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The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

14
14.1

Seventh Edition

Active Filter Design


Exercise Solutions

Exercise 141. Develop a second-order low-pass transfer function with a corner frequency of 50 rad/s, a
dc gain of 2, and a gain of 4 at the corner frequency. Validate your result by using MATLAB to plot the
transfer functions absolute gain versus frequency.
The transfer function for a second-order low-pass filter has the following form:
T (s) =

K
K02
=
(s/0 )2 + 2(s/0 ) + 1
s2 + 20 s + 02

0 = 50 rad/s
K=2
|T (j0 )| = 4 =
=
T (s) =

2
1
|K|
=
=
2
2

1
4
5000
s2 + 25s + 2500

The plot of the transfer function is shown below and it meets the specifications.
4.5
4
3.5

Amplitude

3
2.5
2
1.5
1
0.5
0
0
10

10

10

10

Frequency, (rad/sec)

Exercise 142. Design circuits using both the equal element design and unity gain design techniques to
realize the transfer function in Exercise 141. Use OrCAD to simulate your designs and compare them to
the MATLAB results shown in Figure 146.
For the equal element approach, pick R = 10 k and solve for the other values as follows:
0 =

1
RC

C=

1
1
=
= 2 F
0 R
(50)(10000)

= 3 2 = 3 2(0.25) = 2.5
Design the circuit using the resistor and capacitor specified and then use a voltage divider to reduce the gain
from 2.5 to 2 to meet the original specifications in Exercise 141. The OrCAD circuit simulation is shown
below and the output follows. The output agrees with the MATLAB plot.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-1

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

For the unity gain approach, pick C1 = 8 F and solve for the other values as follows:
C2 = 2 C1 =
R=

8 F
= 0.5 F
16

= 10 k
0 C1 C 2

=1
Design the circuit using the resistor and capacitors specified and then use a noninverting amplifier to increase
the gain from 1 to 2 to meet the original specifications in Exercise 141. The OrCAD circuit simulation is
shown below and the output follows. The output agrees with the MATLAB plot.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-2

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Exercise 143. Construct a second-order high-pass transfer function with a corner frequency of 20 rad/s,
an infinite-frequency gain of 4, and a gain of 2 at the corner frequency.
The transfer function for a second-order high-pass filter has the following form:
T (s) =

K(s/0 )2
Ks2
=
(s/0 )2 + 2(s/0 ) + 1
s2 + 20 s + 02

0 = 20 rad/s
K=4
|T (j0 )| = 2 =

4
2
|K|
=
=
2
2

=1
T (s) =

s2

4s2
+ 40s + 400

The plot of the transfer function is shown below and it meets the specifications.
4
3.5

Amplitude

3
2.5
2
1.5
1
0.5
0
0
10

10

10

10

Frequency, (rad/sec)

Exercise 144. Rework the design in Example 143, starting with C = 2000 pF.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-3

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

The design decisions and calculations are shown below.


C = 2000 pF
0 = 20000 = 62832 rad/s
B = 8000 = 25133 rad/s
=

B
8000
=
= 0.2
20
40000

R1 = 2 R2
p

R1 R2 =

2 R22 =
R2 =

1
0 C
1
0 C
1
= 39.79 k
0 C

R1 = (0.2)2 (39790) = 1.592 k


Use the active, second-order bandpass circuit with C1 = C2 = C = 2000 pF, R1 = 1.592 k, and R2 =
39.79 k. The transfer function has the following form:
T (s) =

314000s
s2 + 25100s + 3.9456 109

which agrees with the results in Example 143.


Exercise 145. Construct a second-order bandpass transfer function with a corner frequency of 50 rad/s,
a bandwidth of 10 rad/s and a center frequency gain of 4.
The transfer function for a second-order bandpass filter has the following form:
T (s) =

K(s/0 )
K0 s
= 2
(s/0 )2 + 2(s/0 ) + 1
s + 20 s + 02

0 = 50 rad/s
B = 10 rad/s = 20
=

B
10
=
= 0.1
20
100

|T (j0 )| = 4 =

|K|
2

K = (4)(0.2) = 0.8
T (s) =

s2

40s
+ 10s + 2500

Exercise 146. Rework the circuit design in Example 144 starting with C1 = C2 = C = 0.2 F.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

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The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

The design decisions and calculations are shown below.

C1 = C2 = C = 0.2 F
0 = 120 = 377 rad/s
B = 24 = 75.4 rad/s
R1 = 2 R2
p

R1 R2 =

2 R22 =
R2 =

1
0 C
1
0 C
1
= 132.6 k
0 C

R1 = 0.01R2 = 1.326 k
RA = 2R1 = 2.653 k
RB = R2 = 132.6 k

Exercise 147. Construct a second-order bandstop transfer function with a notch frequency of 50 rad/s, a
notch bandwidth of 10 rad/s, and passband gains of 5.
The transfer function for a second-order bandstop filter has the following form:

T (s) =

K[s2 + 02 ]
K[(s/0 )2 + 1]
=
(s/0 )2 + 2(s/0 ) + 1
s2 + 20 s + 02

0 = 50 rad/s
K=5
B = 10 rad/s = 20
=

T (s) =

B
10
=
= 0.1
20
100
5[s2 + 2500]
s2 + 10s + 2500

Exercise 148. Design a notch filter using the realization in Figure 1419 to achieve a notch at 200 krad/s,
a B of 20 krad/s, and a passband gain of 10.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-5

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

The design decisions and calculations are shown below.


0 = 200 krad/s
B = 20 krad/s
K = 10
B=

3
(K1 + 1)RC

1
B(K1 + 1)
=
RC
3
0 =

B(K1 + 1)
Bp
1

=
=
K1 + 1
3
RC K1 + 1
3 K1 + 1

p
30
= K1 + 1
B
K1 =

902
(9)(200)2
1=
1 = 899
2
B
202

K2 = 10
RC =

3
3
=
= 166.67 109
(K1 + 1)B
(900)(20000)

C = 1000 pF
R = 167
K1 R = 149.8 k
=

K1
= 299.7
3

RX
= 1 k

RX = 299.7 k
K2 R X
= 10 k

Exercise 149. Construct a first-order cascade transfer function that meets the following requirements:
TMAX = 0 dB, TMIN = 30 dB, C = 200 rad/s, and MIN = 1 krad/s.
Find the filter order that will meet the specifications. The gain decreases by 30 dB in the transition band
with MIN /C = 5. In Figure 1423, n = 4 appears to meet the specification. Calculate :
=

C
21/n

200
=
= 459.79 rad/s
1/4
1
2 1

The gain TMAX = 0 dB is an absolute gain of 1, so K = 11/4 = 1. The transfer function is:
T (s) =

Solution Manual Chapter 14

K
s/ + 1

n

K
s+

n

460
s + 460

4

Page 14-6

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Exercise 1410. The circuit design in Example 147 used the equal element method. Rework the problem
using the unity gain technique. Use OrCAD to validate your design. Comment on the two approaches.
Based on the results in Example 147, we have the following specifications:
n=4
K = 10
C = 1000 rad/s
The transfer function has the following form:

T (s) = 

1
1

[10]

 s 




2
2
s
s
s
+ 0.7654
+ 1.848
+1
+1
1000
1000
1000
1000

For the unity gain method, select all resistors to be 100 k and apply the following relationships:
R

p
1
C1 C2 =
0
C2
= 2
C1

Design the first stage:


=

0.7654
= 0.3827
2

C2 = 2 C1
C1 =
C1 =

1
R0
1
= 0.0261 F
R0

C2 = 3830 pF
Design the second stage:
=
C1 =

1.848
= 0.924
2
1
= 0.0108 F
R0

C2 = 9240 pF
The third stage is a noninverting amplifier with a gain of 10. The OrCAD design is shown below, followed
by the simulation results.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-7

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

The design meets all of the specifications. The unity gain technique requires fewer resistors than the equal
element approach, but requires precise capacitors that may be difficult to find.
Exercise 1411. Construct a Butterworth low-pass transfer function that meets the following requirements:
TMAX = 0 dB, TMIN = 40 dB, C = 250 rad/s, and MIN = 1.5 krad/s.
Determine the filter order:
n

1 ln[(TMAX /TMIN )2 1]
1 ln[10000 1]
=
= 2.57
2
ln[MIN /C ]
2
ln[6]

n=3
The following steps complete the transfer function using the table of Butterworth polynomials to find qn (s):
K = 0 dB = 1
q3 (s) = (s + 1)(s2 + s + 1)
T (s) =

1
K

=h
i   s 2
s
s
q3 (s/250)
+
+1
+1
250
250
250
[s +

(250)3
+ 250s + (250)2 ]

250][s2

Exercise 1412. Rework the design in Example 148 using the unity gain method in Section 142 to design
the required third-order low-pass circuit.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-8

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Based on the results in Example 148, we have the following specifications:


n=3
K = 10
C = 10 rad/s
The transfer function has the following form:
T (s) =

K
q3 (s/10)

1
1

[10]
=  s 
 s 2

 s 
+1
+
1
+
0.3254
2.98
9.159
9.159

For the unity gain method, select all resistors to be 100 k and apply the following relationships:
R

p
1
C1 C2 =
0
C2
= 2
C1

Design the first stage as an RC circuit followed by a noninverting amplifier with a gain of 10:
0 =

1
RC

C=

1
= 3.36 F
(100000)(2.98)

Design the second stage:


=

0.3254
= 0.1627
2

C2 = 2 C1
C1 =
C1 =

1
R0
1
= 6.71 F
R0

C2 = 0.178 F
Figure 1439 in the textbook shows the resulting circuits.
Exercise 1413. Construct a Chebychev low-pass transfer function that meets the following requirements:
TMAX = 0 dB, TMIN = 30 dB, C = 250 rad/s, and MIN = 1.5 krad/s.
Determine the filter order:
hp
i
i
hp
cosh1
(TMAX /TMIN )2 1
(31.623)2 1
cosh1
=
= 1.6733
n
cosh1 [MIN /C ]
cosh1 [6]
n=2

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-9

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

The following steps complete the transfer function using the table of Chebychev polynomials to find qn (s):
K = 0 dB = 1
q2 (s) = [(s/0.8409)2 + 0.7654(s/0.8409) + 1]

K/ 2
1/ 2
T (s) =
=
 s 
s 2
q2 (s/250)
+ 0.7654
+1
210
210

(210)2 / 2
= 2
s + 161s + (210)2
Exercise 1414. Design a high-pass, first-order cascade filter with a cutoff frequency of 100 krad/s, a TMIN
of 65 dB, a MIN of 10 krad/s, and a passband gain of 100.
First, find the filter order. We have the following relationships for a high-pass, first-order cascade design:
p
= C 21/n 1
|T (jMIN )| s

|TMAX |


2 n

1+
MIN

"
2 #n/2


TMAX
1+
TMIN
MIN

"
#n/2
2

C
TMAX
1/n
1+
(2
1)
TMIN
MIN

Find the smallest value of n that satisfies the last inequality. The following MATLAB code is helpful
for determining filter orders for low-pass and high-pass filters with first-order, Butterworth, or Chebychev
designs.
% Select the correct filter type via commenting
%FilterType = 'LowPass '
FilterType = 'HighPass'
% Set the filter specifications
TmaxdB = 40;
TmindB = -65;
wC = 100e3;
wmin = 10e3;
Tmax = 10(TmaxdB/20);
Tmin = 10(TmindB/20);
if FilterType == 'LowPass '
% Compute ratios of filter specification values
Tratio = Tmax/Tmin;
wratio = wmin/wC;
% Set the initial filter order to one
n = 1;
% While the filter order is too small to satisfy the specifications,
% increment the filter order
while (Tratio > (1 + wratio2*(2(1/n) - 1))(n/2))&&(n<200)
n = n + 1;
end

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-10

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

% Display the filter order


FirstOrderCascadeOrder = n
FirstOrderAlpha = wC/sqrt(2(1/n) - 1)
FirstOrderK = Tmax(1/n)
% Compute the Butterworth order
ButterworthExact = log(Tratio2-1)/log(wratio)/2
ButterworthOrder = ceil(log(Tratio2-1)/log(wratio)/2)
% Compute the Chebychev order
ChebychevExact = acosh(sqrt(Tratio2-1))/acosh(wratio)
ChebychevOrder = ceil(acosh(sqrt(Tratio2-1))/acosh(wratio))
end
if FilterType == 'HighPass'
% Compute ratios of filter specification values
Tratio = Tmax/Tmin;
wratio = wC/wmin;
% Set the initial filter order to one
n = 1;
% While the filter order is too small to satisfy the specifications,
% increment the filter order
while (Tratio > (1 + wratio2*(2(1/n) - 1))(n/2))&&(n<200)
n = n + 1;
end
% Display the filter order
FirstOrderCascadeOrder = n
FirstOrderAlpha = wC*sqrt(2(1/n) - 1)
FirstOrderK = Tmax(1/n)
% Compute the Butterworth order
ButterworthExact = log(Tratio2-1)/log(wratio)/2
ButterworthOrder = ceil(log(Tratio2-1)/log(wratio)/2)
% Compute the Chebychev order
ChebychevExact = acosh(sqrt(Tratio2-1))/acosh(wratio)
ChebychevOrder = ceil(acosh(sqrt(Tratio2-1))/acosh(wratio))
end

In this case, the minimum value is n = 13. We have


= C

p
21/13 1 = 23.4 krad/s

The cutoff frequency for each stage is 23.4 krad/s and the gain for each stage is 1001/13 = 1.4251. Each stage
contains an RC high-pass filter with R = 10 k and C = 4273 pF, connected to a noninverting amplifier
with a gain of 1.4251. The design for a single stage is shown below, where C1 = 4273 pF, R1 = R2 = 10 k,
and R3 = 4.251 k.

