibility.
Global Rationale:
Cognitive Level: Remembering
Client Need: Safe Effective Care Environment
Client Need Sub:
Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Implementation
Learning Outcome: Identify legal issues in terminal illness, including essential aspects of the Patient SelfDetermination Act.
Question 8
Type: MCMA
When a client dies, which of the following is the highest priority for the nurse caring for the client? Select all that
apply.
Standard Text: Select all that apply.
1. Wash the body of the deceased person as thoroughly as possible.
2. Remove all tubes that have been inserted into the body.
3. Comply with religious and cultural wishes of the family as far as possible.
4. Place the body supine and close the eyes.
5. Elevate the head of the deceased 30 degrees.
Correct Answer: 3,5
Rationale 1: The nurse first must consider religious and cultural wishes of the client, as some religions and
cultures have preferences that should be followed, if at all possible. The body will be washed to remove any
secretions and make it look presentable for family who visit, but is not washed "as thoroughly as possible"
because the funeral home will prepare the body for viewing if indicated. Removal of tubes depends on facility
policy, state and local laws, and the need for the coroner to examine the body. The body is positioned so that the
head is elevated 30 degrees to prevent discoloration of the face with the eyes closed. Laying the body supine
increases risk of discoloration of the face and head, as blood will settle in the dependent area.
Rationale 2: The nurse first must consider religious and cultural wishes of the client, as some religions and
cultures have preferences that should be followed, if at all possible. The body will be washed to remove any
secretions and make it look presentable for family who visit, but is not washed "as thoroughly as possible"
because the funeral home will prepare the body for viewing if indicated. Removal of tubes depends on facility
policy, state and local laws, and the need for the coroner to examine the body. The body is positioned so that the
Ramont, Niedringhous, Comprehensive Nursing Care 2nd Edition Update Test Bank
Copyright 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.

head is elevated 30 degrees to prevent discoloration of the face with the eyes closed. Laying the body supine
increases risk of discoloration of the face and head, as blood will settle in the dependent area.
Rationale 3: The nurse first must consider religious and cultural wishes of the client, as some religions and
cultures have preferences that should be followed, if at all possible. The body will be washed to remove any
secretions and make it look presentable for family who visit, but is not washed "as thoroughly as possible"
because the funeral home will prepare the body for viewing if indicated. Removal of tubes depends on facility
policy, state and local laws, and the need for the coroner to examine the body. The body is positioned so that the
head is elevated 30 degrees to prevent discoloration of the face with the eyes closed. Laying the body supine
increases risk of discoloration of the face and head, as blood will settle in the dependent area.
Rationale 4: The nurse first must consider religious and cultural wishes of the client, as some religions and
cultures have preferences that should be followed, if at all possible. The body will be washed to remove any
secretions and make it look presentable for family who visit, but is not washed "as thoroughly as possible"
because the funeral home will prepare the body for viewing if indicated. Removal of tubes depends on facility
policy, state and local laws, and the need for the coroner to examine the body. The body is positioned so that the
head is elevated 30 degrees to prevent discoloration of the face with the eyes closed. Laying the body supine
increases risk of discoloration of the face and head, as blood will settle in the dependent area.
Rationale 5: The nurse first must consider religious and cultural wishes of the client, as some religions and
cultures have preferences that should be followed, if at all possible. The body will be washed to remove any
secretions and make it look presentable for family who visit, but is not washed "as thoroughly as possible"
because the funeral home will prepare the body for viewing if indicated. Removal of tubes depends on facility
policy, state and local laws, and the need for the coroner to examine the body. The body is positioned so that the
head is elevated 30 degrees to prevent discoloration of the face with the eyes closed. Laying the body supine
increases risk of discoloration of the face and head, as blood will settle in the dependent area.
Global Rationale:
Cognitive Level: Applying
Client Need: Safe Effective Care Environment
Client Need Sub:
Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Implementation
Learning Outcome: Describe nursing measures for the care of the body after death.
Question 9
Type: MCSA
The nurse caring for a client with a terminal illness would plan to put the focus of care on:
1. Encouraging the client to be as active as possible.
2. Encouraging the client to talk with distant relatives.
3. Encouraging the client to share his thoughts and feelings.
4. Encouraging the client to follow the treatment regimen.
Ramont, Niedringhous, Comprehensive Nursing Care 2nd Edition Update Test Bank
Copyright 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.

