The

Volume 1
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Log
February 1, 1923
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Number 1
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PUBLISHED FORTNIGHTLY BY THE DES MOINES STILL COLLEGE OF OSTWOPATHY.
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A NEW BUILDING FOR D.M.S. C.0.
$250,000 CONSTRUCTION PRO GRAM LAUNCHED BY BOARD.
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SELECTING A LIFE'S WOR.E(We are printing herewith an excerpt from that splendid and thrilling inspirational book.PRACTICAL VISIONS, by Dit F. P. Millard, of Toronto. Can. This fine commentary on thb achievement of professional success in Osteopathy should be it every osteopathic physiciants li1 brary and be studied constantly) (Copyright, 1922. F. P. Millard)a

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StLi COaLLE goin':t' bo-?

To be Most Modern- and Best Equipped College of Osteopathy ih America. After careful consideration of the problems- involved, and due deliberation on ways and means for successfully accomplishing so extensive an expansion of physical equipment, the Board of Trustees of Deas.Moines Still College of Osteopathy has completed its plans for the financing of a new and greater D. M. SI. C. 0. Dr. S. L. Taylor has been named Director General of the project; Dr .M.D. Cramer, Busines-s Manager, andDr. J. H. Styles, Jr., Publicity Director. Friends of Des Moines Still College will be happy to know of this proposed program of'achievement. The institution is at present cramped for room and in need of larger and more modern quarters. Not that the quality of its clinical and didactic work has ever, suffered from this cause, for the College has steadily maintained its place in the van of osteopathic progress regardless of all handicaps. However, the consensus of opinion for some time has been that an up-to-date building and new equipment would greatly increase the usefulness of the school and offer added attractions for prospective students. To meet this need and demand, the Board, Faculty and Student Body are unanimously pledged. Each individlual directly connected with the institution is deadly in earnest in the matter and determined that the plans shall not fail. The precise location of the new plant has not definitely been decided upon. Several splendid sites are available. When the final choice is made, it will meet all the requirements of accessibility and quietude. As soon as the matter is settled, full announcement will be made through the Log Book.

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"Exactly a quarter of a century Dr. C. C. Reid, now one ofr I the best known osteopaths in the I world, wrote me, at Denver, Colo<4 rado, where I had gone to study medicine, that I should personally investigate osteopathy at onec and that he was at Kirksville, Mlr studying osteopathy instead medicine, as he had former planned, and that everytbihno v' lovely and the goose hung high. At that time I was only in mn teens, and very keen on becomin-g a physician. I had made up my mind to study medicine, to spaII ago,
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cialize in surgery, and practice surgery the rest of my life. Somehow or other, the lett seemed so full of inspiration, a he seemed so deeply convinc that he had found the better way of treating human ailments, that · I II I'i II--I the expression used in his letter, i I----I "everything is lovely and the g-sm In general, the Board will draw say that gifts will not be accept- hangs high," thrilled me thrc

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its financial support for this undertaking from alumni and professional friends of the College. A I.I preliminary survey of the field indicates that the response will be 4 cordial and substantial. Influential osteopathic physicians in every state, regardless of .where they graduated, have already- signified, I in response to a general letter addressed to .the profession, that they will loan the institution an average of $500 per man. The Board is not asking gifts. It desires to pay each financial supporter an equitable rate on his money. Although the College is and always will be strictly an eleemosynary institution, a corporation not for, profit, the desire of its administrative afficers is that it shall be independent and self-sustaining. That is not to

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able. Sympathetic philanthropic and through. support will always be welcomed Well do -I remember the and the funds. thus donated wisely osteopathic treatment I ever administered. But for the most given. Also, I remember wel' part the building project must be first patient that I ever talk( financed by members of the pro- I who had been cured by osteoy fession who can afford to lend but after going about on crutches quite a long time and considel not to give outright. have been ap- incurable. State directors Investigation regarding the n. pointed in every Commonwealth An organized, in- science stimulated me to such a in the Union. 'ensive campaign is under way. extent that I realized the abs Every member of the osteopathic lute truth of the statement m profession will be given an oppor- by the Old Doctor, that the bof tunity to participate in this I is a machine, and that if e worthy cause and thus materially' would make any headway in hand& aid in a larger and more success- ling diseases we must consider ful propagation of true and un- the body from a mechanical stand-' point and treat accordingly. limited physic-therapy. As a matter of fact, Des Moines I There seemed to be so much Still College is truly a college of pure logic about osteopathy that the whole profession. Its interests I could not persuade. myself to (Continued on page 3) (Continued on page 3)

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FROMM THE PRESIDENT OFTH' E fGENEIALI SEMOR G Ss e The Cam pag for the%ej3?a^( olg Buildigi u We, the Class of January, '24, few :weeks will be The comin-i (~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~i~~ on d wereoffwitha h hip On us 'mber fourteen stuirdy, new-born strenuous ones for- the: loeal Osteoes. -But we expect every the responsibility niorsall alset for our best year home .me being- sched: ,paths, alumrAs o do oines Still clleg ;they' :;:b:est school in -the .osteouled with State Teachers for Tuesis first, last, and al the i . Itis ou colle pathic; profession. We expect to dy night:of:his week, and" ':a This campaign-a shall not fai. It- is oour colleg. have our pedigree ready,- for :-a. .[trip, toNorthwestern Iowa iin ave e whe- and all Putyour shlder to ter". issue. Officers recently which Buena Vista and :Le. Mars that iitmay be said of De Still Colege ilected. for the semester are as on -will:beImet-': their- home filoors. .. . Osteeopatiy: '6fllows Pres., Kirk; V.-Pre., Blau-:Inde-, :St. :-Ambrose and. Victor ivelt; cyy. Treas,. Mrs. Augur. "Great is our Alma Mater." pendents folow on: the: ischedue :?: i-::t[ijs-our .privilege to- help boost within- a short time, both games es S.L. TAYLOR President' Des t ht roduce: 'the profesitr-'i.i .to ' being away from home. Still Gp eeof steopathy sion this new publication which _,,, I : goes. oith -as a representative .-of field,--three-- ' being '6of th- sensa,-. ·'i i i'-. '' e .'-the':splenidid- work, :the hig aims tional .variety. Nichol'as and My'I i~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ . . .1 -- :. .1. 11 :and the urgent, .needs. ::of Des : ers also shared -honors with'.. Moines Still' College o- Osteo.- which contain liberal ;quantities Wiemers played a Thomas, and of vitamain' "B", accompanied by .dur-"b'linger" of a passing game placards urging. the public to inWe as a class, are backing this ing his-short stay in the mix-up. paper t'o the limit, for we believe vest- at once. The whole team faileid- t6o hit the.; ouri, school is teaching the' princi-. : Vitamins are also substances the hoop regularly, however, many a 4fer. · and. practice :-of -real osteo- cofmposition of which- is unknown. -Reaskins Go' On W:arath Late in shot rolling off the rim . into the lin 'G.am,.e and Capture Verdict. They exist in small qa,antities pathy and sending out: doctors sechands of the 'redskins ; -: nd to none. We are convinced natural foods and are.'necessary to Drake and'Nebraska -U. fought a . :.Playing before a monster crowd :.-that' you atlumni-:of this and other: normal nutrition and -rowthi stiff battle in the other half of the, schools will agree with us and be- Their absence from lhe diet'pro- at thep Coliseum floor last Friday scheduled doubile-header, - Drake come' better boosters when, you. duces deficiency diseases -such 'as night, Still College tasted a bit- emerging: the winner after a athe probably ter defeat atrhands of'- the learn more of the spirit and ideals beriberi, exopthalmias, scTap which .famous: Haskel. Indiani team: of rough-and-tuimble' rickets and scurvy. .. : . ''.'' 'of? th!e '[school. · nearly turned' into a grudge fight Three vitamins have been' dem- Larence, Kansas. T:. present outstanding physihe oat times. Summarry:;i need of the institution is a onstrated and comombnlyy ac:epted: IThe.game was a nip-and-tuck STILL-19 ijw, mpletely . equipped build- and it is to their absence in food affair from the first whistle, and. / G FT F that the conditions named have the outcome was in doubt' ulntil: :-Ti'he -school spirit" is making 3 1 0 Nicholass -rfl---,, pei·od, _. ;near the e-id of the'"s.cd ascribed. Ibeehn'2 0 -,-_5 "Thomras,lf <find:with prsipects ofaneW .- has been, left for Dr. Herbert when the superior training and :-It 2 .3 Mike Hannan; c'_-,.-2 building a anew-hospitalur Evans.and Dr. K.-Scott Bishop of stamina of the speedy IndianI Meyers, : rg __:.,_'0 0 3 -uture looms -bright indeed. We the University of California, thr.u squad began to tell. A last imin1 -0 Weihl, lg a:re entering upon a wonderful -era a series of experimentation, to dis- sute .spurt by the bonesetters fell 0 1 short of tying the score by three .Weimers, If?of progress,- when Osteopathy is cover what may become the fourth H. Hannan, ------. 0:' 0 1 firmly established )vitatminn-and points, and the visitors scored an',r comne into its oWn; Des Moines "'tillCollege is going to be: and is; which they. have designated as other field goal as the final whis8 3 13 Totals, big factor. :Itrmust be a leader vitamin X. They ascribe to it the tle blew. The first period was featured by control of reproduction in animals. it'l he -field.; HASKELL-24 : Our class stands- one: hundred They have :shown by experi"ments close guarding and much loose G FT F by both teams, Haskell floor- work per cent.", strong for a new school that none of the" three 'known vi 2 1 Carpenter, rf -;.3,,,__3 building :by next January. Our tamins have any- control over- this itaking the lead early, only to be Skunkneck, If -.- ,--5 -2 3 -goal is to be graduated' from; :the function and that none of them tied up at half time at a score of J.' Levi c-1. 0 0 produce the effect of vitamin X. five-all. With the opening of the . lege in its ::new .home! 0 2 A. Murdock, rg- -,-1It is found in fresh lettuce: or: al-: second half 4-the- redskins spurted, 'his is no idle dream. It is a -0 0"-.-.2 Dugan, ig falfa leaves, fresh meats, in. egg and at one time had a lead of .tiCal possibility. Osteopathy 0 F. Murdock, lg --.-- ,--- -0. yolk and the germ of wheat. Or- nine' points. Neither team disanotStand still any longer. ,;'Itt played enough punch -on the ofange juice, cod-liver oil, milk t' go up and on or die. We - .Totafls-__,_,,:;i' ' 4'. 8 siugars, cornstarch, lard and ceasein fensive to make the outcome de,c-aught the vision and&" with Referee-Christy, McCormick of contain no, vitamin X,`' and butter cisive, although the visitors--' lived loyal. support of -alumni -:nd has very little of it,,, but they all lived-. up o.their eputatn for i~tClriends of Osteopathy. f tre contain one or- miore 'of-: the three, speed and. aggressiveness. _Still erywhere, we shall- make, the viA- NATURAL -CURE. rallied and was going strong-for ' previously known vitamins. n a- reality. Is 'Osteopathy awhile, but a time-'ut period '"Your Osteopathic ,nowledge: Dora Dietz. forth :fighting for? Then let us checked-their- rush, and the In- has. surely taught you that, with ie upandid at it. If each one will : dians managed to hold their own an intimate acquaintance wlth the JUNE, 1923. oost :in money and in: spirit the nerve and blood supply, you can _-The) recent election, of class o0f' from then on. 'rea:m will come true.e- The school -Skunkneck was the scoring star arrive at a. knowledge(- of the hid:ficers gave :the following .men the ,lonngs to the -profe sion. Let's .of the - game, caging five goals den cause of .disease, and -conduct honor ofr holding'' the reins : -for 'yvegood one! a ' s from scrimmage and two- from the your treatment to .. uccessful ter,this semester. ' -.: ; . :Eisha T., Kirk. l foul line. Carpenter and A. Mur- .mination.-' This : is not by your President -A. 0. Breese.. dock worked like squaws in hold- rknowledge of 'chemistry;,: .but by Vice-Pres--R. R. Tornell. .itamins V'i:( to Date '-- " Sec-y-Treas.-L. H. Kuchera. : ing the bonesetters score, however, the absolute -knowledge of what is With these men holding ?office the floor work of the whole aggre- in man What:.is normal, and .::Vitmins: are substances about -:which "we hear so muchi. Almost and another woman, Mrs. R. Mor gation being exceptional in the what abnormal, what "is effect and how to find the cause" '-:. ;ian:y -display- of :the modern go, gan, in our class,. wel.-have': one o'fa last period. -A. T. Still, Phlosophy of -gettfing - druggist. shows us: samples our:.best semesters ahead of- us. -Thomas was the big gun for the locals, with five baskets- from the I Osteopathy. . ..(Continued on page 3)- ' : of certain: labratbory products 7i

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STILL :FIV TO BE BUSY,

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HASKELL WINS HARD BATTLE

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will". interest h.im. most, nd w aA .- hat-part of' the work seems us your gooi young men-.and -wo- his practice., nost practical-and most adapted Frank "Juiet" Heckert, if his .1 y ad men-we need tem the : E - - i -' brother dnoes not ` object, will join tto use ' throughout his career. -...need 'us., The:' Official Pibli;ation of Every young man wants to make "Billy Watson" and. his "Beef II DES:- MOIN-ES STILL COITEi;GE tt most of his life; his great de-: the. Trust Beauties." WITH : OUR STUDENTS OF OSTEOPATHY Lyman Johnson and Cleo We- s sire is. to select -some calling or s .(Continued from puage 2) profession into which he can pu Taylor This is'. attested-by: the.. fact ..that del are thru planning, because I Director General,---.S. L. his whole soul, and do his .besi Business:Manager--._ M. D. Cramer one of our members, the bowleg- their -wives will do that hereafter. I ' - - . . - . work. .. : . -:.:Tom. Van De Grift I. ged man with the briht red -hair, Piub. Director-._,J. H. Styles, Jr. It was a shock to me -to give. u chosen as the g6at at one of ,Editor:, ____- ._.C. L. Ballinger was .SOPHOMIORE A 3 my early dreamls, in. which I pie our recent assemblies-"Ain't it ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~. turedd myself in white.robes, :ople The following, once upon a time I All good men. k"now when e Application for -- ntry 'as second Red-?" ating in some hospital in a large completely expressed our feelings; 4I class matter at the Post Office at they are well off. 'I city; but, on looking back over I-wish I was a little rock ': Des Moines, Iowa, pending. the twenty-five years since I firs Asettin' on a hill, Last semester was a .'successful I started the study of osteopathy, I Limitation I. one as far as our class was con- -And doing nothing all day long, Osteopathy Without .. - -have no regret, and were' I to But just asettin' still. cerned. We took the back seat for choose my special work again INSTITUTIONS, as men, are II no one-especially when it came I wouldn't eat, I wouldn't sleep, along the healing line, I would I wouldn't even wash. known by- the quality of their to the program for -"Stunt Day." walk boldly out and enter some; _ Witlh the assistance! of the Junior I'd sit and sit a thousand years product. _ * * * one of the colleges of osteopathy, A class of last semester, we staged I And rest myself, b'giosh. .I and with enthusiasm go through issue will a knockout performance of the I ELSEWHERE in this With apologies to Coue it now the range of subjects and secure be found an announcement, of a spectacular type. 'Some of our all the information that I could; new building for Des Moines Still most handsome members posed as goes like this: 2 : then go out, proud to be called s Read it such celebrities as "Spark Plug," I used to think I was a rock College of Osteopathy. disciple of Dr. A. T. Still. and Juliet," "Cupid" and I Asettin' on the hill, well. It is epochal in its signifi- "Romeo Strange it is how some,-» "Hercules." It was something new I And doin' nothing all day long cance. C * comies into our lives and chai_in the way of entertainment, butL. But just asettin' still. our entire program. This is a UNANIMITY of purpose, is one we will try to, change scenes the3 That tired feeling now is gone common occurrence, and if we are And day by day'l say,of the finest attributes any co- next time. "No rock for me, for don't you see diverted in the right direction, ordinate group may attain. Never I and the vision is a practical one, I'm getting better in every has.the student body at Des Moines I On January 10th, the class was3 we follow our work throughou way." Still 'College been possessed of entertained at the home of Dr.1 life with the greatest of pleas-such .enthusiasm for common in- C. F. Spring. -It has been the cus-I tom for a number of years for Dr. Free medical advice by radio is and thrill with the thought t terests as at present. Spring to be the host of each I furnished ships at sea by the ff. S. we have found the work I "WHERE there is a will, there class when the students finish I Public Health Service. Seems to adapted to our needs and t, us that Osteopathy should make perament.-s a way."' The practical value ot their course. d The evening was a very enjoy- more use of this medium for edu- I i have ever beel giu tilat 'D. old aphorism is nowhere betthe C. ter illustrated than by the initia- able one, everyone enjoying the3 cating thepublic as to its many II C. Reid came- to my assistance at the time when I most' needed tion- of the campaign. for a new games, etc. During the evening we a virtues. I p -guidance." building at D. M. S. C. 0. Lead- discovered the champion "sucker' ers in the movement are thor- of the class, our little blondea SELECTING A LIFE'S WORK. Ir NEW BUILDING FOR D.M..S.C.O oughly persuaded as to the feasi- haired man, Bob Tornell. The big .(Continued from page 1) of the undertaking and "blow" was also unmasked, whih e bility (Continued from page 1) s S fully determined that the new col- the balloon blowing contest wav. continue the study of medicine. It in session.seemed as if the new school had have never been harrow or p lege shall be. Refreshments were served bh presented something that was vincial. It proposes to be, y Y : IT will be the purpose of thiss Dr. and Mrs. Spring, which weree tangible, real scientific and out most representative osteopathi( school and consistently to put thf r publication to chronicle all mat- enjoyed by all, except the fou:.r of which some day the entire k pertaining y little ones-Harry Elston, Jac] h world would be benefited directly interests of osteopathy above corn ters of general interest petitive and commercial consideror to the progress of osteopathy in' Rogers, Jack Hansel and Bob Tor 1 D indirectly through the teachthe profession ! nell--who had swallowed too mucl b ings of the Founder of this new ations. Des Moines, to keep Each Doctor- of Osteopathy n .1 posted as. to student activities in ~ milk earlier in the evening. The r school called Osteopathy. d just before the members departe, 6 Well do I remember the first be approached individually to publish only the College, and given an opportunity to invr e 3, such matter as will hohor the OldI Mrs. Earley, the speaker for thi.E copies of the Journal of Osteoto I iA r is no place for 1 class, told the Doctor, in a fexv pathy the first osteopathic pub- D. M. S. C. O0. In order Doctor. There s well-chosen words, -how we, as. E lication that was ever printed; tate matters, however, and a anything but his science and itsk end that construction, may t d. legitimate and proven adjuncts att class, had enjoyed and appreciate, c and in m~y library today I believe 11. ' his work. We are all- sorry to finis]h I prize the early copies of the ally begin at the earliest p .. D. M. S. C. 0. Osteopathy Trit the directorate w. moment, umphant is the watchword by¢ our work under Dr. Spring, bu Li Journal of Osteopathy more than e the Doctor thinks we had bette 11I any other osteopathic literature greatly appreciate the favor if. r which all college policies areE move on and make way for greenI that I have in my possession. interested physicians will malt judged. er stuff. I* e t There seemed to be something use of the coupon found else about those early journals that where in this issue. Full particu WE wish. you to send us the During our class sessions we stimulated and thrilled one to lars will there be given. Just fil names and addresses of young men have discovered the ambitions o such an. extent that he felt as if out the amount, sign and send Ilk and women who would be interseveral of our members. Dr. Jac] s the real truth had been given to to the legal custodian of building ested in a scientific course Hansel, eminent physician, i edu- seeking the position of Chie ~f the people after.all these centur- funds. Des Moines is a center of Do not delay. The new building ies of therapeutic study. It has two universities Clinician in the New College. cation. When a young man decides his must be ready for occupancy by f and several colleges. Des Moines "Red" Manley has spent much o has more money. to spend than any his time with the rubber ban d course in life, the subject that he January first, 1924. city its size in the United States. and paper wads, using anybod ly is going to study, the profession Time spent with the spade pays Our students always have plenty as a target. He has a keen eyee. that he has chosen; the next thing he thinks about is what better than time spent with the of work for their spare time. and I Ain't it, Red? when they leave-feel they owe Seymour Higelmire plans tto particular branch or phase of the Ihamwmer.

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PDes Moines.,their. eduecation. Send manage a Ford Plant along :with
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THE LOG BOOK~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ I L- a Il I~~~~~ I
Due to the fact that we are students and practioners of OSTEOPHY, we have placed our stamp of approval upon this science. Let us, then, be ever elert and progressive. May we feel, breathe, live and practice our profession to the best of our ability. May we always be on guard to protect it against those who would destroy it! With "Osteopathy Without Limitation,, as our motto, and by a thorough knowledge of our work, let us stamp OSTEOPATHY and its truths indelibly upon 'hearts, lives and minds of the populace. Let us stand pat and give to OSTEOPATHY all we have. Mark each day well spent by not permitting that day to pass without acquiring more knowledge of our work and of the mechanism of the human body. A chain is no stronger than its weakest link, and likewise, OSTEOPATHY is no stronger than its weakest and most careless practitioner. Let us fiy our banners to the breezes and impart to our patients and friends the truth of our science. In short, may each student and practitioner be on the firing line at the dawning of this new year. Go over the top and carry OSTEOPATHY to its rightful goal. MEake this yearr 192^ t3 lt-great est year in all history for OSTEOPATHY.
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OSTEOPATHY
By F. D. Campbell, '23. It searching for a concise defi.ition of the term Osteopathy, I find none that seems to do it credit. Aside from saying that it 9is a natural therapy, we might 'dd that it is a science which steals with the normal and abnormal position of the bony structures of the body and with a more ar- less systematized method by ,hich abnormally placed bones may be brought back to their normal relations, one to the other. This brings us to another important phase of the subject, the OSTEOPATHIC LESION. I think that it would be useless to, try and improve upon the definition given by Dr. J. H. Styles, Jr., in which he states that, "AN OSTEO"'_IIC LESION is any deviation ._eA the normal movement of an articulation within the normal anatomic range bf that articulation." Sometimes I feel that we do not appreciate the immensity of our cience. It is a privilege to be -;'ticipants in the study and the ·ctice of a science that deals t h the most intricate of struc')es-an organism whose parts 3 more delicate, more sensitive, more- pergpetualaiaregutar- t-an any contrivance conceived by the
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human mind or made by human hands. Osteopathy has restored health and happiness to thousands. It has, because of the firm foundation upon which it is build'ed, slowly but surely ascended to the plane of recognition, until today, we can scarcely go into any part of the world without seeing the pathways made by its progress, thanks to the fighting spirit of our predecessors. Osteopathy is no longer a myth or a passing fancy of so=me faddist. It is a reality, a fact and a fixe'd science. We should feel proud to be able to say that we are followers of that one great man, Who, through ridiculed and condemned as crazy, yet had the courage to stand by his convictions, until today his students are proving to the world that Dr. A. T. Still was right. By his farsightedness and knowledge of the mechanism of the human body, he gave to the world a science of healing that is unexcelled and which deals with healing as it seems the ALL WISE CREATOR of our bodies intended that they should be healed. For have we not read in the SCRIPTURES of the healing of the blind, the sick, and distressed by the simple laying on of His hands? In Biblical times as well as now, they called that miraculous, but ~ight ~it not- have been-a modified form of our science?
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It's hard to believe, but once upon a time the Spanish Government forbade the export of platinum from South America and ordered it thrown into the sea to prevent its use as an adulterant for gold. The man who says it can't be done, is interrupted by the man who is doing it. Cold cash is often the means of expressing warm sympathy. Good men and bad men are each less so than they seem. Knocking shortens life, boasting lengthens life. He who talks without thinking runs more risk than he who thinks without talking. A thing done right today means less trouble tomorrow. "Beyond the supply of direct or indirect nutrition, human skill is powerless to add a single nervethrob to the vital stock of any organism. There is no substance in the universe, call it what you will,-medicine, mystery, or moon-. shine, which can be made to add a single moment to life, or a single joto-Ar tii-le to the--stength of the organized being. -Dr. A. T. Still.
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DES MOINES STILL COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHY BUILDING CAMPAIGN THE PLAN THE WAY
The method of our campaign is strictly a business Name -------------------proposition. We are asking members of the profession to loan us from one to five hundred dollars each City------------at six per cent interest annually for ten years. We StateStreet ------shall be able to pay this back in five years. If you believe' in your profession back it with your money Amount of loan ---------md all will be benefited. Clyde E. Frazier, Treasurer, Commercial Savings Bank, Des Moines, Iowa. Make checks payable to: (A properly executed note will be sent upon receipt of loan.) Detacli id Mail.
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PUBLISHED FORTNIGHTLY BY THE DES MOINES STILL COLLEGE OF OSTE.
Volume 1
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_IFebruary 15, 1923.

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ANATOMY AND

NOTED Do 0,
-Br. C. H. Downing, Master Technician, Addresses Student Body. The entire student body was greatly honored on Wednesday morning, February 7, when Dr. Downing, the eminent Boston technician, addressed the chapel. Dr. Downing was in Des Moines the week of February 5th, giving his great work in technique to the osteopaths of Iowa, and many of the students of the College.. In his talk at chapel he outlined briefly the principle of his technique. It was an inspirational chapel for he imbued the entire body with his enthusiao. and gave all who listened insight into osteopathy 'ant tremendous influernce. To liste to one so young in years, an; alike in practice, who is recog nized thruout the world as tgreatest osteopathy techof all time, was inspirat; itself. The nearer one comes t( day of his graduation, the doubtful he becomes of his ity to combat with the many diseases that the human flesh is heir to. To the seniors, then, Dr. Downing was -a great balm. His very success is an example of the things we, can do if we but take the time to work out the great principles that form the basis of osteopathy. Often has it been said by the graduating osteopath that he feels poorly equipped with technique. Dr. Downing was one of that class. But in three years he has mastered a technique that is known wherever ostoepathy is known. Does this mean anything to you students or those of you-who are already in the field? Think it over. If you find that you do not get results in some cases, get out your Grey or Cunningham and brush up on your anatomy, and then, apply your knowledge of physics to the case and note the results. D. M. S. C. 0, graduates have
been more fortunate than those I

OSTEOPATHY

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By John M. Woods, D. 0. Osteopathy is founded upon the theory that any deviation from the normal structural integrity of the body results in' abnormal functioning. A thoro knowledge of anatomy, -the science of the structure of the normal -body, is, therefore, imperative for the understanding and successful practice of the science of Osteopathy. We all are aware of the fact that it was upon a wonderful knowledge of the anatomy of the human body that the Old Doctor, Andrew Taylor Still, founded the theory of Osteopathy. It was probably because of this exceptional knowledge that he was able to achieve -the--remar-k-ble results which weendeavor to imitate but -so often fail to obtain because of our in--sufficient knowledge of the humemory of the busy practitioner man body. should be revamped in order A thoro understanding of phy- that he, may the more successsiology, histology and pathology fully accomplish the results that are other prerequisites, not only come from a thoro understandfor the student's clear conceping and ever ready knowledge of tion of the, theory of Osteopathy these sciences. Thus, and thus but als for the successful praconly, can we be true disciples of tice of that theory.. However, the therapy instigated by Anthe basic principle upon which drew Taylor Still. these subjects must depend is anatomy in its broader sense. Thus we must visualize anatomy as inSuccess. volving the living, functioning Success is a magic word. It bodies in which various physio- thrills the blood and clears the logical and pathological pro- mental deck for action. But recesses are continually- being member-it is an effect, not a carried on. cause. It is the reward of indusAnatomy is not an end in it- try, of patience, of initiative. It self but only means- to an end. is the tangible embodiment of Thru it we have a knowledge of an earnest dream, the realizathe structure and function of tion of a steadfast hope. It is the human body thus enabling compensation. us to recognize abnormalities anrd disease. Clear ice taken from polluted It, behooves all of us then, to water may often -contain as low acquire and maintain this view- as one per cent of the number of point. For the beginning student bacteria in the water. -This is it should furnish an incentive. due to the fact htat most microWith this concept the more ad- organisms are killed by a temvancecd student should constantly perature of 0°C. keep these sciences fresh in his mind in order that he may more perfectly grasp the advanced The recording angel is never branches of the curriculum. influenced in the least byv the From time to time the dimmed epitapi on the tombstone..
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STATE DIRECTORS CHOSEN
Organization Heads For States Are On The Job' Plans for the new building
project that was. announced in the first issue of Tne Log Book

are fast taking_ form and by the next issue it is hoped that more definite plans may be announced. The complete list of state directors has been chosen. It will be their duty to handle the cam.paign in their respective states. Below is listed the group. If you wish further information on the campaign and care to have any information on D. M. S. C. O., get in touch with the director of your state or with the main office in Des Moines. Alabama, Dr. Percy H. Woodall, 615 First National Bank Bldg., Birmingham; Alberta, Canada, Dr. M. E. Church, 801 First St., Calgary; Arkansas, Dr. 'Arthur W. Berrow, 322 Central Ave., Hot Springs. California, Dr. Elizabeth McLaughlin, Black Bldg., Los Angeles; Colorado, Dr. Madolin Breckenridge, Wayne Hotel, DenVC t d on p

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SPINAL CURATR WEEK es-

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':in. ^ I?:-t is-now :peffetly, plain why t'aihl:ishedi: theo-minds of the. the-body persists ,energeticallypeople so that the newspapers Tof us. ?This in keeping up ?a .fever in :spite: will stand back gs means a' bettier generat-ion in: the ':f :tie ad::m:inistration f.whic are!given to pul it down. near fUture;: a stronger: race of: The: most careless -of usan haz people;: less nervousness, -insomar:dth:e guie-ss tha t-these' drugs nia and mental disturbajane; and,that taking theim better-- students in our:schols onoi gockl ami i ali wronig. In: large doses they: and colleges. Here is a golden opportunity are- dangerous, because of their sc upon the :heart', -and in for :any-:amouint :.of pu iciy, and ^ i't-"depe~ndsuponieach_ ot^eOPeth od small does they 'o'sio I fever, the patient nust practicing to secuire ethical pub perspire.. Thet greatertein e icity and attract the attention fwater 'and ooing drinks cona-' of the mother- to the: fac::t tha t thelr tning fruit jces: hegreater :here-' is a possiBility ta' .wil bthe aotofperspitra- chi ldren may be growing; uip withspinal cuiirvatures. This; connects ion.Laxativeshoudbeus up with th ide, weo 'ga childre epaien should have last .year, - that action. The e yr ':beexaindtwi should r'etand quiet in border :toenable th6e heart and', other orgn'is of -Eventually':we are going to hve : '. :. S-::ithe::shoo0i e'tablished,
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LG.-.OLD] 777;.

i2t::o17: (i-nclusive): ff ers :a g-ol
a l in;opportuhity to avequmnber`.of newDr. Swo>e' is doingWndru prreceivedletterS from.0nar work, and we.want to hejlp hm ;o-, rineVery -poissible ay. i .. [idents 0f state osteopathic

. pert. Ju~t as soon as ||®J~~ui®&^^aS^^bruisedandtrn, w

Do, you': recall the oid'hard:coal armul burn:er" in the family tliving room Injur-ies 'own on th.. farm:? Remember. tiat:: it is controlled by 'means of Adrafts and d ampers which :admnit the ~propramutofar whie- 'r, shut it .'off entirely,;acordg of aware a momentar to :-the need. When the: e is noht uofbloo given toth pesea burnig -cheerfully, ondelyn blo by th the stov .thows out heat makinig.ev.eryaorpotcto

ned Le to spons h agans the adaceo processe. or~ injurios

diations,:and so :far they ha'vealI S MI LES. pec.ial 'week is most sig-. Thi me -to nificant, -and if handled properly, The. world 'ooks .goqd When 'I can '.see it through. a willH continue yeiar ater year and ..,. ,":. : the .ve.nt-utal:ly all of -- .. motherS--in :.::"": smile; .". North- America, whve r osteo0 )For-then I see the things worthwhile, .. com inpathy is known, will That oitherwise I would.notsee. having /their childterested:in ren' -s spines examined through And, this you'll find is true: 'Whei'. in .a miling frame o the i/nforma:tion- they will receive . '-mind ':. : ' ...- : :: during this speci l week. ~-S. pain:Look at the world,: anyoa: w: :d~~~~ of, circularS an Ahyi fin : b'? pri;ted: A -Iof .the various The world smiles back ai you!' ' ' jo :rnals may con:aih articles, ;, . x :.' : '. '...:' *; -. :: '3. .- , .2.' ' ^.- <^ . * '.. andrmlot _iportant .of'all,: And life looks igood - to me, doctors ineach town nd city can, end Ia '^ pu:^bli ecture - When:- helpingl and should have a To-lighten the budens f a . iv:none i'ght diuring -the wee, ::frienrd;' nsghbin which do trs from And help that friend to- see, ing' towns and.- cities may be in- That life is not w'orth whIe vitd to' address -theaudience: i::Unless he tries, from day t us L :et :enter io tis with at ^^ ^ .;. ,.,:. * dayt, d' whole-:hearted spirt, as it means" hsway fmore to oste'opa:thy:: than-possibly To cheer :some :trafvleri anyi one thig thath (;:With just a-pleasa'ant mile. -OieMatthews,'2 in a long time. It is a novel :i:ea, -and 'we . are fortnteine "temensma Stof Speaking putting. it :acrpss before t ture League or our imitators ha in the world: t here roniet t n :a:chanceto - t h n , of i We will mind that southern Iowa faxe q-wo sharpened all the stiumpson e': -nown s mae? this' wee t his *:.farm to, peve thatitwil^ l :b.eom eas man from sittingdowntore on suchl a permannt bassta
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. . -: ~ .. ' . . I- ··`~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ *, 150),000 'the students here have has the interests and perpetuity : a limitless :-amouint of clinical- of his- profession at heart. Book T Lo -Des 'Mines Still College' of material- at their .disposal. -It means a hdap, when you get out: OsteopatEhy believes that the ma:The Official Publication of DES MOINES. STILL COLLEGE, and youir first patients come to jority:. of her' alumni feel thus. you, to be able to tell them thiat And for that reason, in her hour -OSTEOAPHY you have seen, -or perhaps have of need, -when the construction Director 'General..--S. L. Ta.ylor treated, just such a case a- of anadequate physical plant is Business Manager_-M. D. Cramer theirs. It gives you confidence imperatives -she confidently ttirns Pub. IDirector_ J. H. Styles, Jr. in your power and the patient to every loyal son and daughter, C. L. Ballinger confidence in your ability. Do and to her professional-, friends Editor_-. _-, II not forget this feature of D. M. and well-wishers, everywhere. w.hen you are recomApplication, for entry as second S.. . The mebneers of the directoclass matter at the Post Office mending a student to an osteo- rate in charge of the program of pathic college. In a few weeks expansion ask that' every alumat Des 'Moines Iowa, pending. we will give you some definite nus and every feriend go the-secostelpatty --- ithout: Limitatioli information concerning the linond :mile with them. They offer I ics we enjoy here. a: safe, sound, well protected inTHE passport to poverty is -- : '. - - * : .. .*- . .: - .. - : * vestmebnt for your: surplus funds. "Charge it!" *.. * . . .. THE response to our request Money loaned to the College ,for : A MAN who does not know in the last: number- for the' building purposes is adeq-uately how to, profit by his mistakes names of prospective students- of secured. An equitable rate of inturns the best teache:r he will osteopathy was very poor. In terest is offered. All that is yet fact,-it' Was so por that the re- necessary is: a general response ever have ott of his life. : . * ' .. .. * . .. ,. . sult was- alimost nil. 'Now, doctor, to the appeal. , , beautiful while thisis fresh in your mind, '"ACTIVITY is only HE-RE NOTED D 0-O. when it is .holy;: that is to say, take your pen -in:hand o'r pull (Continued from page 1) . when it is .spert in the spirit of out"t hat- t'ypewriiter :and' --jot down, 'or ppound out, the names that. which passeth not away."of those enterpri'sing young men of many of the other schools of Amiel's Journal. , . ' *., ' '.' ' * -; ' .X,- -, '*, and womien:'of your acquaintance the profession in: having Dr. and send' them:- to us.: We are Styles as their instructor in of all le -''THE onfly-worthy in .to boost for Os- technique. In -the future,' Des just as anx-ious science', of all learning, of all teopathy as a pr`ofession, and'en- Moines Still grads will be even life, in fac't,. is';; that;: human Dr. list ' students merely to the cause .more thoroly equipped, -for beings should'- love one- another Styles has been .absorbing Dr. as we. are to fill our class rooms better."-George Elliot. be overflowing. If this - paper Downing's work, and will , . . . . ,,,, :, * ....** * . . : to oreDared, henceforth, to add Ui.^ i 4<o -1. ; LL Ia J . ll t rt:ii' icO t 'l DtL blli u i l, 'A WORTHY cause has' nothing its .purpose. Of course we think many features of Dr. Downing's 'foes. It -h.at D.:-· M. S' C-:O. is thi best art to his already- noted techto fear' from its active 0 ........... ....... is the slacker within the ranks school of the lot. We should not .. 1"jl1l. who' withholds himself or his be'here if we did' not. And bemoney in the hour of need who cause we, believe that, we allow -STATE DIRECTORS CHOSEN. blocks the wheels of progress. (Continued from page 1)' -of your you to- think the same .. * Alma Mater. Give us a chance Delaware, Dr. George F. Na,THE LOG- BOOK welcomes to spread the glad tidings far son, 200 W. Ninth St., Wilmingcontributions from_ the field. If and wide. ton. you have anything of interest * * * Florida, Dr.- Lucien E. Turner, you wish to say to the students THE average amount paid'by St. Petersburg. of -the College or to the profesGeorgia, Dr. S. D. Richards, sion at large, write it out and an osteopathic student directly send it in. The only requirement -into' the- treasury of the school National Bank Bldg., Savannah. Idaho, Dr. W. S. Kingsbury, is that you make your copy brief fromn which he graduates in no for our space is limited. Every case exceeds seven or eight hun- 14 Pierce St., Boise; Illinois, Dr. Qsteopath in the world is on our dred dollars. This covers ;all gen- August Geis 3 O'Beirne Bldg., eral and special' instruction in Elgin; Indiana, Dr. John Lewis mailing -list. the art and science of osteo- Callaiian, J. M. S. Bldg., South * * * ... . : WE are publishing the sub- pathy as well as in the- proper Bend; Iowa, Dr. Bert Rice, Ceuse of all legitimate adjunctive dar- Rapids. scription blank again in this Kansas, Dr.',Guy E. Owens, 609 issue. to give you another op- therapies. A very great majority of grad- Mills Bldg., Topeka; Kentucky, portunity to aid Des Moines Still in her great campaign for a new uates are successful. in practice, Dr. Frank A. Colyer, Pope Bldg., building. A's time goes on we thanks to the training they re- Louisville. will give you many reasons for ceived at thir Alma Mater. The Louisiana Dr. Earl McCracken, the new building. Take our word influence of their; college days National Bank Bldg., Shreveport. for it now and fill out the blank, goes with 'them down through Maine, Dr. Glen C. Hicks, 'enclose -a check and give us your the years, broadening and deep- Vaughan Hall, Portland; Maryassurance of the plan, thus aid- ening as time goes by. land, Dr. Alcha Kirkpatrick, 319 ing us to' get the work materiTherefore, when a physician Charles St., Baltimore;. Massaally under way as soon as Spring leaves .a school, he has not dis- chusetts, Dr. M. V. Bridges, 351 opens up. ; charged his full' duty to that Essex St., Lawrence; Michigan, ' * * * ., , school. As the educational forces Dr. Frank E. Wood 311 F. P. ALONG with a strong faculty, in osteopathy are at present Smith, Bldg., Flint; Minnesota, D. M. S. C.- 0 has' another fe a- constituted, they must be con- Dr. William H. Albertson, Hersh ture that :has always been a tinually supported by the field. Bldg., Austin; Mississippi, Dr. great' drawi'ng card for the Each osteopath, then, cannot James R. Kidwell, 326 N. State school. Located in a city of I lose interest in his college if he St., Jackson; Missouri, Dr. J. S. 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Bennett Iependence;- Mont'an&, Dr. S. W. Bailey, Billins. :' Nebraska, Dr. C. K. Struble, Hastings; New. Jersey, Dr. B. A;. I I Sturges, 6.1 Madison Ave., Jersey' ,'' City; New Mexico, Dr. Charles A.- Wheeln, 123 San Francisco: St., Santa-Fe; New York, Dr. Ralph: H. Williams, 803 Chamber of Cmmeree, Rochester; North Carolina Dr. Elmer G. Hornbec" Phillips Bldg., '-Rocky Mou?
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Ohio,- Dr. -Ada S. -Liffr1S. Park Ave., West Mansfield; Oklahoma, Dr. Claude D. Heasley, Tulsa;: Ontario, Canada, Dr. J. SBach, 604 Temple Bldg., Toronto; Oregon, IDr.- B. T. Parker, Corbett Bldg., Portland. Pennsylvania,, Dr. Irving Whalley, 1215 Land Title Bldg., Philadelphia or Dr. Thomas E. Slater, 515 Popla'r St., Stoneboro -o. Rhode Island, Dr. W.-B.,Shep ard, 305 Francis Bldg., 146 Wesv minster St., Providence. South Carolina, Dr.-T. C. Jones, 1206Y/2 Main St., Columbia;So-th Dakota,- Dr. J. H. Cheney, Sioux...: : -' Falls,. H.. Tennessee, Dr. Richaxr Boyd, Tullahoma; Texas, Dr. J. F. Bailey, Providence Bldg., Wac=fUtah, Dr. Merton M Salt LaL 512 Scott: Bldg:. :Vermont,- Dr. C. E. Wells, 40 College St., Burlington; Virgini Dr. Jerome Knowles, Newpol. - .. . News. Washington, Dr. Ida L. Deene, 1302 S. Q. St., -Tacoma; West Virginia, Dr. Olyve Ailes, -231 Capitol St., Charleston; Wisconsin, Dr. L. H. Noordhoff, 187 Main St, -Ososh; Wyoming, Pr. Frank I. Furry, -CheyenneArizona, CGonnecticut, Nevada, -New Hampshire and District of Columbia will be handled fromthe central office here., FEVER (Continued from page 2) restore to its former state of health, to work unhampered by any -- nnecessary strain .Recov' u ery will be much more rapid andthere 'will be .-a :'smaller loss, of vit'ality than otherwise.''The physician, who is striving -for the best interests of his patient, which is to quickly restore him to good -working order, lets fever have' its course. He is working with Nature and not against it, when he does those things which aid the bodily forces to protect- their charge against disease and which build it up and restores his accustomed pep and energy with as little delay as possible-.- Drugs are worse than- useless in those cases. Why use them?
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BONESETTER TEAM HAS
PROSPEROUS TWO WEEKS
Win Two Games and Lose One By A
Single Free Throw
wiring the 'past two weeks,pI "Hoyle" was employed by the n's troupe of basket- Catholics in an attempt to break up the Still team-work, but al,, have been on a litthough they managed to cut down the Bonesetters lead to three points in the second half, -the latter spurted again and romped in to a well-earned victory.

iee all their own, and have cut quite a swath through the other college teams about the state. As the scores of the past two weeks show, the boys have been going at top speed every minute, and seem to have reached top form of the season. Journeying out into the cornstalk jungles to Storm Lake and Le Mars, the fighting Osteopaths ook Buena Vista and Western ,nion into camp by the same top-heavy score, 22 to 12. Both of these games were hard fought, but, the stubborn five-man defense of the invading bonesetters, coupled with a flashy attack led by Captain Nicholas, rolled up enough points to in'a big margin. -n Union, in particular,

The ability of the Buena Vista team to make their free throws count, won them the verdict in the other game played here, with a total of ten points out of a possible twelve tried!. Still was unfortunate in this line of attack, only sinking three out of their ten attempts. Otherwise, the visitors were outplayed, although the use of the five-man defense system by both teams slowed the game up considerably. In these four games Coach Sutton's proteges have rolled up a total of seventy-nine points as compared to fifty-five for their opponents.. Much of the inconsistency and ragged teamwork of the early season has disappeared, and the rest of the schedule should show a big percentage of victories. The "Fighting Osteopaths" are fast making a name for themselves, and if they can but hold their present stride, this may be the biggest season we have enjoyed in" years. Of course the outcome of the schedule as a whole simmers down to our annual clash with the hated Des Moines U. team, and if we can but hand them a little tap on the "koko" we will gladly
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a a fast and ranlv souad,
at happened to tangle with the '.als while the latter were in .eir stride, and went down to a decisive defeat on their own floor. St, Ambrose and Buena Vista were met a week later on the local floor, Still walloping the Catholics by a 22-17 score, and losing a heart-breaker of a battle to Buena Vista by a single point margin, 14, to 13. The St;, Ambrose game was of the
"knock - down - drag-out" type,

lay down our work for a month if necessary, to celebrate. The outstanding performance of Nicholas with Wiemers and Thomas assisting in the offense, and the capable guarding of Davis and "Hank" Hannon, has been steadily pushing the Osteopaths ahead. Substitutions have been made often, and at last the right combination seems to have been found. Absence of the team's official "wrecker," Truck Syers, has imade a hole, to be sure, but "Swede" Olsen and "Mike" Hannon make a specialty of -illing holes and at present things are going merrily on. A stiff quartet of games are arranged for the coming fortnight. The Bonesetters meeting Penn College, Central, Des Moines U. and St. Ambrose. Penn and Des Moines U. play on the home floor, but Central and St. Ambrose are met away from the home nest. Coach Sutton is expecting a hard battle at Davenport with St. Ambrose, as that team played a strong game here. However, we are expecting the spurt of the last two weeks to continue, and hope to see the scalps of four more victims attached to the old scalpel. Let's get two hundred wild, raving maniacs out to watch the Des Moines U. gamne, and not only attempt to out-shine them on the floor but out-yell them so far that it will take all the vaseline and turpentine-lard remedies they own to get their windpipes back in shape. Dr. Gregg-"Give the chemical composition of bacteria." Soph. - "Sodium, Potassium, Sulphur and Magnesium." Dr. Gregg--"And what else?" Soph-"I guess that's all the chemistry I know."

I

_ _

IWith Our Students
_ _ _ _ _

With the second semester came nine new freshman to D. M. S. C. 0. and already they are pulling strong for all the things that the college is undertaking in these reconstructive and progressive days. As is true of all the classes in the college, these embryonic osteopaths come from the four winds. Two are from Des Moines and two others from other cities in the state "where the tall corn grows." Ohio, Nebraska, Michigan and Pennsylvania claim the remainder of the new class. According to Miss Buckallew, the first class president, the function of the group is, "Every movement to aid and first to get a new college building." Miss Buckallew is a Des Moines product and Mr. Schaeffer, secretary-elect of the January class of '27, claims Grove City, Penn. as his native heath. Shake After Taking. "Well," said Smith, "I've taken a powder for my headache, a pill for my liver, and a capsule for
imy rheU,fiatism. .Wh.at puzzles

me is how all those things know their right place now that they are on the inside." Dr. Geo. Carr Taylor--"And I've noticed that those students who sit in the front row ,are 100% students. Those in the second row 80% students. Those in the third row 70%, etc. Who sat in the back row?

Thomas being Nicholas and ejected from the fray via the personal foul route. Blocking, tackling, tripping, slugging, in fact everything contrary to
. , .

If you want to make a horse take a bit, don't try to force his Another bad feature of the mouth open with a crowbar. Tell cheaper hotels is that the towels him a funny story. Then, if you are quick enough, it's a cinch.' are seldom worth stealing.
: _

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DES MOINES STILL COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHY BUILDING CAMPAIGN THE WAY THE PLAN
The method of our campaign is strictly a business Name -_---------------------------Name____ proposition. We are asking members of the profes------sion to loan us from one to five hundred dollars each , City---------------at six per cent interest annually for ten years. We State __.-----Street_ ----.---.--.shall be able to pay this back in five years. If you believe in your profession back it with your money Amount of loan -------------and all will be benefited. j Clyde E. Frazier, Treasurer, Commercial Savings Bank, Des Moines, Iowa. Make checks payable to: (A properly executed note will be sent upon receipt of loan.) Detach and Mail.
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^·rs·-.:.i -·I· * ·rifa-··l··1··ullbIE r·.-aa-r rar- -or^r·i-;.;r-·lv-·Y n-·-.·Y....,o"'*.PUB:L1S]ED: -MIONTHLY BY TH S hIL i -S.~Volum^e^. .ar.ch. .L_ )2 S

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SPJ. PEP, AN )
:'Elisha T. Kirk, Jan. '24. W' hae .all heard of that ine definable somethig called school :prit.;:":'; /Solme' of us who' : have .s; pent: the last: t:wVor three: years at Des' Moines Still C,:ol ege .ot Osteopathy' haoe saeeo: 'tifs O;i..
in a wonderftul process 'grol y nwt

30 ST.AT EST ':::.. * REP RESENTED
Cosmopolsistan :'C-op-: .t:dyi '
S Osteopathy at D. M-4.'s^

:and development..: :It i ars been . ;hehore was nly: few "ear-,-ss:'sinel a
czzt vl., in' t e ie,-ti';· (V.

£Des 'M.oi::za The graduates of Still.; Colleges of Osteopatfmhy the _ ext/ few years 'Will xext .onlt 'an influence that '-will-not sbe nation wid, abut cosmopolita as. ell. A'glance at6, t ItWf 0 tics' :reoently compiled .ibyt. registrar' shoves. an-' :'ezven' G.i, studentst enroi:a 'he'e. 'h
Irepresent thi rty' of£ tiefort
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·2l i.koL fraterniLtv' ea"c" ,, : ::Ar.qty :ancd each clique and clanh in ' a th e'ie la h ad its Gon n )MU dti
o i.pirit. f And sca

Ciar;' o2'aw

eight :states in.' tihe. uiion'ahd likewise .three £foreign'i -ds.:'::" Naturally, Iowa ICe'ds-: a l:1 -ine nimbehs wiithe 40 ofIh . W sUol 'g^ kisig tfhe light at I 1. *Y l .

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'IcI respeoto is · icvme ;-ybo'at'it ! - ,,,,,ili,,:,,,,.,,uUp··X·yr-,K.Uu iore '.tiaere 'is room ' or expect.' Iti: -Sma:rovemejnt 'a,_Xd 'Awe.' .~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~'1,,_·.
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on, :a ilitor v ettaer as thime ges to-. cuor . assembies wo'old. not : :reog.ie .e. group as '-scion.ing 'the .o t sam~e institution os :the ' had only eac. represeant Coloradou, Mary -:b,±*'eve 'twore years CaptinrsClosest Game of. Winter sweating bonesetters to te ras^embuies on extra man, du chusett .. sisi.p i land, Massacs, are earni g' thegreat 'We ago..By Rally in 'Lat "Mnaute .fthe ages ew. :Jrsey,, Texas, "Grippe? Montana., 'of tean work, a'nd ,o".e.ori . af 'Play: ." -'Waslting'kn With of Play. one minute to play, the,. Vermor: , Virfiia: are NWo begixni.g,:o ·nerationm. e, and :West Virnima.: CalifrI. ·'Dutchmen:. hooped. a la.ucky .shot ~-- . roe, hat no .one group or. mdi-.: ma, IMIssouriOlaomahoE ',iduiatl hae a monopoly ons..any P.-iayi,:n,.g. a bheady a~nd conistent) frZom the mid'dle of the floor, Island arid .Wyomir. 'ave. : "r-a siangle representative.-, ; ga.nae, in. spite of a weakened giving them a single point ':- . diately they called -gin. I Sutton's lanky j liniup, Coach From the Northl'land, beyOnda squad of hoepsters pulled' .the jtime ou;, to et -set for a stubThings looked the Great' Lakes, thtee o: our bacon oat dof the fir:e i the last born defense have'wanderad seconds wi-.th oly a few. Sblack, Caniek eousins : . for t'hirty ;seconds of th, gamte with ntfl in s i *:'t s 'WC:s :a o cai iendti . it was right here that into "the fold. One io'ne: ugis. inidental ly to :go,. but nd -. Clee-No school or B Sveryone t learn us tim3 d---"ved num-: one of the brainiest plays of the man is' plreparing a Imong tthe sa...te- -":can. endure, orm cWthdv istilAtionV jeoi the forces' minthe Empire. heart failure and .entire season was executed. eases oufs os : i; aike any real p9roges as .aslong. thier. .The ep.oneern..l . · After a short battle Wback and and becomea .'. O'ur pricekly heat. among the specta::}a; 'itg; *stanids div-ided. enticing' beache'.', at I'no.non.h'' forth in the middie 'of'the floor, : 'o uemntry .learned' thart l essoni' .in' tors. havh ser t tto. b o Am'od BA;a i ot of 'The game was played on" the Pamen got-loose for a long :1c1ivil Wo.r.:T thi:es. But Some' S:,'S to us l. ' .-..:' ':. '."' ,-':. -' :: : A.:We: i~ eeasel A:.g.for ti."y Caolic" floor, a.d was nip at the ba.ckborrd, with Nicholas 1 . ' only i,.s t'his :fae tor.o oAt': ta of' t'he "followi"ng it in ite a jackrlabbi, ,. .d tuck from t: C .till sge bt t':o thpe by lack: of Ag.aini.st a theounacad-o- onee hanee tue.est to s gt.',cg," Ha,:,d:ic;apnv ed 4 long-legged Nick grah ed the osteopathi .professi o.in generl.: thie the er to p -i5' to<:lear:n :to 'woA::k t.geti: ', ora'tic~e, "tewb:ng'~-', .... esi'ess, th.. of Ite. ' 'advanee and slipped it ovr the It' sounds" gIte.. meet -reboundP tailng 'rig ^wi riocjs :'itn^her' 'thle comn.on n.,terccts -<o:f th-e:: rim' with.out even slowing up as orig.inal ' drgies-'-"her;?.y purted be- -- 'I -ft:'o the -:of",r."t,.'. are:all. '-hat-,'. ':maklind, and :.'-d a:d.tied he crashed into the.wall. As : per fet .o'. Teachier: ,Name :.r t,,a ** t. -;e.ll.' W:it th referee- started hack for the *:9e at ~the .see'r .... .. .world's greatestde whistle !:i :-and.it i.,-, f . :'b t a-c.ehio'veam ent,. 'lien ' eh.' sat: ' e tV i.' atg of-,. .t'"al .both t*i: M'Sahan'-"ander :' Pupil . t o.D.u. :frodm '.w vtr.a..s . h '.i ; ams.' t" ':: ' ;:, page:'. . aco'r.ap'P.: ',aidyo .lea^tltilreA-:X :'t A .somz .ug. r-stea:.:; -::, ":-a, .ed S:- ::,''

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|S.e The a d e of medicaoltobring this cr 'about Nigger kids never have. any I simply wanft to s.tate nle| -econsideration. oaanda sill 1 ows. antd chiro '.soff-ei out them at ar-; Price. y Te se laxness in regard tO reasons asI see. them a- contfor aft the phonog.n -phl, ad.-'no "rth com~ n p v-..Z~rJ s aftcentrate d effort to obtai t 't s L -4 SI RIT A SGOOL SPIRIT.AND'O Clllve MA attgndingventio number of them is' as the sn ; a rds anen noi. oon'e fee it theiri jl recognition. I . C yE R A TION '" ont the sea-shore They" gso : ( -a) You .should secure this : * . ontnue . dv ainy. to; gotoetu ~ ~ ir. f e" c; e I p ~ "I sneered at 'the apnpeandi, an o pag ie ) ycause u wil bef y :* . o enlyv then thy have a tll te- I legisiro f ion b om :nio v.ery: much, lat. r i.t removed U8. 1.j.tdi--0: etls 0 - ts:;w. f :fe)C~ol;0aV~nlgit5;-~tW re e e rl s .froAm my: midst a. reltive i:.ha al iy.g ou p If to receive -). (1 Yv. can, 'be of greater:- W Vi sore: thSat^tey^n ee ple.which .tuncj service toyour ccratyr by 'i nc jl e a r nng t is sigin ea'tdirer u need t of,s "been: Su:pporting: for ":,seea -reis highly whiec siosuethin t t h i i years. I r hi h contended that if Provrt f v r oi r / n. a t 's I.w y.-th er e a r e Itio i : in th e a a t ' c n i fr profession. idence had willed :.:that.: I th:e ;osteopathic .a you r b'aiu d. o . sp mar; h aif-att ca . edo h e r o e ar s th e r e h a ve been shou d fly throuigh the air t.hey iy >:c'ir nd ea 9 ~ A t s s. c t i £:ioin ufi us s a n'ion f of he1 ( I) Yo u r.,rn~ r my ~~~ ~ ~~~~hie spyt~ hasy arisen ii: ~pe Wouild h-;ave be' equipped' e -,itlt cou tryF . .it ' ch will. 'att i set 2 0 '.!', li.i. k ind s of nte rnal issen sion i d w'igs3 ..nid tait, 'and. niow .'ii t;i 3 c d nd disputes gniawin -a ' th0 ve | e ost op thz r poo essi on as abe b te quarir h . bt toJ etter 1 ^ s, of r- p s plames.are. Cannon sight gVi| are l .ens, We Sirob some- h ich, con ntribue 'ny. -l.-n*i unldreds to' and 'fro a d oaAn wh :-at&ideard an its on ly^ theheal th-You us c give i a gatp E e no by hl Sionally, down.I 'I laug'nea sa that threatensg to split us ^ ,a t p h c conta ed domcally at- goIlf, and nowi: i--i:g a ly0 ' ". n STI L' - 0iecesi n this; exfle>tive tlhatg-; bofostano- ouer ;Hu areds n played under my. Very -' ose: eu ei . at we pth -^^pg^^il^'^^~~~~~~~~~~~~~riass(, . :It o' ig Tn to Atl' t h ose w & d I o L h , Ow½ a- a p ot gold at t r the t oi nirn. whom I r:esre -t, as :'; 'f cthae ot1 .. truth and have begun' atof ag l; fi43ptle s, s . .s... Lately.;..; .' yev-ia:e.i. at sat^N^s^^^^^~01 i A %± j cu ors ss o nd8s y ur on y ea n the wireiess: e ph - M p~ ron Th b '' e ~ t ' r i n w *.i nc~e h e . ver y b e - .against; S t -:X.-}-- a. VhW~ PK 3 w~~ould'~.f- ,frelzne ae r eginni, f o r ngsaft pt hic 'profession,'f wes as a transitory toy and :a p.ii I piddle,. and,: only .last. ii .niit fou'rte:en-year-old. sephew:: gaves have' not We ou wpv. (e) thers w h %'t-hool; There a all a- chance, by ' ameans ofo-, i trapt:Ien he had made. mt ohfs ou Ss-9.~ , :S '-'.~ '' u t v cit11o ' teachingi it:hE ata rsioev perv s r 'tl, :forget ofall ;ou knew,.tl :W~ wll heretofre uhnipop lar profession. own nead, a mess of wire?';id fron It t'' ^3 C, i 6-,.s rny av.2,-oS9

: pac cns in onu roj ias to po 'it outXI a si- l of prosptec- tche strings to be p-lled. ad at-~ -as:Itsnio~tell. u ;1At' k,4 TiU:2U..; rM-- asi..E-;nit;X- :'~ 'aousq 43 4JLJV UbA at' V~t'a LA=-N~l~Ss~3 VVdU8L I* un o b s .a rg{2 : s w C1 3 3' ..T e

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: non1' .ced.- in no '..utaitait the blu.w-g:lass c ue..-. whic'i a II ragfigg a: ' thie ime-". dive y- I . A body was cu.red "by it ti' the I :u turnaed Ito so-Tie other'. foolis

tle . (From the Coun : nve.r: "Four mmany "years: h 3 :: .si:stenitly . cn bated.-' inno vatio S and they hiave contiult'o.'innovateo withoit raa tude," gm yniy conesse odi i anaer. Fogy., 'L: : i g a -. I

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.............. largely o f hundred miles a0way. ':-: e :;:. hajve> been ad a up~imi t, n XS ;ine ol I 'th:.at ..... -s~dtm<.e d wit at 'ff 4$- 't enkrgetic.arid there^ scemns:small :you im higher e'fteers giving you' Iewover, n *new 'era is dawnin .;:"I: 'have battle to the .last Thi i t STILL y. : * j-;urtos to ris? It tt r nig o increase-. . .. areeli^0 o :do f tA.s S evde bi anti a e atte r r ep uyour i X expeiene alon- .f learned teaa p hwork 'together timet to 'ditch . fr my o;pinionS,; and., t6he onef with h n e n unt,, fore a. ^ j^ Thes bie ttiloyether., vit 'one from8 his5 therapeutalars ibi n;e fee'x .^face. -u'^^t o Sab u p ee et 'our ^form er' world habs "move 'n.: just-: 'd *..i: r. the s, rath:l".f 'titan i Yn i'ho'a;¢ ssn' d . t,. t d to work te -t r satme,.n: a '.sawny in shai ifhe foh a Ithink ,aa -rea-on-ery t to ' 'My lifae ahas feren.M h6 5 school yasas Wore -~~~~~~-o Whprepare -or war while-at eac unifonn cone to bul ' trtue of the lar ogeextea t devotl d t:o v> rig -' ugh ait;r i nd Usuall 4 only~ag ivd pe ths ec rtilcilar.-line and cept .of teir-' hiejel as "0ol ,of Think^^ oul ant.isorit tg of'is influence. - cstcoms'thic (S.profession on. a .firm .W-IT givel -y art r ,eking unatatmwao a na ria. 4cro-e opat p conc' ;,4 ion suh hold fofattra cted at o oies e, a pro feess opposed,' aad enu iIs t wo scisoli cs oc0se1dingsand 'd- .0tie 'Y u g9i- r- At w ill h ''^erro^r.If ^t he a c al t%. of j to Ti ndeD -f ,id ulterated 4a :1 ! eos as h.,e' a;.c'ip().'" s . .* , . .' ;1 ; , is-ed. ha, beer ;sildly' t a mu.: rve it o r tflit led Capa city ! truth. yh 0 our^ !io sc asem nblirc were ye- ; s portedX, the: deepest, >i pressiean sr amimlM ,. ,'bac n'nt 'aar the 1 :, It 15 np toeee c i s 'who are my fel.lw ,t'Zls. ; So'iw I.i: X

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h^id'beliefs'" aisid: It~a~y by ouir- "able. to: give var^^ious vised :nts xs. FIron. /'thie: -si kion for 'osteepa this and' w ouid^ .w ell. So that .whet in S go w 5'O it pi:de to, and ihear-.tiy aindo ... ra; ' extr~l~ eme radicals '1: the' nat j tell you. who e iumit oceiled th Iito.praettle a and .bcsjin to takee eer thirlng I. can'''t "ipreve .. te n : sp ? ..o over and ,an aglive part in .the pvco"essi00 has taen 'me eonsierva't"-a' taere _are all iroag-. s14 menthod.. Think it11 ^imabl e .gsra des. .and shiades i''" h~~ ovet uiniteat action.. ' we shall he 'awepa~re. 'to do our realse tha; I, cani spank tle e^ ; but -i': opni^on. -Sn 'rearaad to. every sub" | ,**.* . ,_< ._ _- _ ' ';.piartb in bringing harm-.ony . into v'hoie -:*wid, I 'have: 'Ay 5ect which s-ewes ma fv^'rdiscuss-^ 1 fou'i-d it :t: a... ... t ti..ns sI §^T . ; .'... SO!.^.^-^ ... the rsanks. tThe:smostma I o k on t - o s s w n s e i d i *the his to r y of s t ee h e ot o FTij ai i s It eucir discussi ana *w orsid scumoi ._ . on tlsŽ 1saw „ . ^,,. ,.. pathy lies l -I- ahead, It is go'eas :;, matda:m , pie.se;'. = ^ ds to need lthe .keenest o i P em '||like a r p ort at Thc: pr" c c-Aings'.inehAdI happer 1 - it to Ae:. . -':".' D .: at the tow ey;' ) h'" '._a?^ ot. - ." ' '- *" ' -- : ^ .:' ' ' .'- .: . to dis ern a 'd fol'ow' att-a it att -ohe eaI& : C S sy'ciewi' i.5V .It wad -eqi res .triP -d. eLnd i eV ni tsa ' e . ^ .r. o Th||s l-;swstb' siid 'sa . : a mght- t f-.', i'r Perely to 'a- sl ita r -o r ire scarcer a3.'ta' .a -as' ye-- csa: he rts to car na ' I V'tease, r cdaas o se-^ s 'Wxh tare. rv abWe , "o sw iifl'ii George itX"d ie Anhi' .. nststell her'fO. meo ".' '.' st h come s swdaypr! epare, rt r iee 9i > n-' satisfied (: e 4 % ag''3.OAl - asa')-. he a Insect' ': A~t ."5 - t ':ne,".' ic's ,; : - . fe t oXlesafin 0 0Gi" ,t S iS^ ^late} lThat .have a. good dose-... :' : I ;y.c-l e ' O go : -i~a-t. *wiiel -. raal-lff-B^He^.-m. ja0tiir : . oNl: . :AMfiw e.l 'y*zj,*<^namin^R7 >ef-.fe IId^'^ 0Of' .ti di ... t da.. ,. ' Im Tea. ,|Mal