Exercise 1415. Design a Butterworth high-pass filter using the equal element configuration that meets
the following conditions: passband gain 100, C = 5 krad/s, MIN = 500 rad/s, TMIN = 40 dB 1 dB.
You must use 10-k resistors as much as possible.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-11

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Determine the filter order:


1 ln[(TMAX /TMIN )2 1]
1 ln[(100/0.01)2 1]
=
= 4.00
2
ln[C /MIN ]
2
ln[10]

n=4
The following steps complete the transfer function using the table of Butterworth polynomials to find qn (s):
K = 40 dB = 100
q4 (s) = (s2 + 0.7654s + 1)(s2 + 1.848s + 1)
T (s) =

100
K
# "
#
= "


2



2
q4 (5000/s)
5000
5000
5000
5000
+1
+1
+ 0.7654
+ 1.848
s
s
s
s

= 

5000 2
s

1
+ 0.7654

5000
s

+1



5000 2
s

2
+ 1.848

5000
s

+1

 100 

1 2

The design requires three stages. The first two stages are second-order, high-pass filters with gain and the
third stage is a noninverting amplifier to contribute the remaining gain. With the equal-element approach,
choose R1 = R2 = R = 10 k and C1 = C2 = C. Both filtering stages have the same resistors and capacitors
to achieve a common cutoff frequency, but their gains will differ. We have the following results:
RC =
C=

1
0
1
= 0.02 F
0 R

= 3 2
1 = 3 0.7654 = 2.2346
2 = 3 1.848 = 1.152
100
= 38.85
1 2
Figure 1452(a) in the textbook shows the design.
Exercise 1416. Repeat Exercise 1415, but design a Butterworth high-pass filter using the unity gain
configuration. You must use 0.01 F capacitors.
The transfer function remains the same, but the gains will be distributed differently, as follows:

T (s) = 

5000 2
s

+ 0.7654

5000
s

+1



5000 2
s

+ 1.848

5000
s

+1

[100]

The design requires three stages. The first two stages are second-order, high-pass filters with unity gain
and the third stage is a noninverting amplifier with a gain of 100. With the unity-gain approach, choose

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-12

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

C1 = C2 = C = 0.01F. Design the first stage:

0.7654
= 0.3827
2

R1 = 2 R2
C

R1 R2 =
R2 =

1
0
1
= 52.26 k
0 C

R1 = 7.654 k

Design the second stage:

=
R2 =

1.848
= 0.924
2
1
= 21.65 k
0 C

R1 = 18.48 k

Figure 1452(b) in the textbook shows the design.

Exercise 1417. Construct Butterworth and Chebychev high-pass transfer functions that meet the following
requirements: TMAX = 10 dB, C = 50 rad/s, TMIN = 40 dB, and MIN = 10 rad/s.
Design the Butterworth transfer function first. Determine the filter order and then construct the transfer
fucntion.

1 ln[(3.1623/0.01)2 1]
1 ln[(TMAX /TMIN )2 1]
=
= 3.577
2
ln[C /MIN ]
2
ln[5]

n=4
K = 10 dB =

10

q4 (s) = (s2 + 0.7654s + 1)(s2 + 1.848s + 1)


T (s) =

K
10
# " 
#
= " 2
 
 
2
q4 (50/s)
50
50
50
50
+1
+1
+ 0.7654
+ 1.848
s
s
s
s

[s2

+ 38.3s +

Solution Manual Chapter 14

10s4

502 ] [s2

+ 92.4s + 502 ]

Page 14-13

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Design the Chebychev transfer function. Determine the filter order and then construct the transfer function.

cosh1
n

hp

(TMAX /TMIN )2 1

cosh1 [C /MIN ]

cosh1
=

hp

(3.1623/0.01)2 1

cosh1 [5]

= 2.8134

n=3
K = 10 dB =

10

q3 (s) = [(s/0.2980) + 1][(s/0.9159)2 + 0.3254(s/0.9159) + 1]


K
= 
T (s) =
q3 (50/s)
=

50
0.2980s

 "
+1

10
2

50
0.9159s

+ 0.3254

50
0.9159s

+1

10s3
(s + 168)(s2 + 17.8s + 54.62 )

Exercise 1418. Construct Butterworth low-pass and high-pass transfer functions whose cascade connection produces a bandpass function with cutoff frequencies at 20 rad/s and 500 rad/s, a passband gain of
0 dB, and a stopband gain less than 20 dB at 5 rad/s and 2000 rad/s.
The low-pass filter has the following specifications and results:

C = 500 rad/s
MIN = 2000 rad/s
TMAX = 1
TMIN = 0.1
n

1 ln[(1/0.1)2 1]
1 ln[(TMAX /TMIN )2 1]
=
= 1.657
2
ln[MIN /C ]
2
ln[4]

n=2
q2 (s) = s2 + 1.414s + 1
5002
1
=
TLPF (s) = 



s
s 2
s2 + 707s + 5002
+1
+ 1.414
500
500

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-14

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

The high-pass filter has the following specifications and results:


C = 20 rad/s
MIN = 5 rad/s
TMAX = 1
TMIN = 0.1
n

1 ln[(TMAX /TMIN )2 1]
1 ln[(1/0.1)2 1]
=
= 1.657
2
ln[C /MIN ]
2
ln[4]

n=2
q2 (s) = s2 + 1.414s + 1
THPF (s) = 

1
20
s

2

+ 1.414

20
s

=
+1

s2

s2
+ 283s + 400

The complete transfer function is

T (s) = TLPF (s)THPF (s) =

5002
2
s + 707s + 5002



s2
2
s + 283s + 400

Exercise 1419. Develop Butterworth low-pass and high-pass transfer functions whose parallel connection
produces a bandstop filter with cutoff frequencies at 2 rad/s and 800 rad/s, passband gains of 20 dB, and
stopband gains less than 30 dB at 20 rad/s and 80 rad/s.
The low-pass filter has the following specifications and results:
C = 2 rad/s
MIN = 20 rad/s
TMAX = 10
TMIN = 0.03162
n

1 ln[(10/0.03162)2 1]
1 ln[(TMAX /TMIN )2 1]
=
= 2.5
2
ln[MIN /C ]
2
ln[10]

n=3
q3 (s) = (s + 1)(s2 + s + 1)
80
10
=
 
TLPF (s) = h


i
2
2
s
s
s
[s + 2][s + 2s + 4]
+1
+
+1
2
2
2

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-15

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

The high-pass filter has the following specifications and results:


C = 800 rad/s
MIN = 80 rad/s
TMAX = 10
TMIN = 0.03162
n

1 ln[(TMAX /TMIN )2 1]
1 ln[(10/0.03162)2 1]
=
= 2.5
2
ln[C /MIN ]
2
ln[10]

n=3
q3 (s) = (s + 1)(s2 + s + 1)
THPF (s) = 

10s3
10
#=
2 

 "
2
[s + 800][s + 800s + 8002 ]
800
800
800
+1
+
+1
s
s
s

The complete transfer function is


 

80
10s3
T (s) = TLPF (s) + THPF (s) =
+
[s + 2][s2 + 2s + 4]
[s + 800][s2 + 800s + 8002 ]


Solution Manual Chapter 14

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The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

14.2

Seventh Edition

Problem Solutions

Problem 141. Interchanging the positions of the resistors and capacitors converts the low-pass filter in
Figure 143(a) into the high-pass filter in Figure 149(a). This CR-RC interchange involves replacing Rk by
1/Ck s and Ck s by 1/Rk . Show that this interchange converts the low-pass transfer function in Eq. (146)
into the high-pass function in Eq. (1411).
Start with Equation (146) and make the required substitutions. Simplify the results and verify that it
matches Equation (1411).
TLPF (s) =

R1 R2 C1 C2 s2 + (R1 C1 + R1 C2 + R2 C2 R1 C1 )s + 1

1 1 1 1
1 1
1 1
1 1
1 1
+
+
+

+1
C1 s C2 s R1 R2
C1 s R1
C1 s R2
C2 s R 2
C1 s R1

THPF (s) =

R1 R2 C1 C2 s2
1 + (R2 C2 + R1 C2 + R1 C1 R2 C2 )s + R1 R2 C1 C2 s2

The result matches Equation (1411). We can also use MATLAB to efficiently perform the substitution as
follows.
syms u R1 R2 C1 C2 r1 r2 c1 c2 s
TLP = u/(R1*R2*C1*C2*s2+(R1*C1+R1*C2+R2*C2-u*R1*C1)*s+1);
THP = simplify(subs(TLP,{R1,R2,C1,C2},{1/c1/s,1/c2/s,1/r1/s,1/r2/s}))

The results confirm the solution.


THP = (c1*c2*r1*r2*s2*u)/(c1*r1*s + c2*r1*s + c2*r2*s - c2*r2*s*u + c1*c2*r1*r2*s2 + 1)

Problem 142. Show that the circuit in Figure 1414 has the bandpass transfer function in Eq. (1416).
Use node-voltage analysis. Let the node between R1 and C2 be VA (s).
VA (s) V1 (s) VA (s) 0 VA (s) V2 (s)
+
+
=0
R1
1/C2 s
1/C1 s
VA (s) V2 (s)
=0
+
1/C2 s
R2
Solve the second equation for VA (s) and substitute into the first equation.
VA (s) =

V2 (s)
R 2 C2 s

0 = VA (s) V1 (s) + R1 C2 sVA (s) + R1 C1 sVA (s) R1 C1 sV2 (s)


VA (s)[1 + R1 C2 s + R1 C1 s] = V1 (s) + R1 C1 sV2 (s)
V2 (s)
[1 + R1 C2 s + R1 C1 s] = V1 (s) + R1 C1 sV2 (s)
R2 C2 s
V2 (s)[1 + R1 C2 s + R1 C1 s] = R2 C2 sV1 (s) + R1 R2 C1 C2 s2 V2 (s)
T (s) =

Solution Manual Chapter 14

R2 C2 s
V2 (s)
=
V1 (s)
R1 R2 C1 C2 s2 + (R1 C1 + R1 C2 )s + 1

Page 14-17

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 143. Show that the circuit in Figure 1417 has the bandstop transfer function in Eq. (1420).
Use node-voltage analysis. Let the node between R1 and C2 be VA (s). Label the positive and negative
terminals of the OP AMP as VP (s) and VN (s). The relevant equations are:

VP (s) = VN (s) =

RB
V1 (s)
RA + RB

0=

VA (s) V1 (s) VA (s) V2 (s) VA (s) VN (s)


+
+
R1
1/C1 s
1/C2 s

0=

VN (s) VA (s) VN (s) V2 (s)


+
1/C2 s
R2

The following MATLAB code solves the equations for the transfer function.
syms s R1 R2 C1 C2 RA RB V1 V2 VN VA K
ZC1 = 1/s/C1;
ZC2 = 1/s/C2;
Eqn1 = (VA-V1)/R1 + (VA-V2)/ZC1 + (VA-VN)/ZC2;
Eqn2 = (VN-VA)/ZC2 + (VN-V2)/R2;
Eqn3 = (VN-V1)/RA + VN/RB;
Soln = solve(Eqn1,Eqn2,Eqn3,VA,VN,V2);
V2 = Soln.V2;
Ts = factor(V2/V1)
pretty(Ts)

The results are:


Ts = (RB + C1*R1*RB*s + C2*R1*RB*s - C2*R2*RA*s + C1*C2*R1*R2*RB*s2)/...
((RA + RB)*(C1*R1*s + C2*R1*s + C1*C2*R1*R2*s2 + 1))
2
RB + C1 R1 RB s + C2 R1 RB s - C2 R2 RA s + C1 C2 R1 R2 RB s
------------------------------------------------------------2
(RA + RB) (C1 R1 s + C2 R1 s + C1 C2 R1 R2 s + 1)

The transfer function is


T (s) =

RB
RA + RB



R1 R2 C1 C2 s2 + (R1 C1 + R1 C2 R2 C2 RA /RB )s + 1
R1 R2 C1 C2 s2 + (R1 C1 + R1 C2 )s + 1

Problem 144. Show that the active filter in Figure P144 has a transfer function of the form

T (s) =

V2 (s)
1
=
V1 (s)
R 1 R 2 C1 C2 s 2 + R 2 C2 s + 1

Using C1 = C2 = C, develop a method of selecting values for C, R1 , and R2 . Then select values so that the
filter has a cutoff frequency of 100 krad/s and a of 0.6. Use MATLAB to plot the filters Bode diagram.
Determine the type of filter it is and its roll-off.
Use node-voltage analysis. Let VA (s) be the voltage at the positive input terminal for the left OP AMP
and note that the input voltages for the right OP AMP are V2 (s). We have the following equations and

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-18

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

results:
0=

VA (s) V1 (s) VA (s) V2 (s)


+
R1
1/C1 s

0=

V2 (s) VA (s)
V2 (s)
+
R2
1/C2 s

0 = VA (s) V1 (s) + R1 C1 sVA (s) R1 C1 sV2 (s)


0 = V2 (s) VA (s) + R2 C2 sV2 (s)
VA (s) = V2 (s)[1 + R2 C2 s]
0 = V2 (s)[1 + R2 C2 s][1 + R1 C1 s] V1 (s) R1 C1 sV2 (s)
V1 (s) = V2 (s)[1 + R1 C1 s + R2 C2 s R1 C1 s + R1 R2 C1 C2 s2 ]
T (s) =

1
V2 (s)
=
V1 (s)
R 1 R 2 C1 C2 s 2 + R 2 C2 s + 1

For C1 = C2 = C, we have the following simplification:

1
T (s) =
=
2
2
R1 R2 C s + R2 Cs + 1

1
R1 R2 C 2
1
1
s+
s2 +
R1 C
R1 R2 C 2

To solve for the component values, select a value for C and then solve for R1 and R2 using the following two
equations, in order:
1
= 20
R1 C
1
= 02
R1 R2 C 2
For the given values, we have the following results:
0 = 100 krad/s
= 0.6
C = 0.001 F
R1 =

1
= 8.33 k
20 C

R2 =

1
= 12 k
R1 C 2 02

The Bode magnitude plot is shown below. The filter is a low-pass filter with a roll-off of 40 dB per decade.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-19

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

10

10

Amplitude, (dB)

20

30

40

50

60

70

80
3
10

10

10
Frequency, (rad/sec)

10

10

Problem 145. The circuit in Figure 143(b) has a low-pass transfer function given in Eq. (146) and
repeated below
T (s) =

V2 (s)

=
V1 (s)
R1 R2 C1 C2 s2 + (R1 C1 + R1 C2 + R2 C2 R1 C1 )s + 1

In Section 142, we developed equal element and unity gain design methods for this circuit. This problem
explores an equal time constant design method. Using R1 C1 = R2 C2 and = 2, develop a method of
selecting values for C1 , C2 , R1 , and R2 . Then select values so that the filter has a cutoff frequency of
2 krad/s and a of 0.05. Use MATLAB to plot the filters Bode diagram. Determine the location in rad/s
and magnitude in dB of the peak in the frequency response.
Let T = R1 C1 = R2 C2 and = 2. Substitute into the transfer function.
2
T (s) = 2 2
=
T s + (T + R1 C2 + T 2T )s + 1

2
T2
1
R1 C2
s+ 2
s2 +
2
T
T

We now have the following equations:


1
1
=
= 02
2
T
(R1 C1 )2
0 =

1
1
=
R1 C1
R 2 C2

R1 =

1
0 C1

R1 C2
= R1 C2 02 = 20
T2
R1 C2 0 = 2

Solution Manual Chapter 14

C2 =

2
0 R 1

R2 =

R1 C1
C2

Page 14-20

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

The procedure to design the circuit is as follows: Select C1 and solve for R1 as shown above. Then solve for
C2 and R2 , in turn. For the specifications given above, choose C1 = 0.025 F and solve for the other values.
The results are:
C1 = 0.025 F
R1 =

1
= 20 k
0 C 1

C2 =

2
= 0.0025 F
0 R 1

R2 =

R1 C1
= 200 k
C2

The amplitude Bode plot is shown below. The peak occurs at = 1995 rad/s and has a value of 26.0315 dB.
30

20

Amplitude, (dB)

10

10

20

30
2
10

10
Frequency, (rad/s)

10

Problem 146. The active filter in Figure P146 has a transfer function of the form
T (s) =

V2 (s)
R2 /R1
=
V1 (s)
R2 R3 C1 C2 s2 + [R3 C2 + R2 C2 (1 + R3 /R1 )]s + 1

Using R1 = R2 = R3 = R, develop a method of selecting values for C1 , C2 , and R. Then select values so
that the filter has a cutoff frequency of 150 krad/s and a of 0.01. Use MATLAB to plot the filters Bode
diagram. Build and simulate your circuit in OrCAD and compare the results with MATLABs. Determine
the location in rad/s and magnitude in dB of the peak in the frequency response.
Substitute R1 = R2 = R3 = R into the transfer function and simplify as follows:

1
=
T (s) = 2
R C1 C2 s2 + 3RC2 s + 1

s2 +

1
R 2 C1 C2

3
1
s+ 2
RC1
R C1 C2

To solve for the component values, select a value for C1 and then solve for R and C2 , in order, using the

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-21

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

following equations:
3
= 20
RC1
R=

3
20 C1

1
= 02
R 2 C1 C2
C2 =

1
02 R2 C1

For the specifications given above, choose C1 = 0.1 F and solve for the other values. The results are:
C1 = 0.1 F
R=
C2 =

3
= 10 k
20 C1
1
02 R2 C1

= 4.444 pF

The amplitude Bode plot is shown below. The peak occurs at = 149.985 krad/s and has a value of
33.9798 dB.
40
30

Amplitude, (dB)

20
10
0
10
20
30
40
4
10

10
Frequency, (rad/s)

10

The OrCAD circuit and simulation results are shown below and agree with the MATLAB results.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-22

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 147. Show that the active filter in Figure P147 has a transfer function of the form
T (s) =

R 1 R 2 C1 C2 s 2
V2 (s)
=
V1 (s)
R 1 R 2 C1 C2 s 2 + R 1 C1 s + 1

Using C1 = C2 = C, develop a method of selecting values for C, R1 , and R2 . Then select values so that
the filter has a cutoff frequency of 1 krad/s and a of 0.1. Use MATLAB to plot the filters Bode diagram.
Determine the type of filter it is and its roll-off. How does the circuit and this transfer function compare
with that of Problem 144?
Use node-voltage analysis. Let the positive input terminal of the left OP AMP have voltage VA (s).
0=

VA (s) V1 (s) VA (s) V2 (s)


+
1/C1 s
R1

0=

V2 (s) VA (s) V2 (s)


+
1/C2 s
R2

0 = R1 C1 sVA (s) R1 C1 sV1 (s) + VA (s) V2 (s)


0 = R2 C2 sV2 (s) R2 C2 sVA (s) + V2 (s)
R2 C2 s + 1
V2 (s)
R2 C2 s


R2 C2 s + 1
[R1 C1 s + 1] V2 (s)
R1 C1 sV1 (s) = V2 (s)
R2 C2 s
VA (s) =



R1 R2 C1 C2 s2 V1 (s) = V2 (s) R1 R2 C1 C2 s2 + R1 C1 s + R2 C2 s R2 C2 s + 1
T (s) =

V2 (s)
R 1 R 2 C1 C2 s 2
=
V1 (s)
R 1 R 2 C1 C2 s 2 + R 1 C1 s + 1

We have the following design relationships:


02 =
20 =

Solution Manual Chapter 14

1
R 1 R 2 C1 C2
1
R2 C2

Page 14-23

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Pick C1 = C2 = C = 0.1 F and solve for the resistor values.

R2 =

1
= 50 k
20 C

R1 =

1
= 2 k
R2 02 C 2

The amplitude Bode plot is shown below. The filter is a high-pass filter with a roll-off of 40 dB per decade.

20

10

Amplitude, (dB)

10

20

30

40
2
10

10
Frequency, (rad/s)

10

The circuit in Figure P147 is the same as the circuit in Figure P144, except that the resistors and capacitors
are swapped. The swap causes the low-pass filter in Figure P144 to become a high-pass filter in Figure
P147. The transfer functions are similar in their general structure, but the high-pass filter has s2 in the
numerator to achieve the correct gain response.

Problem 148. The circuit in Figure 149(b) has a high-pass transfer function given in Eq. (1411) and
repeated below

T (s) =

R1 R2 C1 C2 s2
V2 (s)
=
V1 (s)
R1 R2 C1 C2 s2 + (R2 C2 + R1 C1 + R1 C2 R2 C2 )s + 1

In Section 142, we developed equal element and unity gain design methods for this circuit. This problem
explores an equal time constant design method. Using R1 C1 = R2 C2 and = 2, develop a method of
selecting values for C1 , C2 , R1 , and R2 . Then select values so that the filter has a cutoff frequency of
500 krad/s and a of 0.25. Use MATLAB to plot the filters Bode diagram.
Let T = R1 C1 = R2 C2 and = 2. Substitute into the transfer function.

T (s) =

Solution Manual Chapter 14

T 2 s2

2T 2 s2
=
+ (T + T + R1 C2 2T )s + 1

2s2
1
R1 C2
s+ 2
s2 +
T2
T

Page 14-24

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

We now have the following equations:


1
1
=
= 02
T2
(R1 C1 )2
0 =

1
1
=
R1 C1
R 2 C2

R1 =

1
0 C1

R1 C2
= R1 C2 02 = 20
T2
R1 C2 0 = 2
C2 =

2
0 R 1

R2 =

R1 C1
C2

The procedure to design the circuit is as follows: Select C1 and solve for R1 as shown above. Then solve for
C2 and R2 , in turn. For the specifications given above, choose C1 = 500 pF and solve for the other values.
The results are:
C1 = 500 pF
R1 =

1
= 4 k
0 C1

C2 =

2
= 250 pF
0 R 1

R2 =

R 1 C1
= 8 k
C2

The amplitude Bode plot is shown below.


15

10

Amplitude, (dB)

10

15

20

25
5
10

Solution Manual Chapter 14

10
Frequency, (rad/s)

10

Page 14-25

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 149. Show that the active filter in Figure P149 has a transfer function of the form
T (s) =

R1 C1 s
V2 (s)
=
2
V1 (s)
R1 R2 C1 C2 s + (R1 C2 + R2 C2 )s + 1

Using R1 = R2 = R, develop a method of selecting values for C1 , C2 , and R. Then select values so that the
filter has a 0 of 50 krad/s and a of 0.1. Use MATLAB to plot the filters Bode diagram. What type of
filter is this?
Use node-voltage analysis. Let the node between C1 and R2 be VA (s).
0=

VA (s) V1 (s) VA (s) VA (s) V2 (s)


+
+
1/C1 s
R2
R1

0=

VA (s) V2 (s)
+
R2
1/C2 s

0 = R1 R2 C1 sVA (s) R1 R2 C1 sV1 (s) + R1 VA (s) + R2 VA (s) R2 V2 (s)


0 = VA (s) R2 C2 sV2 (s)
VA (s) = R2 C2 sV2 (s)
R1 R2 C1 sV1 (s) = [R2 C2 sV2 (s)][R1 R2 C1 s + R1 + R2 ] R2 V2 (s)
R1 R2 C1 sV1 (s) = V2 (s)[R1 R22 C1 C2 s2 + R1 R2 C2 s + R22 C2 s + R2 ]
T (s) =

V2 (s)
R1 C1 s
=
V1 (s)
R1 R2 C1 C2 s2 + (R1 C2 + R2 C2 )s + 1

With R1 = R2 = R, we have the following design relationships:


02 =
20 =
R=
C2 =

1
1
= 2
R 1 R 2 C1 C2
R C1 C2
2RC2
2
R1 C2 + R2 C2
= 2
=
R 1 R 2 C1 C2
R C1 C2
RC1
1
0 C1
1
02 R2 C1

The design procedures is to select a value for C1 and then solve for R and C2 , in turn, using the equations
above. For the given specifications, we have the following design choices and results:
C1 = 0.1 F
R=
C2 =

1
= 2 k
0 C1
1
02 R2 C1

= 1000 pF

The amplitude Bode plot is shown below. The filter is a bandpass filter.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-26

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

35

30

25

Amplitude, (dB)

20

15

10

10

15
3
10

10

10

10

Frequency, (rad/s)

Problem 1410. The active filter in Figure P1410 has a transfer function of the form
T (s) =

R3 C2 s
V2 (s)
=
V1 (s)
R1 R3 C1 C2 s2 + (R1 C1 + R1 C2 )s + 1 + R1 /R2

Using C1 = C2 = C and R1 = R2 = R, develop a method of selecting values for C and R. Then select values
so that the filter has a 0 of 10 krad/s and a of 0.5. Use MATLAB to plot the filters Bode diagram. What
type of filter is this?
Substitute C1 = C2 = C and R1 = R2 = R into the transfer function and simplify.
R3 Cs
T (s) =
=
2
RR3 C s2 + 2RCs + 2

s2 +

1
s
RC

2
2
s+
R3 C
RR3 C 2

We have the following design relationships:


20 =

2
R3 C

R3 =

1
0 C

02 =

2
RR3 C 2

R=

2
02 R3 C 2

The design procedure is to select a value for C and then solve for R3 and R, in turn, using the equations
above. For the given specifications, we have the following design choices and results:
C = 0.01 F
R3 =
R=

1
= 20 k
0 C
2
= 10 k
02 R3 C 2

The amplitude Bode plot is shown below. The filter is a bandpass filter.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-27

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Amplitude, (dB)

10

12

14

16

18

20
3
10

10
Frequency, (rad/s)

10

Problem 1411. The active filter in Figure P1411 has a transfer function of the form
T (s) =

V2 (s)
(RCs)2 + 1
=
V1 (s)
(RCs)2 + 2RCs + 1

Select values of R and C so that the filter has a 0 of 377 krad/s. Use OrCAD to plot the filters Bode
magnitude diagram. What type of filter is this? With the gain equal to 1, is selectable? What is in this
filter?
We have the following design relationships:
02 =

1
R2 C 2

0 =

1
RC

20 =

2
RC

1
=1
0 RC

Pick C = 1000 pF and solve for R = 1/(0 C) = 2.6525 k. The OrCAD circuit and simulation results are
shown below. In addition, a MATLAB plot of the transfer function is shown. The filter is a bandstop filter
with = 1. With a gain of one, the value for is not selectable.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-28

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

0
10

Amplitude, (dB)

20
30
40
50
60
70
4
10

10

10

10

Frequency, (rad/s)

Problem 1412. The task is to design a second-order low-pass filter using the three approaches shown
in Problems 144, 145, and 146. The filter specs are a cutoff frequency of 100 krad/s and a of 0.25.
Using OrCAD, build your three designs and select the best one based on how well each meets the specs, the
number of parts, and the gain.
Using the results from Problem 144, we have the following design choices and results:

0 = 100 krad/s
= 0.25
C = C1 = C2 = 1000 pF
R1 =

1
= 20 k
20 C

R2 =

1
= 5 k
R1 C 2 02

The OrCAD circuit is shown below.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-29

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Using the results from Problem 145, we have the following design choices and results:
=2
C1 = 1000 pF
R1 =

1
= 10 k
0 C1

C2 =

2
= 500 pF
0 R 1

R2 =

R 1 C1
= 20 k
C2

The OrCAD circuit is shown below.