Correct Answer: 3
Rationale 1: When caring for a client who is terminal, the focus of care is placed on learning more about the
client so needs and wishes can be met to the greatest degree possible. The client does not need to maintain
activity, and only the client can determine if talking with distant relatives is at all important to him. The treatment
regimen is usually discontinued once the client is determined to not be responding and is judged terminal.
Rationale 2: When caring for a client who is terminal, the focus of care is placed on learning more about the
client so needs and wishes can be met to the greatest degree possible. The client does not need to maintain
activity, and only the client can determine if talking with distant relatives is at all important to him. The treatment
regimen is usually discontinued once the client is determined to not be responding and is judged terminal.
Rationale 3: When caring for a client who is terminal, the focus of care is placed on learning more about the
client so needs and wishes can be met to the greatest degree possible. The client does not need to maintain
activity, and only the client can determine if talking with distant relatives is at all important to him. The treatment
regimen is usually discontinued once the client is determined to not be responding and is judged terminal.
Rationale 4: When caring for a client who is terminal, the focus of care is placed on learning more about the
client so needs and wishes can be met to the greatest degree possible. The client does not need to maintain
activity, and only the client can determine if talking with distant relatives is at all important to him. The treatment
regimen is usually discontinued once the client is determined to not be responding and is judged terminal.
Global Rationale:
Cognitive Level: Applying
Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity
Client Need Sub:
Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Planning
Learning Outcome: Discuss aspects of the LPN/LVN role in caring for dying clients and their families.
Question 10
Type: MCSA
The nurse caring for a client with a terminal illness who believes the diagnosis is a punishment from God would
consider which of the following nursing diagnosis most appropriate?
1. Anxiety
2. Caregiver Role Strain
3. Anticipatory Grieving
4. Spiritual Distress
Correct Answer: 4

Ramont, Niedringhous, Comprehensive Nursing Care 2nd Edition Update Test Bank
Copyright 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.

Rationale 1: The client who believes she is being punished for misdeeds by a terminal illness willed by God is
experiencing spiritual distress, and this would be an appropriate nursing diagnosis. More information would be
needed to determine if the other diagnoses have any application to this client.
Rationale 2: The client who believes she is being punished for misdeeds by a terminal illness willed by God is
experiencing spiritual distress, and this would be an appropriate nursing diagnosis. More information would be
needed to determine if the other diagnoses have any application to this client.
Rationale 3: The client who believes she is being punished for misdeeds by a terminal illness willed by God is
experiencing spiritual distress, and this would be an appropriate nursing diagnosis. More information would be
needed to determine if the other diagnoses have any application to this client.
Rationale 4: The client who believes she is being punished for misdeeds by a terminal illness willed by God is
experiencing spiritual distress, and this would be an appropriate nursing diagnosis. More information would be
needed to determine if the other diagnoses have any application to this client.
Global Rationale:
Cognitive Level: Analyzing
Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity
Client Need Sub:
Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Planning
Learning Outcome: List common nursing diagnoses used in end-of-life care.
Question 11
Type: MCSA
The nurse caring for a client with a terminal illness in the long-term care facility talks with the client during the
morning bath. After lunch, the nurse finds the client difficult to arouse, with cool cyanotic hands and mottling of
the lower extremities. The nurse's priority action is to:
1. Notify the family that the client's death is imminent.
2. Notify the physician of the change in the client's condition.
3. Call 911 to have the client transferred to the acute care facility.
4. Attempt to stimulate the client to increase activity in order to improve perfusion.
Correct Answer: 1
Rationale 1: The client is showing signs of imminent death, and the nurse should notify those family members or
friends who would want to be with the client at the time of death. There is no need to transfer the client to an acute
care facility if the client does not wish to be resuscitated, which is fairly standard for those with a terminal illness.
The physician does not need to be notified unless orders were written to notify of impending death, which is not
customary. The terminal client's life would not be prolonged by stimulation, nor should it be.
Ramont, Niedringhous, Comprehensive Nursing Care 2nd Edition Update Test Bank
Copyright 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.