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aiun$i, T;hey:- shid th I~~a~:~.s-e~c~ f-;~r~ Igj i · Y-/iS·' a ~~ 2 ~'v: :-of -xenioica ~ -i~*,-7 to :au'ei'l iwopotio e anJ Prop. or oil,, :a17q an T: hBushinress :'Mnager... ' I:-Cramer aa vwas 'uiflers nu,-d. b, heved 41 n6' l~~~~fs: ~ ~ ~1-:eu:.,r 1)ector. J,-:H. St:yls; Jr, theIaschool of practiec vwhose.gaduTi PR > J ^RS~j ^: .: . . .. a.lli.geY :V .' 0 ~~atm, are zcme.i as: Home . Diand *. not t gie. the5 The Dean's dau% I gter must be Foreign Ms\I-sionaries, '. Appic1ion or en as -'Iy second It need not be stated that She is -elas nromae'r: i yat. ost Office in 'love or oat of it. no~~~~:51 WClid ead nt o on o itsthiS610'1 is ihtheji llopi 1A.iC school is *Allopatiln^. 'Sc t'ti irrpressinnhat I most certai:ily out of-disposition beliee A at; Des Ah boines, Iowa,. pening. udoninatingitheir these days . . ':' · .,: *, , ' . * .-ftt even:the homeopath;c -doe. That. al regula rl sn r .a-. :j Wt :_ .' iatio : saat s and. geniuse s, IwWar . .n.Oscar. Samuelson '.ap- to is barrdA-A t outlh The, present system is maminlyta peared at the Freshman B smokmNet . 7 T A.>SIie 7-.DA stitute', *Besidestisthee I e-s with his forelocks 'brillian- 'controlled-by the Rockefeller Miss case*. I-.Jnfoiuna^ly&hoe i . hi g tiled, they introduced all around *siont Boards are Eontrolled by rga again., ': ns ' d.a _- .r .w medical doctors as their officei I how utofqacer None of this year's .material Tfhis system will go on' as long "'011lv theohr l tlj~s unprop:L:~:~·itj~ioaus dead of whiter will be lost by graduation, and as no outide pressure is bro'i' It e £ sa yte: hiO^ d n. `fhe re^ Ji YCox -:ea .. aad &Ife.d-j we look forward to thC- inext: to bear to 'change it., -jus a pat8en; eI : At the present t-ime. here is to ,e foM basketball season with hligh radvce. T di being. carried f.orthK hefiih hiopes for one o0 the fastest a:amY~o·v?·ermeent was ekIg ws · .* : . . - . :. teams among the smaller col to estaBAish a separate Missiorsubmt1 heif II Ieg-e:..A. late start handicapped ary Board *fo'e Osteropaths, This or not. iofn epit .. [_'mda:y hPoacher's fountain 'penr q onel brought, '.about b e sh .eked. in a ,ghastly spot ,on- a the sequad considerably in ,t:$he caironly.' num, n-csneier' *the. reutatn bg winter just past, but from now *suffiient ';mmbe3r? of ' vely: shirt o,ni. The. offender' : con:ser emht on things are :bound:.to go better, tious hristian osteopats* " ving:.teean clamped to-the left' h Vith_ ..prospects .of a new: cal- ing application; for: mission workc,. W: adi^se opeatoan'. enpocket -,th. :, spil:D gave lye lege building -and possibly: aan , That osteopathis should. be ac- tio isinvitbl, Te muiwa .. sta:-tling e'ff-:c.t f a :heart f:all :. froimoee; as 'to overfiowiug and the. bumped. athletic plant of our "own, we cep ted as^ missionaries canbe suffe should malke'em yagnrat2'nfoe -;:'..f: m.,sia,. ao.ult, com4ple-e,, take notice before ll sit ':up'and *better understood wen :wfe-now ae 'ong. : " that^ Doctor *JohnliiJ ',eipe: T. S pin rested-iear by; one '-wondered: he didri't Government expertes', with 'a *bbtnizonie'-and^-,A push it over into service, Mayben:t for figures have found that reason. why:Mits practn i t e t *e therb -wereQ e two-spots. :: . an: average of more than eiglt pathy has done iso uhform io nte o'^~Qters•l I. , cantr Ipork at::Poucher bat l l: no fo that:'_:'Doctor JohijIbpwr ra m : sle ower '":at" ;attIriW' eic. days each year Ais Apst- on" .ac- *personally *that 'I *can 59see. he could not do anytil cont of illness by the 42,000,00 ' 'i " O'f i 'v." - ~ " ' ' :"-" :on Oa: bei missionariese and"i opeatn f at Oi i~ i men and women gainfully em- should niot 1 z Aid .t '. P-oiicher in American, ployed in'. the United:..States, :or assure you thatIwilldoal ^a'g ^~ -hi wshnde : : French it .is.Pooshay,' In : · LfhTq ho q,.4-_-. a little less than a milion years in ,Si nyV i'poerIto.br Ee:qq, r nYiddish it's- Cohen, :wasted in the- UZ S. seoah ue timagine'r twa -the i, he yea r yeach c'niditionwente aope!ra had h who ',vas ~o- ca lgeon inaTurkey, Tha. :t'sl : I.:ae, to . say"',: :l from that one .caiise. a S All to-. shll *have his 'righxtful place -i Om o die s i quackery, hi gether, Osteoplaths, let's redueoz mont throughout the war be-; :. X;'A.naw::ioW, 4,: 1.,:eshfai: are tiat terrific waste to the vanish- .sions'' *Or, whenwe realiz 0erate..:for in thatni-an.With delicate; and successful.XoperahlO ro And, -o .breakingthliroug:h the :high -board 'ig point. on · .' ]':-"' that the leading missionary sum-. the mostchariable, n fen at "te St efrot of the- small :.,,it.-, I. wonder is there anything BONES.T.T.RS CLOSE'
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heohad performed .a very *har-atanism of.the r'ost d o causet (Continued from page 1) D D. Styies ost 30 pounds 'i cha't wobbled' off' :t.he: : floor,: t l am hea or a higl the ruer days dieting, That .isn't l:ea,:n-'iy^'K roi^a *nrin '"- ' . -. '* '- .. tionx on -the ie i . I Turkey, said, in a p:ersonal:in-J not feel justified:: lahgh f':rmy':, a i..,tr istat:ement of ",se-Bu' to the usnual gang of sip"r s aa 7 'less' b .ut e i:resting^ fact. ' It porte:': t turned out toc watch terview with the writerafter quacks outsid e o :at : retired as a mis- Ieyviciously.-W J o r .eninds :e of t/he : day that, the .boys, wh'ether win or I6se, \having '*been v iprofesso 'bei; generally enI it was the best exhibition min crs two *sionary:. "If I 'wer-e to gobadck ^son, M.D. i Medical Critic and goSSe. m n-tier.mysteries of D. T. years. Before the garme. the lo- as * missionary, I; woulddeem Guide. / : ! .:Dowv::ri:g %diicqre, I 'mean), a cals were conceded. only half a 'is the. best' advisable ,policy to ' ^^:^^ ~:' .::grmp:, of. studAnts acordiagly' chance on,. account of their poor' have a (good osteopath.^' on. miy" Another'.^'feS Mechaicimi Goo ene; Wa'n uly reagon --this The nen'grossed were clustered cpndition, but. to the whole squad staff. : are ?r~f.- 2'vtb-,± is a aiout.: tlie: scales :inMain Hall,- we give the credit.:for one o.fnthe conditione -is not possibled s be-, ....They wer ... essing weights ,and ganmest fights in thie history of acuseof Ie niarro.wness of the: poisonig?" -:'esifyin'g saime W,'here ver, fiea. the'.school, : ' . .. ' nmedicrlI pr'ofession,". -<:*; ':;, ^ : Pr-scbdous--"A for-ni 'ofautoodsteopath, ithr studentinto-ation , .or- w e permitted. Whie I .'-'No one mai out-shonoe the rest ... to so th MUeo h he asp~tin, : eoked 'on -they: guessed: Sara of-his team-, but ever: .ingile.-onie **or-7ion i's whio:is intferested e gradunate,. to -; ''. -----* *--"-^;<:^ *^^ ' .n: ' i ng ::,Schwartz of 't: P'urplI'e squad gare kall: he m or. Foreign iM-issions shouild ; Doe :H-upn-tea ---&ad but two|c -as :185 Hoe. :,:and€ !A:. o:son' as 120. I de, ha-d.' To Captain Nicholas goes: matef.it k ow'to:the editor on . hdalt 0oA catientsodie ''C: :.those ::young.:: gentlremen 't e'di:t- :for -thedecsi' play, lui:o'-. '-heo3e: their tuition: receiptS: but:t I a received" noble': .::ep: be listed piath, t flo In di Y o ,'*a::;d:.physiology:: :grades c'::ome tha.t ---- de,.mra::. -effort.. . ls't ' torsg ad It.udent s wo h a that'unacy t :-~·~, --- ~·J~~~~~~ : :; / . .{.^".^
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at senuec drlino A ^al~fl nonenshio 4-4 the |scha<3iedule i~i~t ishod, but int Olsexn, 411 nstice^ *"to^C rola Sutton sad i his squad 'it- B auLf be a 4 that

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., 2 ae a Laore: apparently a.t a standPl ' ''^ayig ta Vatoia **'off fifteen still , swal e.c rdnatiou: ThreeA fin 1ŽjOStti½ with the best secondary diiitatioaJa E1 0. A. poshgc8ege. in the State, tie 3ieo : goere a- late tion of fctsl bead. M2ambranes aaaged,.aft otltfens of the. fifteenan intact but .ll the fluid at aide of |ltert, -to witeht th -offensive ,faee instead of( anterlor, to occifay'I. |^:^squablea
s^^ystm ha' s~id provcd is: showx put; thus inacreasing suisa
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112. a .M 'aQ 4ii L IJ E J1Th:'. 1926, 11,1. i 18 411 . * 0 1 . 6 SO .10 * is 02 ** .4 1.5 *2 a 8 Freshman "A" class: Beca-aSe *0 0 0 0 11 of fine job of tExterior rDecoI 0 0 2 .:-. rating" ofn the collexe building will be asked to submit bids for pa-inting and decorating the stew college buildinIg and new No., Th8 !-D .. hospitai.?*

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covered frrot Ihis attack, of theria, We are adv¥ised Joe learned to' sing, that "I don't *waxt to get rell." wonder why. How come, de- (Joe *waaI at the hospital.)

And you can't thimn of a" htivi 'Cept "many another fire of cpaea ehat you've braed, Joe l3ader has conpletely rea AndAi 3feel your ecarago al> y you

. bySP. totcal -of $2Q: mints rolled .scending wudt-sn lthe The minembraanes were ruptured tam, as compared YFre'shman A- rusaks have beer up byt t: ii u to g aduatin ' yWo 2v0 w^^9'i-t 11ith by the opponents. While Chatreby reduci g the descending .increased:by the iconig Iis.s .of A aty at hI t. d . :' | wedge. Beatrice Fowler andII r. Ed they hawd you your sho-ot. z^^ ^ of- an aosclutely eonaater t ^AmBd XDiiatatiou w/as complete in five St. Louis, te edefense. hZ4as, *beetn UW^^aiIre, We beli eve teir too, A Pabor progresaed conig wdill be to our ratual ad" With. ckngrtattatsd, a-tblmes, nullk: in no. raislates, a ; brliun 310.4 so rapidlyr ta, t .threa skpefi vc'ial Y * cllii s 'aNI Ard tell you they i- mig-ahty y 2 gain^fes; hlave stire stockty osteovantage. IWe welcame- thorI yo'eve pase.a ; noo pathf g rV~L$ been outplayed,. tears could so.t be p:s,evouted,. it a . granca a.4 via.) "Ain : : Co^^|ach .P.^nttoi2" ?rver ani system feeiin:."";*-A Feshman a A, enjoy ing t? e **', of defes iUnin and again Case to. .1540"J .treated youar iI A nisiqss' .igtisiri±to B , of r±.eevhsg Whlen 7taai ' patient ..wo fingers atiiitctinn that nilunli tiS a: anaae^^i visi g"^teans;dea itad aro2L aO~titiCS1kaions for i And he's lived to tell ,the tale j Vwas not increasead after, aone scrvie'sa. 'Since almost the be- Azsd heos handed you a. t labor, lalanstl ginn ing of thme SChool year he i * for your~fe \**.^ '*',. T 'arf;. L1)±aaa thie em ploy of one i Tlheav tl yr think sou're up ! i .g0Xrbrar| over lower uterine of the ptPds" down t'wn ea^ : ' : : ... .i heaven. 'lA^ tt^y;asog.:o^sx, fowrtd thetai eg r tur dagdilatation, houses ing Icertai hours each iFa" beyond this vary vale :r emlrat",, / 'so rluptured. La day. BiddingI 0 taflta:st otat 15o4^'' shioti; ha, been so kceen AS you. prettti tat £ -t: as-ad upon your knee. er was ayovein les than an for this man's services teiat his Mik t1mb,~~ eta z bae.. , 5with1(1t with. sobidI 'pain that <i UIIOIS0115arc!s .hour; while Say, °'sat it a grand and giA' employer Mn to wnd rreiuis .*" ous feelin/." &fty: 'palts *i pe. JaN nrxt :hi ene rsthetite w as.5 'Put U5("d. : . * .- Olive Matfthews June ta s o alnmity 'Wins' v, mei.- 2.'?Si up H^|ri^ rotled I~~~~~~~~~~i~·c~rl~q a, wr li sgesf tliee mUaldSa day : a tai amoesua eataC. 'ow be .asand £ 5&a± 'sosidcra'io' Lucky' 2 WoIldn't it be. awful funny ift fewer nsab ofn.rs. Faiiur dildd "by saidOrS aI r t .. nault- YrouU!.'any- so, to rcn hh wonst, you, Conn. Dr, TyI-or ever rt to0 make ood on thee throws ig, .Dr. Pacirxars only tillaws bell?9 Vuclkluyvlaeea wae'ti lffay .m CA: ^1;. eat thisfee o'who ganeA. ^ at Prof. Gregg forgot how, to I '^^rd.ch^ a elose. Abrenace ofa tectuetat WN{ £7. whiny. tics embarrassing qv eation a ? "1 hamve prervAtfd Kle~ l Dr. Steffen improved in easna% taiWling tad waly. alla chip samJ toolY tp AERAf' |A^r4'e.- l-ter awi ainer,' at» ( 5o 'S.l' -IT' Ika raid. "But os'y to. rub withr It I tDhr. Sjir^' would getf real angrwtA .tb-ug th Abse andBu- I g^ve Yyou a bui Ed stter y.stemr Johnson evesM w'k."ed, IA "i~tain & teioross substaiee' Dr. '200VABt&Lg~e seduned te ^day(. ; other :eyee imakees it uniit foir drirkj become rouy raod~anbl fights: St"it i'Thiexw e t tde ©Idd Dr. John Swarts became big Mrcl sit t,-g' ~ ~ II . : bal* 1... i feciaI^e^; ' fatyle, ? aune "Cntl w:-sInIW Onet"^^^ "Rub. it in doc; Iala it Ir,: Dr. Styles h~ecame *hlciny?!„

diph" Then the he goes tirag •. t mg. that Ad once again tyour reputatiou saved,. son.g, wal ipaud ad gio.i We "Aint 'it. a feehn '.' Joe! Aatd yo 'N'u. 4'npii four 'veayst L 2$ . F oilegett. And YOa-c managed to *uquecAI;

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letter is typical The PI t ling of %arge nutrrbcer received from a parts Of the conntry cpmamendag^ If. LI., Schaffer's article J7L u last ISSUe.. XC L 10 "lhe Ed (orof The Log Book, i-D.M. S. C'. 03., DesM-ires, Ia. ^ : My IDear Mr, lBallingeAr "^Althio your paper was opened ratlher indifferently, all icndifferen~e diuaappeared. the instant I \ ; .icCO lMri, -Emmet Shaeffer's f4 Once again the students Crticle. C. 0. deserve1 of the1P. '. : iw congratullaticons for ttsclr * pro- i O.-*^ -: gressiveO'ess!' ;*; /*^
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D-ian fr the past few dlays -1 terest in. the. coming I nterilass3 . trach battle has beeni rapidly rising, tcthd now that we are able to
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vtnoun(Xce.the p^rogiern

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ourlg; lifo hi^^T.s. in Wti tt a : en;inditt nd. in te-mr ^t, Boaiily ilutroveI t 'Il 1,' *cata'.^4, .U.L -wi~ t - t.oJ- d .t ct (-ro '. " -^ *.' t ., * - 1 I mt*c-coss oulntcr I-oi . at new' ain. ,^1.1.,<.^ .u atltention, I st-W tuld like ci s 01 I-hic maxoe Icil aint. .w tI - .- ho ti). ^ *' '',*-d.: i^'. t 1 t ttt -npoC it'irett fhct repij~ltonL (nili"n. " " t ,' -< I u^ rnol~ n ' r~ an -n t -: -! paip^. in&-, nc xe&n~n, ^ vci ch to wr-i e an art- cle a: g-eut Ig c-t ne-s. tadvaonc tI inillcfl b „*^*.ring.. *.; itgh IC/ * ,it..Iit, ,Aitdar-cr-a t t..i- putu-so ca t^fn subject, for:- the next Ia- wval. is now. brg-n it^,,,j, .^ ^ .. p . .^ ^ ^ § t 'ibn .tarise vcitl A t' .iler. mi - '^ t f lb. ^Axctae *-lce stucnl ;ra cour e whitc-t *tiatt srppealect :a. --. ^^.?tata, e~i ve<'"ded, ' Inur at I f C.0,hu -^. .~ t ti.aer hslineeI, cve one uttle, .atad clhe.Sunicre 1 ' tili t 041 .piert~ntg 0.t0 ifn.tA~-. / * - *1 K! f' t ^ . ,T^ . Jtcide~ad ; to inittSi tiec-ctiO rt tjtiii --t. 14 .. . . .t- ^ h hi nlege o1 Oate paciwi bt , 1 f0 ti .fa,. -h i in .r- liii Littp ulitt . 1 tnt i ii oilpac- O l ! lit to itv n 'osteopath as n mnt sbi- t n 1 here, I ci- I- (me' orI ly l ocher MtiD. aS i. c 0o lh -i- - rthe :'thai as ' O - O N-. a 'rumo- - tie effect that ts heat h nrn I,.n3 CI aY,.. cio xrha c-tot Ipitic osteopCa it t-i.** oateY, wilil V.Ta Cn-t cl.thieic-n^ niof 3, bonp . as sent t-:: :i ,tt mere aLi.: Ma t i- tt. *Tt --. ('*" ,A ~ * entr t a heSO expEltt e-thtxr--.'l -been W: oe cth, 'but ha out. atan ~ t-- . .~ . 'p fat. ; *" -n . : Sool. Bnidhng, ; . at the bacor. *~-tC(-'- y 'uct and e' *: ii. u-nable C - 1 ive that statem ent, fy * ver httle ecu" I Iu(ee S alnd ; : ; .*e -m n t fn*t„ t Ty . ' ^hurdles 'till 'Ph ^--*»' * ..^. I,;'. .. " liv C ic rr i a ct I * tt -* W U yott k ^ ow toy cu rn atbo ut it? t ll I )c tanand &entty, itooly k, 2-4 Eli E I hincT, I, -.i. ie n gt . ri i '0 A fte~ lud ' -e I tic g f-I I-w ; St ian t -t m^: cia 0i: t of^* unborn I-f ee I Vt-O 0 -th s ab ject , it 1 iu-t o c c ilt *".itecl d .wint- Other hard ougIht ance.: O eaqainta to anyone wel / ; . ::-*., .' ** : ' .' ?^ -to m e tha i tmtgtht jn u tuii f'L- thne --eol I e/ erv obvious ia It-a-" winer, will agoir atito, s ;n:co *a- -t, sic er Lit, tornDwh tytof' a. rr 1 t
t

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thoMe who do notknow the U-t Neton'J wos a cirem t disCO"-N-i on lhthn B nto to bci ngt borne -tIt'ttet nta s cy . in c leo tin t, VIII - I .atitt, 1 fn oribly'to ev-eryo1nc ehl.i-ot 5 te~s ?ppe -he 3iscover~ed:'the ira 'f t nt- the ncts; thel nov rJoyte ate secretary of a nittn .:o G;liT n` TIJ p impty bVt 1et:|graiity „ ts CZm-rilaie ac tion, l Y io-... 't o 7-? while, i-ag |thetr0 is ioaJ> an m .t-sor o' 5 it p^^ ]: nt-t "i-e the .rcsccs -this ;it} and 'tltitn~r.te 'few h c ;o ed at ticir altn ^^'l cter- n- -inrg ' rn f uaid- ci ntic : : '(CottintCt 4t onn pr~- 2) :' * - gratViit. 1tv.w '' *'^ ' ^ ^ C -* J ' cit-y in- -'au ^ -hle v ci-y e 1la i nt \ 7 Ao't', ^ ui ttc-ceti.- V C 3^ ar
fot ot. 0 iti- t rk . /M r. .'Bu t--ca o

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T'he^ cimcu vcondued by De s 1 P;iAs Stilt college teoiyH~thf' Are ^("cnsttintly .. rowingv . g i..h / ojfe, Lacting 1mor. 3a Hand :m~ref at'ter)toion :obiy015 aimo g h people .of. t le ity bot also ~ong 'those who- a6e contoi-qk lati)g -he o O's ispathy. rri^ 5 tica 01S -'e ; e-nrolled h. 'O.' L-gtling experience oJ ant1^-old 7Iii to tlier iot olym now 4 )Uw 10r iI time to come- Thon III 110 vIn ITlilC VOIUC 0 be so. *IJ t le mente ale tot. b,( se.- ' o .i o-uvedfiorn not cnly seein. vani03)0 pathol'ical coiid' It py.f^having oa -.opportunity 'to ' trea''. ie och- the supeanisiQpz o th-e heads of the various 1 tteindance at Ct v a V' clS'.' ".'s griwfn to .a ,. suc~prnp:^ton the facilthat :ot the b chrol, treatigin pooma a e'ta have become m: C q .t -. he "A tu dent t 1 and phyios.s are kapt .bfeuy meettmade uapon ,e deimds ing)
i 1,^I
uSc

physoejsa dating hi'5 jx E6 assigned i::~i;i'':m.for 't:eatmenti,-' -. or and asinior. T y -are' cHoulc 0 i .-. I.D A.'. L. '.,. 'or and his's: :'jImean ' -" tat like : 1 aI IN tifPU iest ppoxtdaitv00tI t I ti a n s '.:: ". '. _t.it. 240 :. u.[£idre' !.!h;, ' .'.'M1: i']iga.- . down there." Ii ,pP'c the : pth cgp es3 ofe -o-tt'S iig in. 'I ii-e pra t-Ial T. wr. n .. Dr.:. :a..o'. '..'H 'r'' ': 'Well, I sthyv n'sthe actual palIpa iIr asj pe!ra. tics. · .ils T ,, -: ost * wvrt'h. W^ lo-' T * ^-f Y .'. treat-mtnt of patient ,. T£is caCI 0 hil:e and nteresting ,ranch of I t. '0':., -'..:iv.ho':,:' get th.e i' -uilt? be insaoe possibie' oni v 1 sviniri c inica l .activity renders "splen 1ora cli ic patien ts alid 'II. 14 did sev'zvfe to tIhe childreli. . needI:V'OPIDr (-' D treatin' iroomis. hile .'we We irig't .. ' · ., . :" Doc.tor J. neckert,---.ipasmrodic inora fortunate ci t is r CO The cl.inic for mental and Torticol 'i? -Well, put .the 'ath-an other oite-saihI (Iho'. nervous diase gave ase se asistance i:.Ient to bed-and if its a wom- or c1 lasses are a ledy too lanr. to 2:a50 ases, a.U. of which weM- a.i apply ti-he electronic theory.' for the, number o' troat ing COI. t1re.ted by seio students. . room1 twa- lable.

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A lot of the girls are finding The eye, ear, no(se and throat P work included 700 cases demon- out that they can't unbob it as st',ated before t,he students. The rapidly as they bobbed it. many condiio.s pre s.ted gave a splendid opounity to see difKIRK ON EXPANSION
fiiculties such s will be encount-

'halos. p.

-

ered in the xield. 'he benefit of D. Taylor's advice in treating such patients -- makes the work. doubly valuable, to tbe students,. In the field of · bstetric5 c the o clinic 'wvs the stori's first. assistant in 380 successful cases. The husky youngsters thus started right on their jo.rney through life will become great boosters fo 'r o-"teopathy and: D. ' ' . M. S. C.

(Contin,'ed fro'm, page 1) why a new building is almost imperative at this time. i.
In the first place ott'- pikes :nt

TidleO *t a0es 1".3 tltiifibC 1111'A thea;.a~ :year . * 1a.-1922, liste:^ dut^ring" reya•ehtd
^ l^it

s~t~act ha se.

~o total

of

Yf'ith ti ier e norare receiv'sf Pesnswhop ing rel tOrm this asuot Airu ing -the''^current year, the nuimhr^ iill greatly exceed. those .of am- other year. The work will. ^etserIously handiapp~d beeauIms al the cirowded b nitions. Ctinios;. 'ar:-conducted by: Dr. S. L:^... Taylor 'in ^ surgery; Dr. la Taylr,.or gynecology; Di: A. T.E Taylor, aedi t-os; D k G.' C. Thylor, . * ear, nose ard. ~ti-oat;' Dtr.' *C.. VW. . Jolioson,. orvo ust a-d m/en'tal diseases; Dr. T:; B.IBachm an, obstetrics; Dr., J. ^i, ^Sehw'arts, ;ger ito-wainary diso.ricloide by Dv. 1. E-Ayl mleded rrmin--or and n-atonsilecii0D^ 'operatcions ferom

pWandr. J &be il^ WII

.

Style", -general.

lom es: to 'serious -*abdominal I wo%^rk, 'Assisting; ti the 'a-cerating orn Dteefes t6oinus gen is ^.eral .*Ihospital a part of the ti^aimi ng; o6f every student ie. is taughtlo- administer anesthet cs. l nl agi~e 11111aidl Dr. Taylor may

building is wholly inadequate. This means that if 1D.. S, C. M. c0. is to continue to serve the profession, either a very considerable sum must be spent in reDconstruction and repair of the old building or a 'new building rmust be constructed. It is i'Dr. J., P. Swart, -in chtarge possible to continue mrach longer of . the glb ito-.'iinary clinicmthe. attempt 'to turn oat our handled200 cases' which cam e for.' share. of properly trained osteoearaminatioin ?'nd treatment. I pathic physicians wi the th pre . Laboratory work was .done at ent equipm.ent. ' T ottempt to the D, 'M. general hospital arid repair'' o- reconstr.uct tihe old by the. students at the Lschool' building is impractical for a laboratories. Thi clinie affords number of reasons. The location another fine opportunity to do is on high priced business prop important worlk under competent erty with no room for expansion. It' would cost more to mlake supervisio. " · A' grand total of 3,00 : cases an adequate structure out of the were C.ared. for by the ge ner al old building on the present site ciinic.Cases needingo speci Ial at- than to .. construct an' entirely tentioh .wea 're' r, rred to the new building in- a less 'experisive proper. depas't,-e nts' Students and io:e . desirable siituation were placed in charge of the The sctool cannot continue, much eases after to aination and less grow, without a newbuild' diagnosis had been made before ing.:' " ':- . -:/ ' the students. DiDr.'Styles the... :This -- ew building is necesclinician is' ver-y :much elated- sary in o-der to acc 0mm'odate a over the work done and :is..: stleaCdHv increfasing number of thusiastie over i!he prospectsl 0f stuvdents. We already have 'more a much greater general clinic students than can be properly when the new school is -,ready cared for with the present facilfor. operation. iti es, and we have every .reason tb believe .that students will EAST-W~rEST -- IOWiA'S BEST. cornd iu to come in larger num-' You may sinaga of your Isle, . ' her o ," . -. ' . '. : ... '. ' 'Of its beauty and stye, - ' We nmost have rmore complete' And.of q'reens of that -. frop- ly equip'ped, ard modern ,abi'ratories i- which to g'ive the stu-

A -man, -a business or. ran insti'l t tion of any kind is. judged 1ij tie average person Iargely ac cording to appearances. And te gardless of the high quality ou training given in the ititnioui he prestige and standing- of .s college and of osteopathy *will JI treisseidously. improved yva 1niT04 rn," wel eqoipped building. Suid a -mbuilding Will altract: nso< n students of goo qualificatijon If osteopathy is to grow and ad] vanee we must atwtract aore ve' trai ned students. We neSd mpr college nine avid vwornen. Hov maryT sc-i. students, Ihaving spec] one to four years in a wel ped coll-ge or university will hi attracted to our school, in ,it

proc-ut hiomxe?

..

',*

:'

A new building will inspir. students to do better wo.,rk__:` to keep up a better morale. 1 J the industrial. world this priu] ciple has been derhonstrated h. yoad a dbubt. If we wish to .a" vance the. best interests of thi Osteopa'thiz profession,, we- shoul neglect nothing9 that 'contribute to the physical, itellectual 0 spiritual fiber of our students.-If properly equipped and at] tractive in every way the neil building will bring us many ner patients. O'u cline wjilblarger and better. With new, amn up-to-date equipient we. a have a greater, nutmber and ety' as Well 'as a -better c4ss ci ' patients. . If for no otherireason.,W

should have a new bu dingI i i:j order to adverltia- the g.rea1 truths of osteopathy in 'a desir sble w/y. ' 'V -shoutld conforn to' modern, st,:Saards of' progre
and equip! ot"r school in- .such . ah

re|'q'uire *in' handlinrg the great Those sweet little Annas, With- their leis and bandanas nIumil: .of, c ases wi-ihih ceome fNr ber And palis, -in languorous 2i!'15a~tte~ntion." Three .. thouSard six * - rhyme. ' , huinm'dcred'. cases were h-a;'dled dur' Alaing" the: 5ear.-vby-Dr. F'ayior and But early and, late . ' ... " Just give me the Corn State . . hisassistants.'' With its blfstering cold and Dr!.^'t. L'Lola' Taylor -through the " and its snow; -: : '..yn:eoogica' clinic, handled '475 'eases(. 4g: :1.1'i the period "named. And thereunto" join opportUnity - A school in' Des Moines-' iStden:ts have·the. t^o/,so tasi.v tmhe examinationg iit of. :'::. Dear' old D., M. S. C: ',-..: ' : -**..:'. ; - - M . *J. :A.,; "'-': :':atents and in mar ig--' the' *'

way as to sw that we baliev1 in 'It.If osteopathly has the. rea dents .through training in tbe value that .isclaimed- for :it, thei' scientific fundamerntals of cem- it' deserves a homie and ;a settinq istry,' biology, histology, physo- toxsusonsurate ;with itS vallUel. ogy, pathology 'and anatomy. An And ifC we of the profession- dic adequate foundation of these not Lhi nk eniugh of :our schco subjects is absolutely essential to to back i.t to the' limit in secur, the equipment of a real physi- ing a new and imodern/ home cian and c-ant be given only by then we deserve al ofs tie 1al havi ng properly fitted laborator- Of recognition: and appreciatioi ie' of Sufficient size.which has been o'"O' r.-':lo intl, ' ·.:n-order .to: do. justice to. His pasu; Ot eoatoh ty a' .a.:e as a patients wnen- n .leaves. seolol ! .i' .fo.ued-:'on. .,.age:..4)i.: he , I i
,I , : 7 . . 1

1

; to strength of character; that

THUE:LOt) BC4O( ~~~~~~~~~~.T
then,
a
,

f'?theavenue -to inward pe~ace." the avenUe to inward peace"' ^ G.H. MoH so:t', .---T 'N j ' 'q" r o IiINSctr) 8,' :' !:, 1 ...., og: W' ':' ....I} ....... r fe o c t.h
: ee

"Wi these collegej "Her i"' F na.s 'pi t 1il o.e vl jtrained' men 'and women make: his eyes.' Jje . co.tacic physicians and i . St e'a: Sail down .the better > : 's eo:n: '[an thoeb:'wheo Oav.re-j s'ti: s aIa sid for ma3 i. 'hi . sP ': ceCtved o-.l :: } i ; }feId i F schco J.:5:nh ecI e us how it : at t.
' e
': .':ain

IH

ui m,-ri , ~ Jx a , T ink

-yU c-ant set down no. fxe, j."? ;rkvil

.'-: cto ; ~' r,.s .s

U. Dire,_to " :, S:y.': , P,,':{For .. ,-. i.2_,. .2" :.( 3:::..::U ^

must answer the question 1.Los Irwin: '1, t". ..W -.iitai got aii 4"h rm tiv'e. 1 There- a,re a' ay D, novan: i--~ <, ., ..... .„.,. .. :~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ , "'~rs trobl ,_% t -iouble ai-r':'' .... ' he go t.':.',',rf; in:!:ei | ma office. :.'' ese " r .... ~ h'ris it'. t.re-sons fo. 'ihs stand. llS i s ,-' ,'
,':irct, air<a'.how ,'-.::,saom ': alU._ ......J :, it beh'auise Jhe. ' ;, .a_
(' M' Jone. o

tango.
Teillum at th

theAirst

aurn.
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.a'ee the coile'ge His

Mrs. AilrIz,
aS Io>

Pretty good .at

hetsel;

;4 teopath'n

'Wlfl'&o'

^i.A;!

':TRUE freedom -.. t' .. . 'by.a thorough conqusa o01 .a':.i

DOUBT si.;irks in cs-eopath,
but Itrue faith woslt,

. h ti :.d'a chanUce .0 abi' t i The aanr: Refuse absc x ai . and . more re'".All' aany' cus ' i no me like osteopth rthe l Ik C than matter h't dpends upon corryi.a ' horse is like p a laying ' nd. Li! the college man haf TheIt ireat We t are With , n:. p ,:*,'%.Te fa mora s So uth.. lea0n'ed .aP' more than the 'the o G-1t Bu ldAaaprint." st.wiAs--.Bo:anmr:,:,m £o:.n ev5e,~ : . was one of ithe CipICS :'Ut-',ic " 0a o .ice"0itration and holw ish,
cI cr" id mi ,y;jirst
''.

ba:s'tesa :fo

the

Oldc

to study

haa masy consider

hlE"-I

i

an.eity

t. ie well spent, When he en" ' o Bi'lt.hapa Reed" 'a * * ' 1ter)s a jprofe'sional school is . t r r Mi"r on fiplrc; Cm):::. pr'epared to grasp the j·H'r.t V i 'tA ar alh 'yXI -' is -1 ~~~~~~~-t, I_,~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~. p LitE is all ooa shc. for i' t ala .... ...............~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Cu and all,) zJ' ..f.. 0 ess:'fntiaii, and grasp them 'istl,' ' ing I' ftoal.. . '. a, a t, zi.~;'.. foot 'azz" ,'R |t ed. ~ . . -I~ and underst anding'C " i f~ C'.e : te"._'a-ll achn~:~i'.l~.,off... · Eoi' S'..! Ci ,! 1few hi''.,, Sii sc. st i drl' s .have " WHE"N tihe idas arej easy, i :9:; Te~i Shawn .''efi'mI tr':e ...... No'' '%"b-y be .an csteopath,V Ilf you fouinh £i a er-J,:,' ~.rl.aaC...Cis re'-g'a1 in ta ±'- dl ' lpt. streg1for the timo sadore7:;cn.?P,~ V. M ai. a ct' ability and in As '. akti-'er pr"... of this, point a.,v,''rqage posse. -badlhip, . d'-: ' ' ;P. * tatii'g¥,uc? you:t may easily be-'.,e :5:,i v as'k why the other to' B L'' 1 l I~ ~ ~ ~ ^ ^ ^ . ^ f'^ iecom.e im'i-,..-nra.''nt f.:n,:-cialtv .>v~d, i::r"fes.:.cs,. 'l...,, :idic;.ne, the-; ~ ~~ ~~. ,s . *:'s ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~(!.['.[}.Cea . . 'PTO turn one's back toward tli t Ij .. .PrtO Je:t . ike, hC nversology nd t, ' light is to shadow one' pati - at, t.he sa'.;:,. time render a g;reat serv.ce o .- sufferin:.g hu~manity, ' "'--'co.! ally s'ti:cjaed . a A e.C e the'raid ing, C dp':oe? itf out' s a 'a'eareC3 er .saSomi, 3 ,'ter tarnd ha":.ouldc toh _afesis to sC aio aim YO.T ft has a splendIid lrnd .. p': } c coile?: wit' : l. a'i 01 '.ecc, n.iing riah. in rvaerial shouldei ' r 6i! O it doa': of its own. It has powe the.o'he.'r pro.:es % J,~~~~~~~~~~~~~.~ .Sa th. ing. ',c: witarh comparative sions we must look t r he "'atoen tme "ru courage, enormouins psasibilitie ease. O.theers, a sm.ll mtinority, when o coleg'es wilC t 'r out e lf t Styes ~~~~~~~~ Don't waste 'them. tan.~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~a d 1 ; jo.xA only to 't]: service e:l.r.., r(::: t'.,me:c can stiandi on an whoif l nAC 7 '0ny a (e the h~a'e plane wit' tche sail 'llca" a ! O m siaf 'IIW- t. Louics, 'i r. . Pi,:,,f':CT nxmot!oC is pesfet t'" baa' da'4a.atedeiilog'C that o'ar j aeual io it.:a: · icotuan. " 7 a o 'eat." T'Uh reason is"omany Oi3e< 1 M th'o'tght leads aili.,, of wvho have -ra.d cal i. atUs ,^ -' atA Witw - Be ntaserwe-W d ap pait bs wear olt before their timr I of the world te cartsh.a e g~'vec'C fes It "ha me. hopola to the *olac I over their hien for that daise .... t.'tht.lt.... ..... ...... is tdoatbtless becauseO their plar i, aln. ~eicwan tese twcn chr1'"e'es if nlCfeTua ihs Iwo taL -inKese C)y in 4 ci...ic.. tad Cs ieh IAsP', ning ,s'nd doing is iinperferct, - o'a the majordity ofI ae gs eoctor osn· rit aft.a- an0 d Aa-d' iet 'or lv f ' a" ..... ti v Ot ........- 1'o tr pacti c !s ~ i'a' ~~~~~~~~~
0 C^.~

.:'...-ten,:e was sad.to a'ond .y'a: t ^ae ' groeat pl~.a,.Ca:e in ?. ivjng :..,,y ,c- -~~~~~~~~j 'e.' to I eli.s5 i:;:' t ry ahenee'. t:: occaon eJrniCit-

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a vey' great mista:ke to. :fall int :e Sl oansevatio.s a the i t ? oitdone ton. : r ce o gr a Ba is 'clat, e . ateaa antal D tie habit o'f accepltii ail ou t fJfnd 'of :io ui law ofo'r life. s !Ph'.'i a f t asoa men }tc,.:,,Jt hroot<h i, Arc ihe leaara. nt,'s-' e "ready C::ade"o It.di':idua 'a 1 CCc iaIOrtof' e an mla tcou,ta a ile ah cso mfs. living 'C~ 'wan feelxtr a'me',~s ewpse'sD " e c te,. s~a '1D the ant in *t re13t Aen all. : . ;att is to be . le - . n W_ S h fs hese ' ake a ";~'tc'v,atma'jt-t:, ....tneed Do braan'ii a'e for in:dividutai Us . reug(ie IAns ift-,iat .I..~_ .3 c'ltoo o w >'y', a"fiat atsne f f ':cUi Are t a isd t tinm~ h ane- canx -e Y' -4 n TeIdC ailS O. ihsamto serv'-d is nr . otil'iie A.:I'.C Diuse prcamotes at:rophy. ~ ta - .:~. .. !,f;.n'ELg'~,ynt_ '" "D go'f vo; ;0 .- i--, *n ~~~~~~~~~~~~ .. ,:. , . n -' ,ea.~ . . ..... pactc ?h e a) ~ ~ ~~~~~~Ca eas' aa Ci ,C A· evbey 'on 'ofe'ao alvc .' eacr ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~e' e t. i pi'actia'' of 'zhici' will ,.,,,k, him ' ,t"~~~~~~~~ XVlVYj4j ;,v ,' i. -* .:-' ??S ¥f t A',f th C ,e..eJg.,,..:3h......, hanve-rane '~~:a p of-t;.a:;: me,:.eab (~otec. ter r e r. in'it- o~ ofess'ion~ .w . /*'. ~ ~ ~ ~~T ~ i Op r. caste, snows -ths: A .. presei'vation . ~ -,T ife'sr r ~ th a i o r- i .....m ......~ . ...... ~ ~~ justf - ">i inhs neat i,' io '~;~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~.. dt ha aeIa pru' h I * pOatl:e at' it't, t O' k 'e .} O h'eraa m L t )e,.:,vahy

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: ! : :sae,:ia: raiteS- of;':::.oC~itra':g o p. rividel for in seioni t, cn't o ' Oct. a. o'; u
al

:,'nteured as second c..ss . m.atter. oebra.ry '3, t92 3,
at the post' office at, 3Des-

:cceptlance' ffor. naiiiA A -

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x1l4

Moin es, Iow' a . under _the act' .of Aug-uSt 24th, 71912.

iL~·t1ottiz -;f.. i ciel o

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PUBLI3SHEDU SEMI-MONTIHNLY BY;: THE:
Volunme 1 ,
rtJUqpUU"·"J-1\C"-"LO""'aiD_B··R* irsgd"ui`rtra.rrmUq..YYr-4·d·sllP

DES- MOINES. STILL COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHY. .
3. ----" ~""'.~~~~-.I.i-,
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Apr-il16th,

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NEW: BUILDING PLANS DPI
A concete oisuairL io of :the pIeni neselh1eheid

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"IN -

In-

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EV ENLY MAC
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Hig7h^ tadi.mn atriTI(-"fty iUt strelt winl G
xcenu of the frolic, arid

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ofer;'s*xeIient ,accoatio6ns. i: 4,40tra1 cJk-_ e:w .ii 'jS field ty of t wi i

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t; en i-eir' .tas.'wi th. ' i: L h if::g, r.ilglht': :i nto' the.' txe-- institution:. The i-

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HIAMRIS·
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TE .
,crela-y


':- -~-'h.:,ffW 7'm. ;q'
<

b.:uilding'.t
n '

to come :i:v-e:
i:.Me:.t

1 t ,atroiago r ms,, '; AN "wenty four, 8x 0 o gropped abot a roomy mn'I
u roomm will be illy eiqu.iped a d wll . ,.:., .contain an i d.ivj dual lava-

well-li ghted c ntra J corid-orTh a roar haif- of this flor houses a.

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'"hef c1 asses-:.attempIc to p.,the' Senor ,toff,;their o:r question now whether^ 4is perch,.
T.lower

a and. pi a willr' pns' nsu'

'the. Seniors ^'can stand the^ 1
. and .two n-1 ore wek a shu ld ^ ' onts a m*raost v^T-iolen rea cYone .wayfor anaoth eri. ie program has been It'ered -a lerably, I and will bepostedu ,heo h ulletinr board in a. w ;Biggest ht y ,have qners i: fo:r te*ams; areevenly 'hJimlied asI tondmbers, t lea i g the; lit, with twety.c rl's and )oshr a will enter t -. 'en 'apiece,' u:an ::.~1_9~9the ,Sop:-i: h throwgflfteen nxih.bto om-aic-n,?, expecting to rashe uy leabity what clacka- i- -quai-p * i

as r,nci:full

//di e nsions '' Oof :th:'ou ',t ~i .i kii.S(tll.l.f. lt_. .,al.A a wil be of presse d .v A J , Vt lt AtV, .- , Iwat er, locker, ec. Severral conr:ein'or ed, concrete, veniently !ocated toilets :.are itih' l.edford- sone.. placed in t.is .sec:t on, also,. '. on to: the main buildThe fron't Italf Iof the ground r'al hea::aing plan i,: anu T ytrnnasiun," and a -sep- floor has a. large ciinic, aampitheti;ion laboratory build: ater which 'will eat two hun-.erected on .the, new. dreCd. Ptfciion bas IeCn' ':macte

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raltlio

1roo,.

.~ ach treata i c

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seem
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tOg be *.tle-:

ors' er- also . fairly well se:it dii irethe nmuers, burtslighb, tly *h

cary.'withi long distanc e me n;: .
L A e Ior oltmice Prsof the :.institution c:iutmld- .<Vc ' ti(2 o. 'ite- apprrov-y.-ani a f .ulIty nroomj .Aerorassthe faPodor iac erewith ie Uis lob a Ihe lft arh the cliia l wndrc. f d t c t iCian'n fic(s Fan ,arv e rol rif w atdxie new buiding i ;ception rooon. The rear half of brNi^^';^^'^.-.^.:;: like this loAor is arrangdi similarly : ^?^|ii"'i at/has ba e large,;. al:Iry,] ..( ontinwe on .Page 2) (c
ys

shron.n sprintersand

7ght

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and .said she 1 had: some men, *T'h.e Frosh. arej oaded for-' in the bank fowr us. 1'i bear" in the. field.section, hP.at Qay sla-ituden't wants--a - re:al iinspir- :unknmown quantity: in: theli: r ':rins.i: aTion he:.sure ought tL vi'sit Dr. DThe Sophs are 'eertaih"n to:' place '" o Bertha CGat~ lt"oberts o: high .-n the sprints, hu'm i ~.areido :d..: j. .u tiu ir mswa:a out anrid l.car to.-efal. down on the, diztances.'.: I cti:r.e on -pag ;,) 2. a 2 (Continued "on Page4):: ', pl;', !m::ney:

'10,

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THELOG 'BOOKI
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urrrrPevrrs-uuaaolmaraa,nYu4·Htwus

take' myepitre. h. pt a NEW BUILDING PLANS thing -inyousr mouth that is glassa AND TH-ER TI. NGS lDetsle hRAWN' e :o losokingo' and *The 'folowing-.lett ers Were ;with a silvereend 4 * says don't bi sto ywrittelln by a. youngster to Is (Conti ated from pagel,). (Goanntnaaied from page.,1) aouir bnlrs Dwavid, to the fsamt space ip the base^J-egrct^cd.D not getting to see him, big brother during his confine-a ng to see be a. hospital bed subse-I senat and provides 24 Iteatingf The roads, were *not bad: freomd meet er hroomsa like those below, 'a '-oaAn-s into Iowa Falls; at lewast quent to an ap endectomy. bThey iDeer Dick:'I anrm feeli ng good today whbre enis waiting room, toilets, locker lhy -were 1ionly rough. In Iowa ae fresit. original and alt ogether -adGould in the midst :iurio-n. Whe are indebted to Mis.f ray apeindicks was3. I had lee and cl oak rooms. ill;ailsI½ b,m. Augur icfr the cream fot lunch and. we heave oiun Eight well-arranged and con.shiart 'seeves, swaeat anId pleity h|3|lf eals oln little trays wchat girl venient class-rooms, quarters for ac - patients. In assisting Dr. Mv deer h-ro.. DiJck: "When thsey told mooewhat a bring U W; in snd there is every- the .Collegebook-sttore and lesockerCll ar-poefern e is .kept busy dae ah i ~~ es Eone oYne plate but dessert. and cloak rooms are located cCn Ijland.*night. ~_ Pek S~; his rega~~- hospital was a nd how the nudrses thir sent regards iib.o olidt friends here at lok I thought itwas like I iIm- Sor'm & the kids cian't eat any- the second floor. The recitation . t al
. Carpenter is one *of agive the north pole is. I will thin g but milk.. Gee I'm glad I l o2r. My nurse said lt m i and a mighty try to'tell you about it. I asked e an eat stuf n1 soon b.ep in ai:awheeled fi ain He feels I-id :Kne enough for soime papter to write; you on. I ev;ill tGAtri ld Still to do 6what The ward I am in is large and chair andh she will take me down hu^lrts:'.hat: -tis, produce a little white beds on Both sides. Kids in tIhe ya rd. DickI, did you ever who was blind in ash. He promised to ;co nme' a-nid abhoat amy' ageIi every bed. I see anybdy! 8 I oever did until I df foot- knorw the most of t )heir names both eye,. hid os tollthe assembly My, nu, ses name is Miss had my aPpndickIs cut out and ball a.n~tics, h.in 190 to nd. .1901: i-ow. saw. So maxny thi-PngBI oter, bGordoi xas very mucl lorton. She werarrs a white stiff I never have s diess end cap and she didiunt I duntacn e before. I reninmber .. |ipt~ted, in ou~r tew building havet brown hair and sm;ilo:geyes. the old blind -hose Uncle CharCa ieaving Iowa Falls we lt , uita-y : theI 06roads wul I e good My aippendicks was cut out by lie used to have and us kids Wi e · u:I-- m7 miles .S~ ase'etled 'down, t1o -Athe.48 nil le : tp-: MlatO .Mason. City. Hamptona pe3 d,.and. by the way r .this looks ; v ^|lik s good loonti for. someonerp ..... 0" . '. ;: 0 . . · ". i f.... ·N.N...` -" ' .N N , '" * ': : ' :'* ' [" ''DS N o H liH^or' itl .. f^ Tamt-r 'a disillusion. ^^.ibet up with a f16 or I7 our birankaisp.Iowcd: aarndp . .At. 0;?' : e the *mud w~ith ^: All letters per0aining to .col.lge b-,us:iness o0fi any , ntSi~les we t i ll. I D,
o:ur

faii I:

Irooes will be eqiuipped with the latest style chairs, and eachd contaims a raised rostrum and black. feature of the third floor 4The ist a ssemly room seating five h r'Idrd ros. This h as *a

well-plannedt

stage,

dresi.lPg
An.

rooms, etc., Jn connection.[

other' large ampithater !.islocated on this floor, as aref the chmehtly, misy ,mroscopy, lisology, a,:er-iology and: pathol -gy: ibaories. One, corner' of itis given 'over to a ;smdoki:n g: room: 8
for men, ':: "' .Taken all· in all, t he.n lan:s and specifications .of tkthe' greater.:.'). Mli S. C. C .call for a superlative

)0I.~~~~~~~~~~~~~.

*

frnt uc f.ound Lib Two men t~jl pin of thegaag wrsthol and iiL. appeedOtobe jt i
I~~ii~e~ -i a 5 TIM -in _a

.'so;t shouwldibe

D s0imply .. essedt t:ddES :MINES

building, extrermely well l-planned and provided w:i h every coheit: : .;
able facility for 'educa:tioni: : ------ --- *-: comifort. ;
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~standing

||3e||? idmto 1e.:Jfflokeg ^for' husin:Res .W^ouwe hey -weor-e.'going; t l 2ltojhad it.- Iniegine how mad we. a w^^ere whern ofol struck the pave-, lalgI areI * foS 'd.the : othe.).Ir is 'beingh Mason. City.,*said. 0 .: * * me'S t|sout *cf a r

ded

Atr::~:~~~iela ChSarles^ "Y'E
feel-ing- tor
_t--7~

'-:Ground will be.: .broke:n very shortly,' ::d constructioin' work started. Respon se,fiom ·the:.!ld s Thie attention of prospecti.fve stu.dlents and others 1 indicate that the. professio4': gnthis mattei -N he is hereby College caled 'writing t o erally as well as the v.altiumi of the College are back of the promay receivea:their, corresponce in oder : ject to the la.. ,. ,..:... M prmpt atltentio.n f o T i * a ; he 0 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~nw~~~m~~~~~~w0 The financiad planis-.ini'qie: ilA,Hudson's smileI o' 0 ceihrecepto-1 S wcitino; the College is hereb callJ5 u is ma ' that the :new-bui'ieg &e'" toi:I'de window.' and

l lyeout..e.ters tp,a .d;. id , ..... · personal.

and ^';

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rs:p-t , ar

Aany A

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b' *llll m!e totellke ci's '-'|ariha tw bctbe. |trave.er
B~na.

o ur school, Desnh elo'is.'taked ceutnc out
chool

ate...is not asking.giftsr h

oinBs,

nuirse why and w'haere. thra is gold mines. *I don't knEw if ahe&4 a~eskimo but his support fro- this signal pro 1 :: '' mc s t nea-trle hand. 'tlllhat i hat..^ 2s: na' sU1 ' Hens wantedi 'to le t out th, in.sopection.. 'There she: looks hindau funny -and .. he gram of osteop .. bic. prcogress:. Colcege-.is -a StilS ff, as if prosperity is is a: piayer piarnow in the ne;4t.: can find her way all over the Des Moines eioig s Lie-s·I f an it looks hospitul. She aint never going college of, for and by the iprol ', :7ea:ta n a a.rd' tha.t is for the :kids : tat ju tarou th.oGbrnr. 'Ith wasd but he's happy any- fession. Its interests - .' as ? I wish I' to' see agan b are up; on cru.ches. ' could be in there with them. "1 *way. New I mwust close 'cause broad as the science it teachcs, e CY ri LIOi . Watehrs r loat. broohitd~ :~r8 v res.I don't fee. Very good f rom the my nrse ise-going off duty and and absolutely non-cemi-ercaia .t. :::·5:·-9 Those physicians 'who.'ha.-c eit They and Scb.[ehwart5S ravo I herIS gang. Outfr·:.-hs;: eather which i s the stuff they I. want her to mail t:his letter. ~~:~·;ea~incP, fay y~~iJ .E We· e 10P er ni |i^sure..lacre 'good *food up there. gaive'-me -o gto go sleep on. :Th:y: IDn't yoa think I spa ' good and yet sent in their loans are-askail t took mle into: the' operating .room I asked her how tow el most of to .do so withiout' fur[ther/dely *the big Ords' '.. '_ that work may: be .'pushe itot1 sen.tiitence.) -Ier U11Ee :: 'ILZFC~~~~~~~I' fondly is well on a big white cart: and said I rth t~a Year bro David. .wasl .going to siam'e nice -oet orbuilding-. complete, eequipped ajrxd anWge stuff to smel;'. Don't tell. ava labIe for uc:se Jaet iaryl 1, b .S-.o .I did nolt get to see anp'-y rpmamma that I was bad in the Dees*Ber iat y.ek:. W :i?:i ;!bojdy.eie.re even though I-used the operating room, 'case I could"" got tae meaeal.e and can't Checks should be-made PaVa i:e int.t hclp it. I kicked the doc- write mnuch, '[h::'ipihone' conhsiderable: .. 'm all red spots to'r. iM 'Horton had to hold on 11e. AS IaS:M a I git well to Cylyde EL FeItr, t- C1r Iepr, /iss 5t, ; me- do'wn and taike nmy pults as from thbIs stuff I cang come home., C-r'ommercial Sa.vings Bankl f s Me.o. ,. r. , the sanme ,time, l.a-stevr that is. seem' mount aiHe IM, t:he Twin- Locust 'S-t-., the : a::w::f,:.T ait 2 .A. M and I 'still I .wihiyoa wr u 'oe re so I could i'iw ian thas we' d wvah is theS led:in' i " ?i-.ifeei'-the ceffets o' 'drivingit, t.tik to. you im:tetad oi: writ e rmase- y n itand. I'm happy cause I got the nmeasels and my:; tsimIi .is ye. a d mamman papa mick filat. My Side Wyhert-' ittie and ;? ^ :*,'-_ .'- '. caus ' e k'se As talK.ing, and I :tw-CM -s :Yes.,^ :C.;e go',cd 'mdie ungL. esU loftfing so it :a- m,;.:s like 'a s hool cas me tH too. I ain't h-ad ·appenIcrks. ;was'. is.'well.c peeitall- gcd resol'uio:i . I house. My n'.ase just coma. in ao n tMi ,z' Your brother D'avim.' . at. butilt mfil:kt since. Goodbyh"
AJdi r°-t I

rode him all over, but there is fhethe doctor two days ago and they a. little blind girl 'here from Jincmy side that 'a big Io B CharlesCityto rile eroplan I|||to ask.Johnson..*', n Cit * n \ :does noft smell' very .good .yet. Alaska which is a vbry cold place
gi
a "feeling. -t

Aleft Dilxeui:suCess:
rjFlte

(ndfine

And I :asked .y

All m0oney obtained .is, wel scured-', pays. an eqiitabie .:rate' of inter-est and will be. jrieidicioulyr administered, No osteoathlc physician can :afford. t/wit:,ihod

office sfokee of success she just smiled and said it wat s

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':. :" A Parable -of Prospect.LOsI.I: Fl. Kichera,: '244 :l3 'By Sonmse oie 'hasbsridi if our 'fre.'': . .: - .:-:.::sight' wasas goolJ as our: hind; MOWER' '''::!:-::.^,^' OST 'EOPATRY . - : .:. .,, ' " . . ... . .' ' * ^ .. ;. \. .. " ~ . . sight:. w'o woul.d be much belter IT is: impossible to- discourage .And it came to pass in: those,_-: .Direztor< enerali&, L Taylor a man whio has learned, ir what- off, The, same may be said regard- d:ays that the secretary called an: :. Business Manager.-M. D. Cramer s0eer eonditioUn he finds himself, ing' t.houghtL assemibly of all they that strove.:: Pub. Director-,J H. Styles, Jr. therewith to -e cont'rt, Most of us do::ot use our fore.. andma./studied in the college .-of-. ^. * C .,.:tit, · :C.O Ballinger £Edior_ L. thought sufficiently and too Still, and spake unto them in Osteopatlih Without 'Il[tation NO matter how completelyyou aften as a result we are tor- these words, saying: "Behold, we cover an ass with a lion's skin, mented by -or'hind-thought, P -~o-··r Y -shall build a new habitation for ihe will manage to poke his ears We might avoid many of our ourselves, that the glory of Os-.. 'CONTENTIMENOT is chap at through somrewhere. mistakes, ailments and heart- teopathy may shine forth in:this: any., price. aches if our actions were' pre- town, yea ard in this State: :and./ DR. M. D. €RJAMER Business irivestigation, moro reasoning. evenr, u.nto the uttermost parts NOWADAYS, a candidate is a There is a great joy and satis- of the earth! And behwold n this / .man who/: stands for what he klanager of tuhe Collee, has just annoianced the reeiept, of a check faction in thinking, According new habitation there shall Bt 'thinks the people will fall for. for five hundred dol rs from. Dr.' to ·Thos. A. Edison, "Thinking; fifty treating rooms,' that tie Bertha Gates-eobcrts, of Ames. after while, .beomes the :'most seniors mmy 'no more fightt ih the: D N'T ,refuse to/ marry a girl Phe amoun+ is a gift from Dr. pleas'uiable th)g in the -world, 'r ' ball for their room ]Tre shall : -A because :she can't cook. She may Roberfts to the new buhilding fund We may r.ot be able to reason be high up, een der the' eves : ihavemoney enoughto pay 'YurI and 'not a loan ' every transaction or undertaking of the 'e-f, , smoking room, The Board is deeply appreci- thrOc'gh to the final result a't the that men m.ay no loger .blow. hoard. ~ ~ ~ ~ :,t ~ ~ ; goIeveroi, .ity beginning, but thee are eertaml. forth 'the 'noxious e ' in.' ':.the:' .: iF ^ ^' ./ GQe: manar the' and- Raussians ative of Dr. Robertsa ad etends to-. her its *-thanks.oh- definite rniules for attaining suc- Ladies' -ating rootm. Androia::/ er . : m/xxiake:' much money; so ,. /^dida~t. .:.. This is a most worthy preed cess 'along al lines,'. about the.building;shall be a Idd e0 * flu ant. ; Whil. tae Ccllege does,_not: Sufficient knowledge regarding campus beautiful to behold, and asl ±foi gift sin Conn eC fco1nwith the hman' body and' the laws pin the ampusa a als gymeinasium: GTEOPAIYJyi iessosar of its ^expansion ;program?. it .is, glad govermning its action has been of fair d-mensons, such 'as has: IA' 0Ifi val Utl uIe' they are put to receilve such d&aatIons, f,£or ec. cummulated to ma.ke unnecesa never be 'n seen in the city ie.einto practicee.' C pak the- *ecie h eC.very dollar saved, on i-terIest, sary: the foundering · and friiL- to-fore." Ihs 'rnd *liability makes possible a Iss efforts so often ..observed tary, and many other words of EI UC 'P O N' is net an: e,nd in good promisespake he, so tha geate' D. M. *S./ C.: 0. i: .the--searcli for health . it elfei.It is rita :deeorattion, bhut; '.According to t'he "scripture, the- hearts' of: *the ' ultilade was Ot a df~b "Ye shall know the .ruth and lifted up.', t trie'ruth' shati'ma: you fee/' Then arose. a.-a'eerom the ^^ "T - diff iculties of ; .ivg w ithH ' in How -are we to know .the 'tr{utl depth/of thie bhall and-spa-Ji/e/; er . 'Headline 'says: "She,Still o^thersre proably( justa asgreat our thinking ma- word only, crying "Vhe?" And: : 9at 57. Of coars, and unless we u, .e//^'on e/oti:r Sides as they aret Pairts /the ' .. chinery? ' . there arose also another volce passes half that.h% ',~e::Official e

P.ublication

of

grace 'may taer is.no c:an be said raith .mu1Cst else :;.-' .

bhe out ~of :usebt time whereinfiati' to b. so;'. wherefore alwaysGbe. in /exer-

Y IDii U. EVRSO AND THINK? ).:

"EVEN SO"
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I~-P.II·~-

: Thought-right *Oe.upom s ations in

a time. the, filling vital to ou-r welfare "in every n wx a a w/THEan who alwh a doesis respect. Thought has brought the c:rner handled find/ a .steady, .demn~and will L/%best civilization up to its present s lcohcol 'insi ead .of gas~oline,. -h therthings that: he m1do . ' . standard. . . Since so much deipends uipon ''*-^IffO 'EJN .Fparents nin^ l 17Iy -do they .cal it. tashine /se ne. tihouight, then why allow iQs eno't rhen it. .ges. in. a car, butr God-given.: faculty to. atropimy ':^*/w like^ fhe couple w' .too~k hat t ho thei children-to/ tImeparade ani a cargo whe ''. goes in a/ship? fromr disuse?. Why not Stop and ".,-,. m., 1 us' . "-, /^'thMen spanksed 'them h' a is the wa ned.'to -go.- to th cirrus. iNow scientists say Iyouth cr Its a little thing to.do bo prolengeld by eating aabbage, ' J.ust.to think. ,TH:chap who is contiually Aa betweena sauerkraut and rnorv Anyone, no miatiter who, I waiin /."for/ sonm et'jlnng to: turn key glands, give vs old g a!; B .Laght to thinIk.. u^p" usually does n'll of^his wantTaka a little timen each/dayv ! 1; : 14. la^t the bfottom .-- ^ ;' ''/ romr the minute thrown away. Thers are: now rBO English in ' Jrelands and th e Ir1icNdations.n are .Spare it from your work and 08S~El 1kjOUItJNS ISAIS E NO' ; . . /./ e that there wi sooI be: no Irish .. ,.' play,. g "'fe'nle c there. s 'des' / e'^^ evn"'s a' yo unm e -Sttop and thing,. O aIfTa w m n ' h t n o t : : too *go &'for,/ *he. wants/ her .)0 '//| lt istsaid b.a the' good die You will find that mneniVo fail :, .Do iot thini : . -;: ':' young. owadaysev xiwmvever, it seems more apropos to say that Men w-ho find thembseies.in jail liyter &tuere the young die good. modern^/^ ili:DST{ ::'· Do npot thiik,. " '' iHalf ihe troubie that we see, .io ith.: characters;in -'.Mi. er.,a 'appem: cnxsfident," for Troubhia' brewed for y:ae.and me, /*,;^^can:'associate /'".A'.D1 .Y he6&^ - ' to wouldn't '' ficioI' that'*^ *.^^ ^ ^ dare "- some "*reason, that, the 'govern- Probabi.' would.ne'der bem ^S peak to or beS^'een^: w itih /ii. real ment- could rei tmhe. coal :miines * better than it :in -the-railroads. ;|/l^ /f0 Shal' we journey 'lit-r-miss, JOHN ^^Butnyan ^rmote: "There is says th; only Irijd :'. ' shall we think? A Geo h' help at along- by g.uess, 'ath liog like foith ,sade tri.angl":fe ' an.to get -·Let's:not go: *p : li; t it l dlhuolveim. Icub to rmxed' . "tdwit wihp a -wife, :pipe B'.t ra c.to' ourselves co iess iar}k.t it rtrin'l>e/ !t wcm-dd hel · ihrt. 's'hat : more or 'IUss a' d^rSU away the MIsts. a rrPa .'lii 'e ": i ' ati ' ^ ~ e ri c nic itf. squares tmi wrld o WEII~ T. o ln

': thought-- is out of the muItitude askikmg. "Whe : ::' Then the 'President'ofthe Col.' up eore '*the mul3fti-tl" lege stood L tude and spake, saying, "My childrenI, ye have heard the fair proposition expounded by the secretary, and ye perceive that it is. good. Ard now ye isk, when and where? Hearlen then,'mito

wne Ipray youv

If

i i~ gently, if ye will even stand l back of me rid 'mtiAe wIortlaly

5 'e

will

ork"./

newi lbnilding ,rise „up'' '*vr 'it^ r Idby; heaven. by the.-New Ye i the Sprioig ?emoest'r: -shal it he'
rmeay. ' bis.: . w mm
a.a<

p-

A' hish, or f'cam, ^s rc the 'iatfer'. * 9 of/ wh~ec e?/ .Tmat "oh; .my rhimd" : ran,- is a: secret between miysel'f : *; 'y." .and *the brick layer."/^ ***Then, t did .thxe assembled com-e~/ : :? .pany *arise; and /winth .much loud . ;noisi. in * joy returned each morn / d. to his labor under -thesun." '". .:~¥)rt.BatelV : for . :ur t , ,.srtims , y.t discover.t-d a way , a lrr.'
A-

mnobody. hia
to rest in

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aMhembers :of .:.'.; :,ationai Wona,'. pmrt'y ,r st:e.:ill. 4a!m ,.'a. u.ng wi,''al rights f:: r........