Using the results from Problem 146, we have the following design choices and results:
C1 = 1000 pF
R=
C2 =

3
= 60 k
20 C1
1
02 R2 C1

= 27.78 pF

The OrCAD circuit is shown below.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-30

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

The simulation results from all three designs are shown below. The colors of the voltage markers in the
circuits correspond to the colors of the curves in the plot. The results from Problems 144 and 146 are
identical and the red curve overlays the green curve in the plot.

The following table summarizes the results.


Item
Meets Specs
Gain
OP AMPS
Resistors
Capacitors

Problem 144
Yes
1
2
2
2

Problem 145
Yes
2
1
4
2

Problem 146
Yes
1
1
3
2

If a larger gain is more important, then choose the circuit in Problem 145. If a lower part count is more
important, then choose the circuit in Problem 146, since it requires only one OP AMP.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-31

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1413. Construct a second-order transfer function that meets the following requirements. Use
MATLAB to plot the transfer functions Bode diagram and validate the requirements.
Type
Low-pass

0 (rad/s)
100000

|T (j0 )|
50

Constraints
dc gain of 100

We have the following results:


0 = 100000 rad/s
K = 100
|T (j0 )| = 50 =
=

100
=1
(2)(50)

T (s) = 
=

K
2

K
s
0

2

+ 2

s
0

100
=
 s 
s 2
+1
+
2
+1
105
105

1012
s2 + 2 105 s + 1010

The Bode diagram is shown below and validates that the transfer function meets the requirements.
40

30

20

Amplitude, (dB)

10

10

20

30

40

50
4
10

10

10

10

Frequency, (rad/s)

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-32

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1414. Construct a second-order transfer function that meets the following requirements. Use
MATLAB to plot the transfer functions Bode diagram and validate the requirements.
Type
High-pass

0 (rad/s)
100

0.5

|T (j0 )|

Constraints
infinite frequency gain of 20

We have the following results:


0 = 100 rad/s
= 0.5
K = 20
2
s
Ks2
0
T (s) =  2
= 2
 
s + 20 s + 02
s
s
+1
+ 2
0
0
K

s2

20s2
+ 100s + 10000

The Bode diagram is shown below and validates that the transfer function meets the requirements.
30

25

20

Amplitude, (dB)

15

10

10

15
1
10

10

10

10

Frequency (rad/s)

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-33

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1415. Construct a second-order transfer function that meets the following requirements. Use
MATLAB to plot the transfer functions Bode diagram and validate the requirements.

Type
Bandpass

0 (rad/s)
15000

|T (j0 )|
5

Constraints
B = 250 rad/s

We have the following results:


0 = 15000 rad/s
B = 20 = 250 rad/s
=

B
= 0.008333
20

|T (j0 )| = 5 =

K
2

K = 10 = 0.08333



s
K
K0 s
0
= 2
T (s) =  2
 
s + 20 s + 02
s
s
+1
+ 2
0
0
=

1250s
s2 + 250s + 225000000

The Bode diagram is shown below and validates that the transfer function meets the requirements.

20

10

Amplitude, (dB)

10

20

30

40

50
3
10

10
Frequency, (rad/s)

10

The plot below focuses on peak of the Bode plot and confirms the bandwidth specification.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-34

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

4.5

Amplitude

3.5

2.5
1.48

Solution Manual Chapter 14

1.485

1.49

1.495

1.5
1.505
Frequency (rad/s)

1.51

1.515

1.52
4

x 10

Page 14-35

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1416. Construct a second-order transfer function that meets the following requirements. Use
MATLAB to plot the transfer functions Bode diagram and validate the requirements.
Type
Bandpass

0 (rad/s)
632

15.8

|T (j0 )|
10

Constraints
dc gain of zero

We have the following results:


0 = 632 rad/s
= 15.8
|T (j0 )| = 10 =

K
2

K = 20 = 316



s
K0 s
0
= 2
T (s) =  2
 
2
s
+
2
0 s + 0
s
s
+1
+ 2
0
0
K

200000s
s2 + 20000s + 400000

The Bode diagram is shown below and validates that the transfer function meets the requirements.
20

15

Amplitude, (dB)

10

10
0
10

Solution Manual Chapter 14

10

10

10
Frequency, (rad/s)

10

10

Page 14-36

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1417. Construct a second-order transfer function that meets the following requirements. Use
MATLAB to plot the transfer functions Bode diagram and validate the requirements.
Type
Bandstop

0 (rad/s)
377

0.01

|T (j0 )|
0

Constraints
passband gain of 10

We have the following results:


0 = 377 rad/s
= 0.01
|T (j0 )| = 0
K = 10
K
T (s) = 
=

s
0

"

2

s
0

2

+ 2

+1
s
0

+1

s2

K[s2 + 02 ]
+ 20 s + 02

10[s2 + 3772 ]
s2 + 7.54s + 3772

The Bode diagram is shown below and validates that the transfer function meets the requirements.
20

15

Amplitude, (dB)

10

10
2
10

10
Frequency, (rad/s)

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-37

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1418. Design a second-order active filter that meets the following requirements. Simulate your
design in OrCAD to validate the requirements.
Type
Low-pass

0 (rad/s)
20000

0.5

Constraints
Use 10-k resistors

Use an equal-element design approach with R1 = R2 = R = 10 k. We have the following results.


R = 10 k
C=

1
= 5000 pF
0 R

= 3 2 = 2
RA = RB = 10 k
The OrCAD circuit and simulation are shown below.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-38

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1419. Design a second-order active filter that meets the following requirements. Simulate your
design in OrCAD to validate the requirements.
Type
Low-pass

0 (rad/s)
2500

0.8

Constraints
dc gain of 20 dB

With a dc gain of 20 dB, which is a factor of 10, we will use the unity gain approach along with an
amplifier with a gain of 10.
C1 = 0.01 F
C2 = 2 C1 = 0.0064 F
R=

= 50 k
0 C1 C 2

The OrCAD circuit and simulation are shown below.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-39

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1420. Design a second-order active filter that meets the following requirements. Simulate your
design in OrCAD to validate the requirements.
Type
Low-pass

0 (rad/s)
100000

0.25

Constraints
Use 0.2-F capacitors

With equal valued capacitors, we must use the equal element design approach.
C = 0.2 F
R=

1
= 50
0 C

= 3 2 = 2.5
RB = 10 k
RA = ( 1)RB = 15 k
The OrCAD circuit and simulation are shown below.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-40

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1421. Design a second-order active filter that meets the following requirements. Simulate your
design in OrCAD to validate the requirements.
Type
High-pass

0 (rad/s)
2500

0.75

Constraints
Use 0.2-F capacitors

With equal valued capacitors, we must use the equal element design approach.
C = 0.2 F
R=

1
= 2 k
0 C

= 3 2 = 1.5
RB = 10 k
RA = ( 1)RB = 5 k
The OrCAD circuit and simulation are shown below.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-41

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1422. Design a second-order active filter that meets the following requirements. Simulate your
design in OrCAD to validate the requirements.
Type
High-pass

0 (rad/s)
25000

0.25

Constraints
High-frequency gain of 40 dB

Since we have a gain specification, we will use the unity gain design approach and include an amplifier
to provide the gain of 40 dB, which is a factor of 100.
0 = 25000 rad/s
= 0.25
R2 = 100 k
R1 = 2 R2 = 6.25 k
C=

= 1600 pF
0 R 1 R 2

The OrCAD circuit and simulation are shown below.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-42

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1423. Design a second-order active filter that meets the following requirements. Simulate your
design in OrCAD to validate the requirements.
Type
Bandpass

0 (rad/s)
5000

Constraints
Center frequency gain of 20 dB

The center-frequency gain is 10. If we use the equal-capacitor method, we need to choose such that
1/(2 2 ) = 10, which means = 0.2236. Now use the equal-capacitor method to design the circuit.
0 = 5000 rad/s
= 0.2236
R2 = 100 k
R1 = 2 R2 = 5 k
C=

= 8944.3 pF
0 R 1 R 2

The OrCAD circuit and simulation are shown below.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-43

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1424. Design a second-order active filter that meets the following requirements. Simulate your
design in OrCAD to validate the requirements.
Type
Bandpass

0 (rad/s)
3974

Constraints
Bandwidth of 125.5 krad/s

With a bandwidth of 125.5 krad/s = 20 , we can calculate = 15.7901. Design the circuit using the
equal-capacitor method.
0 = 3974 rad/s
= 15.7901
R2 = 1 k
R1 = 2 R2 = 249.328 k
C=
|T (j0 )| =

= 0.0159363 F
0 R 1 R 2
1
1
=
2 2
498.66

K = 498.66
The additional gain K is required to return the overall gain to one. The OrCAD circuit and simulation are
shown below.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-44

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1425. Design a second-order active filter that meets the following requirements. Simulate your
design in OrCAD to validate the requirements.
Type
Tuned

0 (rad/s)
3.45 M

0.005

Constraints
Use 500-pF capacitors

Design the circuit using the equal-capacitor method.


0 = 3.45 Mrad/s
= 0.005
R1 = 2 R2
C

R1 R2 =

1
0

CR2 =

1
0

R2 =

1
= 115.942 k
C0

R1 = 2 R2 = 2.8986
|T (j0 )| =

R2
1
= 2 = 20000 = 86.02 dB
2R1
2

The OrCAD circuit and simulation are shown below.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-45

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1426. Design a second-order active filter that meets the following requirements. Simulate your
design in OrCAD to validate the requirements.

Type
Notch

0 (rad/s)
377

0.01

Constraints
Use 0.022-F capacitors

Design the circuit using the equal-capacitor method.


0 = 377 rad/s
= 0.01
R1 = 2 R2
C

R1 R2 =

1
0

CR2 =

1
0

R2 =

1
= 12.06 M
C0

R1 = 2 R2 = 1.206 k
2R1
RA
=
RB
R2
RA = 2R1 = 2.411 k
RB = R2 = 12.06 M
The OrCAD circuit and simulation are shown below.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-46

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Seventh Edition

Page 14-47

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1427. Design a second-order active filter that meets the following requirements. Simulate your
design in OrCAD to validate the requirements.

Type
Bandstop

0 (rad/s)
5000

Constraints
Use 0.2-F capacitors

Design the circuit using the equal-capacitor method.


0 = 5000 rad/s
=2
R1 = 2 R2
C

p
1
R1 R2 =
0
CR2 =
R2 =

1
0
1
= 500
C0

R1 = 2 R2 = 2 k
2R1
RA
=
RB
R2
RA = 2R1 = 4 k
RB = R2 = 500
The OrCAD circuit and simulation are shown below.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-48

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Seventh Edition

Page 14-49

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1428. Design a second-order active filter that meets the following requirements. Simulate your
design in OrCAD to validate the requirements.

Type
Notch

0 (rad/s)
754

0.05

Constraints
Passband gain of 20 dB

Design the circuit using the equal-capacitor method.

0 = 754 rad/s
= 0.05
C = 0.05 F
R1 = 2 R2
C

R1 R2 =

1
0

CR2 =

1
0

R2 =

1
= 530.5 k
C0

R1 = 2 R2 = 1.326 k
2R1
RA
=
RB
R2
RA = 2R1 = 2.653 k
RB = R2 = 530.5 k
Add a noninverting gain stage to reach the required gain of 10. The OrCAD circuit and simulation are
shown below.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-50

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Seventh Edition

Page 14-51

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1429. Construct the lowest-order transfer function that meets the following low-pass filter specifications. Calculate the gain (in dB) of the transfer function at = C and MIN . Use MATLAB to validate
that your transfer function meets the design specifications.