Rationale 2: The client is showing signs of imminent death, and the nurse should notify those family members or
friends who would want to be with the client at the time of death. There is no need to transfer the client to an acute
care facility if the client does not wish to be resuscitated, which is fairly standard for those with a terminal illness.
The physician does not need to be notified unless orders were written to notify of impending death, which is not
customary. The terminal client's life would not be prolonged by stimulation, nor should it be.
Rationale 3: The client is showing signs of imminent death, and the nurse should notify those family members or
friends who would want to be with the client at the time of death. There is no need to transfer the client to an acute
care facility if the client does not wish to be resuscitated, which is fairly standard for those with a terminal illness.
The physician does not need to be notified unless orders were written to notify of impending death, which is not
customary. The terminal client's life would not be prolonged by stimulation, nor should it be.
Rationale 4: The client is showing signs of imminent death, and the nurse should notify those family members or
friends who would want to be with the client at the time of death. There is no need to transfer the client to an acute
care facility if the client does not wish to be resuscitated, which is fairly standard for those with a terminal illness.
The physician does not need to be notified unless orders were written to notify of impending death, which is not
customary. The terminal client's life would not be prolonged by stimulation, nor should it be.
Global Rationale:
Cognitive Level: Analyzing
Client Need: Physiological Integrity
Client Need Sub:
Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Implementation
Learning Outcome: List clinical signs of impending death.
Question 12
Type: MCSA
The nurse prepares the client with a terminal illness for a complete bath when the spouse suddenly arrives. The
nurse will:
1. Begin bathing the client and ask the spouse to wait by the nurse's desk.
2. Ask the spouse to bathe the client so the nurse can care for another client.
3. Involve the spouse to the degree desired in bathing the client.
4. Instruct the spouse to sit in the chair at the client's bedside until the bath is completed.
Correct Answer: 3
Rationale 1: The nurse should offer to involve the spouse if they desire to be involved. If the spouse declines, the
nurse would continue the bath. The spouse should not be forced to assist if she doesn't wish to.
Rationale 2: The nurse should offer to involve the spouse if they desire to be involved. If the spouse declines, the
nurse would continue the bath. The spouse should not be forced to assist if she doesn't wish to.
Ramont, Niedringhous, Comprehensive Nursing Care 2nd Edition Update Test Bank
Copyright 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.

Rationale 3: The nurse should offer to involve the spouse if they desire to be involved. If the spouse declines, the
nurse would continue the bath. The spouse should not be forced to assist if she doesn't wish to.
Rationale 4: The nurse should offer to involve the spouse if they desire to be involved. If the spouse declines, the
nurse would continue the bath. The spouse should not be forced to assist if she doesn't wish to.
Global Rationale:
Cognitive Level: Applying
Client Need: Physiological Integrity
Client Need Sub:
Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Implementation
Learning Outcome: Discuss aspects of the LPN/LVN role in caring for dying clients and their families.
Question 13
Type: MCSA
The nurse is caring for a client on a mechanical ventilator whose vital signs are T; 97.4F oral; P: 112; R: 32; BP:
88/54. The client has no spontaneous respirations, pupils are dilated and not responsive to light, EEG is flat, and
the client has no reflexes. The client cannot be aroused, and has no response to stimulation. There has been no
change in the client's condition for the past three days, and he is not receiving a controlled substance. The nurse
recognizes that this client is:
1. Comatose.
2. In a vegetative state.
3. Brain-dead.
4. Obtunded.
Correct Answer: 3
Rationale 1: The client's flat EEG, lack of respirations, and dilated nonresponsive pupils indicate the brain is no
longer functional and the client is dead, and is being kept alive by the mechanical ventilator. Comatose,
vegetative, and obtunded clients do not have flat EEGs, and could have altered pupil response, but there would be
some level of response.
Rationale 2: The client's flat EEG, lack of respirations, and dilated nonresponsive pupils indicate the brain is no
longer functional and the client is dead, and is being kept alive by the mechanical ventilator. Comatose,
vegetative, and obtunded clients do not have flat EEGs, and could have altered pupil response, but there would be
some level of response.
Rationale 3: The client's flat EEG, lack of respirations, and dilated nonresponsive pupils indicate the brain is no
longer functional and the client is dead, and is being kept alive by the mechanical ventilator. Comatose,
vegetative, and obtunded clients do not have flat EEGs, and could have altered pupil response, but there would be
some level of response.
Ramont, Niedringhous, Comprehensive Nursing Care 2nd Edition Update Test Bank
Copyright 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.