PoTppian .
;'3received :from Simpson College -..,5J.' txv>Siulio caruu.uu uwin3 part ilasi.:-week,^. ; .' bae;ball..11-. squad has., of tile state,- ..:':''' :'-' : ^. -. b'Seen :org -.nized -and is .now pca e -ticng in 'prepara tion-: fr a- hatrd
Schedule' '. This is the .initial ;lmInge£ into the summer sport 'at. tnhi's ,hool, arnd f-orom all appea' " BA iiSKETIBALJ; AIND; i
nsPeam -rosLser- -a te

Thie
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To-M Alhummni of. .. 0 the
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your $0 aarea e P. M. S. C.' O; POnn, to 11Sf' a 'i~uSti, Is i w IIII Itll do dall e's to
itIt wil ith-

I .:'' c~:.AM',: ELE cTED. ' "' !

aences' /e' poss' s,

a better base-:

nbaii' team.. t:..ia: anythuing .else. '

uThursday, April 12th, : was the - date for election of next; season 's

v
hud rad

thei biggesf tttogethe entire. ihstory of 't''h, ig Eeyboxdy: get ;out t tadl x-^, anid root' your he-ad foe your own teani.'.T fac t poabliy tale ;f'sides w - th t 3 Frosh# feeling thatA thcy e .h inf nts *of tlle ienstitUtiUoAian therefore ned all the l-i-titLi.< and teader care p'Qsiblie., o.' ) aotnd se the closet tbattle . t1-h!t etld sehool in yea.s!;;
1

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c-ptai.ns and tihe. whole gang, o" fve twenty-four meni pili -tote rs asseible to. pictk .out i' tid. ocharley ;the leaders;. -' -:.:- '
n.eewin'gs for a week h.torty " Sw.eezy wa.

cilate, the sI Itai ois that yen-D, . iloIV. tlsat smallM

-picked th u$t.tton is -highly -for captain; hin !the grid setton, i , Allia'N the present season's a~rd.. Gus. Wi'emers received the. Games with - -Des h-hor amon. 'the baske t-tossers.. Ld <Simpson np^i'f-are-,", ':W, rvP -e ^nd, no e ' ^ fi.' n
I -1 ).
:I. I

. ! The ('o;..a :I See h.:as -the:' fl "awingto syi DiC Angetla c l; :Crlearyl, Stirelv of irqeley* I' ;Angeola. Ifc'reary off0me Der4.

-s president of the teopathic -:' omVans :

ii

d erd Zr4Žs~smuexx tis fail hre hti.Odyed ~:sllli elits nx r'a, it cqxslodo lllCS*t

is our vision, ' uis:. makCe- it to

t:. .N'-Nebrask'a'. Fe'dolera tici Nhe I': . ' :men.';' (lubs.,: Dr. .inTi Inmh.^'o! p sozn o4- NewLrman erov 0e fis vace idenpreside~t Dr.o 1' : ary :lr; and ; :son '.\ N, . of. mah:,.0' ..'.'.eta ea

reits ,asoc.iation hich:h .'-recently. ~'affi:-i atedwi::!:' it;

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A new school an 'will-4urnish the s e'd-hot schedules. g big! things, thI

'.ith, :Bi-rge, .'.,er' e-ns, .VandeGri!ft -, an,
'he '880 a--and mrile ai

lal - ',
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IATL.ON

tor of. this tdisease. lent-I can't reca tor.-'on't you rex

AS D How: long

o to t he :Juni os,.wi nd Wedel to carry' he-" 220 wll" be- a ffair,--probabliy the he list. :iSkidmore teed, Robertson;, Di aid Green will fight: he points :in ths race., .All of the other eve, e-close- fought, and on ernoon of Ml ay first sh

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schools.;co; rs-"'-li:' differint' Cand.. syj' ori;}qc.o hA . , d9~;chooli, .xa1';.eiy> tL:-.~~~A unt:e.ryinig te'he. . pic ip: ;les :?'eiiia: chool oc meadsicine, and i tv'lt, :pa't.1 .0Wof a t. aeC1 e i .eieci, -'\.::4oia-s,. ity and feb physld -medical physio-medical 'nvr'ib.ly re'!ot

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arainringand skill aid her good. ni the peifor'Mane ,o her work and 'no -rendue dirain n on her vitality. 0..'ate

..........////Z!!^ ''';/,/& ,7A;?/c.'>./A 'a^ J.ocali . wherz tie, elemer t th] _(of ri of hcMtroovctlts have n..is .. pl::eferrcd to'. 1.)'~pths are .%do pbysi-7 .0 evolved. by .m ~Sz^They scceessfii :e.e are w'.f : e',' · ad €:a.s~ 'ALAS, i2a consequenice thoey ''',/ 'A and 2'C01i1equerne they il manifesed. fail because of the-i:,' ai."it; to In 1764 the Philadelphia medi- not always externta. ,avx livd'r obtiMWed. tic schools° critid to be :b,.v osteod at IIebel cal school w's' founded by solme The Drug School, cheer and Qenc,:.:age sik peopl prefer .won,,. tf .any patients of oar first medical professors. 'he Allopathic school .as, un-A IyiaA pie1ns p 'ake I:oh'T physiciansan :. '',.ak t.hi F e.I-, ..:low !5hysicians, not inw:,riably re'- This was sixty4>ne years 'before ':i; is a sig'nifica -Oh4 t fact thai.i til recent years, minain ired that i. e rofsic 'in P-'cfessional /II2^g. -utingi. professional of ~.o....sta. Dr. 3. iB ram introduced the a ?O..an7.h '; .e principles underlyinig prs- 10Homeo1p.athic cult into :this coun- heOroic doses of drugs are most,| the fesa 'w'omani: addition add, $itina-,D ei::acos ad accordingly ad- :.,?.ortullAni;'y ito grO tlctul., ,pract ce of heer otherpx counlts have try., grow "inteilectua'ii2',
': :;eseni -:;] by

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In ta'king 47p the varaious cults of healirng, I will firstI give the unde-rlying prinlciple of practice . Aof the Allopatlhic 'rr regular school'of medicinte ,which can be incorporated in tbhe p "Con;rase traria Contrariis GQa ntrir," In other words, it is the sy'stem of counter action. This implies that symptomns of disease must be overcome by drutig sufficient in amount to quell the particular College. :·':lY/;,c.8 Ms .-- ~ettiiea l PT. I Acst Meta '. collg ests& 0 ,~~~~~~~~~~13 ' ' -.. '' ::i!::}.Thm. :6i'st medical college estab- symptom.. ;?' :*i'5cedfn. Bur'o e 'was. founde4 h,, It becomes apparent that this :::i ~{ii.,;. Sarace.ns a.t Sal~.rno,. in Italy. mian often result 'in misleading " ° -1~!Yt. /5£. b.ullo:er thie al'Sor'-. ]imr,:.'essions as to the real con-, '..:.I(;-W',qw ^'-:i!:'¢":dof^::,&m'erbr Cliarlemagne I:¢ tdilton an:Id preotgress of. the pati'(7:t '5~02.1.' [D::-At~-l.so2i se'e~ms to giv-.:!. it; e nt, b cause beathf I the 1drug; *. ^wf.ie;i '.: ar.lm ;Jar.e, .. d dechlc:~iin? thai; repr '; ' iu 1 otin', or dLag-stirmu ::.'T- 1:·:'ion .'i' ;remsins. the true 4-, . '
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e.p.n. evolved by oatl beodox physi' -'.:"f. remidi~cal agencies, ' 'hw.e-bieer, obuited to be criti h hO oth the , cUea yrC-ete onsideivr t~he hi 'A purposlaity and fel+;,,-"ci period, apart; from t.he illu.ISOflege 01), oi' commencing ,.:/iSm'nsC of. legemnd, as eo-m-reef8ing im (wreee with the~, frt' Olym . y . .; '3leece with the first Oym'?,·,-.n .'t' elenwment of ruth fo:r ncpres776 :r:'ciO 'he years before ' evlved each case none woulda in t oIn tile other cottatries e-r( .era. .. cave l to ived our store.,-:i','tt 'pe':~iod may addT the soma.'have been W'ha';: .ear"ier, considers date ,:rill ::, roter but this the his iP. , : a,.:irw5-ar the purpose.

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n Misnteoed them until the point finane, i,:Iay. snd scial nI 7y r "'"" of tolerar.,ce : was reached; that I' ,., '"- , , *, .. One *t.f~. the woman osteopahs :. is until twane' began to be man'bO te , grea'tos.; fie'ds' Of Setfdry HisiS fested symyptorms -of the druv.'- = f o ' . ^ . ... -** ,,-, organifsn or her' work With children. MOW, " Scarcely a veg:etable w * ., . . , -,oite~~~~~dwn are th-e results o0 mA m^IV comlpound or a mineral compound re th results of h raV what has .' , - ' exists but exists but in what has- been inlud,.... es o'f disease in childhood ce;: . r1in 'tire *men and, .'S 7oaeIed in 'the :ole of medical-agents,. Whih coul e been avvoide.' i ,.... ,,, ^ , , „:an:'~~ - ?'~~whi-h- could6, ave been avolde \ ea havn, .. each h'.0vin!; it. time of trial and . . ty , -,~~~~~atteVtonx of A, optn ...., , „ J, then -a:,andone:.. to be succeeded attenti i .. ' e h,: a.. ,. :iac.. The' health aad by oAime n ew 1re-medy,. ' , proper eivelo'pment of e'Very -..T' [ Mo.,Ae(,p eathic School, the baby ,hould be the endless corN i [etero'dox pchooI, was found- cern, 1f the osteopath. Chfildroa Hr't e bITy S3amuel Christian Fried- a constantly receiving .ki. rich Hahnemc.mi, Dr. Hahrnemann.iur'it mor- o' less serious, some was born at Meissen, SRaxonyo, are -,thich educationa.Ho'?. Api"~ 0(,. 1'.77. -HTe received 'he' e when .e ccidents -like fall.I d.eg>:.: of. >,_.Dutor of AMedicine 'jburcn~, a:">s' o'' are suffered ii from:. the CA] :v:'"sity of E'riange- , is '? >-a't that they thighly be in 'i':.-: :t,.Ai i eipzig. E n cared; f, r 'y and promlrfly. 170' l e ' lae W . CullesO cars :..IdCen are no!ogr' ' ' pge 2 . ..... I o ..... . . ... pag'.

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Arunial^ T.!rack Meet o:f Stilt Ccllege lived up to oThe
rs ... ril.s, beside bring,ng out the material whic

3r.:ctations

:/with lots. to sIare, and furnished the large crowd with pl'i.-ty of
is. held nuder co oVr

Bonesetters
postponerFienit of three other

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in and Lose
(games.

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,

'The past'two weeks have been busy ones for our ball club, which :iffuring 'most of the year. The Seniots, last y.ars chiampion, lost a l'biterly Ion'eate'd battle with'the Juniors, an.' failed to repeat last has wo . one gname and' lost one, while old man Weather has Caused the.
i gear's .

-sweeping victory.

(Must be the four ycis

of this restaurant

i: teed is taking it cuta the boys.) The Sophs, and

Piesh failed to score

highlv1y, but displayed' several classy sprinters in B irge, Marlow and a highl jumper of the "first water" in Stringbean Engberg. a :- The expected battle of the Frats failed to develop, the ITS scrapi:iisng togJth~e'ra total of' 106 points, with the Phi Sigs, nearest competi!;?)t-, ,cob.eting 8^35. th first and second places went to the ITS in Bo hi:-e relay, 'with the .Phi Sigs copping third. :Lack Of condition slowed down the time in the last e'ents,-al:ou.gh" that fact didn't hinder Sechrist in grabbing the halfsi:? ! m:i:e and mils. The former Grinnell and Missouri Valley champ led 'lthe sfield with lots to spare, and wasn't forced to extend himself at i-any trim'e : ti e ' ' ' m ] ; Lustig wa; the only man to win two first places,-grabbing the -:J'"Oyd.- arid the 22.0 in good style. Olybourne ran-a heady race d.ash I in the 440, saving a sprint to tie last half lap to romp into first I: place. Reed took second in this event. ::-:E"ngtexrg, non-fraternity man, copped the high jump without rouble, clearing the bar at 5 feet, 6 inches. The shot put was ise, ParrishI of the' Seniors barely beating Wedel of the Juniors .o' rtheihaveof 35 feet 6 inches.
SUMJMxARIES.

There is in the Bible a verse which reads: ."When the Son mf Man cometh, shall he find faithon the earth?" There can: be. nO do.ubt of the answer, Y -.think. Lives. are short, but life, in itg essential needs, goes on. Science widens our horizon, but the most os, Jr.; 2, Marlow,- Fr.; 3, truly scientific men are men of Women as osteopaths are in. faith. There will be religion .n Montens and Wedel tied 5, Nicholas, ;o-h. Distance 9 eet, 2 inches. Runnig Br': l , Olsen, Soph.; 2, Nicholas, Sophli.; 3, position to serve hum.anity in the earth when the last t-r/xu -M.ertens,Si.; .4, Bei.-ia-- Frosh.; 5, Laird, Sr. Distance: IS feet 5 their greatest need, t'hey are in phet sounds, but how it wilifind: a field of useful activity where expression inches. -whether thrcoutghb High Jump1, 1-ngberg, Soph., 2, McWilliams, Jr.; 3, Nicholas, independence -and contentment Sunday church services,. 'a:d are to be found., where their aid creeds and rituals, or in tsome SoPh.; 4,^edel, -Jr.; 5. Prether, 5'. Height, 5 feet 6 inches, Ball T-ro,. Nicholas, SopW; 2, Wedel, Jr.; 3, McWmiliams, to the worlds nsick is dem'anded wholly diifferent way--this we and appreciated. As an osteo- do not know and cannot tell, Iy, 5 ^ Ir".^;; fligelrhire. Jr.% Laird, Sr. Distance 339.^' 4, FraEl 0 Re^aVrnit Iota Tan Sigma, 2, ITS; 3, Phi Sig' -mpath a woman is able to serve own guess is that the creeds' wII *her home, her f'amily and her have become much sunpler, .f' F-1IOPPICL:;Chief Umpire, Coach Suttcn; Starter, Dr. Robt. communitv a's she can serv,: indeed, they have not entirely' .Bachman; Scorer, Staples; J1udlg, Darn Near Anybody. them in no other field of .ei.- disappeared, and that, when tIe, rINAL STANDumr. deavor. tumult finally ceases, those. who Ii ·.. '^I'^ '.^ *.' :'^, '.·~ ' , . 'P ts. have been most tummltuotus will : Juiniors . . ...... .......... ....................... .. ....... ....... .... 75 .Seniors ..... .............................. , . .. 42 SHOOT TE. WH,,LUE NICKEL., discover.. that they have .'ot, . :-Sop":phom.ores:: "!'. ,. · .f.....,..................... ........ 40 Dr. Wadr K. l-ampton-(To after' all, differed on the ' -. F.. s hme ':(' Fre.................................... reshm n rs ............ ..... ....... . 2340 :': man at g'as station)- "€4imme sential things, .................. ........... .......... ':.....'..... ~ !!:i;!(-!f ..i ..........: ~''........ ....... -------' Y.J i-v; about half a gallon." There is an old Buddhist i'pe:.: ::. . S. . ..... - ........... ... ............. 106 35 . .....-.--.... ^-..^....... Pa^ *Sigs .:......*».^. vi Chorus (from' folks in the' car) found and translated by Lfe; u,: -16 .. !::-!?:Non-Fi:at. , ...]i..... ...............2.2........... ........... 2 20, "For goodness .akes, Ham-pton, Hearn, which .1havo always likei wLsm ~·r~w ._. -.=~nrra -:1 , WC~d I Wtha't do you . .............. 16 get. some gas. ............................... ............ -~:::-:..:--..:~Wiar~ ow: F esL henlub "From the foot of the muintain ';;i(: 'A'- :.: ' Club .~-..1 .. ,.« Juniors--.: .................................. ........ ...... . ........................... =............ 19 : : -: t~las at.McWillms, think ·. you" a . buying icorn many are the paths ascendig':if yo:° tliink S.P FOT VvWI ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~INDI7IUA, ^i^'^^^^ ' whiskey?" shadow, but from the :do1 Marlow Jrethme en ..-...... ............-...... Freshma .. .... ......... 1.... Dr. Hamptoni (witha abandon): summit all whio cimiib behol!'t"h ...... _.. .. 1 .... ,-..^........,........... .... ^....... ^ uy^ ^ 'L'Sti, Juniors .^....^. .. ........ 14 "All right put in a whole gal- selfsame moon."--Br.ace BsAarn·:in 1 ...... Wedll~iel,^. Jtuniors ...... 3 . -:.-:-.. lon,' C ollier's,t

.:5 200-yd. Dash-1, Buirge (So.); 2, Lustig (Jr.);' 3, Marlow i h)e ; .( Fr.os'.~ 4, Van De Grift (Jr.); 5, McWillams (Jr.). Time 11 seconds. _y-y. Ds-I, Clybourne, Sr,; 2, Reed, Sr.; 3, TMcWilliams, Jr.; 4,-: Richardsonr, Frosh.; 5, Vande Grift, Jr. Time: 58 sc:onds. · ::'0-ydSDas -1 el-g. Jr.; 2, Buirge, Soph.; 3, Mao, Froesh; Time: 6 secondsq. ,aird, "Sr ,edeJ Run-I- Sechrist, Jr.; 2, Stohlberg, Sr.; 3, Laiid, Sr.; 4, sp·yaao-a·8lsurrslrUsoll*rP··uPI 880yd.iL .:"; 'ihard-son, AFr sh.; 5, Higelmire, Jr, Time: 2:19. THE WOMAN OSTEOPATH l:220-nd. Dash-,n Lustig, Jr.:' 2 Buir e, Soph.; .3, tie between Mer(Contiu.ed from page 1) tens, Sr., and VanDe Grift, Jr.; 5, Laird, Sr. Time: 29 secoinds. '.':''.One Mile-I, Sechrist, Jr.; 2, Malow,io Froesh.; 3, McWilliams, Jr.; expected to have the so-called 4-,;;heed S;ir.; 5, SkIdmor i o,. Time: 5: 0. diseases of childhood, but they :440-Class Relayv--1, Juniors; 2, Seniors; 3, Sopha.; 4, Fresh.; 5, do insist on having them in sufSeniors. (Second squad.) ficient numbers to. make the : : Shot Put--l,Parrish, Sr.; 2, Wedel, Jr.; 3, MeWilliarns, Jr.; 4, work of the physician interestSw.: eerJ. 5,M.N...sh, Soph. Di4,·1 -e: 35 feet 6 inches, ing and so much worth while,' StandinggBroadl Jurip -41McV

Coach SU on's slugging. crew journeyed thru the mud to Simipsoa, , few days ago and took the pride of Indianola into camp by the. score of 9- . It was a close game all the way, until Olsen's long home: run with the saeks crowded,a sewed up the verdict in the old bat:bag.J: Simpson expected an easy game, but the dope bucket took one mor :e spill,; and Still's first game of the season .was a victory,.;:. The game. we lost was played with.Des Moines University on the, :dg :' d Tiger field,-and this was lost by our own bonehead baserunni'ng1 lo0se fielding at the critical moments. Four men were tagged asleep ' off the sacks when ii a position to score, and errors galore smeared the box score. Lack of practice by reason of a muddy field, caused this trouble; however, and the next game will show a decided reversal of form. Olsen pitched both these games and turned out a good perfonrmance each time. The hitting of the Bonesetters has been hard and timely, and an,. pitcher will have a hard tine beating us. The fielding has been of a: lower standard, but Coach Sutton has been drihing the infield. hard this last week, and the battery should get more support the next time out Several shifts have been made in the lin-eup, in an attempt to bring out the greatest possible strength, and now we seem to have' hit on a good combination. Our neexi game is with Des Moines U.-tonight. Friday we go) to Pe]la to tangle with the Dutch again;-last.week it was rain tha/ saved thc latter fromn the walloping of their lives.. We are hoping -to beat our old rivals, The D. M. U. Tigers, this time, and hope that, within a year or so we shall have them rather well tamed-not oniy i in baseball but. football as well. . .:: .
".-"-"------T~CP~ sM~;rs

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WHEN THE TUMUJt (MtS$

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The.D .Official. Pablication of - _ ES MOI NES, STILL COLLEGE ... rector General ...8 L. Taylor .
`iemness Mauager.M- D,. Cramer ?'FI:itor.._.:_...,__C, L. Ballinger

JIT':S an ill tongue that belit··.teits own, -:NOBODY believes in hell except for the other fellew.
A el

P' : IF a man works hard and gets i'?:::~ /:;ong, lazy folk say that he is . ' . * u:-.^^|3Ckyo'. "i"i"ElN for signs of spring look '..:.'·tdoors; but women look in of ;e/ ^shop windows : !
* *

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I "-.IjJ:.NO'W now," exclaimed the ''';:i|iranj"' who had, been sued for cwhy they k'?::':::! of promise, each courting." al ':.&it *
'i^.'il^''^'.' ^*^ '57

: .. '::fPwagons rattle most. ! well, finish it |::.. And:" So do --::: ?,.:'yoorself. : ';: 7'.S,.AKING of E'RA sad othei tin' g it is quite apropos to reh lia3lb that a profitablc religior /.'l-:a:ever wants for proseyts i
_'-.:

'.'." "':WHAJ'i folly i!: is for the poets ''.is bitd ' .. ay that s Th:'f.x:.'.":-...? else can find! n anyone
imarn |y^:,;'H.'*R who howls ansi

^*^^'^gto'wl

htis w'cieevory lt'm

buries her in a rosewood coffin.
J-UST IKE TODAY smelled Esau ahad; soxsup thi^|-'^'"|fe he forgot all about his Burthrigbt.

'K|||J||

,s SOON AS^^:

c | OTING putz moret wrinkles a fa'ce Ian -,orrying, about in:^{; ^ '1thi gp that cniriot be helped. *^ *.:** ^fm»^^ W TMAX laugh. at the mar 'whio isays "£ dne it", but ever ta ½jat he has probably accomqdishied much as the man wh as
^l~~~~pplayB^^~I , PI 1.0 '

ii'I' SOMETI1\CIES costs a gooc to -do right; but bitter ex dIJ^B~~eal perience teaohes that it. alwayE coqsts more ntt do it.
^SiS^.'^.''^ ''.'. ** 's * * . *

OF MoWElit tPIL TltLE^ MPA-l l )UR readers have apreciate m|2ihtilythe Parables of Misi MoliS~iS lie 'Webb who signs bersell

: ways., Therefore tell, u's1,we bn': l ae .'e,: w seech thee, how "e'. that our hearfts may be gladi.r. :.": our spirits pr1:pare d.' . m- n of lear: T -an tVhe ,ign' inmg-nodded' .his hL'hd and winked, an eye, and gaZing. down' on th group of young me.'and of young.; . women, popned. is. mouth- uia ' . ::..:.: .. spake: ' "By' the gr--at. Hoeus.O . 'Pousit may be ·that some eI: ye should i , 7, I- -- . I I . 1. I go to the farm and tweakk cattle .i . wasn't deep enough". and some to the sea and net fish; giving him. And Th en and some will find the Way :hard,: Des Moines Still College of Os-. because in the past ye have ridteopcthy has always recognized C · OLLEGE SPIRIT. ': den where ye should hav wa ked its .essential obligation in this Weihl-Finds a quarter in the and slept when ye .htuah::':ave:: regard and has, from its very be- corridor. watched. And yet "as.-t loo upo ginnings, made private profiteerWiiliarn'--I get half of that, ye, 'I see some~ who -sa".gcut: ing on the part of any physician I saw it first . with knives but not to:kil, :?d on it:s teaching staff impossible W(hl - (With emphasis) I others who shall use, their hjnd buy P;.. :'.ibiting outside classes have it, so. I keep it. see! o': their' tein fingers;: to Each inconduct. d for gain. what do' I get even .ady---We.l, mighty deeds withal and tihe ead-t n....cto is morally and by con- out of this. '... ', thereof shall 'be'health 'ndiot. tract bound to give the best he' IShamrarck - Stick .Fourth f" has in the course of his regular ar:;iind, you may get to referee. death. And Ilo, I say UntoA. classroom work. rt " Doetor:,->"~ o r- .. i; little band, go forth andpiospff.. Doctor-'-' have torepotsir, for thom'gh ye go into a.Istrange:: special priviThere are no -naugh',yet leges for a price" at D. M. S. C. that you are the father of trip- world which .knoweth fie shall y e conquer because 0. Every member of the student lets." light ye ccay foyrth-which.i.-_: Politician .- "Imp.ossib'ler- dbody has an equal chance. When OsteopathyV' t7~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~. the tuition and other prescribed mrstd a recount." fees are paid there are no ad" mathem.aticians are chas- He a.lways wasuted. something, Whil-' ditional charges, private or oth.. erwise, for any of the regular ing down the fourth dimniensions, n ' .ew.. , - .' hopefuls' are still trying to dework. 'At last he hIad hi'ay,::: *r * * * why a browa cow that uuug He drove his car witheot hi:' eat gr1 ngrs
i- 'f -1. . I , 111. . I .. I I " , 1. ; ; .. - , , fI A .I I I I ' -1 . :i " 0 : .: , I .- -- , ... '. . r ", . 1. , - I .1 -1. ;I, , , I---

wil Hbe Interested ?R'I'T., :Only one 'hundred per -metal so marked. c'.can be to k.now that' Miss Webb-is a: cent British girl, 'whose hom.e is in, What Sterling is to silver, Des London, England. She graduates Moines Still College is to osteopthis month and will return im- athy. A diploma from D. M. S. C. 0. mediately to, London to practice stands for high intrinsic Worth her profession. and splendid professional attain':~ '.~ · , .' ... mnents. When the College thus UNTO 30:S7'WIfGiNS SAYS' its approval "TH' 3:ELLEiR who does th' puts the stamp of upon an individual, society is most shouting is gin'r'lly th' guy assured that he is wholly osteowho is puffec.kly willin' fer th' pathic, and a competent, thorother feller to do th' most oughly qualified physician. Still College Des Moines teaches osteopathy without limiA M.GHTY spineless cuss is he tation. Nowhere in all the world And always on the rack ten-lingered, is old-fashioned, Who waits for opportunity bony-lesion osteopathy of the unTo pat him on the back. adultaerated A. T. Still variety more consistently practiced. Th: ALttXISM has it that we are finest didactic and clinical work in the world to help others. And available is the absolute rule of a worthy sentiment .it is. But its classrooms and clinics, sometimes we can't help wondering what "others" are in the From Doctor Spring's Scrap-Book world for. 'Pome This is the story of Johnny Metuire, '"'O LOVE is to have justice, .ruth, reason, devotion, probity, Who ran through the town with his trousers on fire, sinc erity, common sense and duty faint.and ,welded in.to 'ihe hearto To live He went to the doctor ed with fright 0know what one is worth, is to I what one can do, and should do. When the doctor -told him that " . .cs his end was in sight. Life is --Victr Hugo. Uhe t"·ach·er F as fc hIC lIass if .. I 4 .f they could compoze some.: poetry, BOUG-JTh"llANIlI) Y'`.D FOR ''i, w'or.d el'. t~~~*aPro fessional using the j~Upon She-finally ca'led on Johnny i 1J2I-. r175JI-LA !41 -~CV181 41 - :" I-' -~C~+'E~l ./:* J1ones, -expecta thorough, prattical edu. Johni rose evfbar'rassed: Afor -thebe tuition catio.. in retr. "There was a pretty little pays When i, has dis'he fees .. girl nairied Nellie, . har',., '.}:his "hia-c..ial rb)Iigations Who fell in. the water and. 'as ' se':t for1.h in teI calO"g of the .' wet her liittle feete '"'" .. isof inist.i:,utn :r his-' . doesnt "Why .h .Iy, ,hat to the 'veiy Jeslt instruc'entitled rhym^' ¥n " 7' tio.t each u:mhnber, of ,,. .faculty

The MOIWEI3.~

A Parable ofq Pomise
· . ... '

MO WEB
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Now at this time-there .arose: '.of; a' group, of young men: and ' young women, and they gathered
themselves together andh sought out a mighty man of learmnbiug that is in the land. Arid. they,

_ put forth a leader fro nam: mongs'.". them whom they had instructed,:: and he stood before the mighty man of learning and spskalo, saying: ' 're:no:n', "Oh master, oftenlooking down upon us Where::we. sat- at thy feet- in'-class, :h . thou, scan::ing the 'throng, told:. as thai it 'was given unto theei to know which of us would surc, ceed and bring glory u.nto Oast'' apathy and unto our Alma Mater, and which of us would 'ret.r·. again to the hash siinging and. -w, the bell hopping.. in". whieh:". :'.paw! have striven for gain: ithese four years. Now therefore we pray thee, enlighten us in tis' ' matter, for in a few weekSd. we set forth into. a. world vwhiA.Ak :fo.. :. worships stir'n ge gods and lows stranger faiths 'and.' whih
does 'look' askance at us arid a.
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The Sterling imprint on silver white milk that mnake" yelhow is significant of just one thing-- butter,

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iea'lantdi tea, phy^iee e :prac,- h rai iePinsh ;or oferheti csy, { 'even the thismoral ,es .t .. diEAHNG death on July 2, 1843. physiogia dosage of the mod-' HaIhneraann based lionmeopathby era physicwn. It. is 5n one of >ut
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.acs, one, the facts of the ,any on two sickness. diseams rii subjective and obje',. ewese ase-i~rcl, durugs the ;. p'rove sii]mptoums of the naturally :ty it'- oy ~gress wr k, with of i. act the -i i et; l other, the means, t ideace ©.Lf illn;;~:,. troit, Ci::ci:ati :<,.d .San Prank:, -·.. . ' t.h , I the h spos'Or Cisco. proclueed on fic of 'r f erma'ey ea ctive Properly uder . h n oj :. t"cio h lthy body o ; tihie wemre an t :e sojeite -ce of ta s Hth r oeathiy t'en tha (Coniued' . ? (;xt Isste) ' a met.h od .-- gai in oh .ro¢eethoisi on tsc e : drt P hg' ead'P pe cly l tw oherai''utic aoe -pplie' :..'.:on,. :rIs : :td-eoea rn bo th is-were '[hen qup.eottic cmesop :m. madetodey OTCvd oy demand for recogYW, Wart to ne:ip '[oo<, ooe; ?"D ' w-"as adisere o anacsserve t hje pises. of a sci- a - Is I ecir 1; ,,aV of 'de,Aiacite 1115 deriing t 'clpi' of A'- crc-lplt t facts of .I-:; .. aei the siene tof. f oiuring',a thi 'nr"', fo"r the ret W2.e ha.:',e e.:t.ablishe:d .. :"D>]'! : '-: oeotic' seh-or, esich .o'-: 'D '-. 'br'.tedI' -~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~4 are . a 'hool nd Te. f thre i' m0 ''s of dis-: P.A.R.M.E>:T Oi: -PRO...'.~'S,"-, ':.? .' .: Ae . SSI C/' : hich we. wa.'-' ttBU ; PA ' A K-W /("aideristyni[ptors ':i iratory at'.' 'ica-of cuo rabl'or'epecal fostrtt f'r rad.e si of the dose proofc th e-prose5 ri whnV diseases cu schri tie r'ediocit ion of hte yo/ -*'>tempts of muat:'tr eUy fiti-;hnitIot.' ; t .1 ''r *w'il isz,-z disease. Drugs are peed similitude o c of 'tes-J"isi .tlt eceCe dio wit.h t he dep;rt're nt wit. assist you to 'se-o n'her r" Vhethc -L., g"'ive.n cure a f 'om- 'i'e and (r'dru diseassD toget e; 1I ,t t-' -~ Ac c to the | tu'l w^yhici, ywhre adurh evil~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ r'l:sistnt,, a : Cdeontinus fr-oam P[age 1)ib 'I;temt-saedi u-' o at t Ge rma
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theHornebop Vi'O edieal olleg :na :81 "a :i-: of Pennsylvaniavision took place and tlieHahnemann Medical College; was organmethods of treating ized. Other' Huomeo:pathic Cob h It. admtis 'the po:sibili leges are; at Cleela,.-. C.cago : , by other St. Louih New Y c>;:k Boston' De-

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: t which 'prefacts o fsethe nce of fondid of ethis hypoti :le iS[;1. D'octor, Vwe want you to send,.. logy and Pho:anrrcol'gy a' ','ec The school of .pathy en- us a list of tJ;.e towns withb.in reo ular bcoght into cocrrepdeciced for cduataxM from the your, acquaintance that are it_the "pcrpose of cr whe diseace school of 'tedcUi.e a stiormy pa~th ineed of god, true blood, osteo-; uen of resistance, hut it eveatually pathic physicians. 'We want.yoa.. is possible". i-The college of Homeopathy | gained legal tsogltic)e, andthas all to 'attend the naitional conlie t With atci Dru.gs jiucndamental 5e- forta lhg time, behe- p.rotected vent.iion and will attempt to findi teaI-, c-s all the f ` -*^A;; Eatablihbid -st resh, 1 Dr.B H3ahnoinrrin procaulgated presaert all the facts and in its profession.. The f3'st phy- yo'a a competent nman to take' intradsced Honie..:p-. care of your practice while o-ou gerner'al meJdicine, and sii a in a~ ipae itheoriers of .... hins-now prircop ip SI 1,-,~~~~~ . mao d ceiveod'.Perapiteic suppro as A published in h ii k Wv ,lfe c t in dditioi, gives the student de- ary i' the IT. . A. wy Dr Jo-0 are away. If you are crowded. 0 'hm'isBCa."e I y years lateor., tfailed knowledge of- the Materia '-:-lands-J :.. baegin with work arnd require a full the cit y of 1Boston in !825, but ti,-:e salaried assistan we will -:onvinced that d -g.dministe 'iedic Pure . The hospaIs r-. P 'd:.in' smalle- doses ihan were der Homeopathic control apply received little ao.tlc(e or favwor do e-erything in oar power tot.':. didactic exctt a from the. Ger. nan popu- put you in communication with. isuaily. mniployed :Icively, in a practical way t't oti. letior n. In :835 Dr.) ae%weiier,cs- one that will give you entire sat-"' -erted t. e'ir u:':'.:.Ive powers , he teachings of he coll eges. n, of Adxvanced his d -. ,trine potenti- the colleges and hospitals recog- tablisbad, at Aeriic:,wi Pa:., the isf acti ,.. : Let UsiT Know Your Needs,. of -'HeriLc-an iAc, demy :" A::)a'tion:~' dynarni.zation. Ir 1821 mae the limitations or1 Homeopo- No-h-r. or It fc Doctor. h~leA was forced o '-eav- Leipzigj achy andt confine the application ji.omeop:athic Medicine Address all communications to,. which of themisame to its proper sphere. tract d attention i.ut bonly re:'bAeeause of the ,osticity ''has Jseived mode-ate suppo employ"ed, Homeopathy his new doctrine had provoked J'ues W, R. GL IGG, % 'The I og Book, Dr. C-dinstantine Her ing' as a :motcg various established inter- i a sphere in. medical practe t.hat .1424 W. Locust St., Ia the . enterprise, partici'u'an d -'sts, particular1ly 'i.ose of tho cannot b.e disre,-rded, Des Moines, Iowa.extetr t its oper'to and resived HcMeopaticy a Thierapeuti ;Apothecaries. IWpon the invitai:on-.of the Grand 'luke. of .An. Apli.catieon ations. .' i-eovirlt; so'me years afRussia now has -a commissa-l lHombeopathy is not a system of terwards to Phtiladeph ia, he pro.- Apalt>Coetthen, he went' to live at )'?oethen and utter remaining medicine; it does not replace ctred from thre Legi slature, in for minorities. His duties ,we. : hygiene, t.:there. for fourteeC years, he re- surgAery, .ineorpc biological ed- 1848, an act of )ration for judge, arei those of a cororner.

apathy or ,tect tan to take 'charge of prely and simply your pcactice "'pe.d, it al-l t- el.ts o his -ot it.C to wit _ ptms ienti while y'w,- -are _.fvr. which th, drugi3 'aa pecrie. toric pemanein-. Ia other words ; pon ItC.ans -Cofits 'selection. awa', ? or we awill Ittempt to fUr-' ga H ome. paty then is a '.e';od Oif nish as far as possible, good osto the Pr ss are the scieces of dThe e-r-ud coarse of study :.Again this lono lege 'quire' the. Pathology -and Ph..artacology', and therapeutic procedure.. rThe Honm- tieop-thic phys.iians foc towns is mcthomd by eopathc-f in ced of ti-c at by,omeop .The studentsto lrna-- both the 5TCa iatmenl-;!s wire the need is grecat.

Ao.ns .'of- disease and the oyip:o'is p.prodwced be ic --on 'act a the ininistered, fo the .rug syigpt'o.psbis hedat e"actly' jit te di"* ease sy'ptom'.

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)US MEDICAL TS -OF .HEALING
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PRESIDEN 4X1ODERN
Dr. S. L. Tay the Des Moines Osteopathy, gave Central States ( ciation at the Bi Kansas City- to : appreciative aud: day afternoon.The subject :of Modern H'ospita The contents " were clearly defix in the audience day was dawninu ment of our hi fficiency' will 1: upon. the:' doors tions. ; : - :: ; tD :;In sub:-sance ] ed' that there e rpo or servie and h at t b i j ust' b ginhinz~~li delr gn ingo . : iito th e physician tino his prihysi -

y Dr. H, C. Engeldrunrt Dntinued, from Last Issue). B'Thompsonlan. School (Phyedical School) in' this counso named from r. Samuel Lpson, its founder,: was the -al successor to the "Bnrno'in Europe. The virtues of remedies mployed were ed largely from the Indians from the crude practices of marly settlers. - Tey were ;ally vegetable rather than ral products. Thompson en~ged the o1rganization of dly botanic societies and d a cali for a I:. :S Thompn: convention of delegates Uh:t- scieties' 't' :meet t.'t bus, O"hio,: Dte mber. i17, (This was seven years after, irst Homeopathic ollI n.):'Annual meetings wt erhas until 1838 (six years), when ision rent the. assoc
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:ty:.- tates with Ailor4at . l T| siubjet of this paper has justly wonr renoawn. he i Sandthey .guirs,1 ths I:e 6omeopathis and ill aboutas;eici "e'KleZgtt.ics. .Its origin. mn be ecion %r is rooted in the iundamentals, grade shool, igh eiintitntions as te ak f t aed -t; Dl-i John: Browzi, fr s chool, college and professional triiEng, and has niot been neg- phicati·inl of businesspni -iny' year, pronfer'cd of th tet- leted i: any parsticular:. IHaving beerk well grounded in te could make them. u,r .nowioiui i un'damentais Jb.his dpreparatory .training,he has increased institutions re beginig :. ... a..d. p:ractic. of medici n eiA fne w i an d l h B: fS i owkd-elg by wie and continuous readin along profes- .showi signs tyesicaeni, forx-wh ibur. rgh W.niversityE Hid .. Vers called hi.s the '"Brun aoEi .'. , . ', „ .:* , , tpnrlalcimes. principles busi.ness iee res a 'nom-nan knowshs.li suoject un3til he has taught piLed and the factors fo SteMy I..B honor of its formder.- :ft s id, Doctor Johnson imore .than *qualifies in th.is particular.. ency or e .:;sys;tem, was based upo a the t a ste, alyed it w; Hsed li ^-: honolr man in his classes was ti thle 4Osteopate p6thesis o excitability. .fho Od ltha oneof e ji e gradcuation .he hs been .instractor conrinaousl,; for siz" lenls th8 ; the hoPiptit; es:-; were ei her st henic had taught alost every subject in the cur- solve wa liow to^ make :hotit tiength,: S'tronag, Activel ): or teen 'years . He Ehas j riculmRn. He has givn more tire and study however, to more sii able ihetic, the result of .an exces]s -to men of modea other branch :. :.a deficiency of: excitelment. :nervous and mental diseases than to anWUy and wieaPn T er to rea ths en he spe n his in this fd. ^diung, low det, and eat ;hart-: :has: risen to:emnen : -were t'he'- remedies. for the speeialty, he speaks with' authority, for he not ony -knwfs his jfor our 'hcptas, r;ea bu . : (Continuedon page 3) nm;er; Stimulants for. the leti institutions, otherthau4 Ioa ; l .Brown' theories and prac-: ----'"' p4-t E *%nd were studied as to-thirmeth^L Lfavr upon the ( onti- -patient till he is whit^e, which pathic school in principal, but emiciency, 1 economies-andtwa wssais, in France, pro -becamb the ruling practice: i eliminates the use f ay hthirbsteS drug soon lesarned .that similar doctrines and Anrienca under which te lifeof nternallywhich wpould destroy 'a ws more : creful:y-upeR c ostil (eog Washingon was nndoubt- whitii blood cSl ;iorpuele bY reentritinosd aids wt 1or t
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fom the conviction of its m rid ids composed of countesId two4ree words "Osteo" uris ecs mber f units all onnected (we") and "a-: CUtL TS aId alrea ypIN OF HEA he,':tsbsuctresomeo receivi.ng sensory iraprest ys which means "iufferingo ler ' r)· re- to s ai ton nd tha rytem firn twe itis we eireg u :h :::.·iri s d a .ionti-nued fromn pag-~e~ 1) th~e "Sdecific Mcdicationi sitia ceive and transmit the impulse lish equinivalent for this word, b as a and con-usa from th sensory ne and f ri a drug rnedical stani rniie r diefficulty for the reasor fhati e' Physio-Medical school is point seens quite liogicaln, their duct them : tohe muscie tissues ter of treatment for sufferin arlmost identical with Allo-coten t othe icon being ta the- tis-to effect motion. disease," Th word was consulc athic schoola and the Homege sues of different opgans and other nle other. basic tissu is theiered by its `ounder to be the "patic cult had already sEtablstriuct;urs of the body have a circulatory apparatus, which cpar-I rost ieapi opriat from the fact l1ished 'their legal status, varying chemnical makeup or corn- ries the food supplies to the tie- thaL bo ne" are ased as levers it era1 y:¢a , ^b-k*i Position and in consequence havesues and adouinioterng preatment very ofthe elimnation.ten f rom this" wor d iaes the : oly vary basequally affinities for I o the orgmansn of eing -.... e -ihe efectic School, another a drugs administered dyuring sick Thiey appreciate :othe fctt ai ha' farth maisconception of the :si strayy Iamb rcjm the fold, wasfness, Through, varying laboratoryner vtous sytsm is deprendent up- ence. bet the names of other founded by ))ir. Wooster each xperiments and Bexperimnents frac, on oct legacriiletory apparaitu:s tforrd shools iron o.es amera of p'Abodnow has a reogized medi sta ick turos an eepirical stand- insstedaunce and also iat the his- nlitical piartes, religious danont .o ltegrno. The tedr ' i'iCic hgad potri tequ iletindent ti al ae equally in n been ssed log before ii a gen- of remedies for tIir practicethe inervou syite or-, is ntin.u t and misleading and have c'e eral wiay, hut this 'as the begin- On account of the pwsceent es- two functio l abro o ovlaybsic b Pcined Take the trm Lmng of its use to designate atablished by the orneopathiccharacter of ^cton but a0so"A3lopathy" meaning "other soPf rlicol of madical reformners. in estdtlishing their legal inter-deeperenc oa interrelated) fer'g' a "Homeopathy" mrsai y About 1842 a refirmed medicl status, the Eclectics soon gained ihey recogniae this endless jlg like surfering'what oloileg wan ganized in Cinin- equal legel privileges, cstream r st of moenta' y a well ash o n o ;nati, Ohio In 14bQ (twenty years ?ime Osteopathic School, the volun'ary nervo. impulses sugges t to your mind unless fa" .'hafter , J, B. G(ram started the The found:ing of the Ostopa"-I which caus.e i'i motion. nmiikar witih the theories, drugs firl Hoeo·pathixc c~llege inthe thic School of practice by :An'jThey cont' ti ". f and prctice which they stan Cite of ;toeni a t82S), it was drewlayl"or Still, M.D., in o1874,wole aehine is human a tor were iily in iUr mi jiinctporlrrrted anas~med the F: marked ar evolution in medical perfect adjustameat as regards its A nnm e can only suggest smeO 1eetin iiidical Institution." The thinking, domponenit part, or s egrds parr o:: a complex work. :C of th "leetic othar e.ter The Obleopathic Schoolp thel r , eiixirnient, nist e in The Osteopathic system of.- Institt:e" in 184i, contained the last to be- evolved, viewsa the h- a norai funct2ionaondit-on recogniaes the u-se of .fdlolwiig ciau.se: "Our collegman body from a biological ad a result health must o so d (to e n ed latr) ba dehdI r. 'I!" point, s be' :fl strictly i: :aet wich its astndpoint. This school is unique, and . at aaresulnt of il health e som tain, as n ('et0 helt(h must or butt has case ceitral .-name indicates -.. llectie - ex-in its principles of practice, as it disease they place : ore stress around w.ih:. all else re'vo!ves, :e:.ludimng all such medicines and has very little in common with upon tlie str.cturai pcoadition of the mI aneta,::mcal aspect of the. such re medies as 'under btherhdihePr cults ofh.ealing. Osteo- the boldy, coxtending t~hat body and its relation to functMon nary .crccmstarees cf their jdi paths maintain that en:ergy can- error of structural rei.ations l" Osteooat.ic physicians utilize' .eius IW: aro linable to prod'cei not; be destroyed, as ta.ught by ip'roduce its corresondg syrujp- germicies, antiseptics amnd dian,evil:-conseqauencss, or endan er phlysics, arnd that any remedial oms. 'fetant to minimize acterials !e future health of the prate',' agent ...............ill 0,virtue of the is such by g. ractivi¼g and theiir toi-t e... anhei contrld t Ane.ston t1 aes o f "While we draw from any and ev- faci: that the energy represented They the re f re seek to correct thetics, either in a leael or gert, ery source all such medicines 'by tile renedia agent is convert- alsuch. errors as can be correct- teai sense, to control pain incin and. modes of treatni di.'ase as ed. into it physiological equivaleaving the symptoms to dist e ope:r.ations. Antidotes in are found to be valuabl and at e lent. i corsequence' chemical. appear s a natural consequence, case poisoning, where chem'the same time not .a.cesriiny at-energy is traforme into phy- where nerve siimulation to any cal neurftalizing effects are neeb:,nces" ,tendedwi sioi.Cl oierrry or ubses the tsse is icreased o essary i the stomach or intens iLaxatives or purgatives in 'hrugh decreased they attempt to cor- tine, 'bcdy tissues of the . 'satuai Ee-tit tB. rn .8-. Whmrhto expise .reel I^ same mec!nari-ca!llv, or per- Icsesa of emergency. Scdatives ini c f e pain, whether Medical Association adroped awich to express ief without a p the co.-r1cr. i o f o cIm xree , e platform of prlieiples which change in itselfl Ii like manpatie i. ":: at tise : "T e-C- jn:c, mechanical energy applied,I lsen h. Contained th filowirg: 11 rly su t the nis o c noarked ,a revolution, ill iine " a w tibent to get the al! ti/mes p «t is view ::~.^ in defiite p:.rpose-;.t a oh t~e etito '~~co~~uum~~~~~~rage he a from te need of s apaen tt So it b ' c^alsecienee in a liberal spirit, "s-is tran:osfernm:d irnto its yic to make the organism'self ess is iaid a:.n cahd ta thu, ceveloientQf real eqtrluialent. ie Os'isteopathie tihe greaters:i; tclly p a C n Iu lt is, therefore, mechanisal the blood and. ne.:ve fores, a sdsurlic'int and depcndent upon :tre resources f the veetatble w'.ich is ingested and -al 'fod lts to thleir nor.ma the impedimn hich clt Mataedic, a views trhe body as a ly proaote the automatic if possible,, there activity a re 'oed r Ii Is ecifc--n tmachine: vital in character. a dspe idest and ies IThey maintaisn t~hat thoughi.This they reason, riesults ns acapa.pbilities the buody, a:i- was mthodof t~re~atng diseasge. e ic d by naur normaliai.g tcndency for, oiu- process the the the evolutionary :T-hat. a. dreparture from 'Te couse oft study 'itncludes o ':"jhe'althy eonditi.an i-rrPt:-,pts the man machine has been evolved, functionsi birrng norin'.al, to:ires augh-t in-su:cects pemden. pon them fr nrtiofsucsally tall bodily ! fantions, and only the and that every structure hs its 1 na iti particulr tet iS, -hialege i oeimo must as dtio :tief .ei -e rativc' efrtfs of natur e definite irl..tns. to neighboring ti arc t h nomal. I ttention given to natoxy, Py t.hat through the de.- t"sit, .nd can effet their restoration. I. stact.,en, Course stry. sioo a d (i I Surgery is t.: omron h iaheritI:eopmen of a l the varying object, therefore .fo medication, t le over a eri end ruMctures in thi-: ody two types : 'om:-acordingly, is io0 afford an of Arty-six weeks 't e Osteopatho o i devel ced ol ed . tnure the mea .ns of doing: this? off tissues hae ec. chol 'a, Aiti a to..tal work mi-tore' advanrtgireousiy and which are bsic iR their unC Physicia.: , h .:wevr, decrying pro- i ni h each-school oi blt : o niscons surgery, .rs; utiliing|e"f 6,184 lu. :: s i.n ^which Ition, as all otr n der 'ircuxmsstacnc ' sixty inu;tes, ; .. . I em,. dep.: .I; or h-. y -surn-gery owreon necessary demrands Csosissf 'he w ould otherwioe fin d t is d sd as saterr .n: of' all permanen- .. tiorn a :.j% excl:di .t;: de pessing an.dl digorganmizing Of ittsesft onfe seor-es the-byod idiuencem 7-'f '6J.~.e:,~,:: , ce ser;:'es..the tissus, of t reat- , hn rn, ran' getatot sle:agencies de isuiCh as '. Sprleti rose om whic is ehn- jsc :.:yo urself into th. belie-f ep natur e, comprises with that by. ti©o .a.- a co, en-d medication of logous ti a tclephon- srtem, -dc:s ' n x rM ing i-r.nd.: :i a. -da^ngeu'cu~ tendency; h~t no-:rings ain other 't!uiss'e, ijnto co.-t e 0st;eopathic.u ault which is in ^ I m o -s ye u e about. y s norra, t;As nature muchanical. f:.U :Oato atiity. vey Thisrebalisn^r ^ - nd. .iordinate -em. C st :b':. to todseepp a atvfie': i Te'me steopath is except tissue is cald ne: -or,,:s tissue mA(:;:cjetions orf a -miner'a MI~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~1ill ',:'e. y

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TAKS TUBE CULOSIS` FROM DISEASED CATTLE

--A test recently concluded by mnited Dr E C. Schroeder of the states Depaitment of AgricUl: ture traced tuberculosis n in child directly to.bovine tuaber, the ease ciosis. The history ,.. .att.... is as follows- During ' part of October2,1922, a tubercuie instruction in. nervous axc ' ental didseases as very, very Iin test was applied to a herd of The test wasr 12 dairy' cows. satisfanc.tory. Doeror 0. I D M. S. C. 0. appreciates 5 Dr. Johnson for his splendid mxade t the owner's reques;t WI"Osteopatnly wa.ks hand in educational prepar atioin, for hiis professiona.l. knowledge, ,ind der the p.lan conducted by the raed- with nothing but Natuires' fr lius great 'ai)lity as aninst actor. If D. -. S. C. 0. had o i State and] Fedcral officials works laws and for tha' reason alone otbeV teacher, and all the studients could come under his in"- ing co-operative, :.As a result tie. marks te '.mos significant structio: s, it 'woJld stdi] Dlbe o great college, He is a man, a of the test I of, the 12 cows a .progress in the.' fittory of seien. schol.ar, a !eaher and a real scientist The professione 'oyves were classed as reactors, and upT. Sitii.I tific xes'earcth/."'.-....Acaqnrew on autOpsy all revealedl lesions o him him and ~u:~S. rrt C-LlLIIs as ami mg its; prea-test. am~DRPIL Bois I (·,-b_oa~h tiimv 'a ch.erishs " =;=tuberculosis, two being ad.?: '-'"An lOsteopath is only' a Iu ' janced cases. The veterinarian' I.E JBOILS that the process of boiling thenm 4o. made the test was 'informel': ~,~:l~·~aL.:N h mean en.gieer A'h:,s~h!,uld tUind'ershould begin. Of course, the de-, laws ;govfer'ning the atle stand all the t- body rush to tha by the owner that his 8-monthsj feder -Do: a Dietz, "25, 3By .w-man engine and thereby mas: baby girl had recene:liy oid spot. it becomnes swollen and. hot, Eeon bocls may suciumb to the but the s is:tce of external veloped a swelling in' i ter disease." ..... ndrn'ew T. Still. throa Saturday Bnight- soapy, I recog- heat ma]:cq the- wrork of the dae- WiliC Was bpeingi theatedhytl:hai ::iAs you contemplate studying nized and treated- in the early fenders more -suWcesfu family physician. The childshad bee/n fed on the milk of thein.thiis sci .ce and have .Aslked to stages, boils yield to hot. water in training are com- feete' h rd or about 7.miontis,, -know the necessary stu'dies, I and soft soap baths. If, unforF |Athletes thex are not givern -monly victims, if they are rough- and the physician b"lied' tha.t .,: u;pon youra tunate wish.. to 'impreiss it ly rub'bed down. Persons rtcov-th enlar'emcnt in i:e throat with aniat- early ecre, th,;ey go blissfully on nimnds tiat. you .eg I w er'u.losis of ho ine orig i ;. 5 ini tlh'i2 developmrent un;il we .eri i'ro0m 'wasting dis.ases such wan with' anat"-, unay, and you ec.d with Mark T'wain-n as typhoid freqaentiy have crops, he attending piysician.soon a csa all agree 1/ y"6i'---Amndr'ew 3i. Still, They usually begin terward decided. that an oper.':, that. "the bea:t place to have a <i boils. boil is on the other fellow". We about a }:air and develop until th n to remov the disZased ti. If ': 1' c Osteopmath reanso"s, '. t iand can fully synmpathize with himn ',;he heir can-.be seen stand g up s was need. As a 'result itorder III Ilitat t:C'O3':;Ms at recov' a small ye.ilow ';h, operation .the child is midde so, a -the in ibthy, ideof h-.it'b are insp,-':arablSe, and that and usually tell him .;. s ·p;.-ec 'W'ith sch a favorable w-1N?:'. order in a";.. pacrts is found, same time hoping irwvardly tha n x. i;'san' ' it:ceas^e hp;., ' our turn never comes. W'he.. we h5rrrr,·i ~ i d'; WV ." ivdn -r. of h ii 4 A'. and if prevailH, nt ijseaae.cc a.nn ',:'A part oi' t~he rasi causingi c.,ms know that the nadxer. i ea;i' te and disease is "he esperireent as to~~rwe'. d ~ '"""v'ixts '5itihoui; on eur .. ~4 'ibe .In,,. tC,ere is no use boils dweIl r>. 'bIonid "tall' cci tot' ?oieou ef Aoxhxep l cii ark iii#~ the usual fnorAmrili0yo "by' youi: -ir alde'r."-..And-,: , T. Still. " l ir c4 inJned and to'tI A"'': oa nbu I hirscnlled;~ ',r~l::ss "ano gong y. rylAaq On min da, thecid, ,RV V P-'-el!?l:'oes VV .isiuag lat' v p is siu 4 n'acd bntlnn"Cil fo-a 1 "'cn' ~sli'h ic o~cipiC e/arc~chnantin it 'w a;vs no'. cc it·~ise cci. eoi tIi t be X crnb o to Ht i23..liP~s ~O:·ai: -Wam C·Ou4BteliltP~ly "t :''' b,, t era vihich Tookcnd ah 0' n 0 .int 'IS'I'" tii", ticn IA VW allJustntly PCi A. IA "he rh.tic vicnue, ie likne tub~c e', ba"c·il·,' i'.s(.,'] ete ,the !::-.- ' a.ee,, ei'Pr~naP1 Is> a h ? er n Weakii I b, po, d nulvico 'neviw to I. od w ' iroved beyt f'bt h whic h x . n..;..xoniV called the ra tnzux- 'a as t 'm ! icib yoour l IcitioL, e Cia , earlter "a '.'Snux'i l "core'". i'?he a:"whlit.e'" blood oelis, (q'^inotu to. be- tooercle bacilli of ot o -O~a of gerci E ngl l c roe rs Ians. esCet I'v ~ willt , . -o.-',- .. ' ^-Si. .j7rtl-YCEn·t tC'fllf- .'i".VY1A*.. e rest if saxrar is ci 'i~i ._

subject. theoretically, but also .practically. His clientele has -ef Thei Official Pdubicatin his exi er/ience in actual observation STILL CO imafE, alrays been large and 'ITSMOIN:S yen and treatrm.ent of. cases has gvi, him a basic knowledge of OSTEO'PAT1J4.Y of the symptoms and the pherioirno ,ena human ailments. wich serve him well in the class room and make him an able teachero Pirecttor General.....; L1Taylor idolize him. as a teachere' and among all the .His. classes M, .Baminess Ma iager, ..... D. Cramer rom D.iM. S. C. 0. not one can L, Ballinter' students wlo have graduated f: itor.........C. m be "Coend who does'no t s'peak · ost flatteringly of Dr. Jobhna" eopattby .Witb.ut J5Ltitation son's splendid teaching: ability and who does not refer to his 0t

',ie. "'o.r way ic <he * .~ -'-tA..'e.. T. 'C I-.I t"arew
L

.mag .,:
t I I J;.

· .4 growip 'ic' i habit. of-bi.l.(..c:,:: t p,: ,v,/ardch, Scl'.111. s 'aca 'utic."ng togei icr ir ., s n
'I

." b '~ . l.:i: ' ,,gi. -, oit: by .. |'"-m. ~., i :: ' ge a. , 'I0ccn ait~te n ei^ ":le"'ht t:.".o. .t ,rit:
:

'
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. .AA. . .. b-ec.............. :,:: aus tAe w

a. ioc. Iza,inio' cThe . ndre-w

.nsti:t.. inse ici,'.u, '.' "ii'rdes' p cia -mnc'-

' .o ca. ... ...ci...ea o a ;iI , . cl. or b I1i'ci'.porwrnty.

lyr a.

il.tatedC 'i

0
t. i

"ie'
'i :

mti '. kii inekthe' .the ':c',ui.c.: rb-f

and 's i i the p's.

.... ,

"s a--eo

veri thedu: nsdanc',e from. toli eiostewa'i

an'n ks .u nut;Is'-e. asee ... 1..'-. hI-i :-.... te pn.t; iglx ye'a s theJ.ii

y/mi If

ji uof c:.u 'cadi'cm ins th^ X. S.
iwa Iee d f

jcult,

S.e 'ihica ore-fn.unirth pound. th.
) i'n'icly

O.ot do whic:h the milk. obtained. ay grow o ,et re'io" of a collar or t.. body, the hei' v " :" : -; mauy gin ;.i o":portu.ty for large sir.e before it a her " d:r trea- 'tibe n loc dairy :.:ers ise antamibated, are - "re . be ady to o'o a...e T..s ; t' ciwcs sco -. lbs familiar beginning
r e toughe "" tUhan in lh" '
nfhankafl

germ

the B the regiont t ors s;elec foc a psoce" e p t'

liej. y^ ^edactir emanc f I"' ters aa.sta e' ! n ted.1 at ,xh.'Ce nmi'i' rn etbl c lA bac i, or the type

i
the".a

ios forbs 'db t "otiber to Btjn for the process o: .;ro.t. :' j n I qu Ifc iIted"^'cthldren- under fiwe yeroa. n uget on aiinin'Urbil~. ...,:-,.r ~mnd..e. : · *<^ ' ,~r· . . ..por.tan'.: that te boil. be o..ened. Oany 'f eor m m cases .,f a'd 1 : which 'do not reid a, ^her'nos' it ^ ready, betcau ony wen dee'op Sarit ' eto elo It e ny'W^ help weeri^ ^tow ah c":ft. often leave their via lb may €us' ^ f ha ., p mture ocl)g onits skn A felt wsen he I Rthe pemanently scA red ,or a. bad 'tin i ma are' 'ua' rlv safe front ethers to fcc n 't knoty ' darned Here. th -iA '.h.a c .. . ci. ems and deed ti s rf dnie bodily forces g sicstancen . eat coo·i.'"rn
'o rh. $11,r' ly b2e t.hat o:r s.in:

are aso ^~,6o~0,0 harOd .......

thorsi'ot ilni

g

St' 's

td^b a v esis I'.r^ . e.ayovedaafter t..e boil is open- ...... thern to · err~~~~~~~~~~~~: :l ti .:t tI- ir d and thoroughly cleansed,the remaiAs: to remind ' thehVicttie;o that .ide-ltare a holidao "c.;c inbr a i n b."n' it (Onti me'tisi pputO · pi ,favl i ib¢y o bad ezperien "e the IJ is at, opennag quickl; fills with rBpaui ,*& h p :Inn ;cc'n's cnc fully ec've"ed b; in riendsii -to wibo scarow .. 'I -miay g-, only othingthat thn delopuen' tcu s-'!h..ro : tlih. stge. ibmthi :e' urv. . eea wornan i.ee it: , heri.ss- maKes k:a ney
A"-

'eor

-cr nanach tter -m re A tb u'ti ntert.Me,

0K THE LOG 30
;~a~I- ; I
f. I.IoMtPrrs~nr

U ll UP

INI !Mr

iii

iWZt-Z,-P;gu,-;

^^ai ; -

Bones

m

4tohs

Ag Ah W i n i

L oses

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I

I

sDuring -the past two aw e eeks f] I jD.( M.' . .0. b'aseball team hauIs e r m-et and co-nquerEd the stronl 9 s, ;Des: Moines `ndiverasity team, oum r ~ost deadly ri.vals, and lost sr a osely played garme to Centrats iL I

|

o6lege of Pella.