Pole Type
First-order Cascade

C (rad/s)
5000

TMAX
60 dB

MIN (rad/s)
50000

TMIN
20 dB

First, find the filter order. We have the following relationships for a low-pass, first-order cascade design:
C
=
1/n
2
1
|T (jMIN )| "r

|TMAX |
#

2 n
MIN
1+


2 n/2

TMAX
MIN
1+
TMIN

"
#n/2

2
TMAX
MIN
1/n
1+
(2
1)
TMIN
C

Find the smallest value of n that satisfies the last inequality. Using MATLAB to search for the value, we
find n = 8. We then have:

C
21/n 1

5000
21/8 1

= 16.62 krad/s

K = (TMAX )1/8 = (1000)1/8 = 2.3714




K
T (s) =
s+

n

(2.3714)(16620)
=
s + 16620

8

The transfer function has the following gains, which meet the specifications:

|T (jC )| = 56.99 dB
|T (jMIN )| = 20.17 dB
The following MATLAB plot validates the results.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-52

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

60

40

Amplitude, (dB)

20

20

40

60

80
3
10

Solution Manual Chapter 14

10
Frequency, (rad/s)

10

Page 14-53

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1430. Construct the lowest-order transfer function that meets the following low-pass filter specifications. Calculate the gain (in dB) of the transfer function at = C and MIN . Use MATLAB to validate
that your transfer function meets the design specifications.
Pole Type
Butterworth

C (rad/s)
10000

TMAX
0 dB

MIN (rad/s)
40000

TMIN
50 dB

Determine the filter order:


n

1 ln[100000 1]
1 ln[(TMAX /TMIN )2 1]
=
= 4.15
2
ln[MIN /C ]
2
ln[4]

n=5
The following steps complete the transfer function using the table of Butterworth polynomials to find qn (s):
K = 0 dB = 1
q5 (s) = (s + 1)(s2 + 0.6180s + 1)(s2 + 1.618s + 1)
T (s) =

K
q5 (s/10000)

= h
=

1
 

i   s 2
 s 
 s 
s 
s 2
+1
+1
+1
+ 0.6180
+ 1.618
10000
10000
10000
10000
10000

(s +

104 )(s2

1020
+ 6180s + 108 )(s2 + 16180s + 108 )

The transfer function has the following gains, which meet the specifications:
|T (jC )| = 3.01 dB
|T (jMIN )| = 60.2 dB
The following MATLAB plot validates the results.
20

Amplitude, (dB)

20

40

60

80

100
3
10

Solution Manual Chapter 14

10
Frequency, (rad/s)

10

Page 14-54

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1431. Construct the lowest-order transfer function that meets the following low-pass filter specifications. Calculate the gain (in dB) of the transfer function at = C and MIN . Use MATLAB to validate
that your transfer function meets the design specifications.
Pole Type
Chebychev

C (rad/s)
25000

TMAX
20 dB

MIN (rad/s)
250000

TMIN
80 dB

Determine the filter order:


cosh1
n

hp
i
(TMAX /TMIN )2 1

cosh1 [MIN /C ]

cosh1
=

hp

i
(105 )2 1

cosh1 [10]

= 4.0779

n=5
The following steps complete the transfer function using the table of Chebychev polynomials to find qn (s):
K = 20 dB = 10
q5 (s) = [(s/0.1772) + 1][(s/0.9674)2 + 0.1132(s/0.9674) + 1][(s/0.6139)2 + 0.4670(s/0.6139) + 1]
T (s) =

K
q5 (s/25000)

10
 

= h
i   s 2
 s 
 s 
s 2
s 
+1
+1
+1
+ 0.1132
+ 0.4670
4430
24185
24185
15348
15348
=

(s +

4430)(s2

(10)(4430)(24185)2 (15348)2
+ 2738s + 241852 )(s2 + 7167s + 153482 )

The transfer function has the following gains, which meet the specifications:
|T (jC )| = 16.99 dB
|T (jMIN )| = 103.97 dB
The following MATLAB plot validates the results.
50

Amplitude, (dB)

50

100

150

200
3
10

10

10

10

Frequency, (rad/s)

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-55

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1432. Construct the lowest-order transfer function that meets the following low-pass filter specifications. Calculate the gain (in dB) of the transfer function at = C and MIN . Use MATLAB to validate
that your transfer function meets the design specifications.
Pole Type
Butterworth

C (rad/s)
300000

TMAX
10 dB

MIN (rad/s)
600000

TMIN
10 dB

Determine the filter order:


n

1 ln[100 1]
1 ln[(TMAX /TMIN )2 1]
=
= 3.31
2
ln[MIN /C ]
2
ln[2]

n=4
The following steps complete the transfer function using the table of Butterworth polynomials to find qn (s):

K = 10 dB = 10
q4 (s) = (s2 + 0.7654s + 1)(s2 + 1.848s + 1)
T (s) =

K
q4 (s/300000)

10
 

+1

= 

 s
s 2
+ 0.7654
300000
300000

10(300000)4
+ 229620s + 3000002 )(s2 + 554400s + 3000002 )

(s2


 s 
s 2
+ 1.848
+1
300000
300000

The transfer function has the following gains, which meet the specifications:
|T (jC )| = 6.99 dB
|T (jMIN )| = 14.1 dB
The following MATLAB plot validates the results.
20

Amplitude, (dB)

20

40

60

80

100

120
4
10

10

10

10

Frequency, (rad/s)

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-56

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1433. Construct the lowest-order transfer function that meets the following low-pass filter specifications. Calculate the gain (in dB) of the transfer function at = C and MIN . Use MATLAB to validate
that your transfer function meets the design specifications.
Pole Type
Chebychev

C (rad/s)
2000000

TMAX
20 dB

MIN (rad/s)
4000000

TMIN
10 dB

Determine the filter order:


cosh1
n

hp

i
(TMAX /TMIN )2 1

cosh1 [MIN /C ]

cosh1
=

hp

(31.63)2 1

cosh1 [2]

= 3.15

n=4
The following steps complete the transfer function using the table of Chebychev polynomials to find qn (s):
K = 20 dB = 10
q4 (s) = [(s/0.9502)2 + 0.1789(s/0.9502) + 1][(s/0.4425)2 + 0.9276(s/0.4425) + 1]

K/ 2
T (s) =
q4 (s/2000000)
= 
=

7.071
 

2


 s 
s 2
s
s
+1
+1
+ 0.1789
+ 0.9276
1900400
1900400
885000
885000

(7.071)(1900400)2 (885000)2
(s2 + 340000s + 19004002 )(s2 + 820900s + 8850002 )

The transfer function has the following gains, which meet the specifications:
|T (jC )| = 16.99 dB
|T (jMIN )| = 19.74 dB
The following MATLAB plot validates the results.
30

20

10

Amplitude, (dB)

10

20

30

40

50

60
5
10

Solution Manual Chapter 14

10
Frequency, (rad/s)

10

Page 14-57

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1434. Design an active low-pass filter to meet the specification in Problem 1429. Use OrCAD
to verify that your design meets the specifications.
Each stage has a cutoff frequency of C = 16.62 krad/s and a gain of K = 2.3714. Use a first-order,
low-pass OP AMP design with gain. Pick C2 = 0.01 F and solve for R2 = 1/(C C2 ) = 6.017 k. Solve
for R1 = R2 /K = 2.537 k. Use eight identical stages in cascade. The OrCAD simulation and results are
shown below.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-58

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1435. Design an active low-pass filter to meet the specification in Problem 1430. Use OrCAD
to verify that your design meets the specifications.
The first stage is a first-order, low-pass OP AMP filter with a gain of one. Pick C = 0.01 F and solve
for R1 = R2 = 1/(0 C) = 10 k. Use a unity-gain design approach for the other two second-order stages.
For the second stage we have the following design choices and results:
=

0.618
= 0.309
2

C1 = 0.01 F
C2 = 2 C1 = 954.8 pF
R=

= 32.363 k
0 C 1 C 2

For the third stage we have the following design choices and results:
=

1.618
= 0.809
2

C1 = 0.01 F
C2 = 2 C1 = 6545 pF
R=

= 12.361 k
0 C 1 C 2

The OrCAD simulation and results are shown below.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-59

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1436. Design an active low-pass filter to meet the specification in Problem 1431. Use OrCAD
to verify that your design meets the specifications.
The first stage is a first-order, low-pass OP AMP filter with a cutoff frequency of 4430 rad/s and a gain
of 10. Pick C = 0.01 F and solve for R2 = 1/(0 C) = 22.573 k. Solve for R1 = R2 /K = 2.2573 k.
Use a unity-gain design approach for the other two second-order stages. For the second stage we have the
following design choices and results:
0.1132
=
= 0.0566
2
0 = 24185 rad/s
C1 = 0.01 F
C2 = 2 C1 = 32.0356 pF
R=

= 73.0529 k
0 C 1 C 2

For the third stage we have the following design choices and results:
0.4670
= 0.2335
=
2
C1 = 0.01 F
C2 = 2 C1 = 545.2225 pF
R=

= 27.9046 k
0 C 1 C 2

The OrCAD simulation and results are shown below.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-60

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1437. Design an active low-pass filter to meet the specification in Problem 1432. Use OrCAD
to verify that your design meets the specifications.
Use a noninverting amplifier with a gain of 3.1623 to provide all of the gain for the transfer function. Use
a unity-gain design approach for the two second-order stages. For the first filter stage we have the following
design choices and results:
=

0.7654
= 0.3827
2

0 = 300000 rad/s
C1 = 0.001 F
C2 = 2 C1 = 146.4593 pF
R=

= 8.71 k
0 C 1 C 2

For the second filter stage we have the following design choices and results:
=

1.848
= 0.924
2

C1 = 0.001 F
C2 = 2 C1 = 853.776 pF
R=

= 3.6075 k
0 C 1 C 2

The OrCAD simulation and results are shown below.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-61

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1438. Design an active low-pass filter to meet the specification in Problem 1433. Use OrCAD
to verify that your design meets the specifications.
Use a noninverting amplifier with a gain of 7.07 to provide all of the gain for the transfer function. Use
a unity-gain design approach for the two second-order stages. For the first filter stage we have the following
design choices and results:

0.1789
= 0.08945
2

0 = (0.9502)(2000000) = 1900400 rad/s


C1 = 0.001 F
C2 = 2 C1 = 8 pF
R=

= 5.8827 k
0 C1 C 2

For the second filter stage we have the following design choices and results:

0.9276
= 0.4638
2

0 = (0.4425)(2000000) = 885000 rad/s


C1 = 0.001 F
C2 = 2 C1 = 215 pF
R=

= 2.4363 k
0 C1 C 2

The OrCAD simulation and results are shown below.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-62

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Seventh Edition

Page 14-63

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1439. A low-pass filter is needed to suppress the harmonics in a periodic waveform with f0 =
1 kHz. The filter must have unity passband gain, less than 50 dB gain at the third harmonic, and less than
80 dB gain at the fifth harmonic. Since power is at a premium, choose a filter approach that minimizes
the number of OP AMPs. Design a filter that meets these requirements. Verify your design using OrCAD.
The filter requires 0 = 2000 = 6283 rad/s and K = 1 = 0 dB. At 30 the gain must be 50 dB and
at 50 the gain must be 80 dB. Determine the filter order required for each design specification using both
Butterworth and Chebychev designs. With a Butterworth design, both gain specifications require sixth-order
filters. With a Chebychv design, the 50 dB critierion requires a fourth-order filter and the 80 dB critierion
requires a fifth-order filter. To reduce the total number of OP AMPs, use a fifth-order Chebychev design,
with the first-order portion of the filter using a passive RC design. The transfer function is:
q5 (s) = [(s/0.1772) + 1][(s/0.9674)2 + 0.1132(s/0.9674) + 1][(s/0.6139)2 + 0.4670(s/0.6139) + 1]
T (s) =

K
q5 (s/0 )

1
 

= h
i   s 2
 s 
 s 
s 
s 2
+1
+1
+1
+ 0.1132
+ 0.4670
1113
6078
6078
3857
3857
=

(1)(1113)(6078)2 (3857)2
(s + 1113)(s2 + 688s + 60782 )(s2 + 1801s + 38572 )

For the first-order RC stage, we have the following design choices and results:
0 = 1113 rad/s
C = 0.1 F
R=

1
= 8.982 k
C0

For the second filter stage we have the following design choices and results:
=

0.1132
= 0.0566
2

0 = (0.9674)(6283) = 6078 rad/s


C1 = 0.1 F
C2 = 2 C1 = 320 pF
R=

= 29.0667 k
0 C 1 C 2

For the third filter stage we have the following design choices and results:
=

0.4670
= 0.2335
2

0 = (0.6139)(6283) = 3857 rad/s


C1 = 0.1 F
C2 = 2 C1 = 5452 pF
R=

Solution Manual Chapter 14

= 11.1029 k
0 C 1 C 2

Page 14-64

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

The OrCAD simulation and results are shown below.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-65

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1440. Design a low-pass filter with 6 dB passband gain, a cutoff frequency of 2 kHz, and a
stopband gain of less than 14 dB at 6 kHz. The filter must not have an overshoot. Verify your design using
OrCAD.
To guarantee that there is no overshoot, use a first-order cascade design. We have the following relationships for a low-pass, first-order cascade design:

C
=
1/n
2
1
|T (jMIN )| "r

|TMAX |
#

2 n
MIN
1+


2 n/2

TMAX
MIN
1+
TMIN

"
#n/2

2
TMAX
MIN
1/n
1+
(2
1)
TMIN
C

Find the smallest value of n that satisfies the last inequality. Using MATLAB to search for the value, we
find n = 7. We then have:

C
21/n

4000
21/7 1

= 38.95 krad/s

K = (TMAX )1/7 = (1.9953)1/7 = 1.1037




K
T (s) =
s+

n

(1.1037)(38950)
=
s + 38950

7

Use a first-order RC OP AMP filter with gain for each of the seven identical stages. Pick the capacitor value
and solve for the resistor values.