Rationale 4: The client's flat EEG, lack of respirations, and dilated nonresponsive pupils indicate the brain is no
longer functional and the client is dead, and is being kept alive by the mechanical ventilator. Comatose,
vegetative, and obtunded clients do not have flat EEGs, and could have altered pupil response, but there would be
some level of response.
Global Rationale:
Cognitive Level: Analyzing
Client Need: Physiological Integrity
Client Need Sub:
Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Assessment
Learning Outcome: List definitions and clinical indications of death.
Question 14
Type: MCSA
The nurse is supporting the family following the death of the client. When bathing the body, the nurse would not
attempt to involve loved ones in the process if the family are:
1. Buddhists.
2. Catholics.
3. Navajos.
4. Islamic.
Correct Answer: 3
Rationale 1: People from the Navajo culture often do not believe in touching the body or possessions of a
deceased person, so the nurse should be sensitive to their needs and not attempt to involve them in providing care
to the body.
Rationale 2: People from the Navajo culture often do not believe in touching the body or possessions of a
deceased person, so the nurse should be sensitive to their needs and not attempt to involve them in providing care
to the body.
Rationale 3: People from the Navajo culture often do not believe in touching the body or possessions of a
deceased person, so the nurse should be sensitive to their needs and not attempt to involve them in providing care
to the body.
Rationale 4: People from the Navajo culture often do not believe in touching the body or possessions of a
deceased person, so the nurse should be sensitive to their needs and not attempt to involve them in providing care
to the body.
Global Rationale:
Ramont, Niedringhous, Comprehensive Nursing Care 2nd Edition Update Test Bank
Copyright 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.

Cognitive Level: Remembering


Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity
Client Need Sub:
Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Implementation
Learning Outcome: Discuss special pediatric and cultural concerns related to dying.
Question 15
Type: MCSA
After the death of a Buddhist client, the nurse is supporting the family, and would assist with arranging which of
the following as a means of comforting them?
1. Burial preferences
2. Organ donation
3. Religious ceremony
4. Preparation of the body
Correct Answer: 2
Rationale 1: Many clients from the Buddhist religion believe that organ donation is an act of mercy, and would be
comforted by the donation of the client's organs if possible. Clients believing in Buddhism are usually cremated;
ceremonies are performed before death, when last rite changing is done at the bedside, and there is no special
preparation of the body.
Rationale 2: Many clients from the Buddhist religion believe that organ donation is an act of mercy, and would be
comforted by the donation of the client's organs if possible. Clients believing in Buddhism are usually cremated;
ceremonies are performed before death, when last rite changing is done at the bedside, and there is no special
preparation of the body.
Rationale 3: Many clients from the Buddhist religion believe that organ donation is an act of mercy, and would be
comforted by the donation of the client's organs if possible. Clients believing in Buddhism are usually cremated;
ceremonies are performed before death, when last rite changing is done at the bedside, and there is no special
preparation of the body.
Rationale 4: Many clients from the Buddhist religion believe that organ donation is an act of mercy, and would be
comforted by the donation of the client's organs if possible. Clients believing in Buddhism are usually cremated;
ceremonies are performed before death, when last rite changing is done at the bedside, and there is no special
preparation of the body.
Global Rationale:
Cognitive Level: Applying
Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity
Client Need Sub:
Ramont, Niedringhous, Comprehensive Nursing Care 2nd Edition Update Test Bank
Copyright 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Planning


Learning Outcome: Discuss special pediatric and cultural concerns related to dying.

Ramont, Niedringhous, Comprehensive Nursing Care 2nd Edition Update Test Bank
Copyright 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.