I i I

IF years thLe Bonesetters hma(II or e Ii
I 1been attempting to smotther D. M I

I i i i

MODLi D

NN OSfP[~A LS T

(Continued from Page 1) of the following points have be:: proposed:. 1. By Abandoning; a. Wards and large private

ta. Special duty rooms. an Ii 3-'DL w as mnear avwhitewashing mIf .. IJt a 1. "I general lavatories. for- the score was 13 to 4 and Dess F Moines used faur pitchers before13 2. A,.d by substituting; III . I they slopped the slugging Osteo- II a. Toilet and special lavapaths. Olson pitched great ballI tories in each room. II for Still and held ihe Baptists toD b. Large diet kito..ensaniS 'g few scattered hits. alIe alsaD serving rooms, I wais the hero at the bat, craclkingT c. Central !i.nea; c.ose i o;ut thiree hAits aad ruining two d. Pneu manic stube .vie, b ats. The tearc n owed the bestt e. Dumb waiterv service. wortlat thhey h ve this season-. 3. By saving time; ii 4Olson was supported by airtighti t a. Physician, ; b ;aseball all tie way. b. The internes, At ; -Plla it was another story. c. Nurses. Bone start;ed oar the mound for theI-11 Business is also being applied: Osteopaths S Ibut retired in thea I 1i. In selection of the staff, tAhir ning n favor of Olson. 2. Registering patients, ella- played goodI ball and deI 3. 'Diagnosing, . ifserved thle. 13 to 7 w-in. The, Os- I I -2. --- I~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~d~W''`L9.~· PI~i-·Is~··-_gRY·pL· Treatment of- diseases,; II 4. A teopaths mmade 10: errors and literI In :the stady of 'these po'intts of ALvb handed thmegame to Centralimprovemn(,rtt i: will be found nt:r; Ol*tsoi -aed lurne would have won I only to be economi cal but the pa, esily; had their team mates aclr ed; them up. A home rumn by,] Thirty-live men anao womaen wil tients will e gr ely ,--,, more satis Davis and a brilliant catch by De I be gradouiated from Des Moinec I Our attentioon has been called 'riea;C, (erntral's one handed short Still College of Osteopathy on tiv Dr. Tay-lor was royally received nig'l;t of May 24[h. Af'tbr bon jto an error in th©e Athletic e5e a:'ad, every one -: stop were features of the game. seemed enthusias-' tion of ~he 1924 O:s:':b-Aiast. The ' _:r_,The Bomesetters will cloe' tie i years of diligeY U work Mthese mn'ci I statement is rade there' that th.e tic. The D octtor met several old: I and women wil rieceiv 1 the D. 0, he season fbthiis afternroon with a game ,1 students, " 1 Mr. and Mrs, .: Mincluding I crll nr it o. f\TV f P-i i -flai^^l.I-i A. S. O. BIaseball team deeated vi 1i .^.*I~'..*iy*^ 4 i ,jhere agai'nst the strong o'inimpson .i , the Des.o: .- aesElStJil Osteopai.hs ''. DV Fle.icher.: In tle firs- game -1 College nine. ,i last spring on two occasions. i T:,e students of the D. M. S. C. of the Osteopath, a prof essionmal II These men and women will be I T.'i1ose games were played by tho | 0. will be pleased to learn ;tha't i I son by a 9-7 score but since that sater..ee to all pars o' the UnitA. S. 0. Baseball team against| Mr. and Mrs. .'.letIcher.are -con-, goes to London, time the Methodilsis have been ed States and onem Des Moines University, and not jtemplating returniang to school Engloand to practie:;, The npajorplaying bett'er bll and the game against the Des Moines Still Col:1 1there this- fal.U -promises to ' ii e best of the ity of the new doctrs are going lege of Osteopathy. The latter I aseason. Ktill -,1 be handicapiped int:o oraectice olp their own mi college did noto 'that time have at ' by3'the loss of some of Its best mediately~, Some few are enterlA COfR : .CTIiN. a baseball team and the stude:nt manc. Il1sona dl Schaeffer will be ing :;si :i:;a] 'e int'ernes, while body of that college loyally supothers 're goinginlo offices and nthebatoerlias -ior . Still. .Our attention has just bten..
31: l

I{)A
t

Correction of Statemeen i 19244 (teoblast,

i

Dr. I- XL Styles
-Dr. J H. Styles,

.ci:x:Acs asasistant. The names and probablie locaLesav tions of these graduates will be given In the ne..t tssue of the .Iog B.omrk ,, it . compi-teo "Com'-. three mencem ent :information, for

o

y earsa the correspond mg

magazine published. by Dr. -, Iil coll.eg; be a.way's dic.ted to Das .. Williams of Kansas City, May IlP': IMoines Still Colege of Osteopa'Dxr. Styles will'be greatly miss- thy, 1424 W', Locust S'treet, Des .'ld inthis institution. 'is abil- lMoimns, Iovca,. DL not dieaCt mali -it$y as an instaructor and his to Arin ~als A unlKess yon irtend t a':eowi.edge :m.an aratomm fo-r[ : ,nd.,v_ ... , of. .'~id 5 ii -an an ly be anpore- I .and tenni-Aichline dateda b' those wi. studiied und hin 'The :'. 'acu-tIy and-ltie She, is att racti¥m . Sistuden'i Bodyoo i Di- M,- S. ., 0. you 100ok; anrrd afty -e. J arxry
II I I I i I

eretarvy and Clinica an of Des 41'i n's! "G.Ai L11.1 r 11 ll Still, has 's-igmed his poseition. I-e becanme the A ssociate l.'Edifitor I P:ea, e e/:r in mind the fact : o fle Osopath a mefe' 'jel tha,.t K11 m.'&: intended for t'he

NCe%-IyCE m -if

ported the A., S. 0. team at the basebail games, also entertaining the members of tle A. S. O, team while in Des l!Moines, We sincerely regret this error in our Year Boouk and take this miea:ms of making a correctioa,, 'tGrace A. Wfoodebo.,)a ditd.:o;, 192i4 .Osteoblast. of

called ito an article published in our April 15th edition, "Did Yeo . Ever Stop and T'hiAnkl" was cr.:-. dited to oin. Ho *K'Aihera but i. Dr. Geor, '. lid inafoarms: : ' *that the ape . .red.i the .id I February 1928 ed'itic.of the Osteopathic M... a..zRie. Mr. Kueh era regarded the. article of great i i value and. banded it to us, over-'. I She-D--4id youI do wmall in your ooking th.e e mbodiment of the anatomy qyi.?' source of t.he article. We amre e.-Not so muach, I. said there sorry th. t due credit was not vere se'entee. "e rc. tebrae.in tihe given the Os eopathie MIvagazine : ; spinal eolum, ,: I find these u,nd take this means bxl -f : adjiv new 'balroom styi es have un;cow- ment, ,red. a copulh. more.--D-idson I lanai n go. ) a Ye hdi t -m Bs Bee i~ei hias. 14om- (eMu' ramiy.-d i COLUMtii SCiAW)A 114 I Ža'en i we:60eo

.mmv 1'.;.

of

me:neavor .

1!

I I

her, y' 3 Hlaten. :. -ri)bal 17,

:

eolo'WX ).Isj

an d Ln Zseirm s n Ch vainuina n.aiin, n em v'8 i thn 1n %hxI!a lauboratorxyvitafls.
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------·-----Ii .
---' fFlgriiiS3ligDWW.rlLPZglEi

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bIntered as second class matter, February 3.. 1,23,' 'oFf..iee at Des 'peast at tie

I

I I - .

'Moines,.Iowa,

of Augustf24th, 1912. 'aet
--

under

the

4,koplp+ 0 low, .I 0 a M M. .,,,,,,,,p·nar;Aarsrrcli;jecwsu

I AeptranC t specia
< !

for mailing- at\ ' a. a of n.revidedl : in seetio 110. act of OCet. 3;11i , i vid Ve ?, 93 4ti
authorized IFbeb , :92~3.:
__ _.

JL-

- -I-,-,;I,,,,.

.&%T~;sUY, ~s^A3^ *~,r*^, all a5^w!~~~~ w»..._,.„,._

PUBLISHED SEMI-iMIONTHLY 'BY THElDS MOINES STILL COLLEGE OF OSTEOPAT Y.
Volume 1
_. Vc~~~~~~~~~~~~~~unet

li

It, le

1i

____T____._I__.-r ·jrNnpunrUainp.·umffnr;.r·I,P.igi\srrslla-qYbM·Hvff

. . I°'~,? ___. _____,i,,ura7anrrsrrrz-rrrir

.
I

.

.

wr t Nunc

Ru-;--u----- _*_*_CI·--BB·IU·PIY(P· __3CXrm·PIOTBD1PB

IOPPORTUNITY "A.-n Epitomue of. the Addr:tess

Seni;ors reA onorei

BaA et i

STILL COLlEG GRAD Et~~-,-.,XERC.,SE~o
AUDIETNCE': The Comm.ence-

Graduali;on Class by, IYven1:tQ 'the. The annual far il bnaiirqiet, ihonorimng'the grad Lat ing class was ment Exeriases, May, 24, 1923, t.b:"xev. ::JD., Crissman, Superin- held for this spring's seniors, Thursday evening, May 1'7. The oinner probably attracted the largest

:,e .... 'b.:??r%- Councailn Bluffs was given in Youlkrer's Tea ] .noom the c.a,r voiaed its appreciaand x}thodist Church: tion with full attendance,.a' District "I very- much appreciate the ton The toast program was in charge of Puesident S. . Taylr as or of being permit-ted to addreass .Toast Master. It was opened by Mr. J. C. Co: hran, wl-o sang two. this body cons tituted of faculty,j | .umbers, "Thora," by A\dams and "'oses atf ictd ' rr, F A ;", ad aHoffman acoraoLpantied the sooisc ,. graduating class, students mporitant occasion. fr.ienAs on- so ij Miss1va Johnson was called upon as the -irst -of lie faculty 'to ' hi . i,&S when tiils school and add.:ess the lasas I anlid respoinded with a nonsense ptoem, ral.,' "CoinIthe :.a; i. of healing it. rpre- ments On Vieitni; 'the Banquet, a la Eb-n Iolde'n" . which r ead as p.oorly esteemed and seIents., 's follows:; at. Powerftul influences scof L!d a '* ."Lockhi.:.,:g 'rounid-in all directions; were ar-rayed against t' and you PNorhi, South, East, Westup and down, ostracism. suffere d :professionai I these traditions es Douenit el 1e :ike Osteoschanged. Bu.t a.l ,-Lis has I biggest bunk in iowan? Ar.': tihe_
pathy Js beiing practiced wherever | i.ckness -or paiun and the there. :sa ilaws" ofnp.actically all of our m.-s'.i th.as-e Withdrawn -the ob- a es; I twhich. once confronted II asi-Jes;'
I

crowd we have assembled at Des . Moines ,;ti? College of Osto'-tae. hy
min many iy'ars. This was in si-t
hrhe

due toitn.

fac: tha-t we

:at .

g class :receiviang years dipIom a.~_ fo:':_se~veral and. in a + tO3 i _ipa;'pt Iwa" duex 'o th:et st.iul.lted inte-i.es i thi? instituti o thrugh the camia-ign fo.i thet rewicolaege.. All f:mri._eCtds seeome d"to bui.!ding[.~. beon- 'IheIir ip-toes and ee'- bodv' · ,just as joy as fine sptirs co'tl al '. -.... tin' ilmake te, A'Every Seat iU.h .ti ol.: csseiaty hal *was. l"hed. a
were

i.argju,'.st gr'ada't'ina

hai

.s..

lb:'ou:t

::

an'2 ani. thile extra., ,

,Just beca use it's May and spdingtime,

l, Just because- it's always done Imust 'burstu in frothy play rime, you thi.nk, hMke id.a.
' ' Fn?' W t'A.in't e Gk(:t

.

space ::s occupied ae d even year was :a a.r"': .'ut into the hall. ;he' eIiredt rilx 'I d ,ii.:i na chei

hearts of an y old griadates of tlhie
instio tta o see.' such an assemt:-: 1 -ex. bly o_ fI.ens and hear': their

:

.:Hethen: l.aunched into his sub-

-'tdeclai. ri.g. tihat "ambitious persons s.el,.et ':chaninels through
:which'tiro potr into 'irm:seives the

"Firsr you do four years of larnin' lWhile wve drag out ever;y cent, T-ren becausue for home you're yani'., We, qu.ie suddenly, repent,

presso-:a

of interiest.

-',tte

'd
i-a

ana: tatg here and there amongth

community i-',r which -ihe life: oif the; li've and great men think'of s termo1 o1ly a:- t'o wha.t he ' :in ii.
can do for it. and put into it. I a lme,sur:e to .be filled." ife

:is, not a goblet to be drained, but He etiliphasi;ed the oft repeated thoi git that the doctor's profesisanm is a part of the ministry for h men .. ain:. avenue th rough 'whid may best serve. His high calDing demanded 'ehehigh.est type of man doctors are tr.uK-t kor ·necessarily .sacred "inter.ests | d with the ., I-of fai:ily life, isen o'f tihe pro,:i'ksio.,.l th.lrefCol" itmust be stro.g and nmu,.st take a,:fir'm stand eon the high principles of their callinig
and ..eer' clear fromn

s ourselres for ore ra nd pasrty,i read Buy your seats and all Tiust ro.w, act hearty- -Al. us crabs, quickn up i il'o But it's kinda late, solmhow. 'tSp
"'We can't ffol you much, by this timmeh,rThere's not mucli tlhat you dIcn' know our o'Bout best, nd worst, and sxb,:e shine 'to tell us so. If you cared :tiere we sit. likhe tanned up leatih--er Chat in wh.ispers, laugh in low, forks and "al1kin'weat.her, - '~~~e,*n' .'I ' .~ Worderin' when we get to' go.

ence ,-weire old graduates who bad, returned to listen t:o the oexercises
Ghat.fr'om-! is safe to say : .. nd.-l thiey s""hall have a renewed' n'-::' a-.Jn ine'irest i i their Alm'a Miater r Osteaopathyis fiil: y fixed in the -ithe c'ity of miinds oi tihe people o.Iines. and c an -ev: 'be re- .. Des tle. te'rci ts. placed. by other inl

speaker af the evening,'R ev. George iD. Crissman, w.as more than rordtal in his endorserent
ao- osatteopaity t'as atethaof-healing And of ithe isteopaathie profesas 'a r-hole His emthtusia:m, - 'siou was impa.'ted.. to the splendid an-: dienee a- Iisthe whole evening .Ws turned in.,to an occashie of .jubti':

'I

'"Wie're T¥he same old goophis and go-oph-sses

Settin' pret'ty in a row, Grinning like a. bunch-of amooses, Swavppir.ng yarns that we all knhiow, .. but it ain't true. .... got paiins deep in his chest. IiCe's 'A. I fe'ife:'whi.sers. like theay should do cbr 'r1om -'i. _ Sne i's hi .ng Oher hi-s besti'

lation.

fad

and

fine currents and

A.ny one who doubts the
-ieiinsuppi:-5Ls-

uactkery. He .. .atmasizes

the

.'Dean looks; cheery,
t1

great otpportunity that imen in the o 1rofessionhad th secve meni, biut :· inderstood B-e wtislhed to have. Jit t.i.t .oppo.t..unity *s ' a "thi'ng oj not t '/utrett. ,f the the -prese .and IhOtc-opiortunity is not cil' Ot'er d.:'v01', ht- -'itthat by sheer fior.,c oi c.hatarte you openr and that i; of little use to cquriareel wat. tl:.< nonemay face in thi di'iaties ceYu. M ust ght for you .prat in ).:true serv .'tu-i.deiCr tIe sun--r,! 1fi.:.o"~ ..? (Co:tin'ue "''·::.s. 'o a,,;ge.)

. of Des and ' trini'pi ibie re ha Sti, Coeg 'of Osteopsathy e is Ce |'i !-u , ha've faidc to hoave been ..

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d alng is oolgwith a 'ou_, cuvsea Wisshing i.t was jplain I.anm ad.
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i'Is'atredCI ariC c:oni.viinced ].look .di the opportuniy o
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high in :as brow d:ihcor..s
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|"Dimes were '
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out -t''ri'is banks; sypeit on ci",:ritig h.air.e.sd. aor-ide nMoen- s sitauk ' Creases p)
This No.I.. ¢iCn::rtinuned. ovn piarg 4) · C"1 71i u J g

ehaken

acfarried, iin a .tltod ti .1-* e hour. .Lt ' hen ti,' i' ,.'', ........ .' 110w:i ,.g9t' l ra s duates were receivng the conw many the1i1r :,11 _aitu.la . tioa .
: I . :- ^ .~.:" . . frie S_ gradui.ting tiea'ry a CLA 5 1928, o'nsosted ot hruyt-iive'de....s, '':'-. (Contirntiued oPn.age.;: *

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e::I;t;ave we arip gr

em~ir f-oc etY k AGINXI PI of ~-i~ eperhaip Or-te? sb~rs~c s oftra

.j ng.
l~a3~ags ' cl itei another er-, for whirich,· we del-na'.nd r; ea ef.

Methodist church, exlalning the course of study in osteopathy and -the two years extra training to qualify for surgery and also made a comparison of the osteopathic training and the medical train, ' *'
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jih~s th., vatle: of. ifears alth~uig-h 'th,-,-v are asilbIt: -;ntilneme: tim, I ter
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importf;

I;~a~ s~le~~in
v-IsI that
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e elonelt
etierua e in'

cndition, fully o~ss"

Rev. Dr. G. H. Myers of 150 5th Avenue, New York -City, is the national representtaive, 7:-He. was evidently very much satisfie: Withl .the: training of ihe osteopah it is given .1inall the osteopathic :co leges today.. It gi.ves me pleasuire 'to pulblish here a copy of Dr. Myers7 letter. I would strongly y-re i commend. that :any Gosteopath :interested' in missions: correspond. with Dr. Myers. .
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.0ped_- . rong' and vigI~rous. ~l~0 os·:Isith ui.,q-L t~he'b t W -do Iow, hOW -, r tiit;-:-- the p rup er time~; ite · fsi~ &, ArriPva: find tbal, i
its w~~c- tbro~ughx ay

, Greenicastl Indiarna, ^ .-: · X' ; Ap:ri!-: M: 2,- 283 -. : :Dr. Emmett M. Schaiffer, f-:: : ; Still College, Des Moines, Iowa -. :':. : My dear Dr.; Schaeffer:A-- ;:'!
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' thefstteet Iy; d proper cre the :'. psi -ecourld ' --__e uld- be in gd coindit-:ion" - M::RS. s. -n, SC'HWn-ARTZ,y who clad been the Secretary of I--DS S. ewo-rk required f ^them 0MOiNES STILL CQIL.LSE OF 0,STEOPATHY for three years and re f associa-lted hbeaneeper and stenographer for eleven beoo.kIor digest en, and wiho had i.ie- evidee f: t: e vir- yearsa pre'v usly, making a total ( fourteen years of service, subof * o-vaos$ toth pastes,-titted her resignlation: at de May' meeting which was.' accepted by d th ilk g: es he Bo edar Dr. M. D. Cramner was elected in -her stead. It was' and iynds, tlc det3ntists tell. ns : with. much regret on the part. eo taL institutituon that she saw.fit to ree ni}ou.:is -portal -of sighn, but owing to the cfact tiertne' she was -moving-from the city,, of t te -i the ging placq forcourse she could 10ohold. he posittion. · She had. been secretary'for I$-:; undeirable invad- so' lon.g as she knewv inTtim :teOly al3 "ii aind outs" of the instituC the -tcopic in size. Thley etrion gso th-"at her hel'p .wil.l.h-be m'iss;ed for some time to Xime. Many * 'iteeth ora mXake the expressions of good will t :frolm it student body and members of the . su-roundn '.parts as f-acultvs have; been expressed and she 'carries to her new- horee the ": r asin .tlieir- oi'ictin' -de'"of k- of .Wir -inm b te :ighest respct ' all o hcerned.t Wie join wR1 her many- friends in ith r beesG the, surfaces j ishing e Succes ihe lieu iew fielld of labor. om-ou~lt arG omewhat 'e . ' -: i: lie . ' · I :- ~~~~~ I7~ I I :; to- fffiexx ; : -;Ger ls: \get | . !~ t'weenr :-the eeth :and tant m. : enace to the healthe Of attelndtat 'brown taste, and ma.ny in ehses8ses :arie for-nd the - body. Thlen *we have what others of mere or less serioius 1 root.;8 @oh"arI-st -aC:hcab tu:hr medi-B and. denttal frieinds .l a tLLl e. aer r . nature. .. . :. e ': .as, -a;ct-,:;n:~l;~~t~?:~l-a:::s.ca.lla. "oca, -of infechtion"', *This. One cdentist promptly recom" tarted wis· sB~:,:expressions of'good wil-lrljiLl i f roll3:i:i~::!~B i:-~~~~~ar' 1 fcly lae eliexrs e ie inlmrta.tion:-in l igtea te.irn causes ouro heacrts t.o seek .mends that the offending toothl a . t.oGti.. T;he tiimxe:' aO retreat sorcewhlereb in the vicinm- come out, that nothing can be t:a as ic,:s cc He .: i y t- olr boots and well itr ny.: done. about saving- t. r tAppea.i to flie I.Cyn ation" . got.-. Such.centeri:es..nd harm fuIl, germns Iis -arnlthercentist in -the-hot:e. th;at * . n...i.a., gei& .v i:t:. }ntr. atr..all pt of the b'ody lwhere the' first deesiCit'e.i m. frev'ersbt .. Otn ibg\ :st6ts-. ' '. H t: tho:l: :,ltheiy protlucei' '.i ei- anim!rt si.':' asu -ed: blrings the -uerdict that tihe - ta. .-,t .aie. ta. ;a tpuiPTuree :; c.: ,e :.i .t ternmed .nniy rhepiia-: ."tooth. .r-.Wy -:remai;.. !r~e: "we. nt;rxu I. . bulthe :ascE^gs-Ct: D,' , ' e "teast,. es. hse, t ey - :again :iw f. r7 0, ou bl. Je' tovao 1,-o)t. reinatt'e s; ciex- j.i't, .'aik-et e ' ih: i ts !of :; u:,:ious' th4'u 'o ' mtake.iSc e tl,

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Sincerely :you-s, "- ' ;:Q. H. :MYsS. G
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BRsineas- Manaer -.M D. Crwamer EdIItlor-..-^^C F&-B llgr

OLt'ieepathy. Witho~ut .L'~n.-mtatlonl
1IM···m···;ID·n···-·--·IIMI·Ci · IILIIIID·rP-19I·-·LB-

from r::'Ohief: Meyers and'"Cap: Murphy. -Both are busily ea" gaged in steel construction: worl.:: at' their homes in Ma.rietta,' Ohio0 back for foobt-: They expect to comein ball season as "{lard" as'the' mate rial they are nworking on,. . Meyers -received honorable men' tion. as ll. state tcklde for 1922.
Murphy Nwas last seasonls cap-

:' ,.

EVOLUTION. When I was .sick in nineteen-one, (Oh gee, the whooping. cough) My Ma sent for the Osi-path; iti miade the neighbors laugh. 'CGood Lord, a rub. doct or,' said :they,
IIVow can he rub a: cough away?"

Whecn I was sick in irineteen-ten, . The pox this -time I fought) T..hie neighbors heard;of me arnd said, . 'Well, anyway he's nearly dead., An. osteopath's a last resort." Wh,.en I waso sick in 'twenty-three, "(And thought a grave was made f-or me) 'The-: neighbor., igghing f.or my' ills Slai.d "Send for Doctor quick,'"What pills? "No, -Osteopathy." '-"'4`Old Chappie." IT'S UP TO YOU!" "WoUld like to set the pace?you :-It's up to you" Would you like to win the race? :It's up to you! Hump along and do your best, quarrels with the rest Don't pick.I T'iiink- and hustle with a zest-' It's up ' to: you!

tain and received the same :fonorable inention for his playi:g at full-back. Negotiations are under way -for a football game with the famous Hasklell Indian team of Lawrence,: <.ans. Thins game if sol'ed aled,' wlvl iprobably be the stiffeSt of the 1923 schedule. - ~:asklell Institu'te is scheduled -to play thei Army and Navy this coming season:. Bsie- duling of a .football game with this team is the mnost remarkable' advancement Des Moines Still College has ever made in athletics. Coach Sutton has been going0 over the athletic field for .the p"ast few days and: informs us it will a be kept in the best (of shape during the summer months, so thatit will be ready for the cornping sea- · We received a letter :froml Simpson College this week asking' for a football game. We have tried for a number of -seasons to' add Simpson to our .footba.e :: :h. duDle without success. Th.e1i: ' season promises to fulfill our hopes with our near-by rivals,

OBSTETRICS'
I
.. ,.

The UoS;etrlcal aepar-cmieu[ reports a very busy year. 'Thisis exceedingly inspiring and only is Would you like to w:n success? It's ,; * up to vyou!-, another proof that 'the D. M. So ·Simply this' and nothing elseDr. Morris D. Cramer, a agraduate -of DES MOINES STILL COL- C. 0. instruc'tors are efficient and it's to yon. up I LEGE OF OSTEOPATHY, was -elected Secretary to DES MOINES are succeeding in instilling into. yet, All .you are or wi.ll. beo the, minls of teei"tudbents the vitial' STILL COL[,EGE OF OSTEOPATHY, :May 22, 1923. All you have and all you'll get, factors necessay to make thenI Dr. Cramer begins his work at a very auspicious time in the his- succemss'fo?l, phsicians. Every chance in life, you bet, '" tory of the institution. He is, enthusiastic and carries with him all It's up to you! \We are glad to n)ote tat,, under the vigor and earnestness of youth. ,.::M the instruction of Dr. Robt ' Say it with smiles, ' flowers wilt. P 1 Bachman a.hd iis assistanrt, Dr.; Hee :i.s a, nman who counsels with his co-workers and when the M. Scliaefier, our. obstetrical It is not a question t clinic is gradually growinag. ].aid out, he goes ahead. .is course of action :Dry Do¢s: One who won't prewith him how many obstacles,. but what should be done. Duty is his 'scribe it. hitches his wargon to the star -lTe and he I'noves responsibility. mag'netm Miy dear ':. Fitz 'Tr-itz, per.:of:achievemlenit and with Wiiltiam 'Te.1 accuracy he goesstraight tic mi.t us to reiterate a pile driver surei:ou're right, then--be the marli. It is easier f ' 'Be inm tosucceed than to fail, for he has. to is not a specialist in hentmorhoids, , ertain you're sure. work .hard to toail., but to succeed is his meat and. s ustenane. I arti of success. possesses the; Headcli ne:-- 'Child is born in I The man who goes ahead and. 'Is. Question is: stinmulates universal co- Moonshine Cave," does it. goes ahead. t.-is o:ine personal chiaracteristic which I it a sti-born child? operati.on is co:Istructiv:e HeI is a builder, not to build is a waste oi Ifi.you find it difficult, to get time and ener gy. His 'V.ision is keen antid accurate and ihe visualizec a man ewho has: evit A bolshi ' your -wi fe's attention, try talking a' project as i,whole from the foundation to tie domee -d these vis'i':oithin and i-a.ts ':o ,harre it' in your sleep. jio.as are blue .prints to him. and his c-workers. Thi sis th bcasis .for .c els .'l siltendid co-operation and makes 'good leaders:ip. It-ha i mnde hir '.iti eV.e::yhod: -:.- lie .can' travel. around the ISecretarv' of De I Moines Still-College 1; ' l e o i'A :r,mm atoinecl point' !reinei iand. 'a;in which the 'iteack wo:rlt-d ndl lay:. foi.it a bter: 'H:sfet nd a, wiLnsome a.ddress, sHi 'Hie has a, ple, singI personality .tru.th.islacing up its boots-Mlark ':, f Twai: . mind.is 'alert .d it is easy to pi.:esy,.. or himl a succsetfsul carteerOia d lie.
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(uonunuea JromifPage 1) ce. He illustrated his 'idea by lhe old Greek Hlegend: " "What is thy name, 0 statue? I am called Opportunity. Who made thee? Lysippus. Why art thou standing on thy bes? To show :that I stay but a mo,lent. Why hast thou. wings on thy eet? To show how quickly' I pass -by. But why is thy hair so long on .y forehead? That men. may seize 'me'when iey meet me, Why, then, is thy head so bald, Mhind? . To show that when I have oncj.e issed I cannot boe caught,"' Dr. Crissman also emphasiz eed e need of every doctor to keep ? with current events-; ."to make mself' familiar with :tie "' best agazines and current literature id to give special attention to s personal appearance; show iiself well groomed and we)2l ilt-.ured, as these things enter as large factor into his salesmanrip. His opinion was c ri' aoted, however, that while outa, applJearaness r were ery nessary young doctors shtould not

::ason of their training, la-w; that it inclutec the physicians obi.gations to himself, his client nces werea pearauces were a substte or substitute a corne into the profes- and his community. ' . culture and professional prep ar a most courteous and Dr. B. . Steifen addressed the class, upon problems other than atiion. Every man expressesahim1business co-operation the routine of .daily practice which they would be called upon to, face, self and his preparation in his art with the men and and' included the present econoemic pro'ilm, tihe social probem, ie work and thalmit would be well to o have preceded thee spiritual i ocbem and.the problem. of public' ealth. -master tie secrets of making peoo^d\ rflabor?.: The. class responded through ir pesident; Mi'r, Hurs.inger, pIe lIjki: you. The. general impresDc~~ Moi~nesprStlt o'i- whose talk /graciously included appreci.ton of the evening' eOur- Si made by the speaker was ore at . s . sy andefforts of the faculty thrughoUt the past four years. of the aost. profound and woleJ music. he ..... I. In t some thit im;e institution has exthe cc1asion ofi 'the,gra..... ...... he . ~~~ ~perien,~~~~~~~ occasion ci~ the.~ gin-~ e, d in m any years. E ve.y ecess was. rend~ered · ith flowers, palms, feans a.nd pa:.y w p These certificates were one felt that Dr. Crissman Ywas C. Cochran,s''udent.oak leaves. All th'ese were made signed by the .officials of the Club pouring out his heart and his a ::. o01t.ie T0aylo-· Cni i gorgeous by the rays of pur- and was an expression of appre- great mind. in these words of Nisacmore ple and gold which -were thrown ciation of the faithful service d ', c the graduatin class. Ls ::an has bheen. a hafiu- off by the rising sunset back of thse boys had ren.dered to -ho h addbrys;es w truly an inspiratioa.n per hfos oodur many the rosstrum, and the colored elec- Club. The broad smile which He seemed to !ave sensed the a. nds his ttri c i . wreathed the face of each of these osphee of the new and greater ati that work. HieIia,s , vigorous aand. e-huiidred 1pelr Des Moines'Stilt College of Osteper :,atltenor woenr anda ho-as th t¥oe' o'e a vigorous and onef-h-mndlred thi A a flca ad a scene a:mm, to Ibe for- cent plus Am.ericans . s ver a he opathhy amnd he spontaneously eninag prsonal y ehel d in it. rotteant mineth usowho nares were, called out, .ndicated te edi 'bse into the great currents of c e ^are always highly a l t.clearlya the vthe.ro inner joy which progress wvhich is surging so ierreMv Cochrran. won his iven r.B as for te Irses ppaae'so'mit Ml. ronmp& speeia~iv hr ob ur played over he hoart stiMl.y in osteopathic crides in .ll-pa-~ Erc"_ 'jl: ""tleca14 Tns .. ~.0.i.. stings r..! these f.aith .t. "au.t.-..o-A .... .s 'of til e-evenin:-' and. received e.n.-. -. rei ..umien-Cea :Eor .:: was P. r,. t, --t ,t th ' rie a :~.,11-,:· ", ITM ~'Fk"at: ,a Lq -~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ esafter to which he gracit core -roht.igowit..eh t. Frsm ith.?sband handi:beautti.. 'vior ',sw "' eetusly wes:onded D'es Mcins arranged the appr,;r:ia'le decrau. :ceoo h often afi usband is a esweetd · young men 'seized these c;:1-tifi:..m". p, , oUe, o Ostcopath ti s catee and folded term kindly and e m.y to have suchl a, wonderful ')ES Mi'I" NEI"S CLUB: Oce of almost fondly to h.ir: Poser's ye SI ger.0 its midst:. time happiest and most unique could not biu !e te 'hele . tmie like the pleasfn ~-, L~~~~~~·?M T ~ ..... ~ .:i~~~~h Cii\C\ i·\~~~~~~~~~~~~~ln~~~d.\~~~~··t-ri ~~ ~~~~---rrii f)A . Tt1'i. ,-o -_ ~~~~ T)" ~~~~~~~~, -~ i -r--r.,-.i m.-'gnr ra ir ~ y ti ~~-1J-~1, L.. -'V'i.i.t . . t t, t r r1.1tmi : L, r U'ney oorgraduating' cises was: tht presentation .of tel the r dese,;vedc them. of Lme e beauacifl Not Nel a ertif,,-tes of service Issued totiful -. Syn'o -vs te'enud Cuiters · u;/ to'e5 3rereeset· e-igh; oj:!·; e i:,1 os by' the Doides We ed-on't kyno mrio i'mented and ix'Olesate tonriIetonir scs. yxar and ini kee.,ping :,Moines Club for "'HaSias m 'the :mingi iork, but we doamain.tan tiat. --S !:)ea~nsi l it looked like their -soool course in Des iheshould havye stayed on the job ' e- way, iot to rimake:headwaiay o 'Ishion,.ied: Pio; gaIrTden Moines Stii' College of O.o-. and fi'shead iu . i; to be st' :on yourself, :
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ri-at~the'pt~ss ofltee at Des February pos affice a Ie the attol act' of AU at: tht , 1t12.

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SMbI-ONTHLY BY. TI-E DES MONES STILL COLfLEGE OF OSTEOPATHY. PBTISH'3lSED 81' ,,ol-iT ^'e Volu_.r=e '1
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L JJA'NIC AND it T ¾. SPilt
is nmaintairn

BA.CHIWLiOR- of SCIENCE
The Corporate Boarld disusseda: quite at legnth, the advisabilityof.: offering the :Bachelor of oSecience npre-osteopathic . 'Degree as 'a course ;or with the osteopathie. eourse as so:-ae of the sister institutions are already doing, and it .was recom-nended that: -thisa.' would be an advisable ething- to': do, .- t was '-'., ght tt'h:aby s doing not only the s:'tudent:'bod would' be increased, but -thatfi:tf: *woulfd create an interest in. :; ;c :
.lastic at tainnments whicth,

The Taylor C'xn.

T the' DE .MOIlN ES GEt;FlR AIf -HOSPJTAL chuck :full of pati

'it-s n.g:

:rco'd:,thereby keeping

ents. This is the busiest :tnsti .city of Des. Mohne, tution in t, .otake for itself E . ra . and, ,i;
nt N s-a rch aand ame whic, . wivl *:

isometitme. 'be good osteoptathia hSt.or;y. An' effort is being- rat.d( to keep U.: thie Clin dint:g ti '.hen fall comes th( sunlunl.r :so u nc" : ;which. have beer large Cli the pride :aod. glory of DEE :C C0U1:i:&.I: lO0 -INES S'' ' sf: : i
-)STEO)PATH' .:o' years ":vill b,

awould a'

:

:tend rmuch to *improve the. edic :: W-rocationt.al ataininerts oft t; also , fession at, a-- : - It 'm.thought that- by . oferng-- thia. course- it co'd A. be to'rt-tailed
rinto a preparatoly cour.e fo, the cc.3i:iCt',o: of fhe-' t h,'i :' rec:ognied- . '"school work :as it '.'-s v-.yery generally among :the po.herwi'se-' .owmng e'ss il ci th t; our. school:': tthat (to the fact noI on ':.5 w the high; sI eool ' e.;' andW basis .ma ny young young women . woutd -. e.' d-. [ .of(:. 'Ir a p' eeid .the. prirC-ege ':

: read:Y o-.m: e: busy the stundent;
on.-t ei'be r.eturn:.:-

"n: :
*b

' -' ;-' visitors '-::nc:',;

'; - ':. .-

:'..

panS
ane

tU.itey ==rolgti.

'weekdly

th soffp: *:tup '.the. atN ".Wfor.. :f Taescy,TI,'scday ana- Saturda ':-;inin::. Mav of -them. are t:reat
;:at real -s:o'a:risne -'and..g :' t awvy .delighted. t- is '.always: tha Alumni: 'who come to- ee^ ;the x t.inoiius -prucessio

ssurprse.to

o patie.nts

brought 'tO th :eitngh
to -the '.-streei

fessional

-career and.
:. .eea:,'

t:eoffie f':ni'tal

woul .A be a

of

that 'enat:

:thi

outsid: oft:-ei hospital andd holt
the: line:- ntii they are registerei

and takenh-to' thb^ pe:s.r;,ti ng room
As:man..isv.' aUs:.'--ni,-ey-fi:;-e- patient

gne, through 'the- operx,.ettiv( havT:' :da and:; the woa. -litnc in' onef l.rin< t:he- ciinic :'has kept.-'up i-ts vey.sure' tiha :yea-,yt -th..':ast :. 4urig the days of August ther. ' ,ii-noe bo.ne-b undreu nT -than ' ei^ I - 1DR. n' -ieL- ate 'states . | , a Tl b.% s.:fs record for the .a(Yste't...h...i -ieds 7 Sliic, is oinesoi -ot doing .yount-natl as "' It - the. piofes.sion nny'f xnrgl, a
.

theml 'to : .iace t.iemse'ves' in:' attin. thei:r proper .:I 'to -in : f: for, a pI ofe sliang, hearts da fact;' well knohwa:.i life. It: i; that' soi'me, of our best' and-.mos1; SuccesSfT''l prmact itioners. are ' not. their'attain.at all' scolastic tin .mernts and .others--sulCh.now:. ar: s e' unless this. opportunity:

Iexcluded f)eorded thet. *can be
. L:TAYLOR .'S.CO. ' Pfesi-ent a
t;

by a 'r :

D

'
* '

eopath.u ; doubt
t

and .ii The

'. al

j
'

t u er meet ing .in:adopt the preparatoxy:.' scooland make-this an integra. Truistee. JuneL 'V
r n p[a o:-. the irnstitution thus aoSch

preparationan e bat. th..ath. oa.rdof

.ig an academic department to.-:' A .... am sure trha t i papr is ahieve- the professi mal :I uect r of the c w t i'irn ation . -d e'h^.s ps aoten-teo Something cloei o c-l ai-e 1 'c h approval by . 'i" ;.fa io, trained to wit-: toi.L .e [:as. brn He w HBi..Sfe'i&s'been. one. of 'o tvo dES '; the, 'dain i'ox^-Jos'i. l for- it. never seemed a:. 'ahor. cut tre-es,, mnade :"axis, -re.a-: .,Aluinni'b:u.i .-s i'veste. . ... . ' t S.:-. S'LS C'. LI-R 0F har ox l -b thst young tmeen a'a :d n'.e old :fashionedl cradle. earned .his own. : one:' t- go to %ra:fn, ','iti-; i.SPA4iZ OST --;'-' t\ .'.,_,........... ',, ., . .higA s, h -o,l; w nt 'fi.ve yeaxrs to a to ll e tters, a'id seven jea 3' . o en of brains 'iho "'c ' denied pi)oi'fessional oppo t-a^n ,' ho'is . haiku to o>t:eopa;'i[c and.dneieslal schol Icfr' 1S -ist-. S MiCisi:tix y had not oft iOee o t xe ssceIce Ofhe xape ttca, rained in tPa, a oc gbe Learne. Att ou'g ti mti i ' -^l dot : -fI : high <y<x. ; His iitriuiplt a. ivantage rgery and. diagnosi e' 5 P'..V.'[ice, '-e spe(-i: izcS in sur -' m?.: ir. _ ' 'doctol r tc-v sth: -.'po.-..se ,.cc-omplishe-ntl ::st-. ay not b' card .are essional p*of :: ''h.'-rd- can you ana. 2rid.:;:i....real 'Doc trs,-who 1

way sgreat. c^aravar. t;his'w:y; estart: its : want£ to nma:e DctWors and f yvfoLn

-' '
' tota

;

t,:e prae; Ie-:eadem n- mn thed

l

j

: .a ed iied'only ademd -h tie-ax'neuyej.g. -x 1e:-o'o ;.J¢ i l t fb .t the s.nt ,::: t.-e e.en:m I a 1(fotaes$ ':t. ; b'a ck :'N-'..'t:: ; .o .,.e&. .; 5 <", $;ar;X~lt~s.-Lli~xe, ;;hqA~aa tr¢;'lyW^.^^

He

t tlesKie

ot tl:XL a:n e godsgeof politics. t

..'is;ement and. o.,aci.u.r: . ' : ; e. 4:.,; . pege;)-.^

i--a : not lowering, t:he scho:-A' oin;; ' -0ti"on- b.':i taig vg ('~om.luod onn Page. 4i, o

-ii :- i

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,r;sy:-cu;Fns Irpa

i;:

-F~gT ictontim niwe wvas a the s of age sofas- fhis -age i -rnibe;icoiming an ,;agr Xi ntosn^^ec ion, Ne.Mtional t emperamenP~ts y i moe .sharplC deirl .races 'c ancu. g irledl both natios~ t .. eol ^ ||e.inc2-e. self consiur j^||evr-w -se are ELgeti J to :'i2C1~ bXare :b re

ejxpe' t: w~ makes o ~ c^ you.} F (*~~~~hesitate^^he~~ x hs go;: ~
:five

~r
(Z

ma ; A.luimn auy
I

and it'Wi i

receive

I

tcncai' ned.v oit wvilla Ja .o to : soitn eii ri eeting * approach these -uiiangi :ew ia. t^h-rew. *^el; *te 'yo~u ^ ~thiro ICorpo 7last^ i Badt held:,at the the healithy, .ociar l IasrTesde:i . l 'she 'di'd' was: to wa " her i'O i^Y Biii? n .t S-a0dat . so 0 ., atil environment ands to',gO in ':M, .: 1,' l.:P,, at which. time land outi yo'r pemog'astr( _ .. y..rve; yi'- .z :i · -dalwiti.: morin.g II .:ma "bets of 'interest and u n't knov it' at he limel, iPac. mining Picas sa 'ai t ,now you remem-; ' h t: caused I : .mpo.rtan:ce toc then 'college- Were -spb~ ur~·!lsbome (i;i a E~·:i~W:a~i~ i the. pain in yo r; stomac:h -rid |idicusse. at l.gt .. , --t i,.safe tutic 'i 1 Ii: Sal, 5n fP'ci' f <"n ti' P> - su|\^re"e ^ '£ -n* *tl~s .*-1 ori a»vi.-ii'"f m,< wim;hB il-purbpssd all others in in'Or another way jisto sums.s ±o^?awr of themseliuves,.". i& *a'~ terest was the c;mpaign which .Colo?,nel , Jil vsky Ia J' . .!Amea cas hae a always to yourself anything ~ypq ri to do and you will do it later, is now on and which has btom- on t .n Is f-c lse 5os from .s' t the for som e four months for a new ta~e :whaeji orc~.ragte Conimlnen- no tncatter what it school b mildin. It cannot he Introspection is the ord-ir of tel trwb o i~eor eaa so much denmieel thati, this campaign has Colonel A. 3.R Shaw. -the. first h x your eye thc day and night.d fun of by the Torifis in t+Le Revbecomne deep rooted in the hearts Secretary ay of 'D ' MQ INES -otioiary/ WarA. Nbw, owing to on a door knob, concentrate on of the Corporate Members as STILL COIJLifEiGE oh.y' F01' OSTEOPyour subliminal self, fix your ; tsicicians snd" biologists and well. as the studentibody. A ATNY. and whoI .n'ow,' iyes . ii e are mXore. introspec- mind on your mental insides and fine'- .spirit of co-opration -was 'Ckliforiua, visited the. cityof -. :re a ii) thanever, because whe have you become master of everyaimanifestedi and a dogged deter- Des Mn min-' i-during', thez past: aglsiated'' so. many facts- about thing there'- is.. rminatioi 'to carry the campaign week. and it -was a great pleasure LA-1Kraft, Without desiring- in any way, wa in- to' the. ld gi-aduates W on :to a successfual isue::ssU of. the et -my own he* We k.SSS^ .that a-a lave.. the however, to s* tup fno>w dicatedl by: .everyonelpresent. No scehool' to meet cand greet hlimli no feeble intelligence against the ntewrd ^^|r|chost co~untr a ot .daredto eXpress a doubt again, TiQ Coloneol has. c-haged; a cdicta of mnssvy able. thiixrermI of then abilityvof /Dr. Ctraer, our .but 'little. uluing hia twlenty^./ r -d O00 -A6 a "~t"6 fha-'S JJhan wel say- ihould fike to put forth a simple olar, 66alt new secretary, to triumphlin his yea rs resieice in Caplifunia. He Idea which anybody canm verify ethedayr foi, baa been lowere the death rate thes- allie tat eastern trip for funds. One¶-erv carries with him,' the ate, happy bya demonstration . hand you heard the expression :spirit' arda, earnest good c niear * gsier- 's- ery much within the, ^And thai is that the real Self "Now the a is eold instituti% rdowhich clraciied .u dminm decade, 6s A that'';our t;4axes& are does not consist of a half baked n: -sonmething.^ We have been his- malmy Oyas conne--ti Oi'with. . ggem- tani x hey ought to be, anemic, one foot in the grave looking '. long and have waited the .osleopalMc instiu.tloastOne ~~tkse cer 9lteautreis· -~~r gettin that sits cowering weary hours for this occasioni to happy' *expre cg-on substance Colonel of bettel~l^^r..h~at our iaustsil it somewbere back in -the mysteri- pariseo It Ais ..here; and '-we a're Shaws ought to be healded ie isdistressingtht tt us dept--s, of the consc ousncss, readv Jfor ilt., 'Our vrigor, oubr. enthroughout the 1laud.Iotated, 'lover oni ht that it exists for us in its ergies and our money vwil Le ^put~ting ^it a^1 W^n|en sm-c tha tPduring' all tme W Otime tll ofp paroper Lunnm in i lt of oaur out- given freely in the interest of coninections 'witi : osteoptin t :hsc 113-* Ward activities. In other words our Alma Mater." Many ques- stitutions andlaissc&atiqas witC b6,ute avuh 1itio r C Ing wre really gain the mastery over tions were asked about the new the ct otebpaths an'd misc va - fgleiv~es.^;' Self by losing it in others, and location of the college as it witl ing.. their,' work' and cresults thnot by a lot of morbid sleuthing be moved from ;Locust street ,to' helhas never ywavecldin itsth tAey etaciturn. The J for it. inside of us.- It is in for- another sectionot : oma athe.town'in : rt~opatln sy" 'in' 'iso belief' ad^< :- ese are beginning^"^to',:pride * getfuillness of what the scientists double car line wihere better res~na jmst ieits of a 'permanent p1-cthe Self that our salvation idential environment will be af- in':; t1he nse of hu|ts~i^i^t|mlve n ti .I*herapse-tic.; worid. P ^ t(iith t ^ssians ~on hi u^|||.j lack: ies. If we have got to pass-most ford.ed the students. The old stated that 'he'' -has ir, aV-, s^ it. Th e nItalians are/ begin- Of our waking iours in wonder- college building as it hnow stands ered In hSi belief 'tht c tt op-; ,g'^^n^ng t6 play golf.^' her F h ing what is the matter with us will possibly' be used for a part athy l no fearsrfrom-themedihas a' taI^ ing themselves ser-icusly. we would better , as Mai-rk Twain of next year, but the Board de- cal : profession,S101 ht f4, -allI', bl arits ,·. -Ad so poooug6 tr ^^^|^||i~~~~~~~~~iJ~~~n;:'t^Qn^ h the Y i list. onace remarked, get off nat the sires very, very much as soon asards arise. from-n ifdferences withThi~s~ is" g~etting, a:in-.Cbehan tCo next static-n. possibie to get away from this in', its own i-anst.' Thee are. growing^^~-i'a d. worlwlw Forget yourself" is the best locticn :asi.''i 'is now so'crowded' words of - wi doi. (Ad hm;- nar-' psycanalylgsistp responsiblen? rule for both countries and in- in ithe .business district it dark- row.and selfisixt 'aid inyworti v amdividuals,-Thomns L. Masson in ens the old building to su.ch an those.who omnot head thenifor : r means oficommunica-p The New York Sun. tIoJ n A'reased- theory of. the new 'm' extent that it is considerably everyone, recoSgnies that "push . lse an be conceived in ate 'ndesirale for school purposes. and puIdXch' cm nly dome -ti-em Dr. Emmet 14. Schacffer, As- T'he change into a new resilen- so-opepr -ativee efzort. : for or hmarket dpit-on the kh sistant Obstretician. of Des tial district: will be g'reatly apTe. CIconel cuaries baci tb ~~~~~~~ -I.~ ~ feb' weeks, Mwines Stili College of Osteopa preciated' by tlhe student body oLni mt ion' witi a -f I~be bomem in Calif oria the hiarty years. athy has just received a letter for it will decrease expenses as, where fiormerly :it 't-ofo 9,ood -v, ihes ,f'o his; many'friendsn : .my- ojwn observa-: from Dr. Eima S. Cooper of 34 well a- give them' a better en- of DE2. M.*MC(I'N4 TST 01Andl~l~as fa'aa S ;t3ion goes I noticg htbt the hsame Csanking .Road Shanghai, China, viron me. 1 and .will doubtless de-' i L~E (OF OfAlTUPATY. :: : . " imSiof introspective stuff that who is engaged in private prac-- ve-o101a,: student atmosphere s'^legoig en the world .is being bice in that country. ,;^;: e which; wl.l co''ntribute much to After fouc years ofstre b ^^¾ i dMplicai-fdhi' n. many, :tmdivdi~als, We ar 'glad to note that Dr. t.e.. whole:someness of .their so- work : at: *). ill. S. 0. 0., Di-. i hisisnda;teuralas the w-d is oper is agraduate of this col- cial., life." Of '.course, many of 3ie hranmcis' of 'Manso~n, Iwahs. ' c-P. md up of ndi iduals.:: leg- in 1902 and went toIShcng- thie o"d alumni .will regret ethe taken. hr; moter with Ies for 0 bot,'to.neduce.the: w ola bai Acorn-.. .She. gratefully in 9 change of location on ac-cout''of a 'littIe Uting atthelakes. hea I ierms, thei rnmnds the work that the 'Log sent'iimental reasons but after all. DIc tic-s incidcntl ymcntio1s that. si ,"..the nples r:t:'t / r f th;at is;e beng:-advertised Book" is endeavorini- to do, thai;^x~~g' while we revere old. buildings as... tro epeats to/ doale h !ot.' d anl 'dissected "and- Let us Jhear. froa yOu again, well an &ldi friends, it. is the' ing on ,the ide.'; Itapspeai ^!|!:am.id:'Tl : ( hat mmn^^aalya isreally.the Self, NO Do cto r...; *'** '*, '' '- ' ' . . ' **.^ ., heart oaf. tie: ^Alma Mates which through the procesi| dissct'io ^ i attr.'' twhethe.r it is' a..' national we;' hail- *and, which we leeond' dthe :ad biology,nthat gtglg We'can inish nothingT inmthis siR whase-rer: pert;of thin city of jof the eagle wogrmupe'the hin 'acial .ef, .or an ii.di^I:? f.S ae?. · ?. :i:,l:- %"if t.he: idet is the sameo. life;. but 'xeK .makefkabegin- Des 'Moi es: the. new"istitution hold: may ferfrthe*t you hars a painp in your stom-,.: rnlg; and l'-bequ~eath' a^ noble c';x- islocate.d. it wille^1 enw.ine menu-D 's. IogB oo* .* ^ ample1 - S ies .'" ' '"^' erie-s around the©h"hea t of; its have :^se'invatod tv

vyers VlWr f Vioul

Drearbeo

i

First

4&C, O0~

-so,

Call

.-h' M 7-.,',£'-.':"xV-:te..

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~

-

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.

'

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8---I·--·;·"4R --

urpitnrPr

T~~~L~~~ 2OCn-TAT'T~~~~~OQ

& ti Rco-'etration and. MaiTu 192s 11dI, Se' tem7,bei-' 2 ^.^.s.-. OSTEXEPATHY Ta ..Iln.. ... -.-..-------covrriber 29. " "hristnas R ce ...,^..,.-.-..^.-f.^ .-- -Mrteeor , ezwa.B.S L. T^aylor December 21;.,».»... -Resumed After Ca irStmas -Work :Biiness-Manager.-M. D. Craner January 2 1924b...... -C. L Ballingerw .^^E'i tor SECOND SEMETE*t ilblA~of2 teo9athY Witbout ad Matricnlation aRegistration January .21.... C e-u--.-C----.-a January 22... g o Coroartin. RIPPLING RHYMES May 20 -aM,....i....... . By W ait Mason Cr.--Oon metneeneit Mayw 22

*Thie Off Icia

Paeiation4

of

I

JY^'SMbSNII• STILLf^

Ji~i

oeptenmber 10

1

I
Dr. ary
t'"-AtT- ti

1
l hwab is a bost-.

wmc : S.Q *lives in Vimton, Iowa,^ite ® :
^ -^ '^ LI '.Ui"U*.'^t -^.V^*r'<,

O cane to DS M_. '-ctr ThNEIAL blOSPITA o ; Couple of weelks and. eviden.y

.:.

lid not

,lose aay. f h:erenthusi??'::

asin, because she left, -achece"k

for $3.50.00 for the. new: hospital-'
budcding and -isas n C100,n00 for the
builling.Countg.

ao eck. fr ,Oilg:?: -new- r
kind .

This is **e

are ;* i~lj^'Weindebued to, Dr. W. K. FOURTH YEA-R, THE CUJRFICJLUM for the ^Stefin,; Wahoo, NOb., First Semernester following a MCiAe, 1in whic h\WaltSurgery, 1 oagdrunoted writer, portr.ays The Fui'danmental Os' eaopathic Nervous and Mental Diseases '::''' ... ' . Branches- s :ne a pici of th o s th alt p r is Eye, Ear, Nose & Throat in gobbiin{tre .f Hpul The firrt portion of the course CObstetrics in osteopathy consists mainly of Osteephatic Therapeutics

and loyalt,::y that:: husiasrn tp ~~t o teiShe is interest.e:di heartaeen c and ldollarsa'lna,;? hard 0 (AOAltiumni O:: We just, oedf'h eE. p.:" e to put the. ggests.1 tis ty position over that the pIreof:f 'l?'
has ever k wCn, Those OB ins'.

l B fo ~e t ha t e pa is f u e i~ h,*^ w r t at m d r n P s I u e t at
ito go the long y ear t rough a

:l;

:heinstruction in the fundament al .Die tetics ,' ' *: , ; ; ;.:„' -,

* ,

ground are apec. iat.ing * d"ee ':/ " if 'that wiou-ld be. a caait it
professiohn did- n ejot Come
A^

:'"' '

Deimonstrations Clinical Practicef;

and the

ih'- vel ca ll f or p l s. I s c f e e s Sicst Semestteir ..:' :, . ' .*;at people <'who *would; bloN.w, txueir e tin fors such me a rad i i yu h rd s o s ^Ith Anatomy, Descriptive tfe m ~A, a & b a n of P ! fu gN. ' nh'emisry Inorganic *.phnmnaciss ;would. ,go v- et 4 " . h Histology . a iittcle. -Buswie gyub ey :./ oeoy." fB rBiolesogy Pathology iy, Bacteriology an o s n m y : '*..f m p ic d ai Second'Sen ester ^i-az^e~ F:,^ ^hdoctor^ ;'would >ruu An Anatomy,' Descriptivea relief fro m anguish
i e

~Yaf

tn'flC t '

Surgery, Operative

acros iberalI y, iand:t¢or -e :o e nia! help' e -rect woade fJ n 'that acollege ]buE:iilding wI :.Nh :¢ggi
clals of the instintuion h,-e A

fo TNervous aaned Meal. D isa es, Urology and Proctovloebgy * : Medical Jurisprudences
Dermatology X-Ray, and 3etrinaa
. ·. .: o d.e " em's eT .;

:aiLed'. OW:ill SeOl.:::TI. w.We".... O!f co rse we wil. .We.'havi got at least 1,00 Ur. Schwab's oiutlof I
ou3: 1700. .Alunmi wh
.

Diagnosis D
.. ' ' .. .

ll

gve
_

Oste ophatic Therapeutics :
Clinical Demonstrations

and give 'at, once..--- Mobst; :' o i Sch and edly.Dr.D O3TEOYYPA HY' ard of MOINES GENLERP

.Pracs tice,

'

r PliyIoIoIK 6 rht l CIfe risry, Organic '* i v' er eia h ny inw rd tre..' ,f e Histology vsas : ia I^*" ^but' a' ,wreck, t :Ld ., ninig' many woes, and'gave Emabryology .soph.:my:neck, 'nd pills wto '. .ss'' .COND 'YEAR" hlls any iiose.; The tieeach r P'irst Semestfier
hbit lfastened on me ma Anatomy, Descriptive Phyiology, 11

, ; '' : ..

the-literture h ; to -receive. 3MOI .. STI l CnOsalE.:no,1,/

JAPG COMMANDMENTS FOR:LONGLIFEW
ThIe Japanese have found a re-

tS

I

IIOSPIh^

New'School i*uidiug
D r_ M.. Cramer,-, o,

ethen,

ceipt for longevityh provided the following ten coon xiandments are

Campaigyn PogHresse

. ""'' observed: ' men^ for" pills oif Theory of Osteopathy: Pathology 1. ' .'. ': 1. Spend as much time as haMve^" sugar coatsandpsome of Chemistry, Physiological andc possibleo out of UCooris.i'hu '"' ' '' .1.gj' 2. Eat meat only once a day. th;; em a*re '.b~are,': and **sonie! .are C h. i ',t *.r e'ology PToxric : 3. Take a hot bath every day. Second Semester 4. Wear thick woolen under.fcc s^^onic 'falling :hair.,^ AndI aoe~n : weamr., e some. nin^ -sweet, Anatomy, Descriitiire ^. are'' sour c;adyl 5. Sleep at least six hours son^*^ ie; ^-een. nime pink, some' red; Anatomy, Practical and never more than seven and , and Pathology 11 a dozen when. t] one half. ' Keep windows open th~oughts' Principles of Osteopathy .?hrI to ^bed. M.*y a go. n on / wes Ot ^ of *things ,*sublimte, 'of 'Ph-ysical Diagnoss and room dark. D. edicate one day of week ,, bii p [and :ii ;bh iixr ri s, b t no w Physiology 111 d o to absolute leisure. a thi^ Hakirur all the tim e f new ' TRIRD Y EAR? 7. Avoid excessive brain work desrx ^ns l u^ inpills. I' 'used^ lo talk First Seme-mter ! ';oL books ,and :-art: and^' rainbows Anatorny, Regional and Special and everything that arouses e the ''^^hillsout 'ew I;. wane ' ' . .' .;' :.: .' anger . . Gynecology,, the irtes, hIre ait ano p an.d ' widowers Pathology V, Labor story Diagno- 7t88. 'Widows pll should remarry. j;|I^'nu aking.\piehalc : .pinik, and; .pills of: 'dappled Public IHealth Raid Sanitation 9. VWork in moderation. 10. SpeaI as little as possible. ^yand still lmy' heal'thi is: on Osteophatic D iaross

sp^rrd my iron

secreta)y y.: khas shown such enll. thusiasm'i as has not pp'.bc-n sur-, passed :by an; Xl'mw :i o:

G.:L*,./ G^®;O MOINES. .STII*,CLL
OSTEOPTHY for yearW. ver he gags he

!

Wherc"literally plow

thr6u-L muddu and watertoattain his object. *He:knowsno obstacles: and. the report of hi wonderful reception by With islis Alumnii -of!*the East, o earts. These visit cheers our Alumi ' are showing the. real metal; .they are wide awake; they appreciate a ical,: m a real effort and tIey are. reciprocating his buoyant enthusias n Iby: grateful and :cordiail co-oper-p ation -with him in all his effrs
-Anan

* ti blinkp J.aget ti g wo'rse each

Pathology IlI Demionstratious CliMcal

Th r

is.. vmore

em- lss sorrow

..Practic e . .

:

..*.

*.., :'. . .
'':.'

;

-and

.:in thle ^word^ "goed-byc"' and; yetb
we love 'to 'hear some ; how

Do not say all:- that you know, .around DES MODINES L OSTEOPATHY -'.< but always know what you say. *COLLEGE OP - Claudis.. . . ' ::'' ' vwho .receive -N letters^ are hap-|| :' nWe'find in e-ife txaIctly[' Do you kno:rav what Get . Cronier't "_,it.-Emnerson.-::.-·:'. gwe pint, putacquain-td':,lth.'him:, YouWillgi.
fore. · .:. e ior 4i . respetfo

It is safe&to say that 4evinyboy

J Semester'

gaivapeObstetrics.: '.: . Ne rous' D'iseases

py:. Thiscampaign shall n.t faiL

O:steophatic Thera.peutics': f Fk w^A *:'.**^!s -ure : the D sweetest E-iye:Ear, No:s: &aThroat , e (b t(l d e verI made and Pedia'trics .' ' ii.'?":..:-...':: .. iuig t-8foito IVpt a soul into,- Clinical , Demonsrtations: 'ad I 'I, ,'-~ ~Practi¢ eo:'v ",,·"- -. r Bs c : 1:·
,i :, I '. . 1

Hampiness &-is ;a perfume) you ciannot pour on-: othe.rs- without t:gett.ng a' few" drops yourself.[Zm son, 1.1 r er It ~-

M/r-ingle: yu'ri your A lmna'. bti:.-er::. respet ws-h the ehinki o coi":'ns and we w;ll :I rt'a.JazzBa, do-'"
I Jubilee. :-or. 11, I
I .

11

oil-t, D I
II I I

XQ11'
, , , 7,

-w

I

"

y

""-' I

litu', LO(`

Oi B-0.
r*naaxrusManruoo.