C2 = 0.01 F
R2 =

1
= 2.567 k
C2

R1 =

R2
= 2.326 k
K

The following OrCAD simulation and output validate the results.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-66

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Seventh Edition

Page 14-67

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1441. Design a low-pass filter with 0 dB passband gain, a cutoff frequency of 1 kHz, and a
stopband gain of less than 50 dB at 4 kHz. The filter must not have an overshoot greater than 13%. Verify
your design using OrCAD.
A Butterworth design will maintain an overshoot of less than 13%. Solve for the filter order.
n

1 ln[100000 1]
1 ln[(TMAX /TMIN )2 1]
=
= 4.15
2
ln[MIN /C ]
2
ln[4]

n=5
The following steps complete the transfer function using the table of Butterworth polynomials to find qn (s):
K = 0 dB = 1
q5 (s) = (s + 1)(s2 + 0.6180s + 1)(s2 + 1.618s + 1)
T (s) =

K
q5 (s/6283)

1
 


= h

i


 s 
2
s
s 2
s
s 
+1
+1
+1
+ 0.6180
+ 1.618
6283
6283
6283
6283
6283
=

62835
(s + 6283)(s2 + 3883s + 62832 )(s2 + 10166s + 62832 )

The first stage is an active, first-order RC low-pass filter with a gain of one. The other two stages are
second-order, active low-pass filters using the unity-gain design approach. For the first stage we have:
C2 = 0.1 F
R2 =

1
= 1.592 k
0 C

R1 = R2 = 1.592 k
For the second stage we have:
=

0.618
= 0.309
2

C1 = 0.1 F
C2 = 2 C1 = 9548 pF
R=

= 5.151 k
0 C 1 C 2

1.618
= 0.809
2

For the third stage we have:

C1 = 0.1 F
C2 = 2 C1 = 0.06545 F
R=

= 1.967 k
0 C 1 C 2

The following OrCAD simulation and output plots validate the results.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

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The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Seventh Edition

Page 14-69

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1442. Design a low-pass filter with 10 dB passband gain, a cutoff frequency of 1 kHz, and a
stopband gain of less than 20 dB at 2 kHz. Overshoot is not a problem, but a low filter order, least number
of parts, and a maximum of two OP AMPs is desired. Verify your design using OrCAD.
To minimize the number of parts and use only two OP AMPs, explore a Chebychev design approach.
Determine the filter order:
hp
hp
i
i
cosh1
cosh1
(TMAX /TMIN )2 1
(31.63)2 1
n
=
= 3.15
cosh1 [MIN /C ]
cosh1 [2]
n=4
The following steps complete the transfer function using the table of Chebychev polynomials to find qn (s):
K = 10 dB = 3.162
q4 (s) = [(s/0.9502)2 + 0.1789(s/0.9502) + 1][(s/0.4425)2 + 0.9276(s/0.4425) + 1]

K/ 2
T (s) =
q4 (s/6283)
2.236
 

= 
 s 
 s 
s 2
s 2
+1
+1
+ 0.1789
+ 0.9276
5970
5970
2780
2780
=

(2.236)(5970)2 (2780)2
(s2 + 1068s + 59702 )(s2 + 2579s + 27802 )

The two filter stages are second-order, active low-pass filters using the unity-gain design approach. For the
first stage we have:
=

0.1789
= 0.08945
2

0 = 5970 rad/s
C1 = 0.1 F
C2 = 2 C1 = 800 pF
R=

= 18.725 k
0 C 1 C 2

For the second stage we have:


=

0.9276
= 0.4638
2

0 = 2780 rad/s
C1 = 0.1 F
C2 = 2 C1 = 0.0215 F
R=

= 7.755 k
0 C 1 C 2

Include a noninverting amplifier as the third stage to add the required gain of 2.236. The following OrCAD
simulation and output plot validate the results.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

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The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Seventh Edition

Page 14-71

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1443. A pesky signal at 100 kHz is interfering with a desired signal at 20 kHz. A careful analysis
suggests that reducing the interfering signal by 72 dB will eliminate the problem, provided the desired signal
is not reduced by more than 3 dB. Design an active RC filter that meets these requirements. Verify your
design using OrCAD.
Design the filter with a passband gain of 20 dB, a cutoff frequency of 0 = 40 krad/s, TMIN = 52 dB,
and MIN = 200 krad/s. The required filter order is either a sixth-order Butterworth design or a fourthorder Chebychev design. Since the desired signal can tolerate a 3-dB variation, use the Chebychev approach,
since it will require fewer OP AMPs.
K = 20 dB = 10
q4 (s) = [(s/0.9502)2 + 0.1789(s/0.9502) + 1][(s/0.4425)2 + 0.9276(s/0.4425) + 1]

K/ 2
T (s) =
q4 (s/125664)
= 

7.071
 

 s 
 s 
s 2
s 2
+1
+1
+ 0.1789
+ 0.9276
119406
119406
55606
55606

(7.071)(119406)2 (55606)2
+ 21362s + 1194062 )(s2 + 51580s + 556062 )

(s2

The two filter stages are second-order, active low-pass filters using the unity-gain design approach. For the
first stage we have:
=

0.1789
= 0.08945
2

0 = 119406 rad/s
C1 = 0.01 F
C2 = 2 C1 = 80 pF
R=

= 9.363 k
0 C 1 C 2

0.9276
= 0.4638
2

For the second stage we have:

0 = 55606 rad/s
C1 = 0.01 F
C2 = 2 C1 = 0.00215 F
R=

= 3.877 k
0 C 1 C 2

Include a noninverting amplifier as the third stage to add the required gain of 7.071. The following OrCAD
simulation and output plot validate the results.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

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The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Seventh Edition

Page 14-73

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1444. A strong signal at 2.45 MHz is interfering with an AM signal at 980 kHz. Design a filter
that will attenuate the undesired signal by at least 60 dB. Verify your design using OrCAD.
Design the filter with a passband gain of 0 dB, a cutoff frequency of 0 = 2 Mrad/s, TMIN = 60 dB, and
MIN = 4.9 Mrad/s. The required filter order is either an eighth-order Butterworth design or a fifth-order
Chebychev design. Use the Chebychev approach, since it will require fewer OP AMPs.
q5 (s) = [(s/0.1772) + 1][(s/0.9674)2 + 0.1132(s/0.9674) + 1][(s/0.6139)2 + 0.4670(s/0.6139) + 1]
T (s) =

K
q5 (s/0 )

= h
=

1
 


i 
2

2



s
s
s
s
s
+1
+1
+1
+ 0.1132
+ 0.4670
1113000
6078000
6078000
3857000
3857000

(1)(1113000)(6078000)2 (3857000)2
(s + 1113000)(s2 + 688000s + 60780002 )(s2 + 1801000s + 38570002 )

For the first-order RC stage, we have the following design choices and results:
0 = 1113 krad/s
C2 = 100 pF
R2 =

1
= 8.982 k
C0

R1 = R2 = 8.982 k
For the second filter stage we have the following design choices and results:
=

0.1132
= 0.0566
2

0 = (0.9674)(6283) = 6078 krad/s


C1 = 0.001 F
C2 = 2 C1 = 3.204 pF
R=

= 2.907 k
0 C 1 C 2

For the third filter stage we have the following design choices and results:
=

0.4670
= 0.2335
2

0 = (0.6139)(6283) = 3857 krad/s


C1 = 100 pF
C2 = 2 C1 = 5.452 pF
R=

= 11.1029 k
0 C 1 C 2

The OrCAD simulation and results are shown below.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

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The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Seventh Edition

Page 14-75

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1445. A 10 kHz square wave must be bandwidth-limited by attenuating all harmonics after
the third. Design a low-pass filter that attenuates the fifth harmonic and greater by at least 20 dB. The
fundamental and third harmonic should not be reduced by more than 3 dB and the overshoot cannot exceed
13%.
The third harmonic occurs at 0 = 60 krad/s and the fifth harmonic occurs at 100 krad/s. Let the
gain be 0 dB in the passband and no more than 20 dB by the fifth harmonic. Since the overshoot is limited
to 13%, we can use a Butterworth design.
n

1 ln[(TMAX /TMIN )2 1]
1 ln[100 1]
=
= 4.498
2
ln[MIN /C ]
2 ln[10/6]

n=5
The Butterworth polynomial is:
q5 (s) = (s + 1)(s2 + 0.6180s + 1)(s2 + 1.618s + 1)
The first stage is an active, first-order RC low-pass filter with a gain of one. The other two stages are
second-order, active low-pass filters using the unity-gain design approach. For the first stage we have:
0 = 188.496 krad/s
C2 = 0.001 F
R2 =

1
= 5.305 k
0 C

R1 = R2 = 5.305 k
For the second stage we have:
=

0.618
= 0.309
2

C1 = 0.001 F
C2 = 2 C1 = 95.48 pF
R=

= 17.169 k
0 C 1 C 2

For the third stage we have:


=

1.618
= 0.809
2

C1 = 0.001 F
C2 = 2 C1 = 654.5 pF
R=

= 6.558 k
0 C 1 C 2

The following OrCAD simulation and output plots validate the results.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

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The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Seventh Edition

Page 14-77

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1446. Construct the lowest-order transfer function that meets the following high-pass filter
specifications. Calculate the gain (in dB) of the transfer function at = C and MIN . Use MATLAB to
validate that your transfer function meets the design specifications.
Pole Type
First-order cascade

C (rad/s)
10000

TMAX
40 dB

MIN (rad/s)
1000

TMIN
0 dB

Determine the filter order.


= C

21/n 1

"
#n/2

2
TMAX
C
1/n
1+
(2
1)
TMIN
MIN

Find the smallest value of n that satisfies the last inequality. In this case, the minimum value is n = 3. We
have
p
= C 21/3 1 = 5.098 krad/s
K = (TMAX )1/3 = (100)1/3 = 4.6416

3

4.6416
4.6416s
=
5098
=
s + 5098
+1
+1
s
s

T (s) =

The transfer function has the following gains, which meet the specifications:
|T (jC )| = 36.99 dB
|T (jMIN )| = 2.94 dB
The following MATLAB plot validates the results.
40

35

30

Amplitude, (dB)

25

20

15

10

5
3
10

Solution Manual Chapter 14

10
Frequency, (rad/s)

10

Page 14-78

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1447. Construct the lowest-order transfer function that meets the following high-pass filter
specifications. Calculate the gain (in dB) of the transfer function at = C and MIN . Use MATLAB to
validate that your transfer function meets the design specifications.
Pole Type
Butterworth

C (rad/s)
10000

TMAX
20 dB

MIN (rad/s)
1000

TMIN
30 dB

Determine the filter order and transfer function.


n

1 ln[(10/0.03162)2 1]
1 ln[(TMAX /TMIN )2 1]
=
= 2.5
2
ln[C /MIN ]
2
ln[10]

n=3
q3 (s) = (s + 1)(s2 + s + 1)
T (s) =

K
 
C
q3
s

=

10
10s3
#=
2 

 "
2
[s + 10000][s + 10000s + 108 ]
10000
10000
10000
+1
+1
+
s
s
s

The transfer function has the following gains, which meet the specifications:
|T (jC )| = 16.99 dB
|T (jMIN )| = 40 dB
The following MATLAB plot validates the results.
20

10

Amplitude, (dB)

10

20

30

40

50
3
10

Solution Manual Chapter 14

10
Frequency, (rad/s)

10

Page 14-79

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1448. Construct the lowest-order transfer function that meets the following high-pass filter
specifications. Calculate the gain (in dB) of the transfer function at = C and MIN . Use MATLAB to
validate that your transfer function meets the design specifications.
Pole Type
Chebychev

C (rad/s)
10000

TMAX
0 dB

MIN (rad/s)
5000

TMIN
40 dB

Determine the filter order and then construct the transfer function.
hp
hp
i
i
cosh1
cosh1
(TMAX /TMIN )2 1
(1/0.01)2 1
n
=
= 4.023
cosh1 [C /MIN ]
cosh1 [2]
n=5
K = 0 dB = 1
q5 (s) = [(s/0.1772) + 1][(s/0.9674)2 + 0.1132(s/0.9674) + 1][(s/0.6139)2 + 0.4670(s/0.6139) + 1]
T (s) =

K
 
C
q5
s

= 
=

56443
s

(s +

1
# "
#
 "
2

2



16289
10337
10337
16289
+1
+1
+1
+ 0.1132
+ 0.4670
s
s
s
s

56443)(s2

s5
+ 1170s + 103372 )(s2 + 7607s + 162892 )

The transfer function has the following gains, which meet the specifications:
|T (jC )| = 3.01 dB
|T (jMIN )| = 51.17 dB
The following MATLAB plot validates the results.
20

20

Amplitude, (dB)

40

60

80

100

120

140
3
10

10

10

10

Frequency, (rad/s)

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-80

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1449. Construct the lowest-order transfer function that meets the following high-pass filter
specifications. Calculate the gain (in dB) of the transfer function at = C and MIN . Use MATLAB to
validate that your transfer function meets the design specifications.
Pole Type
You Decide

C (rad/s)
10000

TMAX
10 dB

MIN (rad/s)
2000

TMIN
50 dB

Choose a Butterworth filter to simplify the design calculations. Determine the filter order and then
construct the transfer function.
1 ln[1000000 1]
1 ln[(TMAX /TMIN )2 1]
=
= 4.292
2
ln[C /MIN ]
2
ln[5]

n=5
The following steps complete the transfer function using the table of Butterworth polynomials to find qn (s):
K = 10 dB = 3.1623
q5 (s) = (s + 1)(s2 + 0.6180s + 1)(s2 + 1.618s + 1)
T (s) =

K
 
C
q5
s

= 
=

10000
s

(s +

3.1623
# "
#
 "
2

2



10000
10000
10000
10000
+1
+1
+1
+ 0.6180
+ 1.618
s
s
s
s

10000)(s2

3.1623s5
+ 6180s + 108 )(s2 + 16180s + 108 )

The transfer function has the following gains, which meet the specifications:
|T (jC )| = 6.99 dB
|T (jMIN )| = 59.90 dB
The following MATLAB plot validates the results.
20

Amplitude, (dB)

20

40

60

80

100
3
10

Solution Manual Chapter 14

10
Frequency, (rad/s)

10

Page 14-81

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1450. Design an active high-pass filter to meet the specification in Problem 1446. Use OrCAD
to verify that your design meets the specifications.
Each stage has a cutoff frequency of C = 5.098 krad/s and a gain of K = 4.6416. Use a first-order,
high-pass OP AMP design with gain. Pick C1 = 0.1 F and solve for R1 = 1/(C C1 ) = 1.961 k. Solve for
R2 = KR1 = 9.104 k. Use three identical stages in cascade. The OrCAD simulation and results are shown
below.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-82

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1451. Design an active high-pass filter to meet the specification in Problem 1447. Use OrCAD
to verify that your design meets the specifications.
Use two high-pass filter stages. The first is a first-order filter with a gain of 10. The second is a secondorder filter with unity gain. For the first-order filter, we have:
C1 = 0.1 F
R1 =

1
= 1 k
0 C1

R2 = 10R1 = 10 k
For the second-order filter, we have:
0 = 10000 rad/s
= 0.5
R2 = 10 k
R1 = 2 R2 = 2.5 k
C=

= 0.02 F
0 R 1 R 2

The OrCAD simulation and results are shown below.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-83

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1452. Design an active high-pass filter to meet the specification in Problem 1448. Use OrCAD
to verify that your design meets the specifications.
Use three high-pass filter stages, all with unity gain. The first stage is a first-order filter and the other
two stages are second-order filters. For the first-order stage, we have the following design choices and results:
0 = 56443 rad/s
C1 = 0.01 F
R1 =

1
= 1.772 k
0 C 1

R2 = R1 = 1.772 k
For the second filter stage we have the following design choices and results:
=
0 =

0.1132
= 0.0566
2
10000
= 10.337 krad/s
0.9674

R2 = 1 M
R1 = 2 R2 = 3.204 k
C=

1
= 1709 pF
R1 R2

For the third filter stage we have the following design choices and results:
=
0 =

0.4670
= 0.2335
2
10000
= 16.289 krad/s
0.6139

R2 = 1 M
R1 = 2 R2 = 54.522 k
C=

= 262.9 pF
0 R 1 R 2

The OrCAD simulation and results are shown below.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-84

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Seventh Edition

Page 14-85

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1453. Design an active high-pass filter to meet the specification in Problem 1449. Use OrCAD
to verify that your design meets the specifications.
Use three high-pass filter stages. The first is a first-order filter with a gain of 3.1623. The other two
filters are second-order filters with unity gain. For the first-order filter, we have:
C1 = 0.1 F
R1 =

1
= 1 k
0 C 1

R2 = 3.1623R1 = 3.1623 k
For the second stage, we have:
0 = 10000 rad/s
=

0.6180
= 0.309
2

R2 = 10 k
R1 = 2 R2 = 954.81
C=

= 0.03236 F
0 R 1 R 2

For the third stage, we have:


0 = 10000 rad/s
=

1.6180
= 0.809
2

R2 = 10 k
R1 = 2 R2 = 6.545 k
C=

1
= 0.01236 F
R1 R2

The OrCAD simulation and results are shown below.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-86

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Seventh Edition

Page 14-87

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1454. A certain instrumentation system for a new hybrid car needs a bandpass filter to limit
its output bandwidth prior to digitization. The filter must meet the following specifications:
TMAX = +20 1 dB
TMIN 20 dB
CH = 5.5 krad/s = 875.4 Hz 10%
CHMIN = 55 krad/s = 8.754 kHz
CL = 5 krad/s = 795.8 Hz 10%
CLMIN = 500 rad/s = 79.6 Hz

Two vendors have submitted proposed solutions in the form of OrCAD graphics, shown in Figure P1454. As
the requirements engineer on the project, you need to select the best one. You must check whether each circuit
meets or fails every specification. You should also consider (1) parts count, (2) ease of maintainability and
implementation (fewer parts, number of similar parts, adjustments of potentiometers, standard values), (3)
frequency-domain response, and (4) cost. You should address each item for each design at least qualitatively.
Attach whatever software output you think will support your decision.
Simulate both circuits in OrCAD to determine how well they meet the specifications.

The amplitude responses for both circuits are plotted on the same axes, with Vendor #1 in blue and Vendor
#2 in green.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-88

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Use the OrCAD cursor to help determine the performance of each circuit. The results are summarized in
the table below.
Item

Specification

Vendor #1

Vendor #2

20 dB

20.29 dB

20.90 dB

CL

795.8 Hz

793.9 Hz

723.7 Hz

CH

875.4 Hz

877.3 Hz

964.1 Hz

|T (CLMIN )|

20 dB

20.04 dB

42.4 dB

|T (CHMIN )|

20 dB

20.04 dB

42.4 dB

Meets specs,

Meets specs

Peaked passband

Flat passband

|TMAX |

Specifications
Passband
Parts Count

Minimum

10

Similar Parts

Maximum

1 pair

3 pairs

Potentiometers

Minimum

Standard Values

Maximum

Cost

Minimum

$75

$60

Strictly speaking, the response for Vendor #2 does not meet the specification for CH by 1.16 Hz. The
response is extremely close to meeting the specification and we would have to analyze actual circuits to
determine their performance. From an overall perspective, the circuit from Vendor #1 clearly meets all of
the specifications, requires fewer parts, has more similar parts, no potentiometers, and more standard parts.
Even though the circuit from Vendor #1 is more expensive, it is probably the best option.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-89

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1455. You are working at an aircraft manufacturing plant on an altitude sensor that eventually
will be used to retrofit dozens of similar sensors on an upgrade to a current airframe. You are required to
find a quality notch filter to eliminate an undesirable interference at 400 Hz. You find a vendor and ask for
a suitable product specification and a bid. The specifications you require are:
1. Must block signals at 400 2% Hz
2. Pass-band gain should be 0 dB 1 dB
3. Bandwidth should be 20 Hz 5 % Hz

The vendors proposal, shown as an OrCAD drawing in Figure P1455, claims to meet all of the design
requirements. Determine if it passes all of the stated requirements. Then explain if you would buy the filter
and why or why not?
Simulate the following circuit in OrCAD and analyze its performance against the specifications. Note
that the desired center frequency for the filter is 0 = 2f0 = 800 = 2513 rad/s.

Using the cursor tools to explore the response, the filter has a notch located at 397.9 Hz with a gain of
48.7 dB. The passband gain is 0 dB. The cutoff frequencies occur at 388.0 Hz and 408.0 Hz, so the
bandwidth is 20 Hz. From the simulation, the filter meets all of the specifications. It appears that the filter
is an acceptable choice, based on the simulation. One concern with the filter is the 625- resistor at the
input. Depending on the nature of the sensor with which the filter will interface, there may be loading issues
at the input. We would either have to isolate the filter with a buffer or examine the sensor in more detail to
make sure it would not impact the performance of the filter.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-90

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1456. An amplified portion of the radio spectrum is shown in Figure P1456. You need to hear
all of the signals from 1.0 MHz to 2.2 MHz, but there is an interfering signal at 1.8 MHz. Design a notch
filter to reduce that signal by at least 50 dB and not reduce the desired signal at 1.7 MHz by more than 6
dB. Use OrCAD to validate your design.
Use a second-order bandstop filter with a center frequency of 1.8 MHz and a bandwidth of 0.3 MHz. Use
the equal-capacitor design approach with C = 2 pF. We have the following design results.

0 = 3.6 Mrad/s
B = 0.6 Mrad/s = 20
=

0.3
B
=
= 0.08333
20
3.6

C = 2 pF
R1 = 2 R2
C

R1 R2 = CR2 =
R2 =

1
0

1
= 530.5 k
C0

R1 = 3.684 k
RA = 2R1 = 7.368 k
RB = R2 = 530.5 k

The OrCAD simulation and amplitude response are shown below.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-91

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Using the cursor tools to explore the response, the filter has a center frequency of 1.8 MHz and cutoff
frequencies of 1.652 MHz and 1.961 MHz, which yield a bandwidth of 0.3 MHz. The gain at the center
frequency is 50.3 dB, the gain at 1.7 MHz is 5.05 dB, and the gain at 1.9 MHz is 5.42 MHz. The design
meets all of the specifications.

Solution Manual Chapter 14

Page 14-92

The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits

Seventh Edition

Problem 1457. A amplified portion of the radio spectrum is shown in Figure P1456. You want to select
the signal at 1.22 MHz but it is barely above the background noise. Design a tuned filter that has a Q of at
least 50 and amplifies the signal by 20 dB. Use OrCAD to validate your design.
Use a second-order bandpass filter with a center frequency of 1.22 MHz. Choose a passband gain of 20 dB
and Q = 50. Using the equal-capacitor method, we have the following design results:

0 = 2(1.22 MHz) = 2.44 Mrad/s


Q = 50 =
=

0
1
0
=
=
B
20
2

1
= 0.01
2Q

C = 1 pF
R1 = 2 R2
C

R1 R2 = CR2 =
R2 =

1
0

1
= 13.045 M
C0

R1 = 1.3045 k

The center frequency gain is |T (j0 )| = 1/(2 2 ) = 5000, so we need a voltage divider with a gain of 1/500
to bring the overall gain down to 10 or 20 dB. The OrCAD simulation and amplitude response are shown
below.

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Using the cursor tools to explore the response, the filter has a center frequency of 1.2201 MHz and cutoff
frequencies of 1.2077 MHz and 1.2325 MHz, which yield a bandwidth of 0.0248 MHz and Q = 49.27. The
gain at the center frequency is 19.82 dB. The design value for Q is just below the required value of 50. We
would have to build the actual circuit and make measurements to verify it meets specifications.

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Problem 1458. The portion of the radio spectrum shown in Figure P1456 is the result you want after
you design a suitable filter and amplifier. The passband gain desired is 100 dB and the shoulders of your
filter should have a roll-off of 120 dB per decade. Design a wide-band filter and amplifier that is flat in
the passband and has a bandwidth of 1 MHz with a lower cutoff frequency of 1 MHz that meets all of these
criteria. Use OrCAD to validate your design.
A roll-off of 120 dB per decade requires sixth-order filters for both sides of the bandpass filter. The
requirement for a flat passband indicates that a Butterworth filter design is appropriate. Cascade two, sixthorder Butterworth filters together, with one being a low-pass filter and the other a high-pass filter. Use a
unity-gain design approach for the filters. Add gain stages at the end to achieve a passband gain of 100 dB.
For both filters, the Butterworth polynomial is:
q6 (s) = (s2 + 0.5176s + 1)(s2 + 1.414s + 1)(s2 + 1.932s + 1)
For the low-pass filter, the cutoff frequency will be 2 MHz or 4 Mrad/s and the design equations are:
=1
R1 = R2 = R
R

p
1
C1 C2 =
0

C2 = 2 C1
C1 =

1
R0

For the high-pass filter, the cutoff frequency will be 1 MHz or 2 Mrad/s and the design equations are:
=1
C1 = C2 = C
C

R1 R2 =

1
0

R1 = 2 R2
R2 =

1
C0

The following MATLAB code performs the calculations for all filter stages.
wL = 2*pi*1e6;
wH = 2*pi*2e6;
syms s
z1 = 0.5176/2;
z2 = 1.414/2;
z3 = 1.932/2;
q6s = (s2+0.5176*s+1)*(s2+1.414*s+1)*(s2+1.932*s+1);
disp('Low-pass filter design')
w0 = wH;
disp('First stage')
z = z1;
R = 10e3
C1 = 1/R/z/w0
C2 = z2*C1

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disp('Second stage')
z = z2;
R = 10e3
C1 = 1/R/z/w0
C2 = z2*C1
disp('Third stage')
z = z3;
R = 10e3
C1 = 1/R/z/w0
C2 = z2*C1
disp('High-pass filter design')
w0 = wL;
disp('First stage')
z = z1;
C = 10e-12
R2 = 1/z/C/w0
R1 = z2*R2
disp('Second stage')
z = z2;
C = 10e-12
R2 = 1/z/C/w0
R1 = z2*R2
disp('Third stage')
z = z3;
C = 10e-12
R2 = 1/z/C/w0
R1 = z2*R2

The results for the low-pass filter are

Component

Stage 1

Stage 2

Stage 3

R (k)

10

10

10

C1 (pF)

30.749

11.256

8.238

C2 (pF)

2.060

5.626

7.687

Stage 1

Stage 2

Stage 3

C (pF)

10

10

10

R1 (k)

4.119

11.252

15.374

R2 (k)

61.497

22.511

16.476

The results for the high-pass filter are

Component

The OrCAD simulation and amplitude response are shown below.

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Seventh Edition

The circuit meets the design specifications.

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Seventh Edition

Problem 1459. (E) Design Evaluation


A need exists for a third-order Butterworth low-pass filter with a cutoff frequency of 2 krad/s and a dc
gain of 0 dB. The design department has proposed the circuit in Figure P1459. As a junior engineer in the
manufacturing department, you have been asked to verify the design and suggest modifications that would
simplify production.
Verify the design by simulating the circuit in OrCAD.

The amplitude response is shown below.

The circuit meets the specifications. Since the output stage is a unity-gain low-pass filter, it can be simplified
by replacing it with an RC circuit with the correct cutoff frequency. The design is shown below.

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The new amplitude response is shown below.

The amplitude response matches that of the original circuit, but the new circuit has fewer parts and a simpler
design.

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Seventh Edition

Problem 1460. (D) Modifying an Existing Circuit


One of your companys products includes the passive RLC filter and OP AMP buffer circuit in Figure
P1460. The supplier of the inductor is no longer in business and a suitable replacement is not available, even
on eBay or Craigs List. You have been asked to design a suitable inductorless replacement. To minimize
production changes, your design must use the existing OP AMP as is and either the 1-k resistor or the
0.1-F capacitor or both, if possible.
Determine the transfer function for the circuit.
1
108
LC
=
= 2
T (s) =
1
R
1
s + 104 s + 108
R + Ls +
s2 + s +
Cs
L
LC
1
Cs

The filter is a second-order, low-pass filter with the following characteristics:


=1
0 = 10000 rad/s
20 = 10000 rad/s
= 0.5
Design a replacement low-pass filter using just resistors and capacitors using the unity-gain approach.
C1 = 0.1 F
C2 = 2 C1 = 0.025 F
R = R1 = R2 =

= 2 k
0 C 1 C 2

The new circuit is shown below.

The alternate design uses the OP AMP, the capacitor, and four of the 1-k resistors to make the two 2-k
resistors in the new filter.