Arrangements hyve been comi n sihe hlingaof. a ZJl otbI0 l game _ `with : the,- amo insti aTtCe 'Fbothbalt team. lakl

(2DM[PB :'

A

2 Si(eted fo:r1h-

T®yf'lIOU S 'Q STUrDY NINANE .DUS OTEOPATHYT E .. P..... ACTC -

REM W ... '"

IENCi iACI. ¾LOPR f SO
, i tCont'nuoedl from 'Pagae 1) anda all tlhe .st ldents -. i w:ill be b
registe-ed ie the academic dej .

pla .the ThdiCollege 3| till onN gana wil `ePerl}haytp Lavid! ve'.anoe, Kanas.' ^This is the long^^^ ^rip^ tha any *of 'our. atkiY ititeams Shaveev

, lnadeit

'erowned ialso th.e m atn

school

wle hlraav^ver' scheduled lgames StilVl" Coilege' i'aMi~ wt^'^ith.Bs'S^ t ^erxpcets ..o' wipo- out .the- defeat §|^ouri basket-~all 'team last; ;seawi^thi: HaIskeil's, by *putting ^Ijl
I ever a dirva

A; Cornparison of the Edncational. Le'iorem. ts of Pract itioners i'n M-.dine aId Osteopathy who are licensed to pra" :not 1 who ",hirp.,tor'.. a ant.., .. ti n '...l I . censed to. practice inthe Province of A. bkerta Educetoa ducatrionar Requi re meents for -equirer:,:fents 'the .)practice of,ledi cne .of ... alier the P ';^Schiool of' ''and Osteopatly' Chi.ropract.c .... 'Mdi Ost eopathy. 540 hbours.I 270 hours 270 hours 540 hours sb360 hoour. 180 hou. s · 180 i-urs ' 180 hours. :[8 Ohottcsz ' UCiroprattic rnot required not required not required requ ied not requir&l not required-not required
r-tot requir"ecd i

will noti be al-1. .partme-i.t-and lowed to "egister as candidates
for a degree in osteopathy until. they have ti-:ken their science de-

gree or ha've received their 'higr school diploma. Our schools are 1 the nurseries 'of the profession. and this fact ought to be .recogni'c:od and daly ap'pineacicoed: nl-nw.

TDR. S

1-TNAYN LOR
.: :r

No- i High Sch)ool:. -.... ,,. 'English ....'n ..... . .

D

:~~~~~~~~~

ll be tnt - fy^oot-bl fil Illli |{n|^ s|l|ever' ror .thlits eascmn. .Inl tl(e past Week it hs B~een l~eve-d! now on I ndth;e.g-ss; cut. *ron th grsa ,;ill, be' owed g.eey

hoors i...40 *Algebira.-. ..2.'70 hours . Plain G.abl-e)try, .:.........70 hour s .Foreign language ..-,. h o-rs' Histo : .. ................. 360 hours . 180 hours. PbPhysics ............ C-Gne-r houM. 'Tl Science. ..... ISO hours ~.1!:(c-.....
:-....... -r.Cistry .»..,...1..80 hours-

C-ontii:ued from 'Patge-1)-: i) .)acle; painstski'nr ics Asa ·
'Itauhit and. thoroulgJ,' He' has .x; noss andi.. surgr:y f.r fou r:i teen years and Kiows his -tibcJts' for_ every angle. }5its 'pi'a;is

Whll h ^ ithree;, -weeIs m." No-; Pb:ysiography . ,. :.' t ol^ hurs" v*^llnber^ -ii~ll ^;e . thc.' .hadest : / '*^ ;' a s^fo- ~or: toot-blx l. -'eason. * ' -]?undan"/<utal .Studies: .' ::''"':.- , i. Novc^^niw ^d : we.; joutrny ^to 1 in :the :ealii Art.-:. * : - ." Ki||||aESillc to pY-iy the'.Americaja Common. to.all C: Schools - . 4 $cooi fc^ Gtteop4athy. No4enx1r^ ^ Dth, J-14elir *'*ndiana. ;at{liww-! Histol.ogy .,........ 128 hours, 180 hours ~,ea t. : N)ov nbar 7t,l xencl , Yi^'Kns&Ba o.us........... ' 722. hours l ' IAnatomy. ... of e bcorah, ipwa, L1:itSh-fce: 'College Physi1ogy-,.. ..... 0 hours 322 hours : ;'oihes."' ;. ', ^'Embryolgy," ^ wiVte pi~a usIAS 2. MDs -.. J....^..1 28 holurs -72.- hours Ckise'mistry -,.. ... 400hours ' Capg^Etain ; Swe ea:y Ps astyiring: I 3 . 'athology - : ... ... .. 96' iours::: tb-el sumwil.b ^-^|es i^lci~ns; durg 7? knIOU 32 .1.J.28 -; hours ; : .. hours .i, -:u.Bacteriology : uilf ebaR .1k10blot 252 hours .. 28 'hours ::. . &r I^Jl^tmreBnts.da i g *the' summer. Di'agnosis'.,:,.:_. ...... hours 0.h0urs. 11' 0 ' iieqibe ; able I-HTgiene .... *I |lio3 a 'ohthlth ',:'.:23 4,h U .'us. 1ogy ~ . .. ,2 entire' ;fternuona^ ' Gyec-H ~ ~ ~~U hou'rs ^spendhis; to 72 hours ....-....96 hours Gen -4iing f^oo-bt{^ season devyelop-^ -.. ito-Ur'inary 1486 hours J.......88 hours .Surgery ............. 8724 · hours Obstetrics .-......... ,.152 "hours ichu^^ )i^ 1aos cnd 'Ti~ma 'star baa-. 18 hours. ours k"cet-hai-'u 'the' of past .sensori Jurisprudence . ......-... 344 hours I'' Eye,, Ear, etc.,.......408 3hours'. fo, ha;^;ve^ teto rac; t ;their; homes: 90 hours ...- ,208hoursb ^iNiles. C(io.:' Threy, repor~t hiat I Pediatrics . at I 72 hours 6 hours *.an'd';ex-I;) I- ,ernmato(-gy th^^mey acQ^ buiai .*^tt wodrks 1 .... 48 hours 72 hours 4-.... the-t'om- ,I-Ortbopedics for * ,tim :in .4nt t 100 hours -Psychiatr .. ' l4 4.:honrs: F Both, of; i^tSu ^sensi ut os-bal 360 hours ,-i.30 hours.. ^.^th~esme4wr]old down ;end pesi"- Siymptomatologyno :kiil.;**, i . ;.^.tionis with speed;^ 7,078 hours ',068 hours a novelry bad ^li^^Well and' Williams......

tsis aw' si on the sa..eit ....a..c :'" ':":" of Iris .suJbject;. n -t required ' Iilspire.:idi '; i lty XI! .. I he ,. J.est aspirat.:ioIn 'f.. h'tu-:, lents who sit in hi' classes e. ia.e bued.. witi. the-.eeilg:of.: the proou:e ., spof forect" eit ' tis-' io :'
y lenict: s tholarship and his peJ s./ . .L.( Jio -i.t'p
~j.i.. yv. . ... . h 129 /.:t..],lO.Or- nL · . 9..IS'okrs: '.+ , ' ..... 129-:hours aipologit. Edueaiciio al.ly' .i"in- i socilHy:,| not; taught fluences are .thbe es;tt'f-' :' 6 rnot 'taught i co .i;ct :is exe:m'riiay/: ei'ni. the sDtus at' oyv.: 'e:iai] itt ta' g :t not tausrlI truie' friend, Oct Mnines %i)3 Cob 6 not taught lge a 'loyal :r ,dt:h,l e'rt. o0w:,· .: 22 hoiur great . 'rgeos aol t-e .protes ·-.:: -':'': " Upride. not taught .a; soure cof gce-,a not tauight . not taught -:'We havei-ut received ' letter ",:ai'-from: lDr. Le:av' Fr.1-.c'' not taught'23 s, stat'.not 'taught ate of the My. isi located' at' I not taught ithat he is al. edyA not taught ParagoulId, Ai. He.says thal.:-aat. not taught yet he is oot' ery buy 'b'at,-that etter -' sines, not~taught prospects for :: 43 hours looked :line~ - .We'a..re' 'glad" 'to , -129 hours note tlmt: 'D. !Xeich is stsarting "'-' out stron'g. : . 495 hours

1

correspondenrice l~i-mo not; iSeen sBchodtded. for foot-' thlis and' other schools, whe.n only a who wes' we.'ks to a sa:Bonths' atet.dace co.irse -was sseasn. It : s course o r..a e i pa^l ihhi eomiuii
D ^be n.^xsot ause l~es IVohin Sin
t i-

Daveiport, Iowa, and is the t ndardof education upon which t-i:e. are seekin'g. legislation to pra'ctice in Alberta.:. . -Iowe, .e, majoriy': o.. thoe. now' p.actcing setuaiid at ce Itie^^s Moiea U versi ty, as yet,
more particulars, write of these 1 men.' either
,I.
I

e|^perienice;in thi'tTI trip home to / T hours gi'-cen under .the heading of "'Cliropratic" I The . They say bha; i Malir etta, (:hi. have ^;^C~they: a' warm -spot in thel I'the hours taughrt at the Palmer School of Cmropract t

are
at

hees-Ilt ;for;

oooico

di-anu, l~orj

..i.ed. 'We -ri-, Colle..ge na _o 's 'game ;as ast y th :peet-la prino. 'a usu t MUodh of -:J-Dear Johnson te.lls us that. our II ..il gymuasiusm Wll '1outshi:ne !"y"l"" ing' .in "D'es M:oines' or the e W': :re 'aniousiy es '"'i...lde' |?:'aiti:g its eonstru6tino:. '":C::oach satton', tiearing';om ospects every ~ :.new f.,oot-bal. p,: . s cekj- "'eHist:entuia - is con ^ :: H iagioua.,';,';^ '**.^;.* '.;,* ..;':'f

Stanley; McFll, Iof 2)38mi2ly0 St., Philadelphia, .,sitcudent e0 D. M., S C. (1, is, surely doin'i fine work' uir-aig his sitcm r-' e. wrteus .nsthat i- * vacation. lhas. two and pr oably thre neww -o 5students -to ri-g bere 'this lai . We are glad ,e tiC. enthutiasim whichd Mr. :MeFail deaonStrftes land boim that hlis colleaguge win PMndeavor to i-ake' as
Wgood

- ow:'"(m,:rac-rs".:hau'd bl required to,qu:;,al.ify by the sane' ·: llclbdl--O~~~ t'-'. A'a ",r,' 1 .thati i also tI -mentieop' ¾ MeF Mr.a iregulations by medical :men and osteopaths qualNfy to "hile -wa-lking up thxe street th ii ,.tht I' . 'the Povmince of-Aiberta."' practice ine pleat. other day e hiad quiite' ii II i s ant -. urprise at mmeeting :IiCardi -^:~.. .-.. ;..'..^..:. - JOHN pA.:, M . .. I Gordon, x-md.. Mii ton', Connilao R gt ri e . stud. L1* C. c :"B'aents,' vtoj :: : .,- c:=,:' : P:'h , ..C..:.... l eg . d Sn g. o os:jM r-:-a 1),. M. 'L g l ':.. '..,...';' - . . . '",;,,~ . Co . ai n ,'" 1ha '^ .have, hik da' all th(e *wVay fr. 3 I
I'
iI0II w
.- . ,,i h-~nr 1,-,,,.~, 'L-i·~ li~LiPLI~~9·IM~h~O CBrYrJ~~r-~SU ·

~··lel~~1
C~U

Is

The n-eat morn-ing. they

Gityhwhere .,:is;better :left f-or N Y6or C ;tthe;I' 8peak'ing siWeial ls tl 1 pre·.'t ::':than· sensesless speech. '~-Dutch they inieAn ded stopping vor, -fr V truth---but tha'':drt i the convention. liar 'a 'wi'e ma a: ' j.:t'ProVerb". ' I ::'Chi.l.dren'
; / : :

^~~~~~~~ .* '

.'/''*' .*'.

'

/'

~~~
:

^ N

'^

H~~~ -w~~~~rr ti-c Mo~~osx.ix wa, &wd-".

5 -2%.

s~~~~~a?~~~~V~~ Is "fl 45~~~~~~~~~A

~~

~
4

YiV~~~"Wa s4V3V*. Nr-~~~

4

-

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i Il~ft

cc~~~~~-- face,Uiaco~A
re-hi, CCC

1xsei12&z ci ExONC% 11.

~~~~~~~~~~ 4

ix

~~

*

~~
I.)j Ot-EO

ix Qcts

uNoi j

~ 2113%RT{>) SEML-MONTFILY f ~~~~~ J}~~I$
Volunv'
it July

Thp''V(~~ 1P~~~ t.'

OST(vsPA EtHY. .Nlubt
.
.I 4

1~A

1~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~4-1IL2W

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-.

-,

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~~~n--~~~~~~~--- ---- ~ ~ ~ . ~ u·--~ ·~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~-------·--~ ~ ~
'. II

.

I,

n

p

: . Dre BI K. Cast LeaIvs:a
D rn B.'n ,. (-:Casio, Pathologist

IF

M4 n0'i",

.- i::0::::;many :
h orit ing' ad::xcy:di
V

...Taylo' ?ys'ioscoi~st to his position Clinic, ,i.s left hhere-: ou |and ba, g-one to 'I juque, e'a,': his a po-:iQn in s e:: ~whr.e :e .. : ' -: .j 1 ' ' £ :-: s r' and
It iS :wit' .d : ep e'grel. that
1

prevent the-

P.r,.
..

CGa.h
1i9:

aves

ur midst. -.

To know'
to ,'Jove

W'as .to love .i'L i I

him was to know i : wortliness,6: spite-of the :t^h;it reseibx.
-Not only is ,'he a phtsicianu- of Oki. am.ong':me,.;: ability but: a

ithe ho -Wa' casntcixiY ax 1
f iBt. blie

:is: His work Jnever done-by hles::: but is.· bhorough,: . :: ::: :::: I The I M. S, C. 0. stdnts and'1 i' have lost: . cl fien I : that 'of a: :: structo. ':His life ISwa an" for;S good,Samari II
a

. cero':e:',~t':?:ion ge^ars b' $o'e r-. 'bli~.;O :. -L& 1::.1]: .:ounteey: :rb:
'a-T~affin
-- .:,,'. ., . .. :

i

nae' too busy to taketime:to. y v'nybestrind explain t0 th e h

' :subject-in.': of his '.abiifty. :the ]n hiand. *He' byelievs iaef"]:evin: inera a house by tle ide, of Mand 'being nn;^ ^i^ II 'tt Y Service Wp efficienIcy is is

^iw

:ix c<:,hnin:'
ix^t
,~ ,a:ya

v-Iera 'the : "co"~kbe;' ifs ho iry.ia-Pr;O^int'yfy:'fr

;: niotto. *, -*,,-,.' '-. i ^ N Dr. C ash is a gtaduate. oC 1) om iv.. S. C. .0. ::IHe was ani: nternv.

at the Deos" Moines Generbal Ho-

'o'aititrl'os

ir

':::~vllvwq m:nd, hainni-io 0.: oium.-:*:vc
*'€ou~riii ;;_ tim figures 'co.'.t;'Vies, I'E':e:.: capita ceo:l" e4 pae,-J!, 3 1Cri:'sin:k "'.a;:C trptiap 10:1 of 0opim 1S ax .follows: al l:t - '1- aia i; Cen xany, two ins; ozgra : :grai". ::':-:":nr Vi, -Q :-Frneei"':t 3A'igrai:s; .H1oiiand, ;j

pita' and to:k.. laborati0ry cor.ef:? -hoin Chicago Post-Graduat-e: tal. Ha was in-the united Stat ' 'Army : Laboratory 'Service: a-nd:: was Instructor in PD- M.-.S. . Q,
in Laboratory Diagnosis. The doctor has a host ,of friends who wish him,- and.his fanxily an abundance of good hbealthl and, success- at their new home.
:

*

F. SPRING ~CLAUDE' ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~i.:

Stl 'oines Psrofessor of 'p-rinciples a-d Teclinique, Des College of Osteopatly: If fifteen years of loyal tAd devoted service to a: caue gives a
Vi man a right to distincation, the su bje'Vt of tI. 'pape' has won

M.gran:; U:it'd States, 36. grains.' arii,; of the or-e 'n:.i o c o -' The Student body hlias learned Itospring of: 1920 th:e New' i :-_-,:itsld: liter-' most 'thorough and honest'y frank >ct-rers of the ColTege. Yo'k:Hi]:!,ealthIh Iepartrent opened iannounces his su-ject, lect'-res on it Up a,: :peil clinic -'oro the treat- ally sticks. to his .subject. He intere: ss deep in social It was anrd enids when he fin. shes it. Whilvl- his nent ^^ofe drug; d .class r-om is and and. 'current e'e'"nts, .he considers. mat Jiic. duity in che patronized' .im: iediately necessarily lim-ited to tohe sui bject in'h.Ad. "His conse iica. is his ,verw:'eml.,mningiy by -'''eral thQuu ': guid&'~~~~~~~~~~~ I :n: patients:,t Inmporti-i:t statisau:: m, .ow . aduated ftrom Iowa State College a. Dr. $prig gr'ies ''s:ere o.dbt ained. In the fir:st in O0. 199, a-adI : pla<e, the .eld charge tha t people in 1899. ie receied l'his diploma ifrom D. Mi. S. has. served his Alma Mater in various capacities as teach-r and leci tevirotwh thrg.e became . eiqe ttke .. : . c'areies '.dministmatio::o o.o nat, turer smince graduation. :' HeI i:s a maru (i wide, culture and expernice f and thinks in terims -coinw : . an ,. b -o 'etics .,ysi'ians .o. ' ,i . of peace and god will. .Quiet and tnas stmmng a thinker with 'r-a r :letely -'autea. ::'?l.e PKhN'rSieia.' :: active a-d alert;-I splbridid judgment-,.n exceilent ;praotiionee {a(s^on:~aed:.o: .I.lag' 2;) :--

t.

:Let.. be, of good cheer, reus, lthey miifortunMe rncmbering that * nardest to* -bear are thosuiwhich never cone -Lowell.e s

.I '

*;.

The grea!t thing in -tie world is
::ot s'o

mracvh

wher

e we stand,-a

in what, direction we are' moviifg : :,::: : - Uol-€nso *. deserves and enjoys it.he-thighestrespect of everybody wIMth whiom : he comes in contact. aught .Principles. 'and He has b-, Technique for man¢''years, and i5 well grounded in tihe furndamrentas cf Oste'opathy. It is not-only an:honor, but' a distinction to have him cnnec,-::
ted with the, College,'

I I

~~O~~~n · -,,- : .

-~ a~l--- l m~~~YI`7 9·)rax~~~~~~~~~~~rr~~~br--~~~~~t~~~~~------·-:-:: ;~~-~`Y~`*"~·-·;U-r-··~p~~--L_~_-gy~W·~.

.

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THE LOCI
1

130O ,-K
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-':

-y~--~-w--7-7~-:--:,-,--.7¥-:-._...... T7 .....

.

LPGn;LYakRas:1-WlrplntmiltUIYYr : : ; : .. :··:::i:::
.

::;· :--;:-':-:-- .

HEDRUG:PR:OBLEM;: "C ttfiued from Page 1) -.. :|Yera /They. were,' of of8 i e : : fw cases .- "thi's k.ind ; in -·which the- habit had bee. linentiu, n6aly, acquired -by '-too p)r0olonged:.. Administration, b'ua these instances were so few a-d ::occasional that they constituted noi prdblem.,' 'The )source of the evi:i'was foun.d to be the deliber·ate:- ajnd systefiat;ic initiagiom, :of
young ;
:

a ndefatigabl Adi asthey re 'and ^*al' ; the laws en the!statute

.:UPIN ATREE

?peol by drug,: peddlers or sm-ugglers. These latter are thg^e leSs links in : that g'eat whiJhtb encircosthe entire world, the intraional idrug ring. These smaller fry, these petty Peddlers, are agent for the more powerful interests.
Wh.in

16^ery

in and th:peratI hrp .contey in the-world. None X is exemt, ii'NM ew N. m'k i was fotund thae-third of the patientshad. 'rthe'- drug 'b^itwhile, ier -the eage .20, of and orrc-half of hiem While under ogre, not be onsidereds

Aesp^|exata pers€oo whotket plis ~as he dullgleirvgn ct a ritioawoudhav apoents ofPx'oAih when; *thieh' alcohol sup<use
ll cv N, the wo qaesti on'

,:dg|

Jgngdianeusy thi0, Iave n'Iot tothe' out at..theNe

rinksr and

rugs, ^have: '.'ested

akoh4cept:for rnci else in amounted -to about 971 Vtns.

boo-,ks are worthless, because of h : tho: ?immense 'quanti'ty' ::of drigs '-The follqwing'poem was writ- bThe stillbirth statisics ar oI IC"exonerated -insaratic, in public ad mett, valu ten by :ev. Alana W.'CNA which ' are annually turned'0lose Ps. D., .. Warren,: , I. .'R "'.' 'and~niso. from a .'legal and' social' of upon;the world. .'rugs are veiry . W. Stillbirths,, like standrpo int, easy to smuggle, being light in .;In a letter that': accompanied deaths a'ilon[e 'very yg cahildweight and small inri bulk. Amer- the poem, ,.Rev. .onePtt explains sen, represents a 'C.i.i wastel.e a is peculiarly easy for smugg- that he is not an Osteopath hut a symnpathizer being a brother- of our most' ri 'al:Tes:aces. Tis lers, with: its ;000 miles of Caniundesir able Cronditi on. causes v e' r ' adian border, and. a long line of in-law to five. Osteopaths in Newl much uszeless su 1'Feri' g' and . is'- " England States. . exposed Mexican bor'der, to say a ijurihous enro- ,. Rev. Conmnetr has been a teach- d ccatie of,. nothing of the long- coast line 1:n t or the presence of isea· east 4nd west. But bad as con- er of Practical: Psychology for "'From ii a so' aviewpoint still His ability and ditions are in the': United States, *hirty years,. birth stetirtics are of intere .t if any other country chooses to Knowledge of Psychology won fori: lV of ithe. waste oi hii.an m ake the same study of drugging him a place on the program at becarie life, b ciuse of, the,' expemndit u:re..' i that New Yori has done, and as the Nineteenth Annuala Convenof ; money for. medical care: *..anhe; the Washington government 'has tion of the New England -Osteo,.nuArsing of! thes -other-:' ord: tII.. done, facts very similar will no pathic Association held at Bos18th, lt.h, the bunrial ' ieO fetus.-: ':.. ton, Mass., on. .May doubt be unearthed. .. : Tha. most important causes o . ' ''' .'.'' ':. .23Where. do all these drugs comie 192.:. ,'...:'\ stillbirths are s'yplir,; too f'ro; froin, in the first place? Why is .'.''"T'he: Log ..-ook". wishes to quent preg'nancy, overvwork, of there always an immense output thank Rev. Cornett for· his M.nd the mother during pregnancy to' be sold, legaliy or illegally? contribution and would like to febile illness- suh :as :`typhoid his pen. Ifrom: Opium, fronm which morphis and have more articles -'':/ .fever,'and'pheumomnay anaisd abor". heroin are obtained, cores from We shall 'endeavor to see' thiat tion-i induced -avethe life ofI 3to .the opium.a-produc'ing countries::- ihereceives a copy of ''"Th-'Log thei rother ras- ia ecianpsim , tu . India, -Persia,-Egypt, Turkey -an.d Book" every isasue..';''.:. ';: .. berculpsis and heart diseas. The: IChina. In.'China, however, opium' ' - *' ' 'li*: ree. * *T p InBAt Tl eertain mice'ea'th,,ihazard of c; growing is illegal and is done'in 'triei where pregnxant hothers A: Youn. · M. TX" Pra:yer . :Y defiance of the law. In. India, the clearly shown by; "0 -Lord' sai' a doctor, "I' m n arc employed sa largest. opium-producing coo iT-ry the stillbirth recordsr, '. getting' the 'creeps,' ':· 'e~ery- ,step':of eulat-vat1To, mra-i- The 'goose flesh' is over rmy back; F'rom a legal' vi'w'oi 5 slulifaeture and alsae, is conducted :.s I :have read. that a' dockjr of- birth statistics i-are 'O: iuicr's a government monopoly,, In India "bones" dtu'--you:k.o.'-::-'-hbecause demiand is macde for' li.alone©,:the 'ou-put__.-for : t909 - yn' camping 'right '.here-: v

I' "l|,tN 'impossibility. of *curing these he

nimporteant fact brot I York.elinic was

ellases Alt poents who wert e wSliling 'we / en it re hoapitul j or reatanp ,when,after and

ig I.sevyereu wee, **thcy, ;were' dis-' H|,chiarged' as .cured, 90 per .cent of |
glll ^^them .ecapsed w i hours. Ithe rest soon. followcd, Why' Thu's ase' bi ng used'to "obti [as t
nd

I^If~ing ^their '*drugs through
^I^IN ground, illict channels,A

iiunder-

they

lowed by th e agents, *of wfjl.tere'' *fol

.

c8|||'1orded * dose. was .of -a mnan" whio the devctors receivirg the paper .n, ' .. sure on the'ru, im ^;'ook. * 125;. * Therefore e.profit~able would fill in the blank below I have naaght o do but. 'appeal;' u^stomers, al o them. Too' pro"- giving their correct address and If yo0a co-me, -i.. am dead, a caIll T fi^rtable ito *be allowed. to stay the correct address *of any of the 'daver 'in fact, . :'. ' 1 ^ cured." The drug peddler does doctors who have moved to or I 'shiver at thought .of your , his ik thoroughly. He: firstu in- from_ their city 'steel; . ' ' ' ' '.: : itictcs his victims, thus creating For I, kow yo. can heal all your . a mrket for hlis wares, anC. he *Name .- ^,-_ .. ^ ----c ulk, .. :patie.nts so qic, ^ ^sees- :it^ that .'to; Iino gthere [Without pills, or plasters, or .*Ad 1ddress . . .-. .. - . slipping ot of.the toils. k: nife ;. " "· -.- .,: ". ':/ ''"-.' Your coming'"s . appailing,-:'I am ''ne .aslks: where :re *the police, [Sitt OIi^^ ":'-" the law to prevent Thhere eare l'up in atreeall this? All the poulic active Wit.out 'home, :a lchild or -a wife I
,'4 I1

t0he dog ring ond rmpied again t a the firs Opportunity. c The lrug ring is fotx to ii'ok money, lnd' ioteuti to len e nO good cnst 6 tonie~' s. /The droag. talkers :at^ the . , vt . NOTICE.... Nrw York clinic were taking do want to pay. dosesaof : 'orpbia or heloin that If you "com e, you will -ake em Editors of "The Log Booke" rankged from 15 to 60 grainstonce fronm-me :e : . ' ^BS^^ns hours. 24 The highest re- would appre cite very much if "Yea! Doctor le Oloste'pat, 4 'm 0 Doc tori
.. y-,ntU IL1 i

The. ar Iount pium required' of for the proper medical'eeds .of the world is small. Sir William C6llins, the distinguished London: physici an, says that *the dispenser of a large hospital containing '8,000 in-patients and 130,000 'out-patients, had used "in one year less than thirteen pounds of opium and five ounces of motphia. n this basis, thie 'worlds medical needs are infinitesimal, as compared with the. immense out put used for drugging'. TIherefore, this gigantic :-.overprducin mst be stopped, beLc.i fore the drug evil can -'be ab· olished; ...-. .... ..

'. track;':::'. . ':' .'."'''.. ' - :" The thought i's 'astounding .and -too,'.-''' '' .' preposterous That'he.i should have dared settle "here; .·..'*..." ; ; I'; . :h""'" w_' ~ ."he e.. I will try by entreaty,i I'l 'write an.appeal,' ' ' Then he'll stay outside of my sphere, . '*.:':::'.-':.-. .. '"P1ease Dctoer 'de Ostepath! 0. do not.come "hre'.dd You really would injure m,-y biz, It e b:en ri.f to c6ile;e, and I've polished my brain, Arnd nearly wenti ' 'ff' the in .-quiz; . ' ' :' Please Doct deo (si' ath 0 * o please do not Comei! i'm a 'grad' with the :ite, "M..

various civil and criminal coir' actions. By; lthe term stillbor' we meanr tbt the chiddid not3M live any time whate'ver aite its birth.: If a child breathes, even once after delivery the C shou cldot be reported: as- a ^tlID birth.i... in -ortng ;prematureo births we requie that:all .irthis the after +1 fifth month, ofgestatioe must fe reported. In scm-s isJ defined 'as '' states-t s tilibIrib the 6expulonmm of ::the,' produot .:od

humain colareition! at auiy '.time,;
4aft-'

either before or fuh tern' Under the Wisconsin _ lhaw still births after the, fifth 'month of;<L ; gest atien nost be reported, both as births nd's deaths, FL' thu 4 D § .~ii~r«"t orvi'-nQ TT|v'f\ ^f"^^'1c^*^ T^'s' i-i c C alendar year of 922 w -re J OxxyT!o-n la.r. t~ol'l~.*:fi,,t it ,~ no .. O !I T)i- <^ A\ .. t
3,:Vd [,Pz~t itjI ull. -':~

Moral: dear Docto"r, :wh iso :fearful my "mann,;; . ':" .: he .fooisl are' never all'dead;': T':.er,: are .patients a-plenty; or '. .'. ' you ev,'ry day,'- "' .:':' There''s money for; me"a- :.and for:
:..*b :' ~ ~ e d~ ; ,. " ; : '/,''.. ."7 '.*'** ' :"-:'.:. ' ' ....

Just welcome
"wide

open' . ':'' A' I' see if 'we .all ::Can"be::tre; ThI.I the . with i:. largeness.ew,[''';'

aarms,.
i

wit.roh':,s
' '

'of f'pirnit and iff;': : or;':"': .:.: Wl m:en. its 'x1omra':d:or youe. d
: '" **;' : : *- ' " '.I. ,.'::;/: .-.. : ::':^ **. -. :*.

*'^s .*

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cI, ~~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ss L ~ ~ ~~~~~~~77 ~ho ~r nv~~ g an whilvf r flK ~ny o u w ly "N xv a h aj: ~ ~ a ~e l o t t .Žkn h The w o ig W >~ as ~ ~ o ~ ~ Pi and ~ ~ Oemg m~~ ~ ~'Thi~ ~vry ~ee~ictent ~ rsiui ~cu&~~ W ~ l ~ ~ ~ ~ ~alen t eaiight yo, ye~l have to take yO caa~O~ ~ ffiee'- cie mk yo, "O , mcVh~ ~7 :) Ni ,YWe i~i er a no acttn ~ti ~~i a ~ t m~ the cul~irt, I a d ,mcdW5 ~ ~~ buxstiug nk' teaas o ui ~ L. 'v~iti'at ha the~~~~~~~ r~~~~ Direct~t 1~~ i ' 17K Tayor ~~~~~rieads.; \VSY ~ &e~~~tr tcr~~~yhra~~~~. ~~ woc7 f~~~~~Žrn~~~riynadS l~~5 M~~~ CA ~ ~ lau'It0
4.~ '~ .

4

wsra~ t f fd nn ha th a I' 9. 0. in ou t wn r 3 e.W a i off ice. n Ju m d l u h e +m i ailew set me ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Weekly.~~~~~~~C k~~~~tter a ~~~ ULJI~~~~~~~hT~~~~~i . ~~~ d~~~~. favor~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~ from ~~~~~~~~ ~~~ h aN a b s wa TN o o h i No i t . s i tel e h c he Ir{ic mti n m6tr be' Oth kiio~~ e~ bi'g,' to ~ti2~ reach 4 up b th9Ia ttou ovs &d voil o'.~ernng '~ artck able rter ~-n~"ii gain. ~ng
O le.

~

~

Ro em r

11s

e

,We.are wonderin 'if ",'immie"

w;valiting t'ables at home? Atho t:he. Doctoet b,'!came a, very successfui "hash .s , rer" while working his way itroughi college and was that received 'a -oe:pof: the.oys ei.fic.ate 'from the D)es :'Moi.es 'iibi :for:, lonor and Efficienucy, yet "-v'-are wiring to. bet our iast a tooth brush t!at he's a aold Whiet it .coms to manipula tinl 'tie salver ei'vating machitiery at "' tarle-.-e.pecialy whlen Mother . .o.o . . . it 'e .

... ' " -, scholarship in the 3)o MS. (1O.., doctor, but I'tm all in and out, .warded by the Pierce County then the G".~ ~ ~ ~ ~ suggested ~ P...,~ i.:,sbers.oftheldoctor, he Te :lf';:k'e:, ~ '," .t~ .ie. ~ i ~ I probably had the gout. He ating class will be pleased.to Mr. | Osteopahic Association. ke off coat and shirt learn thft Eugene C. '[erZhogha a Walace Js a- graduate of this ade isa igh rol dw. my B. V.- D's, I guess at last taken unto himself a'wife. year's class at the Sumner Ii The marriage announcehmeTt d Tacoma. It was his fit" he Shot '- something hidden, he School of'' aptitude which won for. othe-rwise could not see. And shows that 'lthe lucky ;omanwas ness and ";, O. En nh "~.,ord! be went to work, Miss A L. Schneider.fhThentfawtal him. t1is: cMhoarship.;, -i " , 19 t ..bei g tied June ' ' ' a d ma in. He his i the w h .:.i,,t'e est shown hiby' : 1t, a....... P'ierece.-.tounty..... Osteopathic Associ- roclet mny-liver round a·spell, My! Their 1 future home will be 1U.~ inn. yelled with pain.He 'the" Collins .'Street,. Austin,:m s icitPdenouragirm': It h,,I e afi:,'n is ided. at ~~~~~( t,, e ncic~~~~~~~~~url"~~~~~~~~~i 'ii' ~~~~,nrlO k i"' stepped right round behing-- '. The Doctor has-: th.-dee-p'e ^^s. spilit and real . of tose who kiow:!ii: ,sympathy r:{'e' -As& ..'f. : .... _~' ,1.9:'2~ .tio g the members of tinsI-~ ~ an.. an -. his fingers 'down ::, .... ~ sa .oa. Ttr'a'ee...ie. and have smiled a' smile sociation to 0rthe, eth ben . .. .. D. . .. .i .... my ,~,,,,> w-m^* r fc,,:e .,-,.,^,fy~,v .q~r1 -r al I retie,. aiua s<aya A s-u tet, "Mike age better' q:a!- ;y arnd, material I sw;e EATI.ER, P . :DP. A,. i the point," and manifested . all tj Dr. Herz<g .was ,pmmsne~;!n':-i .1 '1. CoIllege activitie:andwas f for shor't, drops. in at the office tor 'Osteopathic PLhysvcia.ns. ho 1. said, by a jab 'right :n -the excellent student : Hi:s- ol":gne is' associated -e :cc.sionally. Ijoint. Suffering Lisards!' I thot -wiii ,ememnber 'iow-his melJodious I D,'. W. Iroerts of Des :r'i.[ h"r. *knifed me right,' whil: I ivoice' used to ad- lhe.d'd thr tring he al IT SEIMS: from 6, letter tells us tlthat .. Ilo.00es. Drc "'Mike". C, av 11:,-: time but dressed to this office, that 0. H. rolled right off that table maid' 'of o( I. i:. S..- :0. -while:: :: t h ... 'c : ; h:w m.yself for fight- '..ien. *ber/ cI ' the famroosm " rbt o' D. 'ihal the "balf has never yet been Olsen, a student of DM.S. 0. 0, :prepared Doc expleined his actions which Ousatetto.",- *...; * : ^ .- / ^ ' is Ihavin g a real work out this t:--.n. text 'books '- compared I the I i The D~Og Book exteI to;Dr. I C witl .wshat one learns from actual summer. H'fie tells tus he is work- eased my feelings some, in gi tthat I H-ersog an:d. wife b thn est f oes.' epperience. Dr. Prather is a very ing six and seven days a week. couldn't help but co.nscieno tious worker ar'd we pre- These Swedish people sure love wislhed I hdnh't come. But I got a long and .lappyi - ife. We also :dit for him a successful career. thteir work. But hard work is back on the table, thot 'I'd make iwish -to add that if theDoc.tor h nothing to "Ole" as he worked all another try, this way as well as iany ssereets-prepar ict ell hn day then part of the night while another if its sure you'. got to Ilnow;. :' . :'. ... ,D.R :'LAF' K.. CORS-ETH, a going' to school here last year. di.' The Doce then grabs me i I graduate: of D. M 'S. 0. 0. last MrI Olsen is an excellent cartoon- back of the neck and says "Now I :NT May, has'located in Minneapolis ist as many of the Log 'Book please relax while I fix this ver- I ANNOUNGEi ' r. Go"- readers whos have noticed his car- tebrae that's playing cutty up in j / ?, (Swedeapolis)- AMttnn. The. :Board of Tr sL-ees .wish :tz.. . .1 seth came to this school', from tie toons will verify.' your 'back." Now, friends, I'm. announce to thle stude'nits and' $. (. Boston Osteopat.'.c C. lege. Hi: of the toiughs from friends of O., M.f,. 'o 0,.l tat: that lie doesn't work th:e toughest hiore:.is in Norway. :Svery on-e We hope fa': and near,. bat 'wheT? iny back the plans for the new hiiiding' a"Id not' around thie office hlas ,beenwon- too hard this summer are not' progressing as well ' as vacation, for we want went crackety pop' my brain w:: would iike to have :them, TheVany e :i:n, ii thI Dr. has emabarked :have went .nub with fear.'-For I was '-':the roug"1' and turbulent :,in. back full of that. fine spirit sure he'd broke every bone, in ·reasons 1are: * '' '- '.:>'.-'"':.-':"_':^ '/::...-i '0 ' :'waters: of the.- Matrimonial Sea of enthusiasm and. good cheer' -that old spine of mine, but Doe 1., Poor financial conditi:on:f-::' that has made for himf so many| : ; ; ,iosity is 0nl1 based ueno D:0u :o ? .. ::-: |again just. smiled that smile and collegi-e ',' ^:"?.*L.*::':--.:' :::::'].. 'ita fact that on or abouti Mar 24. wvarm friends. 2. Lack of' proper support in. says "Old man that' fine." I paid [i923, the circubsitaniices looke' )'R. J. I. ,ABBOTT of New the DI'octor': all in full and went Des Moines . -a'rfvrathervable, especially -froee my shomeward way, a saying to I . Lack of support from pro. /: lHow aboa' vi"ew. poi~t * 01of iur casttle. Va. reports that be has. at *vmyself, says I, "This has been * last arrive(: at 'the harbor of his an awful day,' But I am glad, fession,' . it,. ? .. ':. 4.. Inopportune time ) yliood days. 'He says it s're for don't'you know, that pair Our'efforts will continue :but - seems mighty good to- be back 'has Ieft :or goo and I'm giving YK d .'RTZU 'IS3 't OSEMMA.. Tay< The&efore^ secondary ':that.. bubbling, smiing, ever- honme with the wife and kiddies all the <:rodit to our old' home tho college offcials re glad to happy individual wlo has been in after two years of absence. We, towI) ': 0. . * ':.. ~~~I Out vlis g'iuou:A-n ws -U ,'w~ulV g/vc »>> -!V:. :, t·he office hee or the past -2've are glad that he is with them and main endeavor will'be tbo- teter -- D, .. F. monliths is the capacity of steno- nevi' no more tp roam, for Dr, * ~the caum.rse given by this instit.U --- '- , . ".--·. -graphr, : is . her vac'ation. She Abbott graduated frotm this Colpocial attentionw:.ill be t . ' jion. <.S-l M. LUCKY .'/' , 'is forms us that she ios going to the lege l.ast May and has received the Departme>t:of' o: be his licence to practice. -hMe.Log . He hadI long been suspected: of[ given laktes.fo:r awhile. 'Nwiose, l:a:ugh ad ',"ok wishes 'to extend congratu- tbootieg ging, and now: that the teopathy and the Department o .. 'canot -Ca eft.ie!: .y .' ":'* onstable' had caught him with a Clinics. ' . .t'a.lkvvhile swimsng-.'.. Don't try latinms ito the Doctor.-and wishes C i stunt, him the 'ercv best of success in quart of the genuine, things had fthse a:y or:i," \ a dark ookx indeed-' * .- ' " * - ;,' * ' tyou:tcome l:ischosen. pofession .. '..either,:'c-ause.wewi . ..* *;**. . ' -'R ' . .' \CB- ': -*: '-¥ *X M. Ei: -;*
hmy i .i II

is

Wallace of that city w7o

ecei

eve s.

I .says,

"1 don't

know,.; j

' .J

4
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a:;€0 :t a sample of b lood fr;om tfh.e mo<x : Cent"^owed m f) ^ 9):-.:" ta;nm%,' cotamp-ete *reports ci froze :409 to: 49 ye.arst of age. TI ther and send it to 'the -phychii,, I 1 sB'^^^y *-./ , i; ' -. £» ' * : *'..' * ither 'the Jvprbirths or the still- :tautiation of 'stillbirths accord :itc institute at Mendeta for x ^.-.,'."* c *.. L_~~S:-iV OI LA . 4 . i. .t a . ?1 I 5 22wi . re 2.- 3 ±AiaU S-a Jflu) ingc to the ago of the mothieI ahnimaiodn to determaine whether ~I e o as 'ir s!.tillbir of::1:,56 eiut of wediol," Statistes r ic eI- does, not, i di -cate that there :i |the mother is .syphilitic or notS ,. .}; :, 1,784 git~initeb irth.s are-ry difficult .wi"-' : l^^is,:- : a CO':-' any relation existing 'betweer' These ex if nattions are made si||^itilbirthMs reported aH: deaths. to; ot:'ain for ,the 1re son that the age of the mother and- the ::without charge. "i .this practice' The record of stiilbih ihs rcoorsecrecy is it.i.Sted "pen'" and ri stillbirt: .' n i t is followed it wii be possible to, -:::id 'deathsis usually 'mul.h d.., :mas'y cases the mother taees an 'The study of sti!Ibrths in its disco:ver'a.n.d pi'oprlry treat many :.aore. complte than s.lbirths assurmed n.a ih, or goes out of the relation to the number o still- cases of sypis ,nich otsmrwisei r?:-eported as hi:fths for. the easton .state{ to be. co ined, (soe uXDo i 'Pi''that i t is, necessary to file :he born children. of a mother reveal would nof, be Clas.sifying ti.e stillbiriths acserious damage has been donen. some, 4 iitresting. facts, I .most :--ideath :certificate and obtain a :,here i mothe r has :·ur:-?Usia:l permilit befoire the fetus cording to the birthplace of the of the o-set s Classifying stillbireh: accord: -an -:be lega}ly bauried -or other-. fathe., the record showIs 'that iti cad at tleast two stilbbrhs't there ing to who ',s in atedance at 960 'cases the .father as born Iin were twins in the I:ancily and ::wiase .disposd ot ' The dice',the time of b it I . e|Ii co.: : cy :in tie mI ber' of sibirt s Wiscrrns in: in 238 ("s.' the fa-. both of them died. Th-',-- returns shows tblat 1,473 I t' . I :re attended ther "\as born in other states in show one case s-wIee t. is prt'ic. c*ye'portel'asibirtis as .oaareral by physic'ans' and 98 by m:id:::::::::::::::: sftillbirthis rep., orted as the Ljed Sates, 'and in ?68 ui ar. motlh.er who a., a'ttended wives or others, Approim"":e' y : :; /tf.oregl' a midwife h '..:::aP'r?:-S~c O~:'D 1 'C~'O1Y- - case.s tne fatr V:'Iti: a'<'h by had '7 still- six per cent of th-e stilbirth r'a ====== ;==== .'..i:,f h: is co mpar's- born. ' s : *i . birt'hs. -In prawctlca.ilyy of the po.'ted aMA all births for-..922 were 'TXu-. recC~-d6-f.b rt rr 'r) T~lq cC r>-) cases' the ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~reported was .in'" /.:.;,t ~:Iindicates ~'i~~i ~. l'ai~ly::;::sliglrtand -\l 'A J.~ stiltJirtch ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~~~~~~~~~. ~ attercnded b: m.id ve,,,r 'A ce', of t ...,Ale first ,-ilbihierth from .his ino- For 1921 'h; recod 'i;.ws that: that 10 to '" s o ' ssi'. irr::,fyi f the a 5 'istrn 5 : . '",569 '.;::;is. elfthsi.'.reportei as- mothers -we:a born it: Wiscou,.sin,- the r'but in 1t)0 cases the mnother nine pe.rcent of the stillbiths .:irth'by sex the recordsishow 2 in other states of the. U::ited ha' ha.d two stillbirths; in 15 were attended by midwives or : ':'::{at'-:r ,were males, .674 wexir"-'qae ' and it' 243 cases 'the. cas 845 3 stillbirths; in 6 cases 4 others.. The cIassification of stillllbrth i ases3 "malas 'and in 50 cases .the :': mother was foreign born,' tillbirtlhs., a'd i.n .5 cases 5 still- births according to the occupao._-.f th6echild was an'aown'tor .or '"Considering :stilibi:'ths accord- r-thls. in 219 cases it was not tion of the mother shows that; stated. 'Prin ndhiatesr that-ml rI rag tothe age of tre mother the: atated 'whether the mother had practically all of -the 'mothers childrenat'; more apt: to. h" still" 'Wisconsin 'ecord for. '9.22 shows wiven i'rt.t to more :than one were classifled as .iousewr:. es I l'on than" female 67iilirn' and I ,that.i': 65 rases the mother was stillbirth reported . . with the' excepton of the Plegit-. Th genera~lip ac epe ^r a c only 16 ye irss ofC .age; in 101 The i r.t;..ant element of syp- imate births '... te < ',,paOfthetotal nstillirthseported cases the mother IasI from 1 to hilis is ca,.,.inng stillbirths and ion-in five case': was;L given U .as 1' ,2 m^ twins said :three 'were 19' .years ;ole; in ;724-: cases to. were Premature, i'rtha' should con- fac tory worlke'e, t,, . aser s x trivles.ThereD. werec'. 40kzt illegiti- jnother was: ftom th^ c,-h th( .'veers stanl:y be kept in mind and in domestics -t: thp e. n' tht' : ,;2Q. to 29 -was * and two .ases s mat£^elstilbi "Ihs~y pe rtd ao soi92.of rge: in '86 casses the mother :ase of stillbiirtit fro]mr causes ill- students. . . .
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B./ . A. ' M. &R. B CH..
Prof. elue . Al. S. Irof[. or Trec hn.i..e & Osteopathi Pactic D, M. S. , 0.o'6t of ,&oste'opatic.Prcic e
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'}:i,ey ;a.s It May' Be':' : :-"-. .in Sol hug 'Crimies. '", :' Des .Moine'- physicians
'n opinion as to s

!,t'..m:i:, 'he new- truth serun : .. e-i:rimented 'with inCalf .:.'iuy "-of 'them frankly:sa : .;r-' '.r?,::"ranville' RyaA.. c, )'l.his uiNerest;.in the' dMrug .llveilg:that'in tie hands
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ties,;'epeehi^al; "s ' app: '" : ;' ; :." c^frim'incology. Dr. .ran:a;
4milar

.Everybody drank .- rota hth o : :l f tin. -cup .that -hung'..on the: twmn pum p , . ..':, ' . A roller towel in the:hotci:.wX'' room acconmodated all comers. Two 'thousa nd'. peoplelAii'!:':, Illinois every year. fo . ' :a:,. a ::. . fever. '^Th. .healfth officer'sN^^ che ^o wase. to 'inspect 'ally-ad i yards-' for and'' a.gare a anim als.': .:- : :. .' :. /.'..::. ,The state board of healhiiiisted',principa:iy fo',y:ie mi:rpe: ::-. o of examiningad 'irX e 'sing. '1'-:
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.mind at th:e;pese.of tt u,-witas'eterest|ed:in t se r s*^tated that- fis en. '-^ 1 . .ed -fo:r prat'a i s : " 'n . : ,tion wi .".th iminolgy it beof f :the::u.tmost vaue t ": ',r!l'-,Taylor of Des , r , Gener. -hospital, stated'i :'. "':~.of the- dru,:-was-'us; sidea.y I..in. Des.- oines s.-:
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i,';sn[ :eoiction:' *with 'criminology them to (htier' men/ as living, com- done, Dr..; ? chnoman f do .will it h .avetien acieved before with pelling forces. Some people practice osteoThis faculty Is .iif'ere-t xforms of anaestietics, Dr.M. AT . Bachman's chief per- pathy for the money .that is in it cc; pci ally. ether.'; '; / *.;: : * soneal asset.' H is feeliings always but Dr. Bachman practices it b'emellow, 'softeo an-d enrichen his cause he can dio imore good in it thoughlts. His shafts of wit "and than he can' ifI any other avenue NOTIGEM, humo;r, though tlhey :,pierce, .Iever of .life. :He loves osteopathy. Its hi-. A P../h V rincetf ied, Oak, sting "o cea.e a sar. (,:at ' :' ' '..: .' institutiuonal epenseJ .ddy lif e' 'is his life. . iS movingt Ct i. ra O II VI t aIlifornia- .Bachman" is his coIgnonmin. He ...:Dr. ~Bachmian has the ' utior:t Milk was milk and nobody ad' so wishies 'to corny oiee "with is :known every*where .as thIe tu confidence' of :the studcnt-body eared a hang where it: cane from. SUs I 4 Oseopath nbc is lookinga dents frend. ' 'le has won it throu,.gh his fine Soothing -syrup, and pacifiers r a goo1 iioh. .Finds 'of Dr. Bachman graduated at D. pe sonal integrity, .devoton to wer:e standard home remedies for D. V; osnt~f' regret very .much, M..'S. C. 0. in 1911 and located duty' and hh-is genial good spirits. in f ants. e influence prevail. "Patent *thatie. he is heaw4ug Iowa, but at once. in Des Moines where he Long may his medicine., covti.tin: -a'ishhnim muech Osu-ccess in .his has. a most enviable practicer mostly a -. of lcohol i(e.-.a. trick,. '*,K o :wori-.'el ' X) P. rcw (id "C[;:'Hei has taught Osteopathic oi $5,000 was a generous annual nfame, were advertise ' a"sI sold P-actice' for .a 'good many years aippropiation- tothe state board :a a 'ure for everythinr' .from-a. Kncw*^io~edge 'and sel confidencee and .is" very learnOd in this aded. of moaith.""; ' : - ' ':^':' ingrown toenaB to apoendici!}. ' &." pDows rof:sucess. A! a tech :"ician, has no super he (t ; ^rois heath^j Ne~z Ita$4,000 .' F~rz,,?: .fftos:Hat Nes i- The- legislatur- felt tc ....[ eg'islai:'lt h-

^.' ntini ued.,: tie stated that there An educator .m a leader. He .ior. When, some difficut' lesion is i undoultedly somevirtuie -in it, thinrks ahead of men. : ie e!els io 'be corrected the profession has . hut tlihaththe results claimed for his though ts .and communicates learned .where to go. If it can be

NoIodyl~ 'ever ti .. hgl.' ::f :; ;: istering~~~~~~~~ i, · :',birth"anywher:?b: te- faniily bible. .-Ohild en's. l diseasaes :w'ere:'.-! gaaded,: as the: angry v./iiationof;/:a Divine:' Providence ,.-'.'-'1 ": of, folks thog:h.u ots . buckeye in tlhe pocket wo-ldpi'vent rheumatism. ''.Some mohern knewb thata, riled flannel undershirt' amd a .sf"ingoif asafetida. around .the wod'a 'neck A protect. children from' d iphheri and other contagions',' ' '. : 'N"'ea:rly.everyody had smallpox. at .some time during' fe, .. (.?:you don't and that's, pJobably wjhy : you havein't been: vaccineated) : - .muningwater .i: the. 'luer:i',. bathroomn and .- toije we .onyii ; a' loolked upon as: hivuriet. or the very rich. . - .. . .. ...- : ,.^. :u . .. osumption was an incuahbi.. Con di-sease' :and fo lr :who had it' were " advised ;"o, go west-.-whici I the' usually did.'. ' .' ' '. '' . Nobody ever suspected thata: `tihe. .ppaication of. proveatative meai-: cine might save thelitate aheavy. :(i

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We" are all:Waiting ti :.nx. y .... . .WIt ': . ' f .- . . ., for :her return to hear about the : A3 K foMi^n VIn" dse rin og D- M big. one that she landed, Mr. and Mrs.,. Augur, students : shorti a a' s:endign 102 0. I:<::ij-eatiedG,-'(Catisfmeple; -Park, -- · :* __-_:, :- '; ' .\^ :: of ID. M. S. C0.0, who graduae T'here's a little bit of sunshIne I -Spiri DI)r.. M. Sclaeffer, assistant i January, 1924,:were ve kind That enters most of homes gl.a- .ae,; Iowa. He is there mth thi ;; l Ostretrician, reports that Sunday and wrote us a lettr of flteir A little bit of sunshitne: ;Ha -p^ac Grotto bandi of Des Moin l-plays the "Sacksyfoe" July 15th was a good day for trip wes to Colfax, Washington. That you can caiJ. your own $!F: l$ Torisc-"-" babies. Coming in Mondy mon-, "Our trip over the mountains ^ .f A. J. .ellard' of Coon. lap- ing, looking -all tired and wrtn was a miserable one and if I l-ZlA® iS ide'-,0f v it,0 twahs at; the De WMoines out, he was asked what was Ithe coud (express my feelings about That little bit of sunshine a 'That fills your hear.t with 'joy it, this litle missive would I was it a bad ni'gh-t? T -- Ge:: cneral :aospital last *'rhursday. ni",ter-J Is just the sublime preAVsence disgrace. ^??:-' :-;:- He brought three patients; to the Doctor replied that helia j.. ii -- -'iy: Talor Clinik for Vosietomiies, returned fror deli.veIng three "We 'had rain all the -way out Of a baby girl or boy; 0. 13,, cases. Pretty good for one -,mud galore, and snow in the [I' moutrtains. You can imagnie It stirs your heart to g'ianes.. ;' '~['-- ' Dlr IIHI' . onsinger,- graduate' o day 's work we say, Doctor. ?illlS.:: :. ^ M S[:C:. 0., 'for the time being A - ---1-_ -_ . ' what a wond(erful time" we h.ad And fills your soul with Lov: ;::?-:: is- filling the vacancy' of Dr. B L. Mr. J. H. Hansel loft Sunduay pushing the Ford over the top, For a babe's a bit of.-heaven :.1 ! . :as;h in.n the Laboratory at the for a visit in Minnesota, It 0loks We hoped the. worst 'was over And from the GCod a,ave.; . for ack whenWe left Mr. Crew but it had< gg. ;!-: h:: : Jospltal,-LDr Cash recently -moverd a little suspiciotus . :i%;?.'! ;to Dubuqe always had 'an e:e for the fair only begun. The tourists with se:--especally one in particular, Ftords stuck .together like big Oh! those baby hands that call you :MAlss IRosemary i m: Kurtz returned W, hav'eno proof, but we others all of the way over the For its good-night lullabye . iat' Friday from her- vaation. a hunch ' worst roadsJ There were six al- Is like the calling of the flowers She -, ;.'ays 'that aside from trying to - gether-one after the other we For sunshine from the sky. V:: ;0.swaliow most of the water. in Dr_. James E. Cbx, graduate of pushed over:. the top by man .some: of - the .Minnesota lakes- last May, has !ocated in Mount power, while the women and the And that little smile that greets trinmg to laugh and b. ** rteathe Ayr, iowav Dr. Cox. was. ah excel- chMldren walked through mud,-y- : ou under water-endeavoring to use lent student and was nterested H20 and all that go. wSIt it. And that Cooing, gooing style "It is funny now when.we think Makes ·you: wish :her head as a rock .rushor while .. all 'Colege activities. "The Lg t;he more and iVing-in; a shallow· pc. cgett DBotk.' *etends-to him best wishes and talk about it because our . . -: : more - . u-busiA and bi tten by mcait- for a sutccessfal Isteopathic ca-:good visit, in rnt -this splendid cli- They would s ta so, all. the. -while. -es-thlia ther "aiing was moast. reer, ;.mate has caused us to forget and .... : ' . ::pleasant. - .;: . .*. ::has funly .repaid us fef d'all our ; ; ' * But the , '· ' *''' * touble.d, Pi..ra-e. o' t'ima11 < must nuid ) wif^.- nf and w''' VA . D-. W change thelm. ^ile dissection class fi shed olnes are' spending a few days "We enjoyed our wee -end itheir" work: for the .summer lst inacaion_ to with e ith .T INe-braska Ihdcs people and They must iyve. carr:y on ; :?Mtnaday, This' nod doubl was Doctor's people,^ we still have sweet memories of WoLrk that's left behind iun.- -' : finished ' "' ' :grataly appreciatted by all who: Both Doctor -and his wife are the delicious lunch his Mother |t3: ; the .:Work^- The olfactory graduates. of D. M. S. C. 0.- Dr. prepared for our lunch bo - By their elders--aged and gonf:e, i ter surely must have been Woods is an instructor in th chicken axid everything). : ., .0. ' "L yman Crew hahs a -wonderful. nt here ani: I an exc one. -; :'.tortured. i hom eand family, too. e Ti:.y . A. Real anxge ;r :.:;Dr. 'Ross. Parish, graduate of -treated us royally when we Dr .J. P. Schwatz,' ahletic d/.) :. :,; s;. C 00. lst.Ma t us' Stop!lTik Reflect - ! soped with th'em in Bozeman, rector 1as been wo:kinghrd to' ! that he is now located in Mlwau.;--.--.;.ver night Mrs. Crew, also filled make, the coming foot-ball season e k^*Xie, HMl~e m.altions Wisl. mnadie; Stdentse and Doctors: Vaeation: our Wa beal one.I n nother co'umn lit < e.t t -hat-hehad so-me difficulty time is swiftly passing soon: "I mst not forget to mention wil.l be noticed 't -and cloule-.ef ! : :if *:getting, into the' sstate of: WWis., anotherpage wil be opened in our visit wih od friened fromn thi fall. It lt..s vg. d do.es't Lt:persiste:acy won. I: the Dr's. the history of our College--your D. M. a C. O.. 'S. . Ga rri- it? But it ail. has' m.ea.t har, "et.:'miniationis'any near in College. Have you done: al:you Son and family in Big 't.imber, constant wor. way -©M ¢omp:-:.rxin ws i In '.ih:sas:ature, we eoultd for. her? She S ,-ou1 Mcntiiio . U'.' ./B -' Dr. Scha.'tn ivrymuch Dr. St,,'artz ig very muc 'iin:rae..aware of 't~he fct that the.. D. supprt. t.It; wa...hi her halls · t was wit+hin : fact t.}. taheL supporxt aectfe Dr. "We :are 0aow busily engaged I. te|'sted Athletics in H a r.. t.. male soe fhtWe. ar- thlat .yQu reeived the education Dr. A. M. Agee's practice fotr a less woraier. e A. great::'dea of: :ad to klnow 'that ie is :located'at has helped to form the basis few weeks while she is away on a: credUit must 'be girh himifor i a'd wish hfim .,scce. sfu! career. of your success Bs Tost rip to e as. eortsalso co-opeat i utI.n

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an:'d~ in touyh wird somne esteeo-" ia your ' get. hd i , i: .roj ng -indo -ct ' : r he tmain Ti r ne o 'S. :lool is ed. Npth ^ ehc ight b^e clng 0 for.aldet's get together. Co-per.ate "fets (Go! STILL!" . - Tuesday, Ju.l.17th4terl. 0da: g.... iaiotithiat spi. Any and fill .os D. c M is. l'r hitmc ofs e Wo ui .ed or:t ,"n iteBrested i pfroadSi:on students w ha "ae ene. mhe enth'usiA.. takin Stae tBoar :x ';at... of thiiS kiand may receive filthwr .before. A little ime: arid _en ire (Jan,fmeno Tyhey 2). aine grup o infomati'on9h g "The; L. oO T from '.uin . .cbgen eAgee . -: a d e enjo yked' h.t hm X l l Pok' Deil ia " r or -a u: emakion. rmeans of , at the thalt one, don't ike yo.r heart action,, wof ..usr ';. ;: I, ~..~..... . P.,.01S .-. , ersailles, Ohio, h Hundgred fts e . ctlayss this. fall. tehe feoctoe, applying his The school wais nstrluw a. y

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o ; n re6, a e )es Moines. "Slt llgevof as 6s, n- N c;?tiire to met- OY:steopsa thyj i!? t : : h ew Secjetar »f i* D Ies M~ines, *iowa,." 1 ;*^ ; ' r .^'' )es .7a fIi Qbl -eiege, Dr. <mrater. '"As a r.esult of oy tour of i'-ws wa itL: us at our last Cone' Yery good loc i ^There re two v L. O.,ral,. .. GBJ Taylor spectinl during is past. yea, I yention 'at Del.awore, Ohio..I cx- doonl.s oosteopat-h J )Te n Nebrkait , i ~~i d m ~ re~ D . Cx ne feel that the schools are all buld- Lend to him m y best &inhes L for )ne at Ca.Iaway. , *u oneat Bllinger ing up tremendously in their ;he success ofi the new, building Cozad. flv. ®H .'~~~- «^-...^-CJ

-~~~~L3o L: -1-. - , 013,. 1 0

CA A'.. A i 2 4 the Je Thar .C 'fy e JLd' C 1923, ~ ^'.' ti r fo ' z oliclu · ~·~r "boa Bo! A'i'iMtono-, r' n

reQ

part.

nN.-

" Ill

X'n

I

-

-,-

-

."4--.

- -- -.

equipment, and growing iT -umber of students. "We feel that one of Ithe biggest - lae coTnibotor *of tfie followthing$ the profession can do is -big artioles- Mr. Mklon ci-onn, is studicent of DJ.1 M. b'. b' 0. life actively to aid the student campaign propoganda. The Depart'--w *Co.mWHpan 'with R. B. G(ordan, u ment of 1iducation has strongly -imvk p-l ro-n Deos Moines -to Ne'w roe'oummended that every member /rk? -City to atte-J'd Us €wv t/* . We sy tj ias this wvs Sene of the profetsion smarke it his business the "hi ~k^ae" <ly tLdose tsat fitre. seAding to interest 1Imsell in coland of students to the [' -: thw9i fI ^d 'wih the greatI leges; and full information and ness.'of tihv sci.eo of )stCeopatiky aid on best htie metth-s of oba o in :-_`s ad ef its pTrogress taining the desired result an - old - n.w1 -: Lnke suchs a ;r p. e be seeutred fromn the Central ^*" - . :8 East 4th. Street Office. I believe hiat Ith biggest a .befre profession today thlie kl ew Yorlk City, th-g ::: ^/ 1 *.;*-. ,.' . ' ^ .Joly 7th is -the lfling of the colleges 'withI nb properly equipped students. ' \ :Deavit, *rjayte:.. rL , ,l -In my report to the Board of Yorf : Whil att.endiing the NMewx ; Trustees I very elrnestiy re, CI''onvetmon GJ tlie b*A, 0.. . x- was, UU1fo1rnAte. t to wobtalin the commended that they do everyes-u thing they can to aid the Des c - lo : interiV s with nr. for Moines' school, and the other h* IViouroM and eaocd e '(touvett, : schools,- in their campaign for . gthe , "LogB oo 2' new buildings and. equipment. During C:I oconvenfuxD o-veral
a

:rojeet." !wte-rw'-w Inlter'IRs ;ith ~iR

; Calhaway is in a riachTfarig

.Listrict some firty rmles north o Goode,
4. Book", Con,n. Dr. Gaomge Wo Kearn ey, Nebr.. on a branch ine 4iv a. gs- v -thef 110110 io oiic. Anyonle n President of her sted shouldeTrite to ,Mr.J;.I:; AA exclusively for "og c0. IEvaus at Oanawaybwho'is very fly 6, 1923, thkr Milton

Reti+ ring

mn dch

ilnterested inlocating ant:^

"I was out' at the Des Moines The success of tills Convention is due": largely to what I saw there of the way Marshall, Gilmnore and Rice ran I tried to _emulate their Aings sxamnple of a well-oiled mraclhine. "To the studen-ts- of Des Mo1Vineo stiii College 1 ca. give no -better idvice for their sueCss s osteopatlls than this: 'Learn -e oJsto2onvention. pathic concept; learn the phy1sicoLogic movements of the sp ine'.

osteopat there .- ; main 1 Co:ad is on they. fl^Min of 1che Innion Pacific/, w, ofLez

ington, Nebr. This. is haloin, very ric, farming distrk el bACI't the peocple are very tesirous of.or,
an osteopathe loating. there.s :rhis iss :brought to, your:,aftte ^. |

#in,

ti.
.FDah

¾tu:.

perhapsG 9y^!:ou

.i
-

hiave: iniriesLl.. for locatio nsin

Nebraska. -rna~y ' yours,
Byron SPete

s

"The students of Still College
can do their share in aiding us by joiing t:he Student's AunlIlary

OS"TE0PATTM 1?C4
I nih be true lo inyselt, m ideals, my am lIss d. ubitton, and iaylbeV ®

of the A, 0. A.
hope the profession will

"I

'^.meetings .w ore heM 'o:i: 'Hie acid s

io

CORRECTIQN: ; the Assoated o dents of the Des Moines.Still Collego of Osteopathy, the good news erned. that ther IegeS were misinformedrspr~Dr. by *fficers we: President, Dr. S. . tliat this Convention was the lar- We We' si for Vie- gest ever held, Over 1700 mem- Parks in the article fcompariy;Kjerner,:jof !'E saii Cty The result is SonI of hours between medical, os. Priesidont, MrsI *George SUti'. o her-s attended. , chiropractic. We 0. Dr. ueOhler Nwas too g' ater prestige feo osteopathy. teopathic an the A. "You; ay well be pioiu tp be- gave the number as .495hours s nuch in a h urry to. get away to hgie erfa rtherd pl rticuisi p ,t bi long to the osteopatic profes- btii were.xinfor ed- b the-Pialmder eSion, and you maybe- assured School- that the rauber is 41032 . pr- ased ^:a send m i' 'he t (ad tion: . ' -'' ' *' ' , **. ' b ear s . CiO n : s. to thf buiniess^ dones that a welcome awaits you i dafa, e : the major orgnization as soo ee a -m discudsions had a t Pmeetlo,.
:e stre
tataso ' might send them as 'you' have- ;gradu~aed,' and that: Pigs, ecourseCof the the President al other excutives yjou wthi, the, Tei WO the~sof the A. 0. A. are aIlays willn|gLog Editors of "The to liten. to any sugestions or, y very much i| Ihlpful thoughts you mAy- have. would a~ppeciatre "A*ny plan wich h. -for. its the doors reeiving the'papel : ;^fill in thle. blank .bl W object the enlai.rement of the in- wouldi .' gyiving, ;the~ir'. correct address ansld stitutions of learing of the o^teopathic profession is highly the correct address of any of the &to or conxiendable. There is not ,ny- d etors wh. have' moved thing which pan be mnore helpful from tieir_ city. to osteopathy than aggressive, efficient schools, with adequate facilities. "I - have beeu favored. with a I .r ra Ad -~- Ir -rl----rr -.- .- - - -ls-nr ~ ~l ds e cepy of the 'Log Book' sice.th nublicatio of .s thed ;T with mab and1 ! .Iwars xead it -wit, miacb

lbloB oa, the A;ssociaeId .Colleges, -atwhicl,' 'so I.3 informed, no was and eqauip them. understanding of Anatomy, Ph eltctead president of the A. 0. A., ; Tfr'i:eentative : 'appeared on '.pbe"I believe that the osteppathic6 skiogy, slle ; P*athology and d obtained July 7, 1928,:. dtetY. ^.alf~of-'g·: professi in your territory,'and, ences could ive. after,*the close of the Convention, o ' Sti llhwhow erethere - rWeM : ;u~ fact, evaewhere,; should taoeo I'will .especially t e also 0 )r-y ::teato onep Lom exclusively for the "Log BoWo An active- in'terest in. the' cam:- meelanicchaulrl *and', natura, methd -the. by Milton uon. Shl "took p-art in the program. pailn for the new School. of. treatcel :of dseaseand ai{d ; From .Dr..lmeiter, of pBost ti, as,,my 3jdgemen^ egl best im i "I wish to convey to the' stunewly elecdted
Bcretary and 1 will wo6rk-not niou to cure "l disease bnt. to, *prevet 4ee-6 aid' thiss...with' "s lttle xpense to ot possile. el the p Oft e I wll t!cat :fairly

boost every possible endeavor to .1, ray patient -give t ;:' will Interview with PDr. RilUim A. build new schools and 6colleges most ;Service, hat ."l iotofgh Gravetti, of Daiyton, Ohio, newly

fair 'tiea~~nent in' retu
Osteopathic' co ceplt

**, 'n. ,

I. will alway.betrue
Y

ta theru i

GO(U NEWS
We iare always glad., to,: hea

goodi. .repoirts^ .fro^ our la in'

~ni,-

1 -^

Ihop~e that :ye -wil nor coIsidl or that a dorm eanything: iranorma-,: oper i. getting this for- the schoo,. . tl Those^from Still who were at

espec.illy wnP it cone from tahe laymen. 1 of Newburgh,
iJ,,

ettere 'from louis Mil~ler^*;
who ^travel

'S te fta ~phat 'he occAsknmall I
the servi

esI
athan

were:. Breeseeationp o -my he lierst T reich, the. Blauiet, th -eck-rtse , McFall, Cordon Anld mnyad f. M~AILTON *y,- . (3S).^ \.*:. '
-

*mentions that be 1l

of the Ostec

the wIay

O3N N
1

our Men treat'. leiSo wished^:i to procure a directory of ori-. alumni so dma.be might betatb to locate one wIsnxwr her mightl : ^e. b:"O* :happen to t ,'

lP^n clbsures

,***.'

-This' is- eneouragtng to us e~i;d
aim t it is our paoott to "the pyrofesion tim v:er equipped pbysieiam pYN :

^ J^ruiei^v :^aiJt& Dr R.B.Qe

N i interest. Its

articles On the rtif

'O'0ur. records show a- deeidediii-,,
i ;cresseo a ;both our, OCstetric lali

grow fonder fellow). I .;
iy..,etng .. w )y itself,- that" time. Dr IR. iend :'of Athle

:'tWe. ,a in re ceipt. '.of !ltter a fvo . : C. SSt..' Louis, 929 MariE. -etta 'St;,' ;Lc,! .Angeles, Californma, in - which h: states that he .e-:' ipects to ;atxlnd: the: OsAtepbpthic
Phvysicians and Su rgeons 'College in '.aliforn.,.a the comi ng year. :i:'i-t:.-:St.v: Louis. attended'!: Still lasit yeai and wc found him to be a, ypung man of exceptional abil-

.

t is we .i:.in, the College. All he needs asking and we have one, -r or; : tiree of his automobiles our toot-ball and.: basket-badl s. '.We' hope Dr. 'Robert. and Ii Sutton. with their families, .: 'Whaling Big" vacation. a, will a'l 'he awaiting:their fish es when they retu'rn). '
g. :
IWeimors is summering in. .. I

Our foot-ball schedule to- date is as follows: Sept. 29- -Graceland College at Lamoni-(tentaive. Oct..5---Penn 0College,,-.: .. . ,,.: 'at Oskaloosa.::', *:",:
Oct. 13- Buena Vista College '' : at Des Moines.;: -/'' ".' ' Oct-. 18- St. 'Ambrose C:ollege ' at Davenport. Oc-t. 26--Central College at ePeila. Nov. 2-Americar School of Osteopathy at Kirksville. ' -

ity and we are Sorry: to loset him,
In a port;ion of his letter h.e

Private , linics. The:- compis ' eing iadie letteeni May-24, 1,922 and' May 24,j-923,' to pre'sendate. *The:. Obstetrica, : PDep tment shows an- in.reiase .:of'. % and the Private Clinic 118:,'over. thalt of .last; year. '" : ''- ;. ': ' ' '' . We are glad' to note 'this 'in-' crease 'as it; signifiws that .we t awe endeavorin,v to teach atxd praf-. tice real,' true: Osteop.athy 'and that our students are::geting'results.:,'. .',;: .
PR.EPARED.

Nov. ':"0 [oines. -We" are vwondering Nov. -r. it is a, girl. -that is' Lip- - : mt 'here or: if iheis' putti.ng Nov "his;,--treatments ';so ':that' he :Nov.
a'ab

flf ti. ' f-' ha.ve

fr.'

af~'y

-".

..I.t is with- regret that I findit impossible for me to continue my studies at'',D. 'M.) S C. 0.:It :SI is . there tiha,' I nave' mniet thefinest bunchl of studlents: and" teachers, colec'tively, hlat I: haveever -been . 9-Haskall ':Indians ':: ass:ociated d 'i-t is -. lso a at Lawrence, Kansas'.' true that r my observations and x17--Luther College: ' att'es Moines. : ;..--. perience at your school has made of :me a. sincere, constant and a '24-Open. 0; t . ',0 . life-lon.g ' s'ter' for the profes29'-Simpsoi College at .De Moies .'**'nes -; :' sion which I have che.-- ' .. .

-"His dceath' was very, sudden, was itlnot?" we asked.'-:-:-':' :;.0, No!", was -the 'reply. "He- . " -had been , joy riding' or nearly
two: weeks N-4fore t-heo.- acidaent'happened.-- .C(unry:. Getiemman

' , IRM TO)

fFr IkJV I

:-The man or woman wh the "biog head" by' on6e
another-'are only ma'rif'

mills: of ... . ... hi, Ni ed' another :-: victn
-" ·---I-----

.great- .amount
·

- ' 'ux Lof;: -space ,within the bony en
''Mpl'rai··+-j·,·rlryianrPinn;

, L.Lecturer - "Allow ':e, efore "Dr. J.:' P.' .SchwartZi!s'be- :; 'ose,'t'- repeat th-e :words- O"tf i.: eve, the best and most thorough -: ort Webst : :' -Aher, that .AI .have :eer had the :; ayseedH e i --.and leasure of :studying' u'iider, and 'saktes, M '- l,-et's git 'oat ere is; from- tis'.Sur3ceth'.I my 1 He'sa: a-gorn .'t. staar, o n'o the Ilb.oundenl onfidenee' spriigs." dictiOnaryP--P2 % .,eetom. Tiq,'.,

--x;l;dRa··v4diplplSiipu

.M.*u
t^

' f \ - AOU' PANC 44t I j .';'-)-. M.'. .:;:CO. s-e0 ii v
I

J
toclay hbut at

that

v-0'r0 S ca 1Cioue -an( and .if s time caled removd al the specie

a~or^^Mr 'i Ic fl usc-NtshS.1 re. preselt ~day^; law |lip^ adornment .. l o.0pJ1)t~ sh:!o ln:td~y is th};.),^at,aIit:t t-ti d.n ch if any by one1' o::l ' ^*,the;."ge}:^ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~.,Yma.ny kno3 ut Studel 0i 0 fl bh-! u 1 cat, sesn hoticf eva. t ... d' t is 0on cvoalg a -miirs-l Nc verthcless,rey( ce1, The Inog Book" '2 theSt; t'I;{.le~it :sile -cf i;;i ! , e'd ll reept~t a s nl-ufi, ei ienior, are il c'bear *Ui. mateial thi Ie e n eive a l]etter1 f t :f
Wl;r:-.. .'.:noticed IL, -t( -

ame rt-OtIS tec ata'',y6, .Tieyai . not ae,-pa tim te the proC ssion anud will-U be. r-oe' |younger Ostaeopiths,
1

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PUBISJHED SlY-MONTHLY BY' THE•~ L&ES MCfN ES STJJ;L 7OIJYGE OF O8TOPATHVj-----'.* 1 . MC!NE I In r'r tt~r~ i ~ ) . 1eAugust 1st, 1923. V uCCNdE Sr t~~--o ^'''^ "'" ' r' v >:,:~{,,C.[~ lowi,,, ~'Au., iS ^.Nmoci' SH :of Ntber 13 r--~-~ -r~_~ -'ns-', r~. ~ r'r .~'":~,. '~"~. A ~ x .:-~ w'.8Ci~~i)E.DI l,~ ,F, -.......' ....

iLtX , JLA2, It .. U. PiLAt X J. A . MADE By i>;, -L CI>UC, J" II /eld?"mi.. Pr'ofest'sa-r of Gynecoi.oy, D. .2•. S. C. 0, (This schedule complies A vivi. calf or heifer is bound I ng throughout with the requlrement~ down o a movNable tifting table III of the Iowa. aState Osteopatthie (and abdomen i shaved, and i its Laws.) .... n the clea, tender skin 'of the . : -FIRST YB,,AR,. most tender part, a hundred or more cuts or scratches are made. First Semester: : ' Anatomy, Descriptive. ': Into these open wounds is rubbed some "seed virus," obtained di- t1, Cn-emi.stry, Inorganic. ;..-- Histology. rectly or indirectly from humian V '.':..:.;': . : smallpox, and other known or unBiology, . . - .:: Pathology IV, Bactertiology. known human infection .,Second Semester : :. After the calf or heifer has Anatomy, Descriptive. been inoculated, it is taken from .. Physiology .. the staible to a stall, where it is Chemisi i-y, Organic.. - .ieCUrely tied and ca:efully fed I Histology. ' . . : .-.. ;':' ';, for about a week, during which Fxnbryology. t:ime the hundred or more festering wounds are gradually flling SECOND YEAR ' ''t il -]: ip. with ulcerative or suppura*First Semester. . . i.. %i: disa se' male'er This disease. Al .: iv An atomy- Descrip-ie-.:: · .latter con-tains the germs of huPhysiology, II. q.i::.-.'. man smalpox, cowpox or- "vacTheory of Osteopathy. eina" and. many other I known and Pathology I. unknown germs even more danChemistry, Physiological and Toygerous and fatal than ssmallpox. icology. The diseased imatter is sq uee-ed Second Seimester a . nd. scraped out of tihe many Anatomy, Descriptive.. wVounds and- mixed with glycerine Anatonmy. Practical. : in order to dilute it and to kill Pathology II. .many dangerous germs which the Principles of Osteopathy. complex virus is known to co-ntain Physical Diagnosis. to some ef which glycerine, in a I "Embodiment of the finest inAs a teacher Dr. Lola excells. Physiology ill, certain percentage, is fatmi, but flu.ences" is the way her friends She is direct and clear cut in her THIRD YEAR t is not_:. fatal to the germ of sneaks of her. Shle has a pleasing ]statements. Her knowledge of First S&,mester. ,mallpox or vaccina which it is address and personality, kindly. the subject gives force and. em- Anatomy, Regional and Special aimed to preserve in more or less and always courteous, affable and phasis to her lucid explanations. Senses. ' virile condition. The glycerine approachable. Every student is She was s.urgical assistant. for Lynecology. " and .virus mixture pass through her friend and in all her class- four years. This gives her first Pathology V, Laboratory Diagvarious tests to fre e aany work mhe there is clearly manifest the hiand knowledge of the gross/ 'nosis.. ' ' . * : * i .'atal disease germns from the most friendly mutuality. " pathology of the pelvis and faro- Public Health and San mtation,. smallpox germ. which is dangeriliarity with practically every Osteopathic Diagnosis Technique. ous enough in itself. But it is i Dr. Lola graduated from D. M. impossible to guarantee that the S. 0. 0. in 1903 and from the disease of women. Therefore, Pathology IIL. when. she teaches, she speaks with Clinical Demonstrations smallpox virus will be separated .Womans Medical College, Baltiand ' 1 P/ractice. from the many. other dangerous morein 1909. She came directly authority. The high professional standing Secmnd Semester gerns. Heiiee, many dangerous Ifrom Baltimore to Des Moines I. I ,or fatal results 'follow inocula- and has been a teacher in D. M. which Dr, Loea has attained is Obstetrics. I . attested by the almost universal Nervous .Diseases. . tion of vaccine into the body of a S. C. 0. ever since. 1-. iC,, c(onmnmnd o'titrin nf ho-r, ,-r Osteopathic Therapeutics. child or adult. Dr, M." Rosenau, c She began her work in the: obF IEye, Ear.. Nose and Throat. .: one of the best authorities in. the stetrical department, developed the A.lumni o: 'D, M. S. C. 0. Pediatrico ,. co° a'ntry nii vaccine virus, in is it, systemnitied it, and under her an d reetw.- wok kPreent reenttive Medi- supervision it grew in the four Never tell evil of a man; if you I Clinical Demonstrations Practiceo cine and Hygeine, says, "Vac- years from a few sporadic cases do not know it for certain, then I cine virus always contains bac- to 160 cases. Since her resigna- ask yourself, "Why should I tell Ii ::l FOURTHi YEAR ' :::teriaj, There is 'no such thing as tion others have followed up the First SemrestSr i :'a .septic virus, Staphyloecoeic good work until today, of all, this Freedo cossts not in te ab- Surgery I, Principles. . i)::^ streptoeoceic, members of the department is the most efficient, Ereedin' conssists not in' the ab- Nervous and Mental Diseases. ":.'1iehoifrhagi:. septicemic. group, annI nvinh~l.. undrl,',~it~, -nr+o ~,,,o-rl Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat. , (:.: n 'cedon p'.ge 4)' ::.fa. eminient .incumnent. of good ]a'. ~':U.!';'r, page' 4) ': .(,i

d I I .1I I

iii
I

i

i

A..

i

I

toati

practice and from the confidtnce a nd a puncture, she reports a: that fine Osteopathic spirit which manifested in him by his patients very ;pleasant time. She would has won for Drs. Bachman the r ;sMr Scott ^)Wianer of *.Hugo, he is very worthy and deserving havWliked to have brought -back respect and confidence of the al)o.,; -;ad. a *A'tudenti' in- th*e oi their patronage. We wish hi'n a few of Lake Superior's cool people of Des Moines., "wLaufightinr ..College. of- Osteopathy success in his field. .. breezes but they proved too eluat irksville, Mo., was a visitor sive. Dr. J,. W. Abbott expects to loatue: College one day last:week. cate at Princeton, West Virginia, Dr.: A. N. Simpson of Norwalk i.-W enjpoyed quite a visit with him b'rought a patient, July 24, to thef Mr. Swezey, captain of the 1923 about Aug. 15th. The Doctor an--:. :tfound' him to be full of the Taylor Clinic, Des Moines Gen- foolball team is working hard to says that W., 'Va. has just passed d :p:ilOsteopathic spirit. eral Hospital, for diagnosis. Dr. get his work and himself in shape her Osteopathic Laws and that Simpson is a frequent visitor to so that he can produce a winning they are the best that he has no@'))!!::'D^octor; Neva Moss is Ileaving Des Moines. The Doctor preaches, team this .fall. He reports that ticed in any state. Princeton people are fortunate the latter part of this week for practices osteopathy and is super- the prospective material sure intendent of the High School at looks good and that he 'believes' in having Dr.- Abbott locate in :-:-}No'wata, 'OkMa. where she begins . Osteopathic practice with Norwalk, He is a man of wide in- that Dr. S. L. Taylor will have a their city as he is a good physii:her jiUrs Steviek & Stevick. Dr. Moss fluence in his community. We chance to break that old cow-bell. cian. Dr. James lE. uoX, Mount Ayr, :ll::was a;a graduate of last May. "The like to have him. come often. Dr. Cecil Reed, (Shapes) writes reports that business is going |:.it: g ! ::.L3o'Book" extends to her best us that he is taking a much need- good and that he is not growing : ;Wkishe3s:.for a success ful practiqe. There has. never been as many patients registered in -the O. B. ed rest and is having one good as many calouses as he had extime.- He has not located as yet, pected that he would.. This is suMr;i.-:. f'arry Elston, senior stu- Clinic as this summer. Dr. Schae- but- hopes to be in his office by ly a fine report for Dr. Cox has · .:/dent,. is working- hard. this sum- ffer reports eight cases delivered( early f oall. Dr. Reed's clinical been located but a short time. WI : ::::m:iera, both at the .bllege and the last week. What student , can af- work in college was very satis- is surely gratifying to know that : l::i.-Hospital. TUp to the present time ford not to come to Des Moines Ifactory and we feel that his paour Doctors are starting out :;* -he,;-· as given considerable. over for practical work? .i[ h tients will find in him a physician strong and are getting good re-:oini:ne: hundred anesthetics at the of ability. sults. . .. . i:Ta, ylor: Cinic. Mr. .lston- is It is not the things which- we : greatgly interested in the work have done, but the things we have "Why for goodness sakes, look Dr. Irene Bachinan is located ; ni dej- pn:wepredict ,for a man of his left undone, that gives us the bit. in with 3her father, Dr. M. E. who's here! When did you get in -shoWnability--Success,. of heartache at the settiug of the Bachman and -brother, Dr. Robt. anyway, and how: are you?" This sun. Bachman. was the general greeting that was /-Doctor Thomas G. Bu.t,; of AfThe Doctor reports that she is given Gerald Myers, when he untoni-,Iowa, was a visitor at the : Mrs. Katherine Robinson just quite busy, much more i). fact, expectedly stepped into the office DI>es iMoines General/ Hospital on returned a.fter a two weeks mio- than she. had anticipated.L Wednesday morning. Gerald 'is :iJuly 21. He came with a fVor tri-n th l',iio'ugh KNtrotl-h'vi M i n nr.Dr. Irene was an excellent stu- looking fine and seeom as happy tielt. :Doctor Bu .njoys a large sota. Outside of four blow-outs dent In College and manifested e (Continued on .page 4)
-Pa=zz;;. .. . .1""~"~,. I,

ERERIEAND T

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IN DAYS OF YO RE

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Another reminder to those who have finished their work at D. M, S. C, 0, Do you see anyone that reminds you of :you;Se.l f?' days when the It were ahese as exercised. We would apprecia-te ' an aticle for "The Log Book" concerning the days as shown i this pt....re, from ,ny or a.

·

THE LOG BOOK
t"m

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themselves odd jobs snehi a light"I?D T' TVrn? 00fc tug the street lamps, chaifferisg, l l^OP -P. and carrying paper routes. Some play football, some do gym work, TO Ocf somIe sirg in choirs, and some ~"L (,.eYt' Km * t~Yy5 ~i play various musical instrluiiments ' ! 'j for dances and parties. In fact L rien ................... ~ i...SL. ailor 1there, is no limit to the variety of .... .S. President mer opportunity whiel may be offered (r m) -arn,·, Bumine.s i i to ,lA4l:gOr the student body. It-1.C r ........... Des Moines is e.. growing city *h':Rit '&a'"¢ ' of 150,000 population anrd oppor, ~)te4xpa'thy

In

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7

i'ession and get money with which tto erect a new sc.hool building?"

t

r its increase of population want O.ol L youtil(lge to a' tend achi. at D.--. MIif DES MOINES SPtit! Cffllege of Des Moines and you hve noc a Osteopathy has been noted for its dollar in your pocket and you borrow the money to pay your teachers in ostec.pah-c tehn ique. OPPORTUNITY sich tuition, you can make your way. cmn Among these hate bee.an ' By Bearm, Braley. I as Hofsess, Forbes, Spri.g, John- Hundreds have already done so. WiJihI doubt and dismay you are son, Roberts, Ireland, Bachman Why not you? It just takes a smittenl .ud Styles Sorne of thlese men little more energy and' a little You think there's no chance have bekcome so wide!y known to more speed, but that is the kind for you son? I the professiona and their practices of boys and girls Des Moines Why',.tii best books h ave.n't been writt'en, . so arge, that they had to give up Still College is after. I pack up your trunk, load it in their professorship in Technique The best race hasn,'t beena run, Coming h Treat f and hI,ve gone into private prat- your Tin Lizzy and make tracks The best score hasn't teen made r for Des Moines Still College of e. s ,': tice or to other schools o: high yet, ' The corning world's ch.ampion r Osteopathy. position.Jake Brissler, has his own ideas The boest song hase Trained in this school of celeon methods of training., For Ithe I ' i tt :een v.ae'", thme ~-ebe" wasn brities are a few men Who are yet; Football past six months Jake has ; been is y.o.ing ©ad one i D. stiUM -wi'th M. S. CC.-O. taking treatments at Des Moines Cheer up,.or tbot'w ie. in particular, Dr., M. B. Bach- I FROM the prospective names Still College. Brissler recently ci-ance? Why 'the worid-is' man, whose picture appeared on which are coming in, many of the won a match from StanislaOus Zy- No ' . .:;: ' e.st eager the front page of the last issue of new students a-e going to be in- bysko, the mighty Pole, He als For thi.ngs -that you ought -to':' ruThe Log Book." terested in football; From the wrestled Waldeck Zybysko in , .. creatO. 'Wethink the writer of his bie- records some of them are furnish- two-hour mateh without a fall store uotrue wealth is still:.graphical sketch did not exagger- ing us it would seem that Coach Brissler is especially enthusiastic r "-::1 . ., uu er,:ii . c mei agO Doctor Bachman has very Sutton is going to have his hands I ahn.uit tahintM treatmnents on the ate. it.;s -i':e:.s,%: iintcesy4.:.' ~,lu gSo.~,~ thoroughly learned his subject full to decide whose who. That afternoon before an evening .ai more piowr a' d nO' is .and master of Techniique. His means that we are going to have [matcrh-he says there's nothing It yearis bea uty, strength is not in theory but in a football team second to none like it a:s a final w-ind-up to hiLs -. ,,in.r l aughter and love and the pra tical application of the this fall. Sport critics predict training. -. ' . . romane., I principles of osteopathy. - I am It seemis Ith-at there have beent ithat B issler. wilt hold the heavy-1 orec loyalty l-abor a.nd duty. sure tIhe professors and students no games scheduled with the Des Iweight wrestling crown within No chance -why there's nothing:' will be happy to learn that Doctor Moines University, "our sworn. the niext year Brissler's fine 3 but cbhance! Bachman is to be- head of this de- enemy." Why not? It has been conditiln and s+renth is due in fpa.:tment for the coming year. 'suggested that they are afraid. no smnall m.etast're to the Osteo- For the best verse hasn't been They mnay have 1heard a tinkling pathic -teatmearts taken at the rhymed yet, of that ruined cowbell that we Des Moines Still. College of Osteo- The best house hasn't been bi~eiu inolop -n..ent ^^^ ^^ heard so mitch about. Oh! how we pathy. . planned, The h ighest peak hasn tcbeen uestion is often asked in wish we could have a game with IT climbed yet, "What would jou do if I were prospective letters: "Can a stu- Coach Bell. Oh! ye student body . employment snffi cultivate a sofer voice. And tell to -turn you down?" Margaret The mightiest rivers aren't dent e:ecure spa nned. asked shyly, as they sat on the to quit his rassing. iert to defray his cucrent ex-. Schaeffer parlor' sofa. Don't worry and f)ct, faint" . penses while in school at Des · : : hearted, Meyer lI.oki ed straight ahead, New St ents We invaribly answer M.oines? but said nothing. After a few The chances nlavr, j st. begun, not to seyes. The difficulty is 0ro- moments of silence she nudged For the Bies-t os _l. -s" been ONE thousand, or more cure enough places for the stustartedhilfii and aid, "Didn't you hear dents to weotk, but to secureI pective names to dra-w from. ? The Best work hasn't beei... done! That is the list of prospective my qu.est.ion?" enough studCtrts to fill the places preMeyeor looked around . names Des Moines SiiI 'Co[.ege open or employment. Circus Proprietor -- Yes, we thou ght you were "I1~ have been has at the present- time. " Many hensivei-. 'Some of the te-achers have ' o ' o A b e M-t 5 t,~ad l IE2otl:.ea witha'therscho want a lady who can handle wildhe school for ae expressedu their decision 'to addressing the gasY Exchange. animals. H'ave you had. any: exc.nncted wit eighteen earis and they tell us come to Des Moines Still College . A schoolgirl was required to perience. 1 -that during alld that period there this fall. Applicant---- he'- been salesis write 200 words about a motor woman at bargasin counters for .:AlXumni and friends, here been a tine when stuhas never submitted the .following: dents could not find employment your opportunity to put your car. She iuncle bought a motor car. years. - I"My down town. N ot only that, but Alma Mater over this year. D0 riding in the country l a the business men hve learnedof you know that we 'had 'war and He was out Old Lady (to nevwsboy)-Yo. going up a hill. the high quality and efficiency of that -that war almost impoverished- when it busted you, little D. M,. our osteopathic schools? Do you I The other 180 words are what my don't chew tobacco, do the worok of the students of . U *uncle said when he was 'walkingbey? S. C. 0. and each fall they make-{know that we depend upon tulTewsie-No, mium; but I dn for tie naintinance of thc aback to town, but I know you requests for students iastoreslitions you know thiat, it i- >wouldn't want nme to repeat give yer a ciagret if Vou\ want restauirants, siops, banks, .chur- schools? ho I one. impossible to get out into the pro them."-Boston Transcript. ches etc.: tudents also find for.

Osteopathick Te .il

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coa mensurate- with

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There is. only one avenue -by which your schools can be perI petuated. Fill them to the doors wvith new studerrts. IlThere is no bsetter way for the profession to ] 1. show leir loyaty than by sendI^ ing on a dozen or more students I each year. We believe that if your attention is only called to it I and you get your minds centered i it, in a short time you will be on co-opera ing with us in every way ¢possible to secure at least a part of these prospects for Des Moines Still College. The medium for this article is the student paper, "The Log Book", which is- proving itself to be a big itemiin the profession. Won't you see to it that another student is added to Des Moines; Still Coilege this fall?

II?

Notwithstanding the3 itct that ye .are not going io get our new.

txilding this fall, every 'ody'-: : * "S' ;etting so happy around '. .9 . 0. this summer over the pros-': I ects ifor the f all class that: evern I.ngus, the janitor; strikes up.' a t.une-and say, that is a good oned.^ IYon never heard Angus sing? IRosemary says she has heard him ttry and she has not been able -to owhatn it is as yet. There. letermine iis work to be done. Who will offer i I nraseif as sacrifice?

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6wed by our food and drink, i. itChroghh. tl..he mouth, throat, t or: esophagus and somach, the small bowel or intestine, 4mn glands of which become :plaue of abode of typhoid i ':"-'l~tshould,: however, be 'heri|] explained 'that typhoid ns'.living and multiplying in e glands,;as well as their ex· ory. products are, during the :seI of the disease and con;sence, carried in the blood .".lymph to various parts of. for first consideratidn' and.. its body, in addition to being shed discussion. will constitute the refrom the -body through` the mainder of this contribution. The siaia.d.. urine. , . . coinsiddration of food and water ')?Withthis clear understanding as a me:ans of transmission and :Ilth!t t~yphoid germs come, in the the' important role played by the taanal.ysis, only in stols an .phoid carrier, will follow in n !i'/rine from persons suffering subsequent articles. or":cj:t valeescing f"rom typhoid fever:or from typhoid carriers, End of the Rainbow ir:'d'that in order to. produce ty:pfhoiid'l 'f:er in another person Trail . th.i]ese typhoid germs must reach Cupid cut another notch on his the iteus'.ne' t'irough the. gateway trusty how when that t"Don ½: of .t.. body, the mouth, we are Juan' of the "Sheiks,". Walter trepared to begin a detailed c.on- McWilliams, finally bowed his ide rati Aon of the various ways haughty blonde head before the and_ /[mea ns whe reby huiman filth, marriage altar. iadened- wiih typhoid germs, mayV The Sheb's of his hunting ;.be/ c'arried or transported from grounds, extending fromr Columtjhe(tfyphoid sick, convalescent, or bus Junction to Valley Junction, ri" to healthypersons. er" was struck a tserrible blow by that events *: ' . Ira all seriousness, however, we extend to Mac and his lovely bride (Miss Doris Clements) our hearty congratulations.

This little Log Book goes out to every student of D. M. S. C. 0.. If 'i doesn't, we want to know. At the last assembly, something was said about writing back to the old school and telling us what is happening during the sumnmer. A few who have responded to the call of the wild have written I. letters telling us what they are doing. Many are silen "Are they at. dead," is the qumery ar ound the halls of the school. We do not think they are dead but weary on lonely~ We that. to hear h an their long trek.fes expect smthey, from those whor hav not entered the elysian fields of ressurection as yet. Doctor Camp bell is busy, but lonely and he feels that something can be done to add good cheer. We know you are having a good time this summer and that your hearts are longing to return. A b-right cheerful letter will help i
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HOW VACCINE ISn MADE

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Continued from page 1) .:"' and, in ;'e *;.calf or : hifrUS *'t.:"'r'*.^ ^hm', t a few instances,: tetanus spores and gas- bacilli avo 'been I found in vac cine vieus.' a n i I have briefly de 'Cribed how the vaccine is made. But I have said nothing anbout the suffering which the calf or heifer must e-

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r knows LIcaused
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dure., I

believe most

everyone

the great suffering' oen
to a child : with a single

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sore on its arnm, leg, or any other part of its body, and any one can imagine how well pleased an antnma. ulceranimen or .morewould be with a hhundrded ofr suppurlat'i .
wounds and saturated with the

septic poison which cannot-help kIbut be in the animal's sys:te r i Ii If it is nece SFiary for an indi

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vidual to be vaccinated for small-

or IIpox the any othler disease, ing. pus from. a wound human or

tak of a

animal, then, whatc in

nsideration of the more immeate to the more remote and less .parent ways and mJeans of carg or ansfer of typhoid :VMs .from. the infected per.son :phoid acase, convalesce o Ot c wrongn I. dde.. prier) .to a ,eatl.thy norma,, pera or :peisons Contact tra°·saon," therefore. presents itself .oA hoe:'gt oe; med for/bei.ng a~ },og~{, to m~m''ougiht,, but a, bla

We were pleased to receive a I |the name of common sense s the 'ined being page 1) or [letter from Dr. Wilbur G:egg i use of having ccnt fxo taught Ito stating that he had passed the I have pure bloodf in our body. Ohio board successfully and was opening up an office in Oberlin, SCHEDULE Ohio, Continued from page 1) The Doctor says, "If you know Obstetrics. your oats, you need not fear the Osteopathic Therapeutics. Ohio Statot oard. Prospective en- Dietetics. i Clinical Demonstrations ai d Practice. : . ' : ' ; Intuition: The mysterious inSecond Sernestiar stinct that tells a wvoman she is .i Surgery, Operative,. alwVays right. ' : ' :Nervous and Mental Diseases... i Urology and -Pro'io'y-'" ':'.':..' a There ar'e two Sides 'to- everv :. ,; Medical Juogy.pru Medical JurLsp'u (' qiuestion - your side and.' thei

X.-Ray

Dertatology. and El,..(txi¢V i.c'a

Diag>. o

Osteopathic :hap cs O-s~~~~~~~~~~~ +';..., ....... _ |Clir.icai 'emon.......n. 'C:'o :· :*..^ :: :::' : ... ; '·PFractice.

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PUBLISHED SEMIL.O.T\I}LY BY THE D ' .. ; ....
.,,

MOINES STILL COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATH

-_IEJDT·lm\(mraa·rasarcrorr!

August: 1Sth,I 1923.

"Letter from Dr. E. G.

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Numfber ... 14.

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SCHEDULE
(This schedule c o n p i es. throughout with the qirequirements of the Iowa State. (steopathic Laws.) .. FIRST YEAR ' First Semester. ' Anatomy, DescriptiChemistry, Inorganic.
Histology. -

· r R. ROBERT BACHMAN
Professor of Obstetrics, D. M. S. C. 0.

. A.ug' :i, 1923. 2'£ Lg: Dear Mr\ "' (Unconvc~tiozatiit may soun.d, as

.[ lerzog, Doc of Rg'gen.e -C.aL. it is ,steopathy, ha;' the .itch. important and -I aoste o oex flin, that this itch is not of the everyday, seven-year va.Lommon, 'ietiy, but a high.-clas ithel--an most .ncontHall.e, tisistent det
:tire that breaks out all over; the

'

Biology. Pathology IV, Bacteriotelv Second Semester Anatomy, Descriptiva., Physiology I.
Chemistry, Organic.

itch' to ."bust out in print." This
-'ncJinatidn is not entirely un-

... fixed with a sense of duty which prompts me to be trae to the rornise "to submit a. slhare of my doings and misdoings since that memorable. evening when we tripped up to the'rostrum and borse off in triumph, that longt lcokedfr .. piece of "sheep." .hbere wil' ba no 'pretense at but language," . slinging the
.- e'o-v:.as a. _b: ie:C !:larce At m the

Histology. ' Embryology, SECOND YEAR

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;;certesiand incidents which i feel would be of inte:est to your :.eaders. true tihat environIt must be ment molds the thoughtts of man, for no sooner Were Still and Des Moines out o.f sight when that
'.~A-If e.vnivoi "'dcm fx iadnitv"

.'i;rst Semester Anatomy, Descriptive. ' Physiology, IL. . Theory of Osteopathy Pathalogby I. Chemistry,"Physiological and:'-T: icology. 'Second .Seemester Anatomy, Descriptive, Anatomy, Practical. Pathology II. Dr. Robert Bachiman Principles of Ostopathy. Physical Diagnosis. ,Some men are an asset to an Physiology IIo . institution. Thi& is especially so in the person '6f Dr. Robert Bach- THIRD YEAR man. He is young, agile, and in First Semester tellectual, quick to see a point and Anatomy, Regional and 'SpeciA with a firm grasp he comprehends Senses. . , .:.: his subject. Gynecology. The department of Obstetrics Pathology YV, Laboratory Diag, has-4-had no more eminent occu. ''.'-: :: . nosE,. , pant. He has probably dcelivered Putblic Health a nd-Sanitation. more babies than any other living Osteopathic Diag :Techiqe rosis osteopathl and enjoys the further Pathology II. ' distinction of being at the head of Clinical Deinonstrations a< the .a.r5gesi oustetrical osteopatlnic Practice. clinic In America,. Second Semester Dr. Rk btrt, as he ii' familiarly called, is a graduate 'of D. M. S. Obstetrics. 0. C0., and has taught in his Anlma Nervous Diseases. Mater for several years. He is a Osteopathic Therapeutics . good teacher, knows his subject Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat. thoroughly and is one of Vhe most Pediatries.' Demonstrations a rn ( ,popular professors in the-insti- Clinical tution. His coursCs in obstetrics are bei::g soug'ht especi ally by FOURI-IJRli\2 tiose "who. eonte-mplate practicing
ilT .. - -'l

Secn. .Seester d

"do. a fellow honor," as the home town paper put it. Anyway I spoke ,my pi.ece and got it 'off wihtout a whimpe, The knot was tied and the page was on ,a new chapter of my existenceOn the eveninrg of the same day 'we shoved off for Portage, WislonsinI The famous Dells of the thoughts were direc'tead to a more Wisconsin are near at hand, at 'erious propositio:t.: the problemn Kilbouorne, sand we spent- .some hhere viewing the wonders of my timo, getting some ob to le tBooks have "roubles, While :is .statement is tAod and NatuJre. for the "problem seen written on this beauty spot ' bit inaccurate »w /l T ..- iti- s!t -tint '-Iwrri -i o f rm rn tys-. 6f getting" had been settled by the time tould add anythin':g to the many iw~eet 'woman's "yes" somne efore, there were still 'serious fine descriptions of the grandeur this resort. problems to face$ aid. troubles to And 'mav:nificence ef Given an opportunity I would l overcome.. III ..... ., It happened on the .19th of-' strongly urge any au ct ai. o you rimine, and I feel that I "Gotaway who have not seen this spot toin?,g.". rhosiw, of you who have had elude the "Dells of the. Wisconnthe experience know how it is, sin" in your outing program lIt that: dignifie'd' ma.rch. up the con- i' well worth your time. At Portage "metup" with c-i er aisle., with Ma and 'a and Ju.,t as we were everybody looking on. A fellow of our ame, which had q.uite overwhelmed me ince graduation, became a thing af air, just naturally "oozed" (away. No one. took the pains to pemind me that I was a "Doctor" and I quite forgot for the time bhat all the worries of the Osteo Oathic World" were resting on my Instead my iarrow should.ers.

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haeiods- and feet he has u ntil- he "'Eh,.Buck!" and O'Keefe cae | e I htmself on. "dress parade" running up and slippd m tes-' Dei Mom StIl ,(oll i of .finds_ :oy to ti'..:3 :oo ' s':d Pa,-ish .:i::{ c', ::with :a'.arge nuun.ber of adnmiring glad than' :H .:.i.; 'o:e 'c i.r i 4) ,.e CntiV rent tO':. iris :.:,la'-iv.s'

'::ver

realizes now.

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thoru y and if there; ar< mado fresh e o and& ow dLike That o lumps of fecal matter they'shoud s noold be used in an' amont e' be bmoken up because' disinfect equal to the amount of excreta to 'e ants cannot kil gerp's inies s be disinfected. Stir--tfihoroughly Mohe," said a, 'COlle college st- .said 7 WS~ T'yphoid -fever is communicable I:1 brought in actul: contact with before using as the 7lime .' '~.,': set- d .'l~"MthoL~er, had brought will wh his chum -~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~,, -_ t' i,,t h'-rUqbtyis A or transmissible from the sick me them, Cover the vessel containinp tie to the bottom. i " '.:.' ,3 ,T' "-- ^ * :'-r home e for j the"hol'"-ys, ',"'"u' ns The disease i botJ 1. the excretae and disin fectant 'so.. healthy,, t...im.e.. (Continued Next Issue)l . /-:-y -. -.. .v(;-'opr 11D,tot .pi..t'Oh:,,(. . . f ... e, X~t.'!~[ , Mr. contagious." ,lution and let 4t stand for ahonI . :""infecto n.E and ecknoodle." . ;.'1-",L , · :e'y. :e--';rson who' h as typho-id I- one hour before emptying. Th- I Somebody wants ~.. know why p8 to ecekucodle." / -, , r, ".,, ItHis mother, who was a hlcte I f;i'; lis r centy swallowed some II disinfected excreta should be emp- Noah ook those-.first two, .flivvcrs hro ever h g. l h hard of hearing, placed' her hand typhoid germs which have come tied into a water closet or t h into the aP,7 with him. -toher ear n g; some way from sonme otlher n-er- sanitary privy or else into a hol( "I'm sorry, George, but didno't The:.-he germs (the infection) in the ground at least 2 feet deep sonKeeping late hours is said to e quite{::~tatch you friend's noIe. t 1 quite your f riend'sx'o:e r : '::'typhoid- fve" le av hie body f .. protected against invasion by ani- bad for Ii one, but it is fine for You'l. have to speak a little loud: p._.:Per"-sick with the.disease, i mals or insects amnd ;-emote fromi two. er, I:rn afraid." ? ".- stoole and urine and occasion- wells, springs or other source of ::-:the ; - "I say, Mother," shouted ally in sputsm and vomit. -A num- water suppli . If deposited in the We hope to meet you at ID,M, George, "I want to present my :ero b::: of these gernes may be con- II ground, the exereta should be h friend, Mr. Specknoodle." -l aned in a particle of feces or in kept thoroughly covered with S. . 0:., Septembber 10th. "i'm sorry, George, but Mr. *a.. droplet of urine too 'small to be earth. After being emnptied, the Th ink when our one -soul un- What wCas the nanme again?" seen by the unaided humah eye. bedpan should be thoroughly rinsGeog Specknoodle!" "Mr ,Fhingers soiled 'in tthme slightest ed inside and out with the disin- derstands the great world which lwith. any of these excretions from fectant. One of the best disin- makes all things new. WhNen the fairly yelled. up, and ~earthbreaks heaven cx~ The old lady shook her head .. ai- : typhoid fever patient, and Rmes feetants for the stools and urine change sadly. How will the .pands. V''which-I'ave had access to such ex- is chloride of lime solution made m sorry, George, but m ::::c:: reta: 'nmay carry typhoid gerrams by adding one-half pound of good strike me and you, in the house It sounds ::directly 'to human mouths or to chloride of lime to 2 gallons of not made'-with.. hands.-Browning afraid it's no use. made with hands.--Browning _.justlike Specknoodle to me." b!:: Vereages and food whicls are sub- water. A fresh solution should be ,?:.::/seqnenmtly to be swallowed by per- made up every day, or if a supWe teach, preach and practice -of a Suitor eGetting Rid -of:aSio excreta from typhoid fe- ply for. several days i]s prepared the A., 'o Still -osteopathy. -: -( sons,- If ver:patients are carelessly dis- at one time the solu tion should be Hint to Girls:--If you get tired. :i-sedi of, they_may be carried by kept in a practically air-tight TIlE A IWFUL TMIfTII of having him around, thle most '?!: see-:page or drainage, on the feet vessel. -An ample quantity of the I ~-._.- ~ effective way to mend matters is '?(:.:::- of: animals and insects,, such as disinfectant colution should be "You look fed up, old man." to marry hix -.. lLnr him.-Balihmore Sun. '-"|?.;<'flies, and. in other ways to water kept in the patient's room, conto "Yes, I've had a tiring day. i:(::S.upplies and an-d to certain fru its venient for use at all times. Cari Eddie Pice, who is-qnite popa?.:-vegetables. Infection in water bolic acid. (1 part to 19 parts wa- Ta't little beast of an office boy d of niy Ybe seco indarily t-anstted ter) or formalin (1 pa,rt: to 9 4 mine came to me -with the old ular in the sport world as the :to "milk, oysters, and other foods. parts water) are thoroughly effi- gag about getting off. for his "Featherweight" boxer, also a go 1. ::.:in these various ways"the infec- cient disinfectants for stools and .1randmother's funeral, so just to student at D, M. S.C. 0., has re-' teach his a lesson I said I would turned here ready for another ?filloni proceeding from tle: dis- urine but much more expensive I accompany him.' - year of school after a:delightful Ithan chloride of lime. If carbolic I ch:':':?'arges of the typhoidt fever pa- I acid or formar! in solutions a'e "Ah, not so bad; wcas it a good vacation. :i::tient :may' be distributed far and II -used, hevy should be applied in game?" .il: :wide. I n I-h~ ,Ar . rIl inil n rn , *( ii -j-Lck Exactness in little thig. is a ::>":?~-~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~-.':: _U: LiL l. nb ' ~A.'0,.-O/ `;F ' ':. "' H·'No toD-'*ef Mt - Disinfe-, ' 11$$,SUI,, 1, "No, it was his grandmother's saae way as described abouve for I winderful source of cheerfulfuneeral"--The Passing Show. :;Dis, fect the stools and urine -hlrde of e solution, Oy ,. , W. Faebr. 'ness.--F. _.„„_ __~___ :-(and e.pee-or.tion or vomit if disinfectants of throughly recog'.. .... lb :h'e irmhedlatelvud upon nized fficiency shQuld be used. I Become ani employer and not[! To smile at the jest which 'th::/ere baiy) any:,.) imf-ediately Berome an empiplyye. and not their escape from the body. Keep Many of the patented prepara- leI mi employee. ~~plants a thorn in another's breanst c:.oniOstantly in the bedpan or other tior s advrtised as "disinfectants" '' to'tec)ome a principal i'rn the :vessel · used -'- J' receive 'the dis- or ,e.micide.. .hve ~ ±ittle oL110n to hae little o. no :-.~ · ~ · '~ ~ ~or -,l_.C~f mischief . -Sheridan. The Reason ;charges a small quantity of the. germ destroyi: g property. If good ilsiufectanut solution. As soon as chemical disinfectants are not im"I simply cannot stand the c' U S'. :?th'e stooli or .urine are · eceived mediately available. the stools and 1-1 r 1%. sound of a7 motor horn," said c i^n yessel add a quantity (1-2 uhine may be disinfected with: .1-1 the s~~mithy.~ ~Continued from page 1) ,:pints) of the disinfectant solu- boiling water as follows: j ::.ed an acquaint- Ose I "Why not?" I · tion eCual in volume of about Obstetrics. . a,lice into the vessel containing Osteopathic Therapeutics. goub-le thtof the exereta eourbe b of of the excretat^ to. "Some time ago my chauffeur -T% -e t the exreta an ample quaniity (a -soiled -:::disinfected. Wipe the £; ['et t;il3'_-; ;tole my car and eloped with mny Cliial Demonstations an d ^arts oe the patient first with dry on art or a half gallon, or at least wife, a. every time I hear a ~~~~~Practice. nd ractice S y -aper and then with paper or a threeor four times as much as sorn toot I think he's bringing S , ted";·. este Senlester Cloth. moistened with a solution the volume of stols and urine to Surgery, Operative. actually, boiling 1/er back." ?;-;mad: ti: aldi g I pars of thedis- be disinfected) of ::*infectaot solution for 'ase in the (and bubbling) water. After the .........~Nervous and. MentaltDiseases. Doctors! Malfke one more "effort Urology alnci Proctology. Bedpan two parts of wxater. If boiling water is added, mix well be to cloths arei. used, the-y sbhould be by stirring and cover the vessel b- send mi.s,ne or more new stu- Medical J'-risprudence. let stand for one-half hour lents. Iep the mundecided'. to Derm tology -:either -bursed or thrown into a X X-Ray and E;lectrical Diagnosis. Excreta may lecide. contabinig the full streng'th before emptying. vi':e-cls "- ~-----~--~- Osteopathi The rapeutics. ' disinfec'ta et solution 'and after- also be, disinfected by milk of ~1 When a man is in earnest and Clinical nemontrations a .n ' . .wards boiled in the solution. The lime madeas follows: Practice. paper which has been used for To one quart of fresh unslaked Imows what he is about, his work ' .wip.ing shouled bi submerge, in me, add 3-4 of a quart of water is halfd one.- George Eliot. v ,_.. _____ . *'Our Obste'trical and- VeneraI the: .'.e ' :i;'nfectan:t Ldtio. in 'the and allow to slake then add four Cliqie are the largest of.any Osbedpan. The disinfectant solution quarts of water and mix thorWe have parimg reservat steath le le a Irer four oYeAe on y'e-a, -&'i'd 'ihe excreta should be' mixed oughly. 'Tits mixture should be ! hiere for you, for reason. 'Wl.yiv -

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of the state to take advantage of Dr Laura M. Dysart caled at careful and thorough surgical the Des Moines Still: Coll0ege on .The.Official Publication of Dr. John;' H; Styles, Jr., forH DES M.QINES STILL COLLEGE work at a minimunm/expenditure. August 15. The Doctor wil enter merly professor of Osteopathic the practict"again this fall in rechnic, DES MOINESO StIil OSTEOPOTHY. Thne little -ketch on Dr. R. B. Knoxvlle, Tennessee, where they DOLLEGE .O "OSTEO5PATHY, President -S.-.... . L.. Taylor Baehman. Obstetrician of DES have made their home for six: came throughou'rC Icity. Augus . . . . . :' 4th on, his way back to R,-ansas, Business Manager..-M. D. Cramer MOINES STILL COLLEGE OF years. City from the South Dakta ConOSTEOPATIHY, which appears in Editor-.....:...-.....--C. L. Ballinger lohe.rt Murphy, of Marietta, vention. The Doctor showed us a this issue of 'the Log Book' is a Huron Osteopathy Without Limitation, splendid word picture of the ·Ohi.o, returned her one day last little clipping from the I--·Y-·-P-rau*------·ll--rrl-·r s,LI sy man. D. Mi. S. C. 0. is proud of week and brought a new student local paper which certaiinly thus Itim for his skill, his knowledge with him. Mr. Murphy is an ex- very creditable.,\ The *ariblf Alumni and his int erest in his depart- cellent football player and when referred to relatedIto the story Murph gets the ball in his hands of. the almost *'vmiraculots cure We have just four weeks more mient. His work is a big factor sometihing has got to bend, split or which Dr.V 'Styles.: effected| in`th before, the opening of the fall in. keeping up the clinical inter- brak if he is stopped.. His work clilic at the cOnvention. ItwSas est of the institution. The proterm, September 12th. That this summer hardened himuntil a remarkable piece of. work, a ' means four -weeks of opportunity -[fession would do well to point to every muscle in his body is like a the medical inen had been wol-It Dr. Bachman and his wondeful for each alumnus to do something work as an example to young men rope of steel so that we feel con- ing on this case for years withfor his Alma Mater. fident that when he receives the It may seem to you at times and women contemplating tihe ball in this season's games that it out any results. Dr. Styles gave relief by osteopathic manpula-p course in obstetrics. This is one that there is undue -~,rta around of the strongest departments of will take half the opponents' tion ahUd the boy walked out ^o6f lthe old school and that you do not team to stop him. the 'roo to the delight of every lear from it as .oft'en as. you the institution and to those prosone present. pective students who have an innmight. But, take it for granted, The coach is anxious that all see th We are always glad to s that those at the helm are doing terest in obstetrics it makes a men who contemplate playing happy face4 of Dr. Sty es HJ e strong appeal for DES MOINES 'everythingthey can to make your jabusy maniii hi STILL COLLEGE OF OSTEOP- football this fall, be on hand the tells us he is school live and prosper. -We are 1Oth of next month-so that pracnot saying this to scold you or to ATHY. No student who takes this tice work can start as soon: as new location. We are sure that .irritate you, but to stimulate you course may need to feel his defi- possible. Due to the fact that he will succeed at' anything lie undertakes. The -best wishes of ciencies in the practical work. to .more active cooperation. Many ef the students deliver. as our first game" is called for Sep- the old school and all of hiis man D. iDM. C. 0., without a doubt S. temnber 29th, every man .must be friends go with him.- Comeof ! has as good a faculty as any other many as twenty and twenty-five be on his toes and working hard to cases. Out of this number they i.mstitution of its .kind and there get in shape for the -opening Another Name foriThe -- -not a shadow of a doubt that usually have some of the obstetri- game. - .it-has he best and largest cli- cal complications--the practical The coach has just returned Mr. Glass, as officer of tihe day .:ics-in the last year there were expe'irifene thus resulting is in- from his month's vacation and. is during the World, War, was mak!::200 -obstetricai dases, 300 gyneco- valuable to'the practitioner. We are delighted to endorse already working hard on new ing ,a tonm of inspection of some 1ogical cases, 2500 oseopathic plays, plans, etc., to make for D. trenches' the Boehe troops had 1 every word the biographical writcases and o00 surgical cases. In M. S. C. 0. a winning football only just vacated. this. you, as a member of the por-- er has said about Dr. Bachman team. "I was surprised tofindthi |;-.'-:fession and particularly as an and DDES MOINES STILL COLcolored American soldier`alne ^i'alumiInus, ought to take due pride LEGE OF 'OSTEOPATHY. D. 'iM. Co 0. Opens in one of the trenches e-ngrosdS. ! .)arid, "doubtless you do. in, scratching himself most vig^I' .;"It. is with this knowledge that Letter From "01' Buck O D. M. S. C. OPENS SEPTEM- ously. " we expect you to work a little BER 10, 1923, FOR: TlHE BE'What's the maftterdugh-boy "'harder for- another new student In a letter from Dr. E. C:. GINNING. OF THE. FALL cooties?' I asked. j thlts -fall. Is. it not possible for He rzog (Buck) he "announces TE R M MATRICULATION "'No, Sah, Ah ain't got no cooV:.you secuse one mo!e .prospect- that 1he is openitg his off.ce at to .DATE, ARE THE 10TH AND ties,' he repied. 'Dem,: :-th"ings "ic:-e name for our' list? We now Brainerd, Mmin., on the 20thU: of I1TH W-ITH REGULAR CLASSwhat I'se got-'Icalls worse'n coo'nve 1000 of our roster. ' We have August,. His letter is as follows: ES ON T -E2TH. WILL YOU ties.' ' numbier. ,aady reg- 11'h.','.. "e. ,_rVgest i. .,-:.. '.,1 ' ~. 3E: IIERE?"'Whatfcould worseKtan In this e tim ithhistor :stirevdetat I received '"Thne Log -Book" .)tocooties?' I asked. - ,;the iastitu tion. From indica- day. - It sure is a trat. t: read If a man can write a better "'Dem ttings' hat I. got0- freshmen. every ine. Soon as C, _{ioens,- we, expeect get going book, preach a better sermon, 0or Ydem, ; Won't you help. us .put it over?' , I'll start working on the natives make a better m-ouse trap, tian math'matica ibugs, I calls
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'" Who barv lost the ra.ce; J * .*;'*. '*i j' .-. ,.-.' ' ::"~:;^' L^..^-L.::^T- ;;'--~...'-^': -4 .':: For th e pi would -be imperfect Still A.waits a.- Cammant? - On. 'Tuesda:y, August t, 47, U ne'ss i.t h s;ome sphere · :Gladys-"I: lice' declares that The IHusband-I-" .Look here, my kugus : ', 67, an, 'aturday, Thfi"',, ?.).'i the t1oil a-.m':tale.t l for. she never had a proposal, yet she ' UiUesday, August. 1-th, 81, patients 'iear, won't you want to take somne 'A...a " 'tha are .asted. here -' '.assed.' throagh -the 'surgical de, ilero.n ii. you to :pass away the sas that her Race is linerfortune." - .Ella Wheeler Wilcox,. ""'i". ':' '' -. :. .. time?, ',, ~ ~ '.::' par.t ent .::, ^inieT~~ D. orothy'-- racious .It mustbe: .one' of" those, u<nclaimiedl fortunes.; 't.h re S:e:it.ion: of * the: .Taylor ~The Wife-" No darling--you'l F.our yea.r atI, i S, C. , , that. we read' abcbut?-Londond r.it-: 'and sr' be se ndi.n g me some letters, Won't 'will"fit you to enter tire S'-. ':i: tnji'..6:- :spread, far has: hie Bits. ' .. . .: room with ,confidense, :.Clinic-day :you?"--Sketch.. .'.'. ,'|a.'ris maEifetedr every

. 'The Tayloe Clinic is a busy ': lace on Tuesdays, Thursdays and ::;atmurd ays 'of each week. During .wtere 72 Oith' the ore of'J uly the , :incre patients passed through the cl.einic than durinag the 'month of

and see if I c an't send a couple siudents down there,. . Eske and. I.ed are also:figuring on c.oming 'i here now, I believe. Regards Io Roseroary and Mrs. Robiuson and any of tmhe old ' ' . gang. .* .. ' ' " !'BUCK," 13 B ansford Annex.

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his neighbor, thoutgh he builds his .are they. like?'" house in the woods, the world will 'Dry ama lak,' - the; ;^n:a3gr&.: remake 'ax beaten path tolis 'door.- plied, -sit scratching. withall hi Emerson. - . might. Well, bossauniatlimat eal bug im : 'bug w hatis
And I know that the solar system from "' *happints ust somewhere keep in spac 'tentio,, adds 'to y' A prize- fo th.at spent rinniier ... niultiplies -like--ded di vidr-s yo' niiser an l

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L e:-i from Dr. E. G. were t'wo eight pound pike -: As you there. You aie gad -to' be tter for myself, I never saw such par- alive, The mining country is dif. ~Herzog ticular -!fish. I cannot say with lferent. It depresses. But ponly the Hon. Andy Gulmp that "every for a short time ,as there are ;.Siii? Continue^ d from page, 1) : time I threw in my line some many things of interest to see. ti'ed on locating in Milwaukee. pickerelrs wife became a widow." Hibbing itself is: the most mod'iamof opinion that he has a Be that as it may, I won "booby" ern and up-to-date city on the the st:adygirl in those parts for I honors at the walk. : globe, I believe. Things are done c see' no other reason why a ::an Our next stop was at Lake Itas- on a munificent scale as becoming n-fedi -Iowan would go into ca Park and Game Reserve. Most the richest village of the world. e. like of the elk and deer that are shot For Hibbing is in reality a vili-s-.consin. Just the same ifstate:. and find there are a annually in our northern woods lage, incorporated undeir the laws .itlargnutaber o:f very good open- are raised here. We had the that govern villages, although it :ings for the profession. pleasure of seeing many of them has the population and all the Shortly after the Wisconsin trip running wild. Those of you who ear marks of a coming metropolis. -we ;equipped our "coupe"-it's a remember some of your geog- We spent several days here, visfHery -with a camping outfit raphy will recall that Lake Itasca iting places of interest, among -?la':nd: ·in .company "with anotler marks the origin of our mighty them the finest high school in the cnple we toured. the northern .Mississippi. · : U. S. (this is admitted as a mat;p:!-: rt:' of oufr ouwn state, the gioriWe spent some time at Winne- ter of statistics). The open pit ous -land :of the ten thousand gagasbish, where we found fish mines near the town took much of aitkes While' Ours was primarily so plentiful that fishing actually our time. Man has handled a-pleasure trip, I kept my weath- grew monotonous. We sat right Mother Earth rather roughly, |/: :|er !eye cocked in the direction of on the dam and pulled them out, much as great ants would have --:aisuitable location. It developed pickerel after pickerel. Most of done. If ever there were holes ? )htMinnesota more than fa- these were thrown "back ,as we iii the ground they are here. I is -ora:le to Osteopaths and the had more than we could possibly have in mind one of the mines 410nor.thiern' part of the state alone eat. We were fishing for the right at, the town's edge. It iS -can:, furnish enough openings for pleasure of the thing. And this five miles across and several hun(tiJ.l:?cntire output for the. next is no "fish story." dred feet deep. We stood at the Hibbing was next. This is the rim and watched the long train /;:'We · ahade it a practice to spend heart- of the iron-rough and at of empty cars pass under the gim -- two: or' three days at each camp first glance looks like the land ant steam shovels. The locomo: Void of all tive and its load looked -like, a toy ?%is:we honored on our schedule and that "God forgot." ?m-u.¥h of . the time was devoted- to vegetatoin, blackened, charred, train irun 'by a b)y at play. We Jlgishing.'**\ , fOur realy good remnants of burned forests, the were told that with each dump of lit" aitch was at Gull Lake, ten miles first impression of this section be- the giant shovel ,a ton of ore, Here we lies the proved claim of the rich- valued at $45.00 per was, loaded. north of Brainerd. :' caughit no:rthern pike, pickeral, est region of the state, if not of The mining costs of this ton were : acek bass and croppies.- P'.riend the entire country. It is so much about five cents. 4 7 :wst-f .:P~ ri n ·..... 4. ~n4 n . ..... Sr* ri m. r)r - ^l; .o. i n .t m -: v t-.r j All told, we spe'nt four days Uierenl Lrom- tIme majesic Iorhlad been traveling visiting the towns on the range, J'·isate t:thie superiority of thel ests we
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we spent a day looking over ol3ice rooms and left the city f^vovably impressed, firm in the idea that if nothing better was found .we would hang out our slingle in the World's richest village. -:omeward bound, we ngain r-a turned to Brainerd, and things sx: shaped themselves that we deftnitely decided upon Brainerd ne our home. We secured -i splendid office suite in the Brainerd State Bank Building and apartments in the Ransford Hotel Annex, and came home satisfied that a lcation then e were few bItter. To the faculty of Still Collego and my classmates I wish to extend an invitation to come to Brainerd when in need of a vacation. I can assure you, of a hearty welcome, I hope to keep in touch with most of my classmates through the college publication. And remem- ! ber I'll be after you this fall for a letter to ouc annual paper. Fraternally yours, ,I E. C. HERZOG, Brainerd State Bank Bldg. i Brainerd, Minn.
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a notary public." --- Bohenmiani
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Aceo&ptan ce for UpAocial rates.,a prOvided f-or.I 11.ac-t-of Oct~ utorimed FON 8

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l. C. Engeldrum brf1evy ,.·SUms"Up.' a few' 1 e nWat rea wSons why everyone sho.ld be A^AIANST complory vacina.y

iDr'. ·Dr.

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UORRECTIO]
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First: As. J..g G. Wili"nson, ;m,^ D.,:/ M R. . S, o.f non, author of numerous scientifiC and 'beaUhilosophical works,. makes :. ifuly clear: "I nature nothig e nterms the blood :aed -becomes.a' 'rI oj) until it is .first selected f:it b: the ehsese of taste. It is ithn eaten, broken up .and carrid thirough long avenues of introdut[ i.stand. t ioin; along these avenues r i.any :Sentinels exercising their q ualitying, mitigaling and seleCt i.g function,.; digesti'e" :juices, world is certaiajT and lung purifications. en pathway to act upon the blood pabulum (nm. the Des MOinAS ' uition or food) before it becomes !paXt: of ithestaeIn :o life.,:;:This; · :' physiology aed..ivine humlan is : :: d eec ,ncl like a- ma nstle. if. ' ?aCcination ! trave:sc :"L':" awldI tramples upon all' these .safe : ':.guardc :l~ - wisdom. It goes dij .oines, Grea the Des M rect to Lhe blood ,or, worseU the of 140,000 popullation inI ,ymph and not wit, food, 'itpts ted: .States is located . p:o.:si.on, introduced by lUnctr're ,EFFEN'. DR. EESS center of Iowa, 'which' :nd a: thiat has no ,esi applicable to : '. :~Prof. of Pth:ology, D.M . 07.0.,: : : 5,0t0 square miles of 5:tit, and can have a character giv· t is his. to attain. Ilis.biary is his head. He carries more' in fertile agriculture lanidt: en, to-it, but ht it is aflvefol his: Aind',than' is usually:":posses^e'ed'by ma.a: Such a mentality ::iii of ica. Thbe value of the fa: nimal and h'umar' poison, at a a,: .ifound dep)ths arnd soars to geeatr·, in this territory is over te, bo' into the very center his an Unusual sorto-4t fathoms half bitlot dollars'heights, grapples leisurely, 'bost play ully with the more abst:rse |otherwi guarded by nature in :", ' . more tha the value of i :' '/:: ' problems-.of science.'' This-i th p:,:Provide.c ofso.a .other st his 'mind is big enough to grasp his subjet-ahooy, ;ie of£ twer:' i hree 'and has :mdC biine.:. Te. I a'rn prod, :has been at'the head Of te depe:tment for five y.. murzhrer'sD knfe. [ ;Iculture wealtx in excess " ..''.' is oW.n :e;utation,. .. ""':.-': ISecond: If there:iS any: protee- '-'' :a'mnan he has His home fin oualities. Hmany; is his, ain." 000,000 eachi year., As ton i vc'm:acin:ation, le those who He lovest, and in. it there ismnifest the. radiant glow of: he !Des MToines Is in the: w n:t-.'i (n-o a n .vc vaccinated. 'happy' fieside.: He is generous to a f.ault, courteeus: b '.o d riticl; :ct :large eal^' fell and at-1 diaoes sympathetie, sarcastic n iot^If thetr wn vaccnatio still Is haftS are not poisned with tiou of two riverg, ntu woia."ouhe: {:hat'.. l has:a largeplace : in:hi heat pt:ectthem.neit:r..: for all wel 'meaning pieo . priced .~-nA penti-i:e acel&i::tin of:the entire comiuin0;0:., gas powei. ,he-has: .. : :: ::is :department is one of tie big departmients of D. .S C. y.: :eieore:as. Dr. Zacai"ary. anu.a' oi:utput wUi 'an and he is an experienced teacher in it. 1.a[.e hi ac ierp:'-: Da fptin t00,0o0 with :over 1,o0, <-"y --.s ^- - s : w ration : hasstat^;d: "We ..nlust :do- '*=s£=sss ^. rIa Q lives.. P-ra^ Tay. feat6 tie effort of the roan who fore ehteing the army, while a smallpox mortality than anly "ivv,00.000. Des Mone wuld :make: it an, :entire corn- further re'vacinatirn Is enforced ilizod" country in thle worldin publications with ae 'nI A wail peo)ple in the rear if an onthreak of smallpox." the same period (1889-M908) 20 flu .nity tiAy output bof ^ver a:sma~ll cprtlxo of it may be- This was the law from and after years,_ or which the figures are tt e "oft'hese: copies, ' i. cases numbering ceom:e sick. We must denounce thbe year Th8I though compusorh tOns ar' tri japurnal in effect 171,500, or an annua avermge Of ida that a heal y person is vaccinatioeen national ecitulatio.[: th i ce 1 T ( e o t l J hn P t 8,5th, w^ 48,O00 .deathis; a nor-n m(en a ce t a y o y. ( ficial- ·. Des. M~o'es'.has overl *Third: "Thereare n a nti-vac- eatsn, m e lbr Peri.ylvani'.Vac- ital oL 2t .,per cent.ppg paved. treetS,:reprcse a 18 statlistiCS supj ieII **by ^. Kubota, of )1 very; elation Cocniisson,^ pag ciiiatio nists^ in' *Japan. '' outlay of some: $8,000.,0 S i before it is I vaccination coel d cause _ -. Direct r ;of afh.. itary:Oreaur s chi -ld v accinated ooer;. hlas' .Des Moines ffars Hose "six- '*months' old ^re-vacinatfed miuni k, hiow cool an' epideiio :thieDepartimm tti
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cal cases operated 'eforeie at D. M.::S. .:: 0.: ii I-e gave o300 the n:u as should have been 00. . In this issue we are :haplpy o state were 635 cases operated Taylor ,ilic, MoytI Des etal Hospital, during .th : o Atugust 1923.-::'i 't Would. seem that Ei i: statl ement is true inrega iran. Wh 'would write-: book. uDreach, a -. b'eiter s'!r beru,setO

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M.ss Alice Burnett of Weiser, contemplating taking up Osteop- ate of DI). M, S C. 0. last, May, MlIention ino'th ... - . mart I -Thahn aIs reti.rtv .,. . latt.er 1f -- at.hv at D V., S. 0. 0. this fail. has located at Storm Lake,'Iowa. .. ,t .. .V OJ . , ,. .'.A. . . __ _ Francis she 7'S of this week to res-mie her studies, Mr. Bjce is an excellent footbal. In a letter from O'z.r, of Tola Kansas, here. -I, player and likewise a fine man. states that Dr. iCharles A lexander lave itun unto It is gratifying to receive men of had also located' in that city. The or ktter, life oe in "Log Book"' joins their many Dr. Robert Mertens of Story sucl: character into our college. We have nlot N! friends it.' wishing them success. ('-its 1 ,,nlrcl-i t!rn.- City, is returning to D. M. S. G. 4<< ul u ti *-v 1a%1'eu 41u U0LIa u a. 01,11Ut ; 0 0. the 10th for a short visit with -Fred N. J. tDubie and Robert an.- Mr Kirwood wvilt be' a From here J. Landu.::y of Nashua, N. 'H., are a few of the "boys. [n Americat there are 1,500,000 S. n-ior in D. AtM C. 0. this year. he expects 'to go oni to- Kansas ceossing ha.ldf the continent to take people unable to speak tlie E gCity for P. 0. work in the- Kan- up Ithe st,:idvy of Osteopathy at D. lish langr-uarge. cThere are 3,Q00, 0. .O. Wedlel oi South Bend, In- sas Cit'y College of Physicians and M 8.S . 0. We welcome these Suygeons. : ,, : . -.' gentlemen, and hope, at the end 000 inmore who cannot- ead it: 'his , has returned' to school of tour years, to present to the th-f' Dr. -G. F Stial'te of New Han-mpshire two ex- - There-:Jack Bice, brther was 53,000,i00 deolars Physicians., e . (.laarshso of Wor- Bie,; who graduated from Di m ealt nOseopat fn.r im r nth B. itP, a .0 3 - T cI'. lost. inl 19 22 th.'rough the alteration ^ '8. ' „« .(.» ^^ ^*i .s ' .*t .] 'i . '.u z 'Q. 13 i ettv ii't a MTaiDisD grade- tot chece. aisle Dr. coaci of Saiuna Kansas, is C. .0 .e th for D. i.S. : 1 : : 1 ; 1 11 ; ch chs-'' I. ;* 1 1 ': : ad -o cast*^ 'V l' 1 -" ^ <- ~ "^' ~ ~ ' ~ 1~ ~ o 1 S. i 1 1
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THEI~ LOG BEOOK -

3

The Log Booki 'pathy,
The Official Publication of DES MOINES STILL COLLEGE OSTEOPOTHY. President .................... S. L. Taylor Business Manager ... M. D. Cramer C. Editor..-............-. .- L. Ballinger Osteopathy Without Limitation

is devoted to, and lives for Osteand that as many mistakes as can be corrected will be %voided in the future. Many thanks to the profession for their frahlkness. We believe that their criticis 3 were given only from interest, and prompted by their loyalty to their Alma Mater and Osteopathy. , We welcome criticism of every sort, but particularly construetive criticism.

OSTEOPATHY
Osteopathy has come into its Osteopathic Principles own this year at Des Moines Still College. Principles have Osteopathic The institution has had the hon- been taught by Dr. Claude Spring or of having within its walls some for a good many years, very acof the best technicians the coun- 'ceptably. try affords. For many years Dr. He has had his vacation and M. E. Bachman has been known will settle down to another year as one of the foremost Osteopaths of hard work. of the state of Iowa and of the September 10th will find him nation, and is becoming more and occupyingposition as the same more closely identified with the progress of the science. We congratulate the institution in havThose who know him will appreing such a splendid practitioner ciate that Osteopathy will have a at the head of the Technique de- booster and staunch supporter in partment. He will be ably assist- him through all time.< ed by field practitioners this year. Dr. Spring enjoys a large pracDr. Cramer has already made tice and is a very busy man, but arrangements with well known we have learned that only busy Osteopaths in various parts of ad- men make good teachers-all othjoining states to give the school ers have either wasted their own two or more days of technique. time, or the other fellow's time. Suffice to say that we are Dr. Spring gets right down to very happy and the student body business when he enters his class is happy over the prospects. and the roll call is over.
_!

Illinois '.,;. :-: of Public Health, i '; ir':from typhoid Dr. Mary Golden, who has germs ai~. :::minal disinm taught Pediatrics in Des Moines fection o0t itlua:tion quarters Still College of Osteopathy for a and other parts of quarantined good many years, but who re-premises subject to contaminasigned her position three years tion have been effectively carried ago to go to California, has re- out under the direction of the lo-' turned to Des Moines, and has cal health. authority. been appointed by the board of In the event of typhoid fever trustees again to the chain of occurring on a dairy farm an exPediatrics. ception may be made iL that the NotwithstandiAg the fact that live stock only, may be removed Pediatrics has been ably taught to some other premise provided during the interim, the old stu- permission 'so to do is obtained
dent body particularly will be from the local health authorities

DR. MARY GOLDEN

glad to know that Dr. Mary has returned to Des Moines and will They occupy the same chair. know her ability and efficiency as a teacher. She gave splendid satisfaction and her experience will contribute much to the institution.

Osteopathic Clinic
years

and from the Illinois Department of Public Health. The udders of the cows must be efficiently disinfected and the milking done and the milk cared for, 'handled or sold at or from such premises by persons other than those of the household or the patient or by persons other than those residing on the premises where the case
With the advent of more

pastexists.

It is remarkable how Osteopathy draws patients, when you give them real Osteopathy. The last few years have been an indicator, and have shown just what can be done osteopathically. Dozens and dozens of patients seek the treatments of the student body ,and there is reason for this. Osteopathy gives such splendid results that ever such inexpertenced practitoners as the students are sought, and are giving wonderful satisfaction.

adequate and effective local health administration in rural Illinois, which in most cases means the organization of county health departments, supervised by wholetime specially trained medical health officers or commissioners, asssisted by an efficiently well trained whole-time personnel, it is likely that a modified form of typhoid fever quarantine could be offered in the superision of typhoid fever cases or carriers residing on dairy farms. Such
undoubtedly become an

Truly it must be a great sci- would

Around the Circle

of it in the hands of experienced dairying is an important indus. . ._ Dr. Morris Cramer, our Secmen and women who have given try and even in the average counretary, has just returned from his Dr. C. W. Johnson, head of the years in preparation. ty the saving to dairymen would swing around the circle. Nervous and Mental Department be considerable. He has visited some 15 states of Des Moines Still College, TYPHOID FEVER Second, Reception of milk at during the summer and has met been very busy this summer at has quarantined premises. If his___ many of the Osteopathic practiprivate practice. He probably Other Sanitary Precautions milk delivered to the quarantined This personal contact has the largest Nervous and Mentioners. has been of great satisfaction to talpractice of any Osteo- Still keeping in mind the pa- premises is not bottled, the housedisease Dr. Cramer, and has been the path in the country. He is busy tient in isolation under the best holder must place a thoroughly source of much information to the rfrom morning til l night. conditions which local circum- sterile container (a freshly scaldauthorities of Des Moines Still stances ,,will permit, let us note ed bottle or other receptacle) to sanitary precautions receive the milk to some convenThose who know Dr. Johnson further College of Osteopathy. the criticisms, annoyances, know that he is one of the most which must be observed in and ient place outside the house out All about the quarantined premises of reach of cats, dogs or other anpiques, dissatisfactions, and ali- careful of men in his practice. are known enated practitioners, Oft times we have admiredhis if the spread of typhoid fever is imals. The milkman should place to him. splendid ability and his splendid to be successfully prevented. the milk therein without handling Three months of official life, teaching qualities. the receiving container. He thinks These are: by personal contact, has given clearly and puts his proposition First, Sale of milk nda other Bottled milk must be deposited him a year of experience. a suitable deliverer h foodstuff clearly. urnie ihu lc r iti ~ ~ ~ ~~ie.Teslecag from quarantinedprem- by the without theat quarantined y~ We believe that D. M. S. C. 0. ises. The sale, exchange or distri- place He has but little use for fads bution in any manner whatsoever premises and later taken in by an has not suffered by the personal We appreciate that of any sort, and gives full sway of milk or other drink or food- inmate of the household. Howcontact. to many of the criticisms are just, , his sarcasm in referring to stuffs produced, handled or sold ever, no milk bottle, basket or any . and that some alumni have al them on premises quarantined for ty- other article whatsoever, may be right to piques, but in the mad He loves Osteopathy and lives phoid or para-typhoid fevers is taken out of or away from the rush of forced circumstances for it. The profession has a strictly prohibited in Illinois and quarantined premises during the these things inevitably occur, and1 great leader and teacher in him. upon recovery of the typhoid fe- period of quarantine. Before milk the profession must be charitable. Any young man can consider him- ver patient such sales cannot be bottles are removed from. ...the All must realize that Dr. Cra-- self fortunate who has him for legally done until the exereta premises after the quarantine ismer is thoroughly in earnest , his professor in Nervous and (stools and urine) of patient have raised, they must be sterilized unthat he is a life wire, and that he3 Mental Diseases. been proven, satisfactory to the (Continued on page 4)

Dr. C. W. Johnson

ence which cures in the hands of economic asset of great impora novice., What may we expect tance in those counties where

4
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In

THEL jOG BOOK

TYPHOID FEVER e As a result of the. inexcusabi [ The Undecideed times more nar(Continued from Page 3) conditions vJiich existed on ihi ls :Anotics, in the form of opium and der the direction of the local insanitary "Sanitary Dairy One.: o f the derivatives, are produced than health authority. One of the greatest problem. greates7s farm, fifty cases of typhoid fever re legititamately needed The Third, Privies and Cesspools. with seven dealihs, occurred dur - that the ambitious, energet6, average age of the 50,000 known! Any privy existing on premises ing mid-summer in a delightfu 1 American youth has to -Solve addicts in New York State is 23 on which a case or suspected, case county seat of some ten thousan( - I d of typhoid fever is found, or on inhabitants in a far western stateI comes to him a-l -waiLks proudly years. 1. any premise to which a case or All this unnecessary suffering from his High School Auditoriun 1 1 9 suspected case of typhoid fever and death took place because E with his diploma in hand, which VACCINATION a may be removed shall be made so-called "sanitary dairy" was 3 s marked the- successful terminathoroughly fly-proof by close fit- such only in name and shouldi tion (Continued from Page 1) I of his preparatory and initing, self closing lids over the have been truthfully advertised I Fourth: Germany, the second ' i tial education in life. But after r seats and by elimination of all as the insanitary dairy. most vaccinated country, had a, Thea cracks and crevices that may per- remedy was of course quite obvi- a short time the feeling comes tcD death rate for Berlin for the nine mit the entrance or exit of flies. ous and its application resulted I him that this education that he years (1904-1912) of 72 per cent, Any privy or cesspool on any in the immediate prevention off has received so far is not enough above that of London being 4,500,such premises within fifty feet of further cases of typhoid fever.I to carry him through the business3 000 and that of Berlin 2,000,000. any well or other source of water The responsibility for conditions3 world successfully. And hea (Vaccination and the State, by I supply, or which though at a which made possible such a seri- wants to be a leader, a success. Fifth: In all Germany with the greater distance is by reason of ous catastrophe lay primarily at t And then the struggle begins. oldest vaccination laws in the the geological formation of the the door of the local health au- Question after question is con- the world, the epidemic of 1871contour of the ground, liable to thorities and justice would haveI sidereq. What am I best fitted I 1873 killed 124,000 vaccinated and I infect such well or other source of demanded their indictment on aL for? Will I be able to be efficient re-vaccinated citizens. (Is Vacwater supply, shall upon order ot charge of wilful neglect leading r in this or that line of work? If cination a Disastrous Delusion? the local health authorities or of to untold suffering and death. I decide on this line of work is I by Ernest McCormic, page 25.) an authorized representative of Such apathy on the part of both Lthere any chance for me to adSixth: After the epidemic of the Illinois Department of Public the public and their officials isI vance? And so on, he stumbles I 1871-1873 a lesser outbreak ocHealth be altered, remodeled or altogether to common and flagrant darkly. curred in Germany in 1880-1882 entirely abolished as directed by in many states in our Union and This is not a new problem at I when there were 25,000 cases and such authority or such represent- many communities in Illinois, we all, but one that we have all had 2,700 deaths. (Testimony of Carl ative. regret to suggest, are far from Lto solve in the past and which Ruata, M. D., Professor of MateHouse Fly as a Typhoid Carrier blameless on must be solved by all that wish to iIria Medica, University of Peru-. this charge. The possible role of the fly and advance, in the future. But there II gia, Italy, before the Pretor'sI other insects in the transmission is no one that can solve the ques- Court, Perugia, July 31, 1912, and of typhoid fever is of such imMAKING GOOD tion but the individual himself. printed in "Vita e Mallattie," portiance as to deserve brib.f sepConsider the men whose names So Des Moines Still College Vol. 2, No. 29, Aug., 1912 --.Enarate consideration under contact mean efficiency, achievement, suc- would be pleased to have any lish translation published by Ithe| infection now being discussed. cess. Notice that practically I High School graduate write to us National Anti-Vaccination League By virtue of general prevalence everything they undertake comes for literature. Ask us questions London. in great numbers, and their dirty out as it should'. concerning the greatest of all the Seventh: During the two epihabits, flies may be guilty not inThe reason is simply that these healing sciences. We will consid- demics in the City of Berlin in frequently of carrying on their men have the hhbit of making er it a favor to serve you in any 1864 there was a death rate of a legs, mouths, etc., human filth good. There is no luck about it. way possible. We feel that there little under 1,000 per million, containing typhoid germs. In They have acquired a habit. is no science greater than that of while in 1871 it rose to 6,150 per this way food, particularly milk, That habit-the habit of making Osteopathy. That there is no pro- million, for smallpox. may be frequently infected by good-was gained by hard work fession in which as much real Smallpox in Bavaria, from 'a flies with typhoid and other dis- and the unsparing expenditure good can be done for humanity table laid before the Royal Comease germs. as that of an Osteopathic Physi- mission by Dr. Hopkirk for the of energy. The first typhoid outbreak inThe successful conduct and de- cian. To be a good physician you purpose of showing the results of vestigated by the writer some velopment of a large and diversi- must receive the proper training long continued compulsory vacci' years ago was milk-borne, the fied industry requires the services and sufficient practical experi- nation ,showed that vaccination milk apparently being infected of thousands of men who are ence. You must have a thorough was made compulsory in 1807, and during the cooling and bottling chosen for their fitness for the working knowledge of the human that in 1871 there were 30,742 process by flies from a nearby positions to be filled. anatomy and its functions. You cases of smallpox, of which 95.7 toilet which was used by a typhoid And in proportion to a man's must know the difference in dis- per cent were vaccinated. (The carrier. The so-called "sanitary fitness to his career. If a trial eases, in the signs and symptoms Wonderful Century, page 265.) dairy" where this occurred was proves him to be unfit, he is of disease and the art of making Eighth: If vaccination renders about as insanitary as a dairy dropped. If he proves his fitness a correct diagnosis and how to one immune, why should individcould well be. The contents of for a higher post, he gets it in treat the cause of the disease, uals who have been re-vaccinated the shallow privy vault served due course. rather than the symptoms. and re-vaccinated from one- genboth as a feeding and breeding The opportunities are practicThese, and many more of the eration to another, in the most place for multitudes of flies and ally without limit. Given a nor- imperative subjects are taught in thoroughly vaccinated countries it was situated not more than mal brain and the desire and D. M. S. C. 0. Our faculty are the world, contract smallpox? thirty feet from the milk house energy to develop it, there is no Physicians that are thorough in Ninth: The conditions which esin which the milk was pasteur- position to which a man in the their work and are successful pecially favor smallpox, plague ized, cooled and bottled. The .milk ranks may not rise. practitioners. They know the yellow fever, typhus, enteric fehouse itself was of very poor conIt is necessary to the progress needs of the young physician ver, measles, scarlet fever, diphstruction and most inadequately of industry that men in the ranks when he steps out into the theria, etc., are foul air and wascreened so that flies could travel should rise. The industry is not field alone. They are interested ter; decayed organic matter, overunmolested between privy vault a thing of today alone. Products in each and every student to the crowding and other unwholsome and all parts of the milk house, of industry will always be in de- extent that their greatest desire surroundings. If vaccination has carrying with them human ex- mand, and the man most fitted is to see that the student is fully any bearing on smallpox, why is creta reeking wtih germs which will be the man who will lead in equipped, so that when he enters it that the other zymotic diseases should never be permitted in milk supplying the demand. - Brill his practice he will be a capable, as a whole decline and flucltuate intended for human consumption. Magazine. efficient and reliable physician. with smallpox? i
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E3ptered as second class matter. February 3. 1923. at the post office at Des Moines. Iowa. under the 24th. 1912. act of 'Atugust

LOG BOOK
DR. G. C. TAYLOR

tfr malilingl a Acceptancei ratesR of pstf^a i specia-l sec'tio o previded'^ for /in , Ao 3 11063. Act oif O^ct.,-3 auithorized Feb. 3. 192t2

Volume 1

PUBLISIED SEMI-MONTHLY BY THE DES MOINES STILL COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHY. Number 16 September 15, 1923

Constipation
The causes of constipation are many. They range all the way from an impassible obstruction caused by an incurable cancer of the rectum to simple carelesssness of an otherwise perfectly healthy person. Some cases of constipation are curable and some cases are not curable. Many cases are curable by the patient himself if he knows what to do. And these cases make up eighty-five cases out of every hundred. The remaining fifteen cases in a hundred are due to diseases of organs other than the intestines and require the expert attention of a doctor, some of which are curable and some of which are not. But the eighty-five cases out of a hundred which are curable are the great majority which cause most of the common ills of piles, hemorrhoids, headaches, and sluggish feelings familiar to the chronically constipated person. This large class of cases is due mainly to faulty habits of living which can be corrected and this, therefore, the class of cases which we give our attention to. The faulty habits of living which cause constipation come under three groups: (1) Irregularity of going to stool. (2) Improper food. (3) Lack of exercise. Irregularity of going to stool is the greatest cause of constipation. The bowels are kept from forming the habit of regular movement. It is made hard for them to act properly. If a man should lose his watch, and if there k were no 12 o'clock whistle, and if he was also unable to see the sun, he would nevertheless know when dinner time came. He is in the habit of eating then and in the habit of going to the table whether he is hungry or not. So his stomach has formed the habit of acting at that time and it tell him The when dinner time comes. bowels will form a habit just as the stomach does if they are given a chance to. If one gocs to stool after breakfast every morn-

VACCINATION
Edited by Dr. David H. Reeder, D. 0. LaPorte, Indiana. 'I dislike to VACCINATION: discuss this subject or, in fact, any subject about which there i~s such a radical difference opin i ion by medical men, as wetllas by the laity. I feel, however, that I would not be keeping faith with yu if bn. I did not tell you What my^x observations have revealed, but also what experience has taught to those who really wish to learn. One of my papers on the subject was published last year in a big New York magazine, and although I condemned the practice in most emphatic terms and I gave valid reasons for so doing, i I was surprised to receive letters from many physicians, co-c

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'Professor of Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Department, D. M. S. C. 0.
The large tonsil clinic in D. M. S. C. 0. is a great practice builder -developed until it was the largest of the state, even five years ago, when Dr.G. C. Taylor came into the department. The impetus it had acquired has increased in momentum and today the department is the largest and most efficient it has ever been during all the history of the college. Dr. G. C. Taylor is making good in the department, and by his preparation and his many years of experience, together with his

mending .me for telling the truth in such a plain and positive manner. The famous Dr. Win. Osler advised the medical profession to "Know Syphillis in all its manifestations and relations and all+
other things Clinical will be add-

ed unto you." Dr. J. W. King goes a step step farther and says Syphillis is the father of disease." It is my own positive belief based upon many years of personal study of chronic disease that
of the cases of so-

75% native ability, he is demonstrating what a man may do when he fully

tries. By the Osteopathic practice which this department enjoys, the professional appreciation is clearly shown. Patients come from widely separated areas, and they come because they have learnedl that work done here is done well. Dr. G. C. Taylor is a careful operator, a good teacher, an extensive reader, and has due appreciation of his subject. When the students finish the work of this department, they are well grounded in the fundamentals of the specialty.

called "congenital syphillis" are caused by vaccination, and I have not yet found a case of tuberculosis, cancer, erysipelas,
colitis, locomotor ataxia, or per-

I----1,-I-i-----to stool every morning whether a movement occurs or not. Soon the bowels will form the habit of moving at that particular time. And a good passage will be possible then, although there may not be

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My observation has also conmaterial in it along fast enough and fiermed the opinion that this to keep it from damming up blocking the intestine. Or (2) it cause of disease, being in the may over-stimulate the intestine blood, can only be eliminated by and arouse it to such strong con- the direct treatment of the tractions that it holds the mate- blood, with the patient's own system the through any strong feeling of necessity rial in it so tightly thqat it cannot blood, before it. With the form-ation of move along properly and it dams known as Auto-Hemic Therapy. The addition of poison to the .- ing the bowels get the habit of this habit the majority of the up and blocks the intestine. In both cases blocking of tile i:ltes- poison already in the blood is moving at that time. With the cases will be cured. the tine occurs and constipation re- suppressive treatment and- does food a ffect, few first attempts no movement I Improper not cure. Auto-Hemie Therapy may occur. Then the thing to do movement of the bowels in two sults. People who eat concentrated, plus a correct eliminative diet food may not stimulate is to remain away from stool all ways: (1) I ,day, take a laxative at night and the intestine enough tc arouse it refined foods are those who suffer does cure and thereby removes (Continued on page 2) ; (Continued on page 2) to carry the go to stool the next morning. Go to sufficient action

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nicious aremia, that did not give a reaction of congenital or acquired syphillis, and fully 95% of these had been vaccinated.

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nlumbering 171,500, or an annuimal ?i||?CONSTIPATION average of 8,500 with 48,000 (Continued from page 1) (:': : deaths; a mortality of 28 per s cent. (Official -. tatistics supplied :from their first type.. So much of by S.. Kubota, director of Sanigoes. to nourishment, and itheood'f tary Bureau of the Departmient I:s absorbed from the intestine of House Affairs, Tokyo, quoted -;that not enough bulk is left to in "Both Sides of the, Vaccina:?stimulate the intestine to normal tion Question.") action. In such cases there needs "Germany, the second most to ?be 'added to the diet coarser vaccinated country, had a death sUch as rye and Graham i:o rate for Berlin for the nine b:!read, cabbage, turnip tops and years (1904-1912) of 72 per cent, Brussels 'ii.spinach,.:' cauliflower, above that of London being prunes, dates and figs, going'Io stool. If he eats the ISropruts, 4,500,000 and that of Berlin, 2,o a limited amount of cider and proper diet and takes the proper 000,000. a?:,nd: coarse bread and exercise he will not likely get sat?.buttermilk. The "In all Germany with the oldv:egetables and acid cider.. and isfactory -results until he estabsluggish lishes the habit of always' going est vaccination laws in the .slour, ':milk tone up the the 'world, epidemic of 1871i'm:uscle of the intestine and stim- to stool at the same. time every 1873 killed 124,000 vaccinated iuIat -it to move its contents along. day. This one regular habit will !iiBut if one uses plenty of these do more toward preventing con- and re-vaccinated citizens. "After the epidemic of 1871Igicoarse foods and has regular hab- stipationt han anything else. 1873 'a lesser outbreak occurred .?its of going to stool and still sufin Germany in 188I-1882 when from constipation he may ,feri' VACCINATION there were 25,000 cases and 2,!Illiiihayvedc a sensitive intestine that is (Continued from page 1) 700 deaths. (Testimony of Marl !'being over-stimulated and which ;is contracting so hard that it is Ruata, M. D. Professor of Maoiihlding its material tightly in- the cause of disease. Nature tera Medica, lTniversity of PeruIn does the curing, drugs neveE. istead' of passing it along. gia, Italy, before the Pretor's In some instances we use fire court, Perugia, July 31, 1912, and is:ich cases the condition is often rj.:eeiqv,'ed. by making, up the diet to fight fire but not when' we printed in "Vitae Mallattie," ' ??]f'~ronm:':such soft bland substances have a more efficient agent "at V.,2, No. 29, Aug 1912. English patented hand. 'So why put the poisonous translation published by the Na]as white breads, from rice, fruits, macaroni, oat- taint in the blood of innooent tional· Anti-Vaccination League -1 :flour, 'meal, eggs, (always soft cooked), 'and healthy children in Order to: London. fresh fish, all meats except fresh prevent a disease which may "During the two epidemics in pork, 'stewed rhubarb, fresh as- never come near., the city of Berlin in 1864 there celery, tips, stewed paragus Vaccination catises sickness, was a death rate of a little unsquash, small white onions, white suffering and sometimes incur- der 1,000 per million, while in an:id, weet potatoes; among the able disease. It does 'not pro- 1871 it rose to 6,150 per million i-f ats, butter, olive oil, cream, tect against smallpox, 'as you for smallpox. O[c"ream.i ;cheese, and cottage cheese. may. judge by the following exBusiness Before Pleasure "Smallpox in Bavaria, from a ?:Tese, Will make some btilk, but tract from a paper in the "Log table laid before the Royal Com"Yes, we have 'gobs' of tonsils .irritate and stimulate the Book" by Dr. H. C. Engledrum. Gal 2--Log Book, Frink 9-21-23 i Yll not today." A person would: think ?int;:estine like the coarse foods are no anti-vaccina- mission by Dr. Hopkirk for the that this statement might be true '?mentioned for a sluggish irtes-' II "There tionists in Japan. Everychild is purpose of showing the results if they were to visit the Des tine. is six of long continued compulsory Moines General Hospital'on Tuesvaccinated before it Lack of bodily exercise allows months old, re-vaccinated when vaccination, showed that 'vaccin- 'days and Saturdays. On these all H.the muscles of the body to beat, six years, ation was made compulsory in days there are no idle moments ..come flabby and sluggish. The in- entering school again re-vaccinated at fourteen 1807, and that in 1871 there were for those that help in the Clinic. }??:te]istinal muscles become sluggish in the middle school 30,742 cases of smallpox, of Everybody jumps. If you don't. !:and the bowels become constipat- year~ when and the men are re-vaccinated' i which 95.7 per cent were 'vac- you get stepped on. d. Since people have begun usthe army, while cinated. '(The. Wonderful CenThe grand and glorious moment ~ iing:their legs only for getting in before entering a further re-vaccination is en- tury.) to all concerned comes gabout noon and it'of automobiles constipa"If vaccination renders one when Dr. Trenery informs the of smallti:on has increased. In the days Iforced if an outbreak immune, why should individuals "crew" that dinner' is ready and ' pox." enwhen -people ised them to walk on "This 'was the law from and who have been vaccinated and re- to step right this way before it :to 'on. to horses with hold nd . i.D:!:h : after the year 1885, though com- vaccinated from one.. generation gets cold. "Oh Boy!" Then Dr. |!there was less. Now it is getting to another, in the most thor:?:::::ommon) 'to find people in their pulsory vaccination had been in oughly vaccinated countries in S. L. Taylor says "Thirty minutes effect since 1876. (Report of for lunch." Now, that may sound. ms roiioi'? stretching and bending of the' the world, contract smallpox? like a long while to eat, but when thi-hemselves to the music of phono- John Pitcairn, member "The conditions, which .espe- you sit down to the table with all _1 !graphs in the effort to tighten up Pennsylvania Vaccination, Comcially favor smallpox, plage, the meat, salads, pie, desserts, mission.) i t":h:eir muscles to keep themselves "If vaccination should cause yellow fever, typus, enteric fev- Ipudding, etc., arranged before :iin shape. It would be better to er,-measles, s-arlet fever, diph- you, well, boys, it just cannot be ?'get:out and walk or work and use immunity, how could an epideair and wa-, done, or at least the writer has natural mic occur, and why the high theria, etc., are foul miuscles in doing some tit?'4he'i ter, decayed organic matter, ov- always failed to finish in preI:seful:ting. Buttheyshould 'be death rate in Japan? Japan, the ercr6owding and other unwhole- scribed time. uiused in some way, if for no other most vaccinated country in the some surroundings. On Tuesday, August 28, ninety,::.purpose than that of keeping world, had more smallpox and a heavier smallpox mortality than - "If vaccin-ation has any bear- nine patients were operated on in ?temi in tone. !: Sometimes a person is found any "civilized" country in the ing on smallpox, why is it that our Clinic, and the Tuesday and hisconstipatd because the in- world in the same period (1889- the other zyinotic diseases as a Saturday preceding there were day. :These: gures ::testfines are sagging too low and 1908) 20 years, for which, the whole decline and fluctuate with ninety each prove satisfactory/surgiGca' work. 1 figures are available, the cases smallpox?" forming unnatural ,kinks which hinder the free passage of, 'mate rial through' them. These people are usually helped by '.wearing tI specially designed 'belts 'r ban11 dages, which are put 0ri while the patient is lying down with the organs in place, and which then holds them' in place when the patient stands up. They do not always produce a cure, but they .I often do help. But the average person who is bothered by, constipation has irregular habits and is irregular in
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Club otes,.' High' Blood Pressure: ::Mrs. G, t M. P. is having trouble. :Dea! Doctor 'Reed: Will you please tell me what kind of diet I should use for high blood pressure? I suffer greatly with indigestion. ANSWER: Although you did not say so, I believe that you have suffered for years with colonic constipation. That although your bowels may move daily, the movement is from 24 to 60 hours behind time and that you re-ab-' sorb poisonous matter which should not remain in your colon. You also probably secrete poisonous pus from some source. Diseased teeth and tonsils are a frequent cause. , Find the cause and remove it if you wish to get well. The [diet will help wonderfully.. No meat, beans, peas or cheese, few eggs, very little, if any sugar. Eat freely of fresh raw fruits and vegetables, the less cooked foods the better. Drink lots of water. Don't worry. Fear and anger cause the pressure to rise. All readers of this publication are at liberty, at all times, to ask any questions pertaining to, their health. Address all such communications to Dr. David H. Reeder, c. o. Home Health Club, LaPorte, Indiana, and enclose at least, six cents in postage.
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sending' a new one, that make the school grow.

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These are the kind of: friends ' visits

May we have frequent The Official Publication of from the doctor. DES MOINES STILL COLLEGE Long live Dr. Simoas! OSTEOPOTHY.'

THE NEXT TERMJ* President ............ . S. L. Taylor The registration for this term Business Managec--..-M. D.. Cramer L. Ballinger will be over within ten days. alfitor-C. Thus far so good, we must now Osteopathy Without Limitation put behind us our jubilation Obver this present class, and make for the January re:..THEl, FRESHMAN CLASS. i. early strides gistration. It. ,comes in four and 'As president of Des Moines one-half months, and we must 'Still C11oege of. Osteopathy, I have fifty freshmen in the Janu:want to thank the profession, ary class.' not only our' alumni, but the We rejoice to learn that other 'graduates of other institutions, osteopathic schools have regis:for their contribution to the tered big classes this fall, and -present freshman clas: we wish' them the greatest stucWe have personally ,.known of cess, because it is only through a number of graduates of other the success of every school that insfitutions who, have persuaded the profession can grow as it :.young men and young women to should. i 'take up the study of Osteopathy, Nothwithstanding our desire to and though some of them did see ,everyone prosper, our first directly influence the pros- duty is to D. M. S. C. 0, t'"nt pective student to come to D. M. Now as the'. clamor of the presC. .- 'S. 0., ,they have been very fair ent campaign is, dying away let :with us and have shown their us marshal our forces for the appreciation of Osteopathy as a campaign of the next four and profession by telliag the pros- one-half months. .pective student that D. M. :S. C. We believe in Osteopathy, and 0. is 'a good school and that we we believe in the wonderful work have some clinical advantages that D. M. S C., o. is doing, and which are not enjoyed every- we are "fighting like mad,'" to where. 't Sa make the osteopathic profession The present freshman class, we grow in numbers., anticipate, will reach close to Our hat is in the ring, let .fis the 75 mark. We now have7on go forth for a class of fifty the ground, and 12 upper class- freshmen in January! / men from elsewhere, which gives us 'abonafide addition to our THE QUARETTE. -situdent; ' body of approximately ".The. Taylor Clinic Quartette 87 'new students. f made its .appearance at the .. irst . handsome addition is assembly on Wednesday morn:.and we appreciate/the good work 'It made a 'fine impression of .all who have made it possi- ing. upon the student body and reble ceived encore after encore. Fraternally, We thank youi. There are three new members ,.!.r. .:Dr. S. L. Taylor. . in this organization this year. Doubtless this Quartette will be called upon by many of the A -WEJLCOME VISITOR. organizations of the city during Dr. Simons, of Grand Rapids, the coming winter, anrid we are M lich., blew in on D. M. S. C. 0. sure that D. M. S. C. 0., wili be on the 13tb. :'She could not resist the tem- proud of its respresentatives.,

sought and Des Moines has prov eni itiself big enough, and active enough, to absorb all new comers. Thereare no disgruntled students "clumping" in the halls for every body is so busy, he is happy. Des Moines has long been known as the "City of Certainties.'" We are glad to say that it is keeping its reputation. Anybody with a good sound mind and body and with a will to, work is "Welcome. to our : " City can still.. absorb Des Moines the services of 150 new students. Help us to find them. t OUR ALMA IATBR. (By Dr. W. R. Gregg.) There are some things in this world to be proud of. Many of these things we fail to fully apnone of us But preciate. who have taken several state boards and passed them all can fail to appreciate our own DMSCO... It is a great satisfaction to know: that the old school is teaching the real important fundamentals in every subject. It is a great pleasure to know that where ever, you go or whatever you do, you will find that thoe important things that will confront you the most times have been stressed time and time again at school. This makes us all yell for DMSCO. No DMSCO graduates flunked the Ohio boards this year or any other state boards as far as we .know. Why? Because our instructors were all busily engaged in practice. The ideal teacher is the one that has the experience. This is more than ever true of the man or woman teaching therapeutics. In a therapeutical school everything depends on practice. , Theories. count for little and the man with the greatest experience is the best fitted for imparting his knowledge to others. That is why DMSCO takes the lead in turning out capable physicians. We are in,deed proud to be long to the alumni of DMSCO.

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If you keep your head:whenall . about you : :,.;. ' Are losing theirs and blamingit
,o you;

If you can trust yourself wh
all men doubt you,

But make allowance -forfheii ..,i':(;(!: doubting too; If you ean wait and notbe tired 'by Waiting,' :" "'. Or being lied about, o't deal -in..lies, : ::.. ::i:' Or being hated don't give way t hating. And yet don't look too good, npr : 'i talk too wise....' If you can dream and noit maklei .'dreams. your. master; . If you can think, and, not make 'thoughts your 'aim,If you meet with" Triumph and : : Disaster, And treat those -two imposteys just- the same;.. ..... If you can bear to hear the truth you've spoken, Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools, ' Or watch the things you ggave;. your life to, broken :::,: And 'stoop -and build 'em.up-wth worn-out :tools. .·.".:[. If you can make: one heap of -all your winnings-,,And risk, it on one turn of pitch-, and-too, ,: . . '..'': :. And lose, and start again;at your. ·beginnings .... And never breathe a wo'rdiabout your loss;:'" d If you can force your'hearit nerve ,and: sinew, To sarve your turn 'long a·fter;? : -they are gone;. ':;-':' hen'hre is' And,'so holdoon w : nothing in you, :' ·i Except the Will which sayS.to 1them,: "Hold on!'"::' If you can talk with crowds aand keep your virtue, .. Or walk with kinds-Lnor loseethe common touch, ' If neither foes .nor 'loving. ' friends' can hurt you,.If all men count with 'you; bIu' but none too much;..('- : If you can fill the unforgivin minute ' . ' '''.. :' With sixty seconds' worthlof idis.. , tance t run, e' rth ' an e:ry i Youse
Yours is the earth -and" evei'
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ptation, to come back again to ';the old school, and take a peek in (:on the present activities.:' ',Dr. Simons loves her alma ma. ter: and though this is the first time since she graduated, she has visited the old school, she has given us many expressions of her interest in 'the institution.

WOR .......

i She -has shown her loyalty by sIenIding ...several students of a high class,. some are in the h s''ho6now, and hardlya yea her .'fsses:over head, without -hei

.During the summer correspondence, many requests were made for work, and prospective students were told to come along, that there woultd be no difficulty in :finiding places where they could pay a part, at least, :oi their current expenses. Fulfillment of promises 'is always a joy to all concerned, especially are we 'happy, since: ai fast as the students appeared or :the scee ie their services were

Physio-Clinical Labora-

tories at Mt. Ayr, Ia.

. thing that's in it, ': '!F And-which is more-you''ll be'a'
'; MAN-My Son.'

-Rudyard Kipling, ''We ' have just received an ann · ouncement from Dr. James E HI. B TsI Cox, Mount Ayr, Ia., which states Conductor---."Change for ,Mari-· that he has, in addition to his practice, taken charge of Dr etta! Change for .Marietta!'"'' Hick Passenger-"'Dni't kn-ow: Marshalrs Physio-Clinical' -Laboratories, recently located' at who the girl is, but if 'chip i' ·t , '....' : {·:·' 'a dime."'. ' (that place, ··'.. ·
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C l 'fisher 'Ieads Collego .:Net- ;List.
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C|||arl H. Fischer, of the PhilaCollege of Osteopathy, d -lphia has: been ranked No. 1 in '-the int-erc:llegiate singles, ranking for the season just closed. This an;, 'nouncement is made by R. Norris , _Williams, former national chamchairman of :as pion, who acted committee that ranked the ''ldthes^ :College players of the- present l L -" BS year.e-:' ;-- ' -:-0l ' FOOLING THE BUGS. Frank Anderson, Columbia- UnF: A motorist in the South once n Neer, Leland iversity; :Phil :?Stanford l:niversity; :enLs.ow E. stopped for water at a dilapated 'Yalem , are placed res- house where a barefooted man, iliamsi-of .pectively, two, three and four in leaning' against a rickety fence, : : was gazing meditatively across -'\ .. sf'ing les..i,- ' -'- : X *'':- '.' :: Fi:chier .is.a; sophmore student a field that had grown. up to :'-:t: 'the P.' C. 0. He also has a- weeds., "How is you cotton this brother, H:erert Fischer, prac- year?" the motorist asked. 0. C.wteo. "Well, sir," replied the man, '::ti:cing Osteopaty. D. M cngratulate Mr. Fischer upon "I ain't got no cotton. I didn't plant none cause I was afraid the :'is.'atta"inmiaents.'-; boll weevil might 'be bad." '-"How is your corn?'I, UNC2LE J OiE TALKS ON BOOTS. "Well," came the reply. "1 . , didn't plant no corn neither, for - .'' .. '" -..... '., :. "'L.. ' -::S,-';ral. members 'of congress I did'nt know if we'd git rain." The motorist hesitated. "How el:rer satting on the western steps tca'pitol, watching an un- are your sweet potatoes?" he of" usually beautiful sunset beyond asked at last at last.'-"Well, now, stranger," the man wooded hills of Virginia, ac-the fording to Ithe National Republi- replied, "you see'. it's just this ,can. The talking and looking, way; I didn't plant, no sweet percame to a sudden halt taters cause I was afraid the n :'-a . g wh:e. wstranger strolled: by bugs might' take them. No, sir, a ppair of old-fashioned I didn',t plant nothin' I just iwngring cowide boots, with his pants played' safe."-Youth's' ' Compan.. . 'trousers.s) stuffed': into ion.- .: (no,,' 'ncot,
r .however,

' S'mne boots can't stand wa ' ter;': neither can- some men."When a boot is well soaked it is a hard case; so is a man. "A boot to be much '.account -must have a mate; so must a man. ' "A boot when well heeled always feels comfortable; so doe's a man. "The less understanding there is in a boot the bigger it feels; so it is with a man."

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the- faculty D. M.' S. C. 0. faculty wish'to' ' September, 2'd,d of D., M.- S. C. 0. had one' of the thank all those that have respondmost enjoyable' picnics of. the ed to the: call for more, Students.' ;.''. '. We greatly appreciate your ef' season. * The Professors came with all forts. Keep the good work going. nembers of their families' , . _ : '. ' . the and had a regular picnic spread. As I Go on My Way Each brought his own basket food, prefilled with excellent By Strickland Gillilan pared by his own household. My life shall touch a dozen lives ' The younger members of'the before this day is donefaculty seemed to have the advantage, what they lacked in age Leave countless marks for good or ill ere sets this evening's suimi they made up in "fulfillment." They played ball, three corner- Shall fair or foul its imprint prove ,on those my life shall ed cat was the favorite. There : hail? were evidently -no Babe Ruths Shall benison my impress be, or among them. shall a blight prevail? After they had worn themselves to a "frazzle" in the varWhen to the last great reckoning ious games, they each expressed the lives I meet must go, himseif as having the best time Shall this wee, fleeting touch: 'of of his life, and fully prepared mine have added joy or, woe? for the work of the coming seaShall He who lo6ks their records son. o'er-of name and time and ' plac--SOMETHING, NEAT. -Say: "Here a blessed influence came," or "'Here is evil's O'Connor, coming into the :' trace?" r' school building' with his lip cut asked Tom Van de From out each point of contact of and bleeding Griff if he had some . adhesive my life with other lives '" tape. ' Flows ever that which helps the Tom-Yes, do down stairs 'and - one_-who for the' summit I'll fix you up in a minute. " strives. O'Connor started down stairs -Te troubled" souls encounteredand when about half way down doess it sweeten with its turned and" remarked: "Say, touch,: TLm, I want something neat you Or does it more embitter those emknow." bittered overmuch?" In another column we have an article from David H. 'Reeder, 0., founder of the Ph. D.,. club and author of the club books and lectures, a graduate of two medical and one osteopathic colleges, formerly Professor of Dietetics and Hygiene,, College '.of. Medicine and Surgery and -'of :Natural: Therapeutics, National Medical University' of Chicago, Fellow of'' the Allied Medical Association of America, and the American Association for Medico-Physical Research. Does love through every handclasp flow in sylpathy'ss caress?' " Do those that I have greeted know a newborn hopefulness? ' Are tolerance and charity the key' note of my soig As I go plodding onward. with earth's eager ,anxious. throng? My life must touch'a million lives . in, some way ere I- go From this dear world of struggle to the land I do not know. ' .So this the wish I always wish, theprayer I ever pray: Let my: lice help he other lives it-'-':" ' 'touches by the way." -From Osteopathic Magazinl Factory-made grass may' -now be bought by the yard, and laid down in full velvety growth on -golf courses or lawns. A British-' inventor has perfected a 'method of. sowing grass seed on a special fabric in a "factory" 'where the temperature is always that of spring or summer. These green carpets are laid down on flattened . surfaces, the fabric rots away-and the roots become incorpora'ti .with the soil.

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slowly remarked Uncle "Boys?:,t;'' El' :ioe, "'that'"s the' first pair of cowhides've' seen in Washington in d%.ozen- -or so years. ,How well ,.a . do I remember the old days when IIwore them and -greased them everylttle while with tallow! Andoh,' what a' j6b it was to upa'w-rk shine on them out in th ,woodshed when I wanted fto ! a on@ couting trip and "B'ISy by, do you realize that aconsiderable affinity exists bea -tween =men ,and boots? They both '*"have like weaknesses and good qualities, and are similarly affetd under certain circum-

GOT AWAY WITH ITM Verbosity and the "grand manner" will sometimes accomplish marvels. An elderly actor with stately. bearing and melodious voice went for a holiday to Sunderland. .Fishing one day in a forbidden stream he was accosted by the keeper, who asked him by what right he dared to wield the rod and line in private 'grounds." ' "'Bywhat right?" answered the melo-dramatic one. '"By that great right the vast and tower-ing mind has o'er instinct of the vulgar kind." jstances. The keeper stared at him for "Booots go on feet; so do men. a moment,' then touched his cap so have and said: "Beg pardon, I didn't have soles ',Boots nmen., know that."--London Tit-Bits.
"1::': :':Boots sometimes get -' tight;

Large Freshman Class

. ' sodo: men..: 1:--"A-boot will shine, if polished; .- . 0: -?·so ill aaman. ;::".Some boots have red tops; so '. hia;ve :s6me men.''' ::"Some boots lose their -soles; :: ' : :'men.: some so :d tanned; 'so are,-men fi"n:Bloots:ared - stly, 'in their. youth.' 'X
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The largest freshman class in years assembled at old D. M. S. ,C. 0. September 10th. They are a peppy, ambitious group "of young men, and women, and are Dr. J. E. Rogers, student' and already awakening the college instructor of D. M. S. C O. has -halls from their vacation nap, returned -to school- here after' a with conversation and laughter. pleasant summer with: the Midland Sevens Chautauqhta Co. Dr. "The:Log Boo.k" Rogers has been with this company for the last three years as joins the faculty in Welcome to , :'' ": a' lecturer. . .. our new freshman class.
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n nE tered - as second class -matter -February -3. 1923,

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PUBLISHED SEI
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LOPATHY.
Number:17
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October 1st, 1923
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U. S. Dept. of Labor,Children's Bureau, Washington
Astounding percentages of un:.der-nourishment and physical de-

smalli:.amounting to 85 per cent

.ects: were found in- a group of 6,015 young 'children- of Gary, :Indiana', studied by the U. S. Department of Labor through the

:Children's .Bureau. ' :-i-The' Gary study is the first in:itigation by the Bureatiu 'f the n:eglected' age i of " hildhood"':t wnbabyh6od and school. ': 'T.o reports have been written fi the resuits of this study. The first, called "Physical Status of Pre-School Children," was issued last year. The second, called
"Children of Pre-School: Age in

of th:vhole group. Less than 10 per /c:"it of the children studied in other words, were receiving diets appeared adequate ahich to th'nir needs. Almost three times!t|hbis- number. (29.2 per cent): diets (C) whose adead quacy! as highly questionable; and. nEIly two-thirds of the entire g Pup ;(60.5 per, cent) were found't .- ave diets plainly inh capabl, of covering.. all their bodiiy ''requirements, 58.4 per cent in Aing Dt group and the 2.1 pe :cent (5 times the percent:a· Jof A's): in the extremely inadeq. te E g ':group.,' ' -The report .analyzes in detail .the us'i of certain staple foods among the <children for instance: Only8.9 per cent of, all the childr. were getting a pint of milk da':ay and 57.2 per cent had no milI; at all todrink. Twothirds j:f the entire group were found to drink coffee habitually
anda 40 per cent to have it more

HOSPITAL SUPPLIES IN SOUTH, AMERICA

Gary, Indiana," and dealing with :general child welfare conditions, especially nutrition, is now in ; : . :. ... : .. press. . Results of the second study, made public today, show the poverty of diet among nearly all the children.
The diets of 6,015 children all

from two to seven years were classified into five groups, A, B, C, D, and E, according to . ' adequacy -and suitability for children of these years. Of. the "A" diet the report: says: 'The 'A' 'diet is not one diffi" cult of attainment. It is merely any diet capable of meeting the body's needs and administrated ,with.'some consideration for the: child's age and development. Moreover, such a diet need not, Sbe' an expensive one-milk, whole cereal, and fruit or vegetable daily being sufficient to allow a diet to qualify in this groupand it is the easiest possible kind of-.diet to prepare. This, being the case it might be expected that the large majority of the children would fall. into the 'A' diet group. "These facts notwithstanding, only 25 of' the 6,015 childrenless than half of one percent of the total number-were thus fortunate. FtirthermOre, the number lassed as 'having 'B' "
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than--once a day. "Milk is not the only desirable food which was little used," the report states, "since vegetables, -fruits, cereals and eggs were likewise conspicuously lacking. "The extreme poverty' of the diets is further- shown by the fact that nearly half- (45.5 per cent). of them -lacked as many as four of the foods usually included in a child's diet." Slightly over half of the children studied were given physical examinations. 64.7 per cent -were found to 'have:.- decayed teeth. 14.9 per cent had bone defeats which are the result of a deficiency diet. Only 4.8 per cent' had no defects at all. Over a third' had' more; than five distinct defects. Children' with adequate diets (classed as A and B) maed a better showing than the rest of the group. Over. four times as high a percentage of these children were free from defects as, of the children receiving deficient diets (classed as D D:and EE). . :r`he report also analyzes other corlditions affecting children: of this age, including co:mmunity: conditions, home and ^ family cOditions, h:using,. ecodnoiic : dtis chi:l care :anfd ;.i
Pie and dental care.''
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An active though limited market for hospital supplies and surgical instruments in Peru is reported to the Department of Commerce by Consul N. R,. Park, Callao. Public hospitals are own- THE PARABLE OF THE WAX:· ed and controlled by national : '. EAR... benevolent societies (Sbciedad de Beneficencia Publica) which Once upon a time there was a exist in. all the capitals the Prilgrim :who became;' afflict! tof' · " provinces of the Reepubl.& They with deafness in his good 90 . r are largely charity hospitals and behold in his travelst"he,, with limited pay wards and are corneth to an.. osteopath and supported by. revenue derived sayeth unto him, "My dland, I see from lotteries and real:: estate but hear not-I pray thee heeI: donated. to the institutions by me." -But he was not healed. 'the government. And ,he journeyed onto a secoind 'The army hospital and subor- and a [third osteo but was ::t dinate hospitals. are under the healed. :And his- courage being supervision 'of the' Health De- good he' cometh to a fourth D. . partment of the Army and Navy. and said unto him: "My laird; I Surgical instruments and ap- pray thee release me- from this paratus are usually purchased di- affliction. Ears I have but hear rect from the- foreign manufac- not." And this D.. O. who was a turers by the institutions and in- physician said: "How cometh dividuals by means of 'catalogs thou retaineth, this affliction so and who generally make ar- long when all about you are so rangements for payments thru many of my brethren?" And the some bank. A few local dealers Pilgrim answered, "Many calls I carry. surgical supplies and in- have made but you have' I chosstruments, but their stocks' are en to give the relief-I se'k." And said the D. 0.: "';What .did very small. There is only a limited mark- the many find in your ear?" An"fd. et for American' hospital sup- he answereth, "They findeth not plies in British Guiana through for they seeketh not, but sought the fact that these- are almost only the kinks in my cervicals entirely purchased from Govern- and snapped them. thereupon." . ment funds for use in 'hospitals Whereupon this D . who "was a which the Government control- physician, opera glassed'-the led. Practically all orders 'are auricle and beheld therein wax placed in England through the in abundance. And h:e ivoryed out Crown agents in London. Two or the wax, sent the -'patient f.orth three firms of chemists and healthi and proclaiming the 'virdruggists however, carry a small tues of osteopathy. From which parable. may destock of surgical instruments duct: : X. . .. and hospital supplies, Consul May wax full of enthusiasmChester W. Davis, Georgetown, informs the Department of Com- but few enthuse full of wax.: merce. There are two modern hospi- PRIVILEGE IN FRIENDISHI?. tals in Puerto Castilla. Both are operated by a large American If ever a man is to be a real company which purchases its anything, the sense of privilege; supplies through its office in the will be the sign. A physician 'to. United States, says Consul W. L. whom .doctoring is not a priviBeaulac in a report to the De-, lege -is no real doctor. A teacher partment of 'Cmmerce. All io whom teaching is not ';a, iriuipiment ' is 'A: erica^. With rilee mis to r:al takiaier'. A the exception " '' acotii^a:! ~~WiY~~e~~is ~Inor f~~ sV [6itloii 6f WhkI' are purhased

etc., are purchased in the United States. A new hospital in process of construction in the city of Puerto Castilla to replace the one now in operation will have asproximately two hundred and j forty- beds. -

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ayr .it Roplayer, .is ruled out, A Letter from "Buck" hard time seeing this man and Graceland Battles Still I class on account of thebrokof a I meo Doctor of the class room as -the :_-_-: ___ -X . : to 6- 6 Tie I en rib. His line is still in good one, When he informed me that Brainerd, Minn. shape so we know his Juliet is II had -he for a long time past been Sept. 16 1923. But the paper which carried I being well entertained. Is it a member of the National Rifle that headline did not tell the still the same Sheba, Hank? l Dear Mr. Log Book:like to tell the stu'Association of America, his abil- half of it. should ity -asas a a marksman was acmarksman was ac It is very much to the credit ity dents of D. M. S. C. 0. of a very It Pays to Advertise counted for. of the boys that they even scorthat has been happy experience A few weeks ago we ran an ad us ed under conditions. Leaving All of these sports gave my share since I came to Brainexperienced that a healthy appetites and we surely here at eight in the morning in "The Log Book" for Dr. W. N. erd. -I have justice to Mrs. Bachman's and traveling under weeping Vincent of Red Oak, Iowa, who -did man may be a dual man 'with a banquet. Everything was so in- skies until four o'clock in the af- wished to sell his practice. We dual personality, 'each personality being in mood and disposi- viting and the round table talk ternoon with nothing to eat in have just received notice from Doctor stating that he has tion by environment. By meeting' so jolly ithat the digestion of our the interim (or any other part the E. Bachman a few large portions became an easy of their anatomy) they trotted sold his practice and expressed with M. Dr. to out on a heavy field ,, at five his gratitude. We are pleased weeks ago at Outing, Minn.; has matter. So the day was spent-and in o'clock. Due to the lateness of have helped the Doctor and.are taught me this, that, "Folks are the evening "Daddy," Irene and the hour and the inclemency of willing to do the same for othnot always what they seem." .I Four years with Dr. M. E. I built a roaring campfire. With the weather the quarters were ers. "The Log Book" is published me to the 'Doctor's family and mine short. Bachman did not teach twice a month and is sent to :Osround, we spent a Both teams showed up poorly teopathic physicians in the know him as I learned to know classes, him recently. is To his the big, mighty happy time, telling stor- under the handicap, but the States. Foreign Countries and Isies, toasting marshmellows and always Dr. Bachman work of Hannan at quarter was land Possessions. If you have lkind, excellent teacher, discipli- singing. We tried to duplicate one of the outstanding features contributions that will be of innarian and friend. I have fouind the "Curbstoners" but it could'nt' of the game. Curtis and Wells out that he is also an "honest- be done. "Skin-a-ma-rink" refus-, of the Gracelaand line did some terest to the profession at large, we. will be glad to publish to-goodness" sportsman and an ed to be done with Cicero J. good work. same. ardent lover of God's great out- Shapes, Billix, Mike andJimmy. The lineups: pass too Good times always of-doors. Stiil-6 Freshman Smoker When I learned that "Daddy" quickly and home-time always L. E. -_ O'Dell_ spending comes before we are ready to and his family were Phi Sigma Gammas gave a ._ _, ...L. T. Sweezey _ their annual outing at their cot- goOn leaving, the Doctor in- Higelmire ___.-...<,I G. smoker to the freshman class formed me that he was teaching Lee .-..... tage on Lake- Washburn, near , .. ;____-.£ ___'C. last Tuesday night at their new J. G. home at 1109, 18th street., Outing, Minnesota, you can bet -technique this year with Dr, Staples -Iota Tau Sigma also entertainas assistant. I am sure Walker . ...- T. R. . that I lost fvery little time get- Campbell ting up there to see them. I that I envy his classes this op- Thomas ,--. E. ed the freshman with a smoker Friday, Sept. 15th. found them hidden away in one portunity just as I know they Hannan -B. .Q have of the coziest log cabins of man's envy me the day I spent with Davis _ Other entertainments H. -L. making, located in one of the the Doctor at his camp. H. been held for the freshmen, but Murphy _R. I was happy to learn that Dr. Graham most beautiful spots our MinneF. B. have not as yet been reported to .. "The Log Book." sota Northland has to afford. Mary Golden is again on the Graceland-6 let me tell you, that the faculty and I ammorethansure Cudworth Folks L. E. wonderful site the students of D. M. S. C. 0. Doctor chose a ~ WANTED _L. T. ----__ for his summer home -because are more than pleased with the Franklin L. G. ........ Shank- ,.. An Osteopath with some capithis-- country is the garden spot instructors in the various de- Vernon -. C tal, that would be willing to inof the U. S.,-its Nature Won- partments. R. G. vest in a health resort. Main ,___----Come up into this Northland, Walden :' _,fderland. R. T. building has 104 -rooms, four The woods are full of Curtis Folks, it was great to be met folks. Isiasmett it "Daddy these Folks, by was great to pleasant _R. E. Medicinal Springs. A beautiful ...._.I locations. Ibeam enthusias- Wells amid by~ -"Daddy amid these pleasant tic over the outlook and very Leeka Q. B. place and well located. Present ------surroundings. Dressed in his L. H. owner wishes to, take rest. DeLong uch in love with the country. Butterworth ___- _R. khakies, with a 38 calibre pistol H. ... . Address Box 93, Richmond, With best S. C. in his belt, he invited sports, cess of D, M. wishes0,for the suc- France . B. Ind. -F. and "hello" fishing, target shooting, bathing, to all the old gang, Substitutions-Buirge for Hanrowing and a hike through the Fraternally, nan, Bone for Davis, Brown for D. M. S. C. 0. Entertains woods. We followed out his rE . C. Herzog, Murphy, Nicholas for O'Dell, On Thursday evening, Sept. te Bank Bldg., Br program, missing nothing. Every O'Keefe for Walker, O'Connor for 28, Des Moines Still College sport we engaged in was spiced Higelmire, Briggs for Shanks, gave a dance at -the Woman's Brainerd, Mnn. with Osteopathy, h6wever. I had Kelley for France, Shanks for Club building in honor of the so many questions to ask "DadBriggs. Great Was the Fall new freshmen class.' The affair dy" about. He gave me many Referee-Scott of Kellerton. was well attended, there being Thereof little helps and I felt that I was over 175 present. getting a first rate post gradHospital Notes Jim Brown, one of our foot uate course thrown in with a ball players, had a set-back the day's outing. Double Trouble Ted Kapfer is at- the Des You would be surprised to see other evening while at practice It is reported that Bobby TorMoines Hospital convalescing Dr. Bachman rowing and fishing. with the pig-skin. They were nell fell out of an apple tree the I know I was. But when some charging the rope line when after an operation for appendiother day (or night). We do not citis. ~ one suggested bathing and the Jim's chin came suddenly and Albert Graham, one of pur quite understand this but it Doctor swam and got away with unexpectedly in contact with is nursing an must be true. Also Bobby exthe high dives, that would have the rope. The result was that foot ball players, perienced another shock when defied gravity and injured ankle. We hope thathe .1 been a credit to any old sailor Jim's feet his be in condition to get .4 best "Sweetie" took her picwill soon and later won over everyone in started heavenward. back into the game and finish ture away from 'him. 'Tuff" luck How does it feel, Jim, to have target shooting, I was dumbBobby, but don't get .disc6urag, founded. 'He was so at. home, in your gluteal region caressed by the season. Hank HAni'an, also a foot ball a Mother'Earth?
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David Skidmore Soph-B, has SHEBIDAN, IOWA, COAL DX. gather the fruits.-irWilam 'UV.ERE N DES: 3OINE., ':" :':''":::.: .beenh:laidcup :withi/m.mpsand a Temple. .. . ' .. ' |See Davis, and on Pretty-severe:' caseofthem,,-. .....~. ' , - _ .- - , ~ DB.|Davisdoes the Some wit said,' Daewould ner, Soph. The Official Publication .of No man ever sank under the heitruking. burden of -today,that the weight DES MOINES STILL COLLEGE :most likely :feelik:e substitut- .loading, 'Bill does t out ing one letter for two (sw) and Suit case loads-. rice is more t.han a man can bear.OSTEOPOTHY. ' . . adding thee. words-of-a.. How sight. George Macdonald, ~ ~ ~~ See Bill and Dutch. ,-. President ................... S. L.,Taylor about it, Dave? .i:We feel for yot anyway., Just because a horse is wiling Business Manager....M. D. Cramer That D. M. S. C.0. has on the to pull, it is by no means necesitor......:.... ..... C. Ballinger THE PMH SIWA` AMAH list of its student body, men and :sary:'that he be over burdened. iy women who are fighters and real M3OVED). * t ^,:^',,. , .. :teopai, . Limitation .WitI't The Phi Sigma Gammah.ve go-g.getters, is evinced :by the fact Our Own', Din moved into their new':' homueat t'.ihat during summer vacation 'i MISSIONS: .,1109Eighteenth' set, and 'o they were busy, some in their J The new freshman class hai Sunday afternoon Sept 30had own home locality and some brought us another tcartooisft; :Whe .me: one has dne:" some: "open,, house." staying over- in. .Des Moines;. ' . from' (W umbus, Ohio. So it i finet.hing: or :you--'you al-most Despite" the 'very inclement busy, putting it o:ver to ma it ati s t ti me ~ th h a ~ h_' o invarably right away quick tell weather a goodlynumber:'of the possible' to get back to :olfege. B|/6kwishes to introdn: t. its :.s£Oflp,- your'.:f:riends .about it, Faculty, Sorority and othr, Far- this fall term to hit it. betweeni E ?'of ;'':[[.'*l ,y^ ^*: Sdon'te you? k Wit rry i-ternity members graced the pc. the eyes, even harder this, yar r a^ders, M r. ILa thi is:sue appear the first ork , No wt j s l t t e h e rt t casion with their presence. Nei- than' last. for "The log Bo k th t as heart talk, honiestly. How many ghbors also paid a visit and all It is estimated that ninetyplr. .been submitted:'by Mr. uk times' during. your month this were loud in their praise of the cent of£ our student', bo"dyia IWe wish.'tothanhk him |'er much suii.mmer at home didyou uggest Well appointed and finely. equip- seeing themselves thru: itherin|: for.his conribi:utin adopra Osteopathy ^to some one Jyo ped house now the home of the whole or in part. ' him fof 'his ility.: We h e Delta, Chapter. ki"ew. who0: -sone cmplained ' : Among some of the work which. amy'have more from .:his"pen.: The boys are greatly indebted engaged the time of our.folks is:'isrder? '':.':: :. ' .': I : sure: did tlht very thing and to and greatly appreciate the for the summer months were: HKAPING . M"ASUI.: work of the Sorrity members, Farm work, bank work, real es: ::' ':.:: : -I ::.~. .:'ot them started in the right for their :p:artf' in the arrange- tate, mill work, railroad, maga If we take th.e g.X.lwei, rection:r with ailments ranging -. 1 a fr'om a dislocated hip to hay ment of :theew. house fo ?the: zine selling, general office worl~ Jasking no questions,we| I *occasion.,':- . ,::: ' :: <::. hotel aand restaurant work, ge-, have heaeping zmeeasuire6,T geatV fever, and had some satisfactory There s bt' one detrimental eral store, auto factory and oe . gis are not got .by ayi , reports tha "They never knew.. feature in the whole scheme. might go on down the : list 'o -erythingpgodsnh g y *f the breadth and s.-ope of OsThe:house. 's haunted.a"'. ."':.::" ':'.. ;:':( teopathy. . hard labor, not to. :"mention' the: -Ruskin. Justa' ew nighs, aftertakin work of upper classmen n four' 1 <' It is as has been said many ' the house ;over, there were heard: professional lines. Some of these' times a "Process of Education." FOR SALE. all :over the house, wierd sounds, s'pent the time in offices·and in, 'How :.are they going to know WinnaMi. moans and' noises as of a re'stle.ss looking after the practices ofes ;:excep't they are told and who spirit dragging-- chains about.:. taBlished Osteopaths. in the field, Des Moines Still College, will tell them if .we who are .,Des .:Moines, Iowa., T'.')he:' bos . were? :very m': ys uch aIll o.which' is .to their, lasting -most: vitally interested don't do Because of breaking down, perturbed to say the least, and c.redit,: bernefit and ex'perience. it healt)i I am selling my! practice' it' is safe to say that if any of The', man who digs it out for immediately. ''' : "': ·.. That fellow who said, "He them got a hair cut the morning .I am located in a town of:20,-^ t'hat:tboteth not, his own horn after.one of these periods ofun- himself and knows' how hard it the:same shall not be' tooted," rest, it will grow out pompa- comes and where it::comes from, 000 : i inhabitants in .'Minneotat is the man who is going to make State.. Norial S :i : l athi sure said a big thing. our.r . ' ^ " . , ..^ / .' - the; 'best use of what' he gets, Boys Colleg6e, and other school a ::::And away::back there in Bible Iack.'.of space here prevents ti:mes, a fellow by the name of any further comment. Those in- whether it be dollars or' know- are located here. Best location. ; in the city, elevator servce,, . ^ : * 'David said, "The Lord has done terested in spooks can gain fur- ledge.,^ So with this indomitable 'spir- good offices. :great things for me, for'-which I ther information by applying to it which seems to characterize ·Collections last year and year -:"am: glad," and he didn't just sit Lee, from Paw Paw. the student body -of D, M. S. C. b:efore $7,000 'or above. This year .around and be glad and happy 0.Wea look for nothing but for a 4will equal or surpass. Largely himselft;: his · object> in telling it A FIGHT FOR REPUTATION. big line :of Big Successes in this office practice. Office ,reatnent was that others might know the t he 'iggest of Fields "OSTEO- $2.50. ·- 'Practice can 'e'asily':b Lo:rd and be glad and happy too. .:A man: tgoing along a lonely PATH'Y."', " '" ::::" bbhilit 'to$10,000 if DoctOr can: :'!NowIlet .usjust pinch our- road was set upon by two high-: take care of it. selves a bit /and wake up to the waymen. .He fought disperately, Far; away ithere in the sunshine Office equipped with McManus." :great opportunity that is all but was finally overcome and are rmyHighi,aspirations. I can- DeLuxe Table; Ear, Nose,Throa around our door: and be "Doers searched. All that the bandits nriot reach tihem, but I can look operating chair, diagnot0ic i.nand not only Hearers of the round was -a dime. "Search him up and seeitheir beauty, believe struments such as Holmes Nas--ii d':" .t w- ' W d again," said one. ",Hewould nev- in them,?and try to follow where" Pharyngoscope, tuning ''orks·i, 'r put up-a fight like that: for a they ld'.Lo-uisa May Alcott.. ':" etc. Aloe -.Lighting El'ctrie Ca-. 1 : r " -If the way the Freshmen lim e." ^^^^^ ^ ' :" ^ : * * 'binet :and many other !instru-: sang (?) in first assembly: is 'ariy :-Th.ey searched him again, but You"Uhavie:not 'fulfilled every mehtS. Office so arranged thati! i'dication of their ' enthusi"sm: could _ind'ino more. uty unless you have fulfilled e t;:reating ::can be continuous and; nd pep: theyshouild methingsi "N'ow.::.,teli ::-,me,"- asked the ' 'hat of'being pleasant. Charles no waits for dressing. ''Equipped' hum in more ways^^ an-one p-o kesni an,- W y ou fo gh so BUxt-n: uxton." ' .' will invoice: between $1200andL ; r |g n e arly| h a d to kill 'y u " *' $1,30o. If i' can sell -':toL:gveI W AN~~hl~ T:~A SO P H" "Wel' answered' the victim, Good intentions are, at least, possession at once I will'take... -B.O'" Soe ericaion forhis trac-t 'the truth .of the matter :is I the seeds of. good actions; and $1,000 cash. This includes every?/:..: heasothe^ .food c6uld pass more lidn't want my financial condi- very. one ought to sow them and 'thing. except books.:. : eas'iiy. -Aswer.thru,,"The .Lg: tion exposed."- Harper's 'Maga-: leave-it to the soil and the sea-, Frternally, ^solik ^ sons whether he or any other Dr. L. Upton Millei\ sine.

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* ltntered as second class Or iFeruary 3; 1923. a2tte . -&at -theo fpos't~ office at Des Moines. Iowa, under the act of August 24th. 1912.

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Acceptance for mailing ai special rates. of .!Posaga provided 'for in section 1103. act of Oct 3 :1917. authorized Febi. 3ai19 J.:

PUBLISHED:^.SEM-Lt" . -PUBLISHED SEMIMONTHLY BY THE DES M1OINES STILL Volume 1
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November 15th, 1923.
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:Post: Graduate Course
The -first session of the 'TAYLO:-'CLINIC field.. membership .- as:held at Des Moines, the 16th w and 17th of October. There were- sixt-seven members present 'and a number of, visitors, mak'i:ng- about ninety-five in attend-

"Gussie" Weimers , I ................ fI

-TomVandegrift.
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Dr. C. B. Gaard Killed -; in Train Accident
Dr. C. B. Gaard, -Fort Dodge, Iowa, was instantly' killed Wednesday evening, October ..10th, ' when his car, in which he and;, friend were driving, was run into -by a passenger .train.. The accideift occurred at a point between Rockwell City and Following.Fort Dodge, Iowa. the crash, thehe- car caught fire and ' : Dr. Gaard. was burned- beyond :" recognition. His companion.was :' also killed. 'Dr. Gaard was a graduate in the 1919 class of the Des Moines Still Cqllege of Osteopathy .'and a year ago studied the 'Electron-:' :at the. 'ic. .Reactions of Abrams McManis College, Kirksville, Mo.: He was successful both :in- -' :teopathy and E. R.A.' Hislosswill : 'be keenly felt in both profes- : sions, for he was an enthusiast / and a worker. It will be a brightly-arrayed ( group of students that will ti:en; train' next Friday morning, in'. company with the footballn teail, for Kirksville. Even Angus and.Dr. S. L. Taylor have donned the:' white 'and purple caps for the' occasion. ; The football team -is going'' down there to conquer if possi-;' :f, ble the honors, or. in terms war times, "Bring home.the bacon." '. " , : '"'-: : -:;. :So, Doctors, if you hear a orumbling sound Friday morning-do not fear an earthquake, for:;; it is only the Des Moines, Still. College Student Body starting: southward to do their part'- in spuring: on to their ' uttermost our football players. Listen f6or-, the music in the air, too.-.. It.ll be there, for our band'is going: along filled to overflowing with: music and enthusiasm.... -.',:.:,,

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.'The two days were filled chuck .full from 8 A. M. to 5 P. M. Besides the resident members of the' TAYLOkR CLINIC who were n 'the program, the men best .known were. Dr. Gaddis, National Secretary; Dr. Laughlin, President of .the: A. T. S. C. O.; and -lr., :'Downing" of Kansas ''City. N'Me'ver :has there been a meeting : , such intense interest and enEverybody had exitlusiasm. pressions of most cordial endorsement of the innovation and Tom is one of our pioneer foot"Gus" is to Still College 'Bassomeone said it was a real renket- ball what Heinz is to pick- ball men. When athletics were aissance.. revived at Still College after the slump .caused by the war,- T~m , .- The -profession -evidently is 'Captai Weimers Will- play his, ready to accept educational ad- fourth 'year of college basket- Was on he first Varsity football vantages, and it is by this move- ball this coming season under the team; he has remained there in m,.-inent 'that the opportunity is colors of the "Purple and White." succeeding years, .and. has .always p.rovided whereby Post-Graduate Of these four years, two of them been a hard fighter throughout his, football career. The digni: erk is made. available. he hasJ,een captain of the Varfied seniors claim Tom as one of sity. This is truly si gnificant of ':The: program consisted altotheir members, -thereby spelling ,.geer of practical stuff. Real his basket-shooting -skill and, his his last year fori athletics in old team work. lecture work was eliminated Still College. from the program as far as pos' Our Captain represents a We all look with regret to his 'asible,': and that is doubtless why man of unusual; athletic sports- absence next year on the gridt''ere was so much enthusiasm manship and a' personality to be iron. He has always been a modexpressed by the attendants.- copied by his teammates. Fair el of loyalty to his school, a Tie 'TAY.LOR ,CLINIC STAFF OF play and clean 'sport is his motstaunch supporter of all ,college MOINES ' ENERAL HOS- to, two requisites often sought .. enterprises, and an excellent stuO '.PITAL :-were hosts to the field but too often found wanting in dent of Osteopathy.. members:' during both days of the athletits. ',nvention. During the dinner "Gussie" plays as .a senior this Mistress of Farm House-Yes, were coming season. He intends to be h:o trs various. members I can give you a job. You can elailled upon'for little talks and the captain of the most powergather the. eggs if you are sure enjoyable hours were -fu basketball 'team ever devel- that you won't. take any. 'tetmost ; lnt. '-. : * oped by. D. M. S. C. 0. Hobo-Youse could trust me ": it. is intended to make'. this a "Gussie!" WE ARE WITH wid' anything,- lady.: I" was' the manager of a bath house for permanent affair, and the'prob- YOw!!! fifteen months and never' took a : . .4lities are another session will bath. "Be h;elMd some time in the spring.

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Dr. Hersfelt Honored

Tourist-What's that beast? Dr. Hersfelt, of Detroit, Mich., a': razuh-back Native-That's was recently elected chairman hawg, suh. Tourist-Why is he 'rubbing 'How do you feel?". asked the of. the publicity committee. of [Detroit. himself against the tree? p:hysician' who :had. been' called Dr. Hersfelt, is a graduate of hisstropping Native-Jest ·t:. i;attend- the 'seamstress. .:' sew, sew, but I seam: D. M. S C. 0;., and we together self, 'suh. Just -stropping hisself. -,,' since you put those stitch- with his .host of friends, wish wirse: ito congratulate the Doctor upon If Lung Power were wisdom, ",;o ."i'in. ,- id;e. a :e : We 'know. !we know some men 'who'd never :'T* doctor hemmed and told his,, recent success. losem an argument. . ' that he will make good. . med sI n.;, liewld e EADING. .., W Y . .

For Sale ," Iowa. practice.: Established:2 years. City of 25,000, ideal loca-: tion. Reasons for selling'- given. to inquirer. Don't answer un-" less you mean business. '.: Address "Log Book" Stil 'ol.-

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Atlas Club Notes

The Weaker Sex

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Things Work Out

By Edgar A. Guest. By Belle Fligeman The men of the freshman One more victory will be adda. I class were given an Education..- My Pa, he says my Ma can't vote Because it rains whe '.., ed to our schedule when the D. it wouldn't, Oct. 8, evening, 'Cause she's the weaker sex, M. S. C. 0. football team enters Smoker Monday e I old club rooms at 13th An' she can't understand the Because men do what - .7 '.y:ft Kirksville on November 2nd. In at the shouldn't our modest way, we have made and Grand Ave. things Because crops fail and plans g I Dean C. W. Johnson gave them this prediction. The entire stuThat trouble an' perplex wronga very interesting analysis of dent body will be there to see II past and future as The minds of even men like him Some of us grumble all day long.' the present, it fulfilled. ]But somehow in spite of the care I That's voted all his life"Osteopath," Osteopathic Physiour record is an enTo date, and doubt, "Osteopathic Physi- An' bein' weak, she couldn't cian," and viable one. In five games, we cian and Surgeon." It seems at the last that things stand are undefeated, we have scored work out. Dr. M. E. "Daddy" Bachman The governmental strife. 57 points to our opponents' 6, was introduced as an Osteopaonly one of the five teams hav- thic Physician and talked as Because we lose where we hoped ing crossed our goal line. Three such, in the way we know and I says to Pa: "Pa, you're so to gain, strong, of these were victories; two of love so well. Dr. E. J. Marshall Because we suffer a little pain, them tie games, both having been I urged on them the necessity of An' know so many thingsBecause we work when we'd like played away from home. He didn't to playorganized co-operation at pres- (An' Pa, he smiles. Still and Graceland College, ent as students and later on as Some of us, whimper along life's know the first game of the season, end- practicing physicians. Dr. J. P. way. My compliment had strings), as day always foled in a 6 to 6 tie. The game Schwartz, owing to the fact you're sittin' talkin' But somehow, But while was played in a sea of mud and that it was the birthday of the lows the night, to in semi-darkness after our play- announcement of X-Ray by RoMost of our troubles work out The men down at the store, ers had been on the road from entogen, explained something of all right. eight in the morning to four in its uses. Afterward a little ci- Why, Ma, she's on her hands and knees, the afternoon. der and a few doughnuts were Because we cannot forever smile, floor. A-scrubbin' up the Because we must trudge in the Next we motored to Oskaloosa. consumed. Come again freshdust for awhile, Revenge was ours to the tune of I men. The Atlas Club is making ex- She does your washing', makes Because we think that the way 13 to 0, quite well repaying our is long-three-point defeat of last year. I tensive preparations for practiyour shirts, the beneSome of us whimper that life's An' works hard all day long, October 13, we were in a posi- cal work this year for It also. all wrong. tion to show off at home, again L fit of its own members. An' then she goes to meetin's, L expects to bring some interestBut somehow we live a]ri :r victory was sweet over Buena I when the student body r sky grows bright, Vista, our conquerors of a year ing things to There's talk of rightin' wrong, And everything seems to worls I as a whole, which will be an,ago. The score of 6 to 0 is an That's goin' on at the schoolnounced later. out all right. indicator of the battle staged. house, The next Thursday, St. AmI The parents of a Louisville 3 Or when butchers sell bad So bend to your trouble and meet brose met us on their field in r meatyour care, I baby were seriously considering Davenport, another semi-lake of its condition and after talkingr An' she has your supper ready For the clouds must break and a gridiron greeted our warriors. the sky grow fair, time the faI here The game ended 0-0; a moral together for some Let the rain come down, as it ther said: victory for D. M. S. C. 0. When you come home to eat. must and will, "Yes, we must get an osteoOnce more we entered foreignI I But keep on working and hoping I path for the baby." fields on the 26th of October, ,p talk too much, 4 still. The child, who was sitting or My Pa, he says I Central College took the "0" An' I should hold ray tongueFor, in spite of the grumblers near by, looked up wher mark, we took "32." Coach Sut- the floor - The reason I can't understand who stand about, ton used the majority of his ma-- he heard the remark and reIs 'cause, he says, I'm young. Somehow, it seems, all things plied: terial in this game. 2 "Daddy, get me a billy goat ; But I can't see that Ma's so weak, work out. Last year we played a 12to 12 Nor knows much less than Pa; tie; Friday the result was decis-1 I'd lots rather have it!"-LouLOVE LIKE LICKER isville Courier-Journal. I think he's SCARED of governive. 1. The first drink raises one's ment WHO NEXT? We ask: spirits. CHARACTER. "The PONE PUSHERS OF THEE That's managed by my Ma! 2. The second increases them. our cry!!!!!! A. S. O." is 3.The third makes you dizzy. ,We sow a thought and reap 4. The fourth makes you more The people think they want to CLINGERS. habit andI THE BEST an act; we sow a T they so. a Mrs. Shortley was discussing DI reap a character; we sow ai run the government when T 5. The fifth-you know noththe latest fashions with a young character and reap destiny.- don't know how. They even think it is a sacred duty to vote when ing. lady caller. "Did you say yourr Thackeray. 6. The morning after - you they haven't got a glimmering father was fond of those clingAof an idea as to what they are swear, "Never Again." ing gowns, May?" "Yes, he likes 9 0 The use of character is to be one to cling to me for aboutt a shield against calumny.- _ voting for. They may even I NO CASE think they are running the govthree years."-Sheffield (Eng Burke. Judge: 'TWhat's ti.e. charg-eit but they are not. They ernment, land) Telegraph. Officer: "This mam, 'os. eaugh: a are yanking at it here and You cannot dream yourself ia stealing eight bottler mfbee.r" Ford. THAT. there.-Henry HE DIDN'T MEAN - character, you must hammer an(i t^t Judge: "DischargAA newly married widow over.Iyourself one.-Froude. forge .-.. make a case of eigh-t q -:art. 9 heard her second husband telling5 A character is like a kite. It Lord Jeff. a friend: "Yes, I got a wife an(d s He that respects himself ibc will never soar unless held by a four children to boot." and "There may be a substitute in a y "You just try booting m:7 safe from others; he wears 2 string of good judgment, none can pierce.- - balanced by common sense.-An- the world for good nature, but YChildren," said the lady with vi i- coat that we don' yknow what it is." onymous. I gor.-Louisville Courier-Journal 1L Longfellow,
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1923-24 will be the hardest eveA Serum-Comic Tragedy made by Still College Most oJ the larger colleges of the state By J. Edmund V. Cooke and several outside will be sched The Official Publication of She was a doctor's child, and he DES MOINES STILL COLLEGE uled for the coming season. Embraced the opportunity We are expecting big things OSTEOPOTHY. her from the basket-ball team this From all disease to make ] :~~~~~~ free Pre.sident .....-.......... S. L. Tayloi year. With absolute immunity. Business Manager... M. D. Cramei

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College Yells :
We are Osteopaths, Osteopaths, Curing every ill, Without a single pill. We are Osteopaths, Osteopaths, We're from the S. C. 0. Tune-(Iowa Corn Song.)
Well man, sick man, dead, stiff,

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Osteopathy

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Limitation

Cripple is Cured
Mendal Hoagland, aged ,8, of New Castle, Pa., left McKinley Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, Tuesday, able for the first time in Mhis life to walk on the bottoms of his feet. Born with club feet, the lad had previously been operated upon four times. None of the operations enabled, him to walk properly, however. He still had to walk with his toes turned in, resting his weight on the outside: of his foot and unable to touch his heels to the ground. The operation at McKinley Hospital was for the purpose of removing excess bone in his feet. Wedges of bone were removed, several ligaments adjusted, and ,leaders strengthened. The foot was. then straightened, closing the gap whence the bone was taken, and the cut edges of bone were sewed together. The boy spent two months in the hospital. Dr. John M. Hiss, orthopedic surgeon, performed the operation.-Columbus Dispatch, Oct. 11, 1923. -Dr. H. E. Clybourne, who graduated from Des Moines Still College of Osteopathy, May 24 of this year, is practicing with Dr. Hiss in Columbus. .

"And first," said he, "as I inCut 'em up, hash 'em up, what's On Friday night, October 12 dorse the diff. the Axis Club entertained the Prevention of diphtheria, Humerous, tumerous H20, rushees of the season with a the- This antitoxin from a horse We're the gang from the S. C. atre party, after which they '''. Should kill some bad bacteria. . 0. went to the Shops, where dainty After the football game, Sat- "This vaccine virus from a cow Bones and ligaments, blood and urday, October 13, the Axis girls (And I indorse it fully) pus, entertained with a chop suey dinShould help along, and anyhow What 'n the hells the mattet ner and theatre party. with us, 'Twill make the child feel A number of the Axis girls Nothing at all, nothing at all, 'bully.' We're. the gang that cures .em enjoyed the game at Oskaloosa -among them, Dr. Irene Bachall. "Of snake-bite serum just a man. touch; Oska wow, wow, Skinny wow, Mrs. Messerschmidt entertained We get it from a rabbit . the rushees with a waffle party Which we have bitten up so much wow, Osteopathy, Ribs raised, bones set, at her home on 33rd St. It really likes the habit. We cure you bet, Osteopaths. "Some meningitis toxin, too Head like a tack, : Would better be injected. , Belly like a tub, When he is litt1i the big A it Osteopath, Osteopath, rub, 'rub guinea-pig we strain girls kiss him. through rub. .. .. When he is big, the little girls To get it disinfected. kiss him. Rah, Rah, rah, rah, (15 time. If he is poor, he is a bad man- "Some various serums of my own Team, Team, Team. ager. I'm rather sure will answer; sssss-ssssssh-B-O-O-M, If he is rich, he is dishonest. I make them for all troubles W-H-I-S-T-L--E, STILL! known, If he needs credit, he can't get From freckles up to cancer." it. Help! If he is prosperous, his credit is solicited. Alas! Alas! for all his pains, Oh Muse, I cry now to thee If he is in politics, it is for The end was scarce desirous. Hear, oh now hear, my plea, graft. She soon had nothing in her veins Incline, your attentive ear If he is out of politics- he is But various kinds of virus. Toward this turrling mundiane not patriotic. sphere. . If he does not give to charity, Part horse, part cow, part sheep, he is a stingy cuss. part goat, Give me, Oh give me a brain,If he gives to charity, it's for Her laugh was,- half a whinny. That possibly I might retain show. "Dear me," said he, "she's half A bit of physiology, or perhaps If he is actively religious, he's a shoat ' of pathology a hypocrite. -And badly mixed with guinea. For with me it is raising Cain. If he is not religious he's a sinner. "A girl who bleats and chews her The soldiers' bonus we know, If he is affectionate, he is a cud The ins-and-outs in detail softy. Will never make a woman; Autos, accidents, autopsies, If he cares for no one, he is I'd better get some good clean We now know, they prevail. cold blooded. blood If he dies young, there was a And make her partly human." Obese folks suffer, in fact, great future before him. Their equators are muchv ti -Exchange. If he lives to an old age, he large, .. . .' has missed his calling. "Hey, papa, there's a fly in my They can't go by like a skiff But much like a freighter barge. Since the road is so rocky, soup!" let's cheer up and make the best "Vell Ikey, eat the soup un: til you come to the fly, then tell But as for that dreaded disease, of it.. the waiter to give you another And its pathological cause, It's certainly not with ease Algy-Dearest, I've. often plate.", We understand its laws. longed to tell you all that's in my heart. WANTED-An inventor who Miss ; Bright-(yawning) No, will devise some way of taking Mrs Busy: "What's your hu Algy; tell me all that's in your the "din" out of "dinner" and band's average income?" head-it won't take so long. putting the "rest" into "restaurMrs. Hank: "Oh, 'about mid ; : -Boston Transcript. ant." night." ' : ""'\ , :"

Axis News

MAN

Basket Ball
Basket-ball prospects have never been better in the history of 'D). M. S. C. 0. athletics About 22 men are getting in condition to don their basket-ball uniforms. A number of the prospects have started -practice in the gymnasium, while many others are already in the prime of condition, due to their football training. The .Freshman class has brought many men basket-ball ~reps," they, together with our squad of 12 veterans, should round out a machine nearing perfect. '

All of last year's Varsity are in college, with the exception of Weihl, and -all intend ito play on the hardwood floor again thi:sseaThIe ':;l basket-ball schedule for

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"A NEW BUTILDING or BUST" Yea. Be;We Want IT, This space reserved for Angus. Whatohasay? -~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 0 ~~~~~~~~~~~~ ?
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STILL COLLEGE DES MOINES ~-·
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Volume 1

December 1st, 1923

x'i DR. MARY GOL]

STILL OLDS HASKELL -NDANS--34 TO 7
Osteopathic Athletes Make Name Still.receiving the kick-off and brin.ing the ball down the field ::or Themselves at Lawrence, by straight football tactics. We Kansas'

.';:The .heaviest game of D. M. StilH ,College of Osteopathy footb · all schedule 'was codmpleted on November 9th, with the Haskell Indiiani Institute at Lawrence, Kansas.:' The game scheduled wivith, 1 a team of natioinal repute was by far the greatest advertisement that Osteopathic athletics has ever received in Des : ines. f e T')hTte of Des Moines became 7city aware Thursday night :of the :presence of Still College in their -midst. .The student body, 200 strong, accompanied by the Imperial college band, escorted our football warriors to the Union A parade was held station. . thro ugh' 'the- e nti e'-business district, students carrying large banners of Still College and large placards calling for a victory from the Indians. Thie teeam entrained in a pri'vat'e: pullman which was covered -with signs of "OSTEOPATHY," "D M:. STILL CO'LLEGE,' skull and cross bones and also many :ther sayings of an osteopathic nature. The advertising from :our car alone was no small matter, as we passed through, Iowa, Missouri, and into Kansas. Anyone seeing the car could not :help but remember the word 'Osteopathy" The Haskell Institute football team of this year is the heaviest "and speediest aggregation ever turned out by the Indian InstiJohn Levi, fullback and tute Captain ;of: the Haskell Indians, ·is refuted by the foremost sport L Writers to,0 be; a second Jim Thorp fand is slated for a berth
on the All-American mythical

reached the 20-yard line, and there lost the ball by a bare six The first peinches on downs. riod was scoreless, wih the Indiamns considerably o-n the_ de; . ', fense. At the opening of the second

quarter Levi made his spectacular run of the game, taking the ball from the forty-eight yard line, breaking through our line, evading the secondary defense and placing the ball between the goal posts. A place kick added the point, giving the Indians a seven point- lead. Again in the second quarter Haskell scored after completing a forward pass for 30 yards. The half ended with the. Indians having a fourThroughout the entire half, Still's line was like a buttressed wall, time and again breaking through or downing the runner in his tracks. The second half opened with our secondary defense lacking in accuracy of their tackles, consequently the Indians were able 'to complete forward passes for long gains and an occasional wide end Dr. Mary Golden has become thom run. Three touchdowns were scored in the third period with iatrics in D. M. S. C. 0. She takes the She not hem two goals after touchdowns, giv- rical Department leaves t ing Haskell a lead of 34 points, this field, but she has a mighty ,pullini In the last few minutes of the private practice is very large, and she' period, O'Conner recovered a This Department is growing, and will Haskell fumble on their twentyDr. Golden is at the head of it. No three yard line. Murphy went- long as or intellectual. She is a splendid lecturer, ar through the line for eight yards Where she leads, others gladly fo] on the next play and then nipped Osteopath. - : -L:___ ---· a forward pass for the touchdown. Cartwrlght kicked goal, game was a "nip and tuck" battie with both teams on even' their Ind giving Still seven points. fourth quarter found our terms. A cleaner game of foot- and that The men recovering their< first period ball was Inever played -by ,our play thr fight ,and the Indian warriors team. 45 yards was our entire ers and were unable to add any more to total of penalties, while Has- that the: their score. The game ended kell's amounted to around 125 with a 34 to 7 victory for the yards. Haskell Indians-a glorious dNone too much feat for the D: M. Still College the, stalwart lin of Osteopathy, McNeish, as cen The/ score is not indication of games of their the quality of football played in fensively and d It was only an occa- position was a I this game. na1 I .Sln fonrm Capt. SN wall.
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eleven. Levi's work in Friday's game was of a stellar nature, especially his ability to kick and :~-o throw forward passes with unIn fact, the canny accuracy. whole Indian team was centered around one player-John Levi. ;lThe entire indian team lived up
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Dame Rumor is again at large. It has been reported that another of our worthy seniors has at last reached the precipice Not known as "Lovers' Leap." only has he reached it, but, if reports are authentic, he has also slipped over. Now you must bear in mind that this rumor has not been confirmed as yet, so congratulations are hardly in order, but if circumstantial evidence will convict a man, this party in question is guilty beyond the shadow of a doubt. At least we will have to believe him so until he proves his innocence. If this has aroused any curiosity in the minds of the readers, further details can no doubt be obtained by consulting Harry
Elston.

Hear Ye!

"Red" Cartright Does Not Believe in Pads
"Red" Cartright, right halfback on the Still college football team is a rare player. It is very seldom that a player, especially a backfield man, performs on the gridiron in such an attire as Cartright is in the habit of wearing. He does not beieve in pads of any kind. In the game against Luther college at the Western League Park Friday, "Red" did not wear any shoulder pads, head gear or knee pads, neither did he have the usual elbow protection inside his jersey. In addition to this, his stockings were rolled nearly one-third the distance to his ankles, leaving his knees almost bare. Cartright performed in a spectacular role Friday, making many long gains around the Luther ends and through the tackles. One of his runs was for 68 yards through almost every visiting Another was for 25 player. yards. He formerly played with West Virginia Wesleyan and with the American School of Osteopathy eleven of Kirksville, Mo. Wallace Walker is also moving around with a dignified air, due to an injury ofqthe neck received in the game with Luther College last Friday. Walker is player, and we an excellent hope that he will be in good shape so that he can finish the remainder of the season. Deane Elsea, one of our football warriors, is in the hospital due to an injury received in one We understand of our games. that he will not be able to play any more games this season.

SORORITY NOTES The Delta Omega girls and their pledges were delightfully entertained by the Iota Tau Sigma Fraternity. Their spacious home at 2007 Grand ave., in keeping with the season was decorated with Hallowe'en black cats, pumpkin lanterns and witches. The hospitality of the fraternity was most thoroughly enjoyed by their guests. Dr. Fern Woods opened her home to the Deltas on Nov. 23, in honor of their pledges, Miss Dodds and Miss Trimble. Eats prepared by the pledges were enjoyed by all present. Dr. Neva Moss, a Delta of the class of '23, favored us with a visit last week. She has just refrom Nowata,: Okla., turned where she was associated with Drs. Stevick and Stevick. Her stay in Des Moines gave us an opportunity to get together on several occasions, a picnic party at Donald Mc.Rae Park being a most enjoyable affair. The Delta girls accompanied the football players to Kirksville on Nov. 1. The members of the Alpha Chapter met our train and gave us a royal welcome. They did everything possible to make our stay pleasant as well as profitable. To say that they succeeded is putting it mildly. IOTA TAU SIG3MA NOTES Sunday November 11th, a fellowship diner was given by the Actives of Beta Chapter, Iota Tau Sigma, at the chapter house at 2007 Grand Avenue, with twenty friends from the student body and Dr. Ben Lan, dentist, from the Kraft Block, as guests. Friday evening the pledges appeared in a very original skit during the Amateur Section of the show at the Majestic TheaThe pledges with their tre. '"Follies" copped off second prize, the first going to a girl act on the same bill presented by pledges of the Phi Psi Sorority of Des Moines. Wednesday night Nov. 14th, thirty couples enjoyed a house dance at the chapter house. Phil Hoffmann's orchestra furnished the music. Dr. C. R. Bean of the Taylor Clinic was a guest at this time. "Dutch" Worrell of the Worrell Jewelry Company of Mexico, Missouri, was guest at lunch Friday, dinner Saturday evening and Sunday noon while in the city placing orders for jewelry with the different fraternities and sororities. Dr. Neva Moss was a guest at lunch on the 14th and 16th dur-

ing her visit in Des Moines. "Ding" White and "Mac" McCleary of Alpha Chapter of Iota Tau Sigma at Kirksville, Mo., spent the 13th, 14th and 15th at Beta Chapter house arranging final details for the Thanksgiving dance, which was held on Saturday, Nov. 17th. The chapter house was robbed of watches and money on Friday night, Nov. 16th. Most of the fellows lost pretty heavily, and to date no clue has been obtained as to the thief or thieves. The city police and detective force have been at work on the case and have promised results. SENIOR SPIRITS In one of our classes we have heard frequent mention of the There has been female sect. some question as to just what Some have this might be. thought perhaps it might be some rare racial division of the human kind. Others have supposed, and not without reason, that it was the designation of some religious organization. I am interrupted right here by the suggestion that this is a mistake and that 'what is really meant is female sex. Of course that puts a different light on the situation. Most of us being serious students of anatomy and physiology, understand just what is meant by the term female sex, though we confess to being rather in the air, so to speak, concerning the female sect. But, to turn. our attention to The more important matters. greatest problem at present for many of the Senior A students is to decide on a location. Of course t here are a few unfortunate members of the class who in one way or another have already decided this question. Two have engaged passage to Honolulu for early February, having decided to give the islanders the benefits of osteopathy. One of our bright and shining lights is apparently hoping to be private physician to Henry Ford or at least to some of his fellow townsmen, and is going to locate in the financial center of Michigan. One or two seem to think the arid plains of Nebraska will furnish them with sufficient patients. Minnesota has been chosen by another of our number who expects to hang out his *shingle in the home city of Aside Washburn Crosby flour. from these unfortunates whose future has been decided and circumscribed the remainder of our class are as yet free to choose Continued on page 3

Opening for a Lady D. 0.
A good opening for a lady D. 0. who would like to take a small town practice. Hagerstown, Ind., is a little place of about 700 or 800 population, surrounded by a rich farming country, all roads good the year round. This is a good Osteopathic town, and practice could be extended to other places if looked after soon. Those who might be interested in this proposition write to Dr. M. C. Mammer, New Castle, Ind.

Notice
A good Osteopath is wanted very badly tin Nashua, N. H. Several prominent people are desirous of treatment, and I am sure that expenses could be made from the very start, and in a short time the doctor could have a large practice. Communicate with Mr. A. L. Whitney, '10 Courtland St., Nashua, N. H., for particulars. Mr. Whitney and family have been patients 'of mine for a great many years, prior to moving to Nashua and they are real, enthusiastic boosters for Osteopathy. Nashua is a city of 33,000 inhabitants and is very prosperous. Very truly yours GEO. W. REID, D. 0., Worcester, Mass. 405-415 Slater Bldg.

What

Mother Thinks You Are

While walking down a crowded city street the other day, I heard a little urchin to a comrade turn and say, "Say, Jimmy, donchyer know, I'd be happy as a clam, If I only was the feller dat me mother t'inks I am." "She t'inks I am a wonder, and knows her little lad Would never mix with nuttin' that was ugly, mean, or bad. I often sit and t'ink how nice 'twould be Gee Whiz! It' a feller was der feller dat his mother t'inks he is."
So, folks, be yours a life of
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or undiluted joy, You still can learn a 1e!Son from o--d boy-this small, untutore Don't try to be an e.-rthily saint, with eyes fixed on a star, Just try to be the fellow that your mother thinks you are. -"Noodles" Fagan.

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Dr. Honsinger to the contrary notwithstanding, we have been notified by our dean that if we have time to do laboratory work when we get our practice started, we might just as well give up and get a job for we are failures as physicians. While the Dean admitted that he had made hundreds of blood counts, yet he said that if we had time to fool away at that kind of work we would not be worth much, as he would not give a cent for all the blood counts we could make in a month. Whenever the Doctor makes a statement like that he always turns around and tells us not to take him too seriously. We suppose this applies also when he speaks of slipping the atlas on the coccyx or tweaking something. Some of us are born short, and we cannot appreciate all of the Dean's little jokes. STILL COLLEGE IS EQUAL TO ANY MISSOURI VALLEY CONFERENCE TEAM

SECOND SEMESTER .............. Registration and Matriculation The Official Publication of January 21;................ Regular Classes Begin DES MOINES STILL COLLEGE January 22 .........................--....... Annual May 20-.. .......... .. ....................................... Meeting of Corporation OSTEOPOTHY. %A'n~ 00 tCommencement Y¥ y J ... ........ .....................................-President ............. S. L. Taylor SECOND ] YEAR Business Manager ...M. D. Cramer THE CURRICULUM First Semester Editor --.- _----Jack Hansel The Fundamental Osteopathic Anatomy, Descripti ve BranchesOsteopathy Without Limitation The first portion of the course Physiology II in osteopathy consists mainly of Theory of Osteopa thy ENDOWMENT OF CHAIR OF instruction in the fundamental Pathology I NEUROLOGY osteopathic sciences. It includes Chemistry, Physic ological and the following branches: Toxicological Osteopathy has been practiced FIRST YEAR Second Semestt er for more than thirty years. We First Semester Anatomy, Descripti Ive have now some seven thousand Anatomy, Descriptive Anatomy, Practical practitioners, mostly on the Chemistry, Inorganic Pathology II Histology American :continent, but scat- Biology Principles of Ostec apathy tered pretty well over the lands Pathology IV, Bacteriology Physical Diagnosis of the earth. Our colleges are Second Semester Physiology III the source of the future practi- Physiology I THIRD YrEAR tioner. Neglect our schools and Anatomy, Descriptive First Semester we neglect the source of the Chemistry, Organic Histology Anatomy, Regional and Special output. Abolish our schools and Embryology ^ r^ -,T. anolrs rv we abolish osteopathy. Our inurynecuotgy I Pathology V, Laboratory Diagnostitutions can live and may live support of our colleges. If every sis indefinitely, but to live is not practitioner in the field would Public Health and Sanitation , the question. To live and grow give $10.00 a year to our institu- Osteopathic Diagnosis more efficient is the vital proptions, the problem would be Pathology III osition. solved. What do you think of it? Demonstrations and Thirty or thirty-five years ago The movement is on and we are Clinical Practice any sort of inferior medic'al col- sponsoring the same with all our Second Semester lege was licensed to issue diplo- hearts to have a chair endowed mas. Times have changed rad- for Dr. C. W. Johnson, who is Obstetrics Nervous Diseases ically since then, and the infe- head of the mental and nervous rior medical schools have been department of D. M. S. C. 0. He Osteopathic Therapeutics abolished. Public sentiment is is a school man. He has had the Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat heartily supporting osteopathy training. He is an osteopath to Pediatrics, and Demonsrtations and has been for all these years, the core and knows nothing else. Clinical Practice but just as public sentiment has This sort. of movement will be demanded that the medical the salvation of our schools. FOURTH YEAR We schools become more efficient or want to hear from you soon. First Semester die, so may they demand that the Surgery I S. L. TAYLOR, President, standards of osteopathic schools DES MOINES STILL COLLEGE Nervous and Mental Diseases be raised and the student body Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat OF OSTEOPATHY. more efficiently trained. Is it Obstetrics not probable that public sentiOsteopathic Therapeutics AN OPEN LETTER ment will go so far as to demand Dietetics The football game between D. higher standards of efficiency or Clinical Demonstrations and that our institutions be abol- M. S. C. 0. and A. S. O., NovemPractice ished? The force back of the ber 2nd, in more than one way Second Semester medical institutions, which in- proved to be a fiasco. PersonaSurgery, Operative creased their efficiency and ly, I deeply regret the misunder- Nervous and Mental Diseases raised their standards was the standing between the boys of the Urology and Proctology almighty dollar. It is true that two colleges. If there is anyMedical Jurisprudence the dollar came from taxation of thing that is unfortunate it is X-Ray and Electrical Diagnosis yourself and myself, your friends a family quarrel. Personally, I Osteopathic Therapeutics and our friends, by making their am not asserting who, in my opinClinical Demonstrations and colleges an integral part of our ion, is right, and who is wrong. Practice State Institutions. But facts are It is my purpose in this paper facts and publicity for higher only to use my influence to allay SENI, SPIRITS standards is extant, and we must unpleasant feelings. I hope that (Continued from page 2) meet the issue. How can we do the officials of both schools will use their influence for harmony our future homes. We have the We have often talked endow- instead of fomentation. Would wide world before us and the joy ment, but no one seems to have it not .be better for professional of a free will choice is ours. eniou h money to start such a reasons for all concerned that Why miss the thrills of this freef:id: We have, therefore, cast nothing further be said in our dom by arbitrarily limiting yourself to some sordid commercial about for other sources, and it is papers? S. L. TAYLOR, President, place before you have to? Anticbeing discussed whether or not the profession is interested to con- DES MOINES STILL COLLEGE ipation is always sweeter than realization. tribute so much a year to the OF OSTEOPATHY.

The Log Book

COLLEGE CALENDAR

When it comes to football dope and comparative scores, Still ranks among the leading teams of the middle west. In f act, if we start using the dope-brush we can take on any team and stand a good chance of winning. To prove this point, I am going to give you the dope ,on a few of the teams. Still College defeated Luther, who in turn beat Dubuque; Dubuque defeated Coe early in the season. Then to make things a little more interesting for the dopesters, Coe turned around and defeated the much vaunted Drake Bull-dogs and completely upset the would-be Missouri Valley champions. However, the Bulldogs had already defeated Ames, a team that had defeated missouri, while the Show-me team had in turn tied Kansas. The huskies from the sun-flower state had held the Cornhuskers from Nebraska to a 0-0 score. To tangle things more, Nebraska beat the wonder team of the fighting Mick,s who had previously defeated such teams as West Point, Princeton and Georgia Tech. Much to our regret, Nebraska had to turn around and beat Ames, but as Ames was not even able to cross Drake's goal line, and Ames scored twice on' Nebraska, the dope would make the Stillites the equal of any of the Missouri Valley teams and give many of the strong teams of the country a good run for their money.

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The Vikings from Luther deStill outplayed Luther in this scended upon the stronghold of stanza, and had the ball on the the Stillonions, and were caropponents' goal line when the ried back on their shields after whistle ,blew. a merry battle at the Western Between the halves the ImpeLeague Park on November 15th. rial Still Ba.nd bestirred itself was featured by the The conflict the teeming and serenaded jack-rabbit dashes of Cartwright, stands. Fisher ran up a new the work of the Still ends, and Still pennant on the north side Captain Owens' work on the line of the field, amid the lusty cheers for Luther. of the hundreds of students Still scored. first on a 65-yard present. Doc. Rogers, resplendreturn of a punt by Brown, who ent in a new caribou coat was made 'a pretty. run through the mistaken for a Luther profesentire BL ther team. Late in the sor. As soon as the mistake was final quarter Luther made a des- noticed, the throng ceased to perate last minute rally and treat him with respect. No, he opened up a machine gun barrage didn't shoot the caribou. of passes that took the ball to Third Quarter within the shadow of the Still Still received the kickoff and goal posts where a savage tackle on the first play Murphy romped by Sheetz upset a Luther back for a twelve-yard loss, and the thru right tackle for 40 yards. final pass was knocked down on The Luther line settled down the Still goal line. All the and the two teams battled on passes 'were completed by two even terms the rest of this quarsubs, Orwell to Bauder, and were ter.

Fourth Quarter Here is executed brilliantly. Luther went into this quarter the game play by play as reported by the Log Book special ath- fighting to overcome the 6-point lead, and 'with two subs doing letic reporter. the lion's share of the work, First Qlarter hurled passes to all carriers in Luther kicked off to Still, de- the field with the result that the fending the west goal. The kick Still fans were aroused to a was short. An end run and two frenzy of anxiety. The team, moline plays netted 8 yards. Still mentarily demoralized, standing failed to gain appreciably thru on their goal line, the Rubbers the line, and Cartwright punted, fought desperately, smearing two Sheets catching the ball. A line plays before Brown knocked split buck made 5t yards :and Lu- down a pass that would have ther punted to Brown, who re- been a certain touchdown. From turned the ball 6 yards. Still here Buirge took the ball on tried several line drives, at two flashy drives 'and the game which Murphy proved the best ended with Nicholas returning a ground gainer. However, the punt for eight yards. Luther line held and Cart'wright The Lineup punted again. Luther tried the Luther Still center line twice and' Walker Stokke Bice L. E. smeared them. Otte punted 45 Burkeland - Myers L. T. yards for Luther, Brown received Knutson Swezey L. G. and ran 65 yards for a touch- Losen McNish C. down. Cartwright missed his Anderson Thomas R. G. try for placement. The pass Owen Walker R. T. from center was O. K., but the Reishers Nicholas R. E. Still line leaked and Murphy al- Otte Brown Q. B. so caressed the ball for so long Westby L. H. Cartwright a time that he was smothered by Larsen Murphy R. H. the Luther forwards. Graham Olson F. B. Capt. Owens of Luther kicked Referee-White (Simpson). off over the goal line and Still Umpire Sec. Taylor. put the ball in play on the 20 H. linesman Carberry (Iowa). yard mark. An off tackle drive by Murphy and Cartwright took STILL HOLDS the ball to the center of the HASKELL INDIANS field, the ball remaining about the center for the rest of the Continued from page 1) quarter. Cartwright ran 20 yards after first having fumbled look for him to do big things in the pass from center as the our next contest. Sheetz and Nicholas as ends were up to their quarter ended.

regular form and gained many a yard through the line in their individual way. It is the opinion of the writer' that Nicholas played the greatest game he has ever participated in, throughout his long athletic career. Brown played his first game in the quarter position. Hie showed good generalship throughout the game and was always good for yardage through the line. Cartwright and Murphy as halves played like we always expect them to, their consistent gains and hard tackling have become their rule rather than an exception. Bice as fullback was there with his usual accuracy in passing and his ability to break up passes. The Indians were old stuff to Bice, as he has played against them a number of times before. Hannan and Buirge did well while they were in as halves, they really did not get warmed up, however, in the time they played. The entire team was a credit to old Still College and Osteopathy. Our Science and our School never received a better boost in the sporting field than that demonstrated by our hard-fought, clean football game with the Haskell Indians. The' University of Minnesota is the only other college that has crossed the Indians' goal in the eight games played thus far. PSYCHOLOGY The purpose of this article is to call the attention of the students to the importance of a study of psychology in reference to their life work, namely, the the treatment of diseased conditions. The doctor needs psychotherapy much more than he needs the knife and the electric current. Can the profession afford to send into the field every year doctors who are unable to use some of the most effective tools, simply because they have not learned any psychology? A study of the elementary works by James, Wundt, Titchener, Stout, Ziehen, or Ladd, wouldbe fine for the beginner. This, followed by James' Advanced Psychology, would give the physician a good understanding of the subject. He could follow this with a study of the methods used by Sidis, Munsterberg,, and other leading psychatherapists
of the day, in regard to the

could have been secured by psychotherapeutic methods.
And if the physician haughtily

declares that he does not care for
methods of suggestion, it might

justly be asked whether he can be a physician at all if he does
not apply some suggestions; yes, if his very entrance into the sick room ldoes not suggest relief and improvement from the very start The introduction of psychology is the most immediate need of every curriculum. However, it seems that we are too busy to take up this study in school, and the purpose of these articles will be fulfilled if an interest is aroused to such an extent that the subject will be studied in your spare time. First, what is psychology? It deals with the facts of conscious-

ness, such as the elements of sensations, feelings, pains, and thoughts, acts of willing, and the like. Physical phenomena are in space, while psychic are not. Mark Twain said "There are two
sides to everything the inside

and the outside." We might say that the inside were psychology. And again the poet in his poems makes understand the inner life, but he does not describe- it and explain it. The purpose of the psychologist is to delve into the inner life and understand and explain it. Now you no doubt can see the importance of the subject to us as physicians, for there will be many Who will come to you, who show no signs of pathological conditions, but in whom you could diagnose mental derangement if you had made a study of psychology, and effectively treat them if you had made a study of psychotherapy. NEBRASKA LOCATION Do you have -at this time anyone desiring a location for an Osteopath? 'If so, I believe I can point you to one which offers opportunity. This location is at Osceola, the county seat of Polk County, Nebraska. A town of about 2,000 people, surrounded by a rich agricultural territory. There is no osteopath in the above city. I have for rent a modern combination office 'and living room apartment, located in a brick building in a very good location on the square in this town. Rental $35.00 per month, with heat and water furnished. Host water heat and electric lights, city water and sewer, oak floors and a complete bathroom. If you know of anyone desiring such 'a location, kindly have them communicate with me and if they will come direct here to David City, I will take them over by auto to Osceola to look the situation over. G. A. Bryant, David City, Neb.

treatment of abnormal states. It can be said with certainty that hundreds or thousands leave the doctor's office every year without relief, where relief

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,Ciomm'encement Address ' May -22, 1924 ;

Senior Banquet;'
Twenty-seven members of' t June, 1924, graduating cassweri: guests at a banquet teindere them -by the college on Wednes -:. day, May 21st.' The :banque.t :v-i -held in the spacious homeo:X- "-h' Des Moines Womep's- Club:.(e ' orations were carried out ini the" class colors of blue and gold -. h class flower, lily 'of the :val ey, was used profusely on 'the -tables. Covers -were set for sixty. Each member of the graduating cas was presented .with a cop'y': "The Physician's'- Prayer," a:li-.i erary masterpiece written y i (I Egyptian phyysician -of thetwifth century. ' ' :;s In:-the program followig 9 i:,ner, ,Dr. S. L. Taylor,:presid : ' of the college, acted as toastmaster. -Mr.J. C. Cochran, a stule: 'of the .):college'.d ': d ' :-irect: fi£Chautauqua music, reneredsev eral solos in -- pleasing manner, a Dr.: M' E. Bachman, the "D' d of the college, spoke on "Tom .orow".- .Dr. Bachman 's tal Wi impressive in 'its appeal d-. -for ty an.da sacrifice of -physici-i demonstrating that-: these' sfsacrifices always brought ti i own reward. .An original poeon "Tomorrow," written: -for t'h-:ish' special occasion by one:-of i. !:. IDoctor's- patients, 'was 'aaiso and received with enthusiasm by; ,the guests of the .evening. -;": Dr.:M. E. Bachman, Dr. Rob- corn, her sweet, smiling disposiDr. E. E. Steffen spoke- on he: ert Bachman,; Dr., S. L. Taylor, tion. won favorable- &ommentsubject of "Shoddy.";' Dr. Stef'. Dr. F. J. Trenery and Mr. Milton from the entire assemblage at fen covered personal, eoffice, busi Conn, of the college faculty, at- the memorial service. Rachel's ness and moral shoddiness. -'-l" -tended- the- A 0. A. convention representation of Iowa's: greatest .descriptions were ' made' li at Kirksville, Mo. Dr. M. '-l. :product 'was truly worthy :of our by relating a number :of anei Bachman was on the general pro- great state. Much credit is due dotes :-to -bring out the particul :r gram Wednesday. The Doctor Mrs. Payne and Dr. Bachmen for points he stressed. "'-:. ' . spoke on "Simplified Technique."- the, time and effort they put forth From, past experience,, we .have.l Dr. Bachman's talk was enthusi- to make this part-of Iowa's pro- learned to heed the:.advice- of ;:Dr : 'astically received, and due; to ,gram paramount to all other Mary Golden/ "' Dr. Gold'en. :., : ' " ' many requests the Doctor repeat- states. " for her subject, "Mirage."Manyi Iowa won the first prize' in the good, wholesome; points -- /i~v ed it on Friday night to a private ) audience. Dr. Bachman also had parade on Monday for having the brought out- by Dr. Golden in h:ii' .charge of the Iowa Committee largest delegation. 'Dr. M. E. words to0 the graduating-. elass, for: the: arranging of the Iowa Bachman: and Rachel Payne in, which are always enhancedb-y:' representation in the Memorial the parade represented "Ding's" the Doctor's sincerity of pracService on Sunday at the ."Old famous cartoon of the "Iowa tice and w:alth of 'experience . Doctor's" grave. : Little Rachel: Farmer." This part of the parade 'Mole-hills" covered, the'0'conPayne, five-year-old daughter .of added a real touch of talent to text of Dr. J. P. Schwartz'siitalk Mrs. Avis Payne, a senior student the Iowa delegation. The Doctor demonstrated:ltheoid: at ..Des Moines Still College: of Dr. J. P. Schwartz, of the fac- thought of not making mountain Osteopathy,' represented ".owa." ulty, was also on the general pro- -out of molehills. '. :-- ; f:X; Rachel was dressed&as an ear of continued ;on page 2 \-, C ':."Continued on".page 2:: .
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:By :Rev. C. A, Rash, Pastor TrYou say it's tomorrow,w they will start . bandale Federated Church" b.^ X . .- Upon-the road of their chosen part? -I .am. happy -to -be here at the What a solemn moment it will be,' - .; ' colege. tonight on this ocqasion,. \ When each receives his D O..degree. . iappreciate the invitation. This -I -is 'mny second association with os.teopaths within a week. I offi' trusty , A physician's badge -sacred ciated at a certain wonderful : But do they know :'twill tarnish and rust, evyent. Dr.' -Potter -remembers, - Unless upheld in the light of truth, ! and Dr. Wedel was second good ' :: Where alone is found the sheen of youth? man iat the affair. the -I prize my association with !ico lege- very much for a good . i'it to them a banner, or shield? . imanyreaso'ns,. It reminds me"of - An insignia:to wear'on the field, .my ;cQllege qays. I remember ; . :Where ignorance and suffering ,reign; " how Still. College looked sevral ' Or, just a shield for personal gain? ' y: ears ago. Whesn I:tcame back to' Des Moines I oould not find it. I ' ,. " i; -''.. . -; . .. '-.*.'' : .. '. '; ' . ' - [. : ' 0.. ; futnd -the :'scenery changed. I - ;. Wa . a wondrous service some will see, '- -: at di"d di not tecognize th 'building. :In: h-'ealing with Osteopathy ! f - : :.:: I have suffered many times un,A fewwillclimb honors high seat:. ;, ,' 'der osteopathic-physici.ans- .There . '. .While .struggle some, the wil never meet., is &a?-greatvariety in osteopathie physicians and in suffering. Iwill never forget the first osteoBut all the road just now is clear' .path' that, IJ suffered under. My ' An equal chance- but the time' is near, theri-sent me to an osteopathic : '-':: Each, by his service, must stand or fall. physic.ian as a last resort. There Who'll then, answer humanity's call? are(. great many: people in this ea, , 'world who try this and that dOc(Written by George .'A. Drew, Des Moines, Iowa, as .a- special N'rand.:as a last resort and not t; poem to the departing senior class. Read at the senior banquet by -:elieving' what you pratic they Dr. ME.:Bachman.). ' . ; come to you. -There is your great I ll never forget .opportunity. :She- sensation when he first op-

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respect for your profession. :

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ter being treated under this doctor for two -years, :I went on. to-

of college. I have a high idea -wi%:hat an o-teopath can and will
't.w'e'nty

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ago- I stood on

li:i'eplatform ready to .graduate. the W;e-e each-had to give an- oration. ' It was the day we ha'd looked forward to. With the assistance of friends and osteopaths, I camie to ' graduate. I was to- receive my Bachelor of Science degree.' I came to the place where I could look on myself as a success. My father and mother and friends congratulated me.' I look back all the day with great enthusiasm. When I came before you to-night I wondered about many hings.' I wonder what is in your and'- in_ your:: mind. '-'This ii:ea .I :inst ilt:tion +has . iawide -;reputa6 -i::I :Cto;ntinued- on page 2, i':':

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Commencement Address

I sion a great deal of study, work, rPhi Sigma Gamma Notes LeRoy Wesley Skidmore will high ideals and ambition. spend the summer in Des Moines I would never have preached a The boys of the Phi Sigma helping at McDermott's Funerai: (Continued from page 1) tion for high standards. Before sermon but for a certain good Gamma fraternity have nearly all home plus sending his spare moments with his better half. is so much gone to their respective homes, I you came you had certain ideas osteopath. There Ted Reiter and "Swede" Olsen good to be done by this profes- but there are a few left over for of the profession you were en- sion as there is good to be done the summer who are staying at will enjoy the spare time at the tering. Now you have come to by every profession. I am won- the house during the three house-or elsewhere(?). the place where you should be dering tonight just what idea you months of vacation. congratulated. You have proved all have in regard to what makes Everyone seemed to like the Kirksville Convention that you have the sort of charac- success in your profession. Peo- walk to school from 1109 19th ter that will stay with a thing. ple have different ideas of a pro- every morning, so we decided to (Continued from page 1) You have stayed until you have feSsion. You can be an excellent hold the house over for the sum- gram and spoke on "Osteopathy Comparatively few osteopath and a real healer of mer months until we decide and the Kidney." Dr. Schwartz's graduated. stay through the educational diseases. There is an opportun- about our home for next year at talk was well received by the conLook ity to do more good than Words the meeting in September. grind until graduated. vention visitors around and see graduates and of man can ever tell. There is The Alumni meeting of D. M. Those who 'are staying are as there are many. But compare it such a need in these days for follows: Dr Robert Tornell, who Still College of Osteopathy was with the number who began and real professional service. Do not evis living at the home for a week one of the most enthusiastic did not finish, and it is very few. live for technical success. Do or so' until he hears from the er held at 'an A. 0. A. convention. After years of study you start not live for money. Do not think state board From Des Moines, One hundred per cent memberout 'and tell the world you are I would not want you to charge alumTornell expects to go to Cal- ship will be the aim of the ready to do something. The world what is' right, but do not be Dr. ni for the coming year. One of ifornia to see his folks and look can give to professional men and small in your profession. Joe Rader is Ithe most encouraging matters for a location. not for women a crown of honor, I one knew an M. D. who was leaving us Thursday' for the brought out at the meeting was what they do, but for what they sick for years. He took all theto Buckeye state. Joe is going out the organization in an effort are. I would not be true to my pills he could find, but got no reaid Des Moines Still Colloge of on another Pictorial campaign. calling if I came to you without lief from them. Finally he said and make Brothers Morgan and Nicholas Osteopathy financially that admonition. himself in are staying the entire summer, new college buildings a reality. he was going to lower What idea was in your mind the eyes of other medical doctors and both men expect to stay in Enthusiasm, loyalty, college spirwhen you began to study? I won- by going to see an osteopath. the house during this time. it apd sincere endeavor were der if it was, "What is the great- The osteopath relieved him great- Brother Steingrabe and wife have voiced throughout the meeting est amount of money I can make ly .and he lived five years after taken over the entire first floor, by the members for their Alma was such in a year? If I became an ,effi- the M. D.'s had given him up. and they expect to make the frat Mater. Never before cient physician I could make I I love a physician with all the house their home for the summer an open-minded meeting held in tl. interests of Des Moihnes Stil. moroe umoney than I can now." power of my heart. There is a months. Cvllegxe of Osteopathy. Each and )id. you think you could make so 1 great, Doctor I would have you staying at Bill O'Connor is also voice, present tmember eevery a year or was that all copy. I do not speak of Dr. Still. muxcn the house, but Bill has to sleep *hin: elf as having the keenest rightt in your mind?- Or, again, I speak of Jesus. I have been in in the day time, and if the kids did you think of the position it I the land where he lived. He of the neighborhood make as interest in the future of the institution and pledged himself to po- healed the sick. Go out with adwould give you? The doctor's much noise in the daytime as do all possible .to make Des sition is always an enviable one. miration of Christ. they do in the evening, poor frail Moines Stlil College of OsteopYou decide on a location and Bill won't- get much sleep, un- athy the center of Osteopathic have your notice put in the town I less he is a second Rip Van Win- Education. Senior Banquet paper. The people begin to wonkle. Dr. F. B. McTigue, of Emmetsder about you and what you will I burg, Iowa, was elected president (Continued from page 1) be. How will you approach peoIota Tau Sigma Notes of the association, and Dr. Mott ple? You are going out here and I The program was concluded by Hudson, of St. Charles, Iowa, secthere. I asked one of the boys aL a talk from Mr. Weimers, presiDr. P. H. Manley, '24, is anx- retary. The annual dues were while ago where 'you were go- dent of the graduating class. I iously waiting to return to the reduced to one dollar, and the ing. He said, "Everywhere." You I The class was kept in an uproar "'world-famed town" of Little secretary, is anxious that all of are pledged to the healing sci- of laughter by the relating of Valley, New York. He is plan- the alumni of the Des Moines ence. What kind of doctors are I11 amusing incidents that had hapning on leaving as soon as the Still College of Osteopathy who you going to be? Do you want to pened to its members in its four "ship" comes in (via mail). were not at the meeting in Kirksbe the best you can? I challenge111years at Des Moines Still College. "Cupie" Staples succeeded in ville remit their dues to him at have met many7 The senior banquet is a semiyou, because I Because you have annual affair, given to every r bucking mud to Des Moines along the above address. osteopaths. The college officers and faculty entered the profession will