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Seventh Edition

Problem 1461. (A) What is a High-Pass Filter


Ten years after earning a BSEE, you return for a masters degree and sign on as the laboratory instructor
for the basic circuit analysis course. One experiment asks the students to build the active filter in Figure
P1461 and measure its gain response over the range from 150 Hz to 15 kHz. The lab instructions say the
circuit is a high-pass filter with 0 = 10 krad/s and an infinite frequency gain of 0 dB. Everything goes well
until a student, intrigued by the concept of infinite frequency, inputs 1 MHz and measures a gain of only 0.7.
The student then inputs 2 MHz and measures a gain of 0.45. The high-pass filter appears to be a bandpass
filter! Motivated by an insatiable thirst for understanding, the student asks you for an explanation. You first
check the students circuit and find it to be correct. You next replace the OP AMP and get almost the same
results. Desperate for an explanation (your credibility is on the line here), you read the course textbook (it
is Thomas, Rosa, and Toussaint), and find the answer in Chapter 12 (Example 125). What do you tell the
student?
Real OP AMPs have a finite gain-bandwidth product, typically on the order of 1 MHz. The gainbandwidth limitation does not affect the high-pass filter gain for test frequencies in the range from 150 Hz
to 15 kHz. At 1 MHz, the OP AMP begins to run out of bandwidth and its closed-loop gain decreases. The
effect is even more noticeable at 2 MHz. In other words, the OP AMP eventually runs out of bandwidth, so
active high-pass filters do not really work at infinite frequency. To design an active high-pass filter, you must
choose an OP AMP with sufficient bandwidth to cover the frequency range of interest (150 Hz to 15 kHz in
this lab), which must be a finite range.

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Problem 1462. (A) Bandpass to Bandstop Transformation


The three-terminal circuit in Figure P1462(a) has a bandpass transfer function of the form
T (s) =

VO (s)
2(s/0 )
=
2
VS (s)
(s/0 ) + 2(s/0 ) + 1

Show that the circuit in Figure P1462(b) has a bandstop transfer function of the form
T (s) =

(s/0 )2 + 1)
VO (s)
=
VS (s)
(s/0 )2 + 2(s/0 ) + 1

That is, show that interchanging the input and ground terminals changes a unity-gain bandpass circuit into
a unity-gain bandstop circuit.
The original input to the circuit is V1 (s) = VS (s) 0, and the original output is V2 (s) = VO (s) 0. With
the interchange of the input source and the ground, the new input signal is V1 (s) = 0 VS (s), and the new
output is V2 (s) = VO (s) VS (s). Apply the original transfer function to the new input signal to generate a
new output signal V2 (s). Add VS (s) to the new output to determine VO (s). Divide the result by VS (s) to
determine the new transfer function. The steps are presented below.
T (s) =

2(s/0 )
(s/0 )2 + 2(s/0 ) + 1

V1 (s) = VS (s)
V2 (s) = T (s)V1 (s) =

2(s/0 )VS (s)


(s/0 )2 + 2(s/0 ) + 1

VO (s) = V2 (s) + VS (s)


=

[(s/0 )2 + 2(s/0 ) + 1]VS (s)


2(s/0 )VS (s)
+
2
(s/0 ) + 2(s/0 ) + 1
(s/0 )2 + 2(s/0 ) + 1

[(s/0 )2 + 1]VS (s)


(s/0 )2 + 2(s/0 ) + 1

TNew (s) =

VO (s)
(s/0 )2 + 1
=
VS (s)
(s/0 )2 + 2(s/0 ) + 1

The following MATLAB code validates the solution.


syms s w0 z Vo Vs V1 V2
% Create the original transfer function
Ts1 = 2*z*s/w0/((s/w0)2+2*z*(s/w0)+1);
% Create the new input signal
V1 = -Vs;
% Calculate the new output signal, V2(s)
V2 = Ts1*V1;
% Calculate the new output signal, Vo(s)
Vo = V2+Vs;
% Determine the new transfer function
Ts2 = simplify(Vo/Vs)

The corresponding output is shown below and is equivalent to the results shown above.
Ts2 = (s2 + w02)/(s2 + 2*z*s*w0 + w02)

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Seventh Edition

Problem 1463. (A) Third-Order Butterworth Circuit


Show that the circuit in Figure P1463 produces a third-order Butterworth low-pass filter with a cutoff
frequency of C = 1/RC and a passband gain of K = 4.
Use node-voltage analysis to find the transfer function of the circuit. Label the input as V1 (s) and the
output as V2 (s). Label the nodes to the right of the horizontal resistors as nodes A, B, and C, and note that
node C has equations at both input terminals of the OP AMP. The node-voltage equations are:
VA (s) V1 (s)
VA (s)
VA (s) VB (s)
+
+
=0
R
1/2Cs
R
VB (s) VA (s) VB (s) V2 (s) VB (s) VC (s)
+
+
=0
R
2/Cs
R
VC (s) VB (s) VC (s)
+
=0
R
1/Cs
VC (s) VC (s) V2 (s)
+
=0
R
3R
Solve the equations for V2 (s) and then divide by V1 (s) to determine the transfer function T (s). The MATLAB
code to find the answer is shown below.
syms s R C V1 V2 VA VB VC
ZC = 1/s/C;
Z2C = 1/s/(2*C);
ZC2 = 1/s/(C/2);
% Write the node-voltage equations
Eqn1 = (VA-V1)/R + VA/Z2C + (VA-VB)/R;
Eqn2 = (VB-VA)/R + (VB-V2)/ZC2 + (VB-VC)/R;
Eqn3 = (VC-VB)/R + VC/ZC;
Eqn4 = VC/R + (VC-V2)/(3*R);
% Solve the equations
Soln = solve(Eqn1,Eqn2,Eqn3,Eqn4,VA,VB,VC,V2);
V2 = Soln.V2;
% Create the transfer function
Ts = simplify(V2/V1)

The results are:


Ts = 4/((C*R*s + 1)*(C2*R2*s2 + C*R*s + 1))

The transfer function is

T (s) =

4
=
(RCs + 1)(R2 C 2 s2 + RCs + 1)

4
1
s+
RC

"

1
RC

3

1
s2 +
s+
RC

1
RC

2 #

The polynomial for a third-order Butterworth filter is shown below.


q3 (s) = (s + 1)(s2 + s + 1)
The transfer function matches the form of a third-order, low-pass Butterworth filter with a cutoff frequency
of 1/RC and a passband gain of 4, as expected.

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Seventh Edition

Problem 1464. (E) Notch Filter Comparison


To eliminate an interfering signal at 10 krad/s on a new product design, your consulting firm needs to
purchase a notch filter with the following specifications:
Center frequency = 10 krad/s 0.5%
Bandwidth = 200 rad/s 2%
Depth of notch (attenuation at 0 ) = 50 dB min.
Two vendors have submitted proposed solutions as OrCAD graphics shown in Figure P1464. As the
owner, you want to select the best one. You must check that each circuit meets or fails every specification.
You should also consider: (1) parts count, (2) ease of maintainability and implementation (fewer parts,
number of similar parts, adjustments of potentiometers, standard values, and power usage), (3) frequency
domain response, and (4) cost. You should address each item for each design at least qualitatively. Attach
whatever software outputs you think will support your decision.
Simulate the circuits and analyze their amplitude responses.

The amplitude responses for both designs are shown below.

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Seventh Edition

The two responses align with each other, so they share the same characteristics with respect to the specifications. The following table summarizes the results.
Item

Specification

Simplicity Plus

Filters-R-Us

10 krad/s 0.5%

10 krad/s

10 krad/s

200 rad/s 2%

200.4 rad/s

200.4 rad/s

50 dB

90.4 dB

90.4 dB

Meets Specs

Meets Specs

Notch Depth
Response Summary
Parts Count

Minimum

Similar Parts

Maximum

0 pairs

2 pairs

Potentiometers

Minimum

Standard Values

Maximum

All

All

Power Usage (OP AMPs)

Minimum

Cost

Minimum

$15.00

$12.50

The circuits have the same frequency responses and both meet the specifications. If using an inductor is
not a problem, then choose the design from Simplicity Plus, since it performs better than the other design
with respect to most of the criteria. If using an inductor presents a problem, then choose the design from
Filters-R-Us, since it meets the specifications.

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Seventh Edition

Problem 1465. (A) Biquad Filter


A biquad filter has the unique properties of having the ability to alter the filters parameters, namely,
gain K, quality factor Q, and resonant frequency 0 . This is done in each case by adjusting one of the
circuits resistors. Analyze the biquad circuit in Figure P1465 and determine which resistors influence each
parameter. Explain how you can adjust three resistors in a specific order to set all three parameters.
Let VA (s) be the output of the first OP AMP and VB (s) be the output of the second OP AMP. The
node-voltage equations at the negative input terminals for the three OP AMPs are:
V1 (s) VA (s) VA (s) V2 (s)
+
+
+
=0
R3
R1
1/C1 s
R2
VA (s) VB (s)
+
=0
R4
1/C2 s
VB (s) V2 (s)
+
=0
R5
R5
Use the following MATLAB code to solve the equations for the transfer function.
syms s R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 C1 C2 V1 V2 VA VB
ZC1 = 1/s/C1;
ZC2 = 1/s/C2;
% Write the node-voltage equations
Eqn1 = -V1/R3 - VA/R1 - VA/ZC1 - V2/R2;
Eqn2 = -VA/R4 - VB/ZC2;
Eqn3 = -VB/R5 - V2/R5;
% Solve the equations
Soln = solve(Eqn1,Eqn2,Eqn3,VA,VB,V2);
V2 = Soln.V2;
% Create the transfer function
Ts = simplify(V2/V1)

The results are:


Ts = -(R1*R2)/(R3*(C1*C2*R1*R2*R4*s2 + C2*R2*R4*s + R1))

The transfer function and its associated properties are:



1
R2
R1 R2
R 3 R 2 R 4 C1 C2
T (s) =
=
1
1
R3 (R1 R2 R4 C1 C2 s2 + R2 R4 C2 s + R1 )
s2 +
s+
R1 C1
R 2 R 4 C1 C2

K=

R2
R3

02 =

1
R 2 R 4 C1 C2

B=

1
R1 C1

0
Q=
=
B

R12 C1
R2 R4 C2

To adjust the parameter values, first set R2 to specify the value of 0 . Next, adjust R1 to specify the value
of Q. Finally, adjust R3 to specify the value of K.

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Seventh Edition

Problem 1466. (A) Crystal Filters


Although not an active filter, crystal (Quartz) filters are very high-Q filters. Some can have Qs approaching 100000. High Q means high selectivity; hence, crystal filters are used extensively in communications
where fine tuning is essential. In its simplest form, a quartz crystal is a rectangular cut crystal with metal
plates attached to its flattest sidesimagine a parallel-plate capacitor with the crystal as the dielectric. An
electronic equivalent of a quartz filter is shown in Figure P1466. CO is called the shunt capacitance and C1 ,
L1 , and R1 the mechanical capacitance, inductance, and resistance of the crystal, respectively. A particular
crystal has CO = 1.0 pF, C1 = 2.6 fF, L1 = 6.0 mH, and R1 = 35 . Assume RL = 10 . Analyze this
filter and determine its Q and 0 . Use MATLAB or OrCAD to examine this circuit and help calculate the
requested parameters.
Construct the transfer function for the circuit.
ZO =

1
CO s

1
L1 C 1 s 2 + R 1 C 1 s + 1
+ L1 s + R 1 =
C1 s
C1 s



1
L1 C 1 s 2 + R 1 C 1 s + 1
Z1 ZO
C1 s
CO s
=
=
Z1 + ZO
L1 C 1 s 2 + R 1 C 1 s + 1
1
+
C1 s
CO s

Z1 =

ZEQ

T (s) =

L1 C 1 s 2 + R 1 C 1 s + 1
L1 C 1 C O s 3 + R 1 C 1 C O s 2 + C O s + C 1 s
RL
RL L1 C1 CO s3 + R1 RL C1 CO s2 + RL (CO + C1 )s
=
RL + ZEQ
RL L1 C1 CO s3 + (R1 RL C1 CO + L1 C1 )s2 + [RL CO RL C1 + R1 C1 ]s + 1

The following MATLAB code confirms the results:


syms R1 RL C1 CO L1 s
Z1 = 1/s/C1 + s*L1 + R1;
ZO = 1/s/CO;
Zeq = Z1*ZO/(Z1+ZO);
Ts = simplify(RL/(RL+Zeq))

The output is:


Ts = (RL*s*(C1*CO*L1*s2 + C1*CO*R1*s + C1 + CO))/...
(C1*R1*s + C1*RL*s + CO*RL*s + C1*L1*s2 + C1*CO*L1*RL*s3 + C1*CO*R1*RL*s2 + 1)

For the given values, the transfer function has the following value:
T (s) =

s(1.98 1016 s2 + 1.15 1020 s + 1.27 1033 )


1.98 1016 s3 + 1.98 1027 s2 + 1.28 1033 s + 1.27 1044

The poles of the transfer function are s = 1011 rad/s and s = 3750 j253.185 106 rad/s. Ignore the
pole with the largest magnitude and determine the response from the dominate poles, which are the complex
poles. With just the dominant poles, the denominator is approximately s2 + 7500s + 6.4102 1016 . The
center frequency is 253.185 Mrad/s or 40.26 MHz. The bandwidth is 7500 rad/s or 1194 Hz. Calculate
Q = 0 /B = 33758. The filter is very selective with an extremely high value for Q. A MATLAB plot of the
amplitude response near the center frequency is shown below.

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Seventh Edition

10

Amplitude, (dB)

15

20

25

30

35
40.29

40.291

40.292

40.293

40.294 40.295 40.296


Frequency, (MHz)

40.297

40.298

40.299

40.3

The OrCAD simulation and results are shown below.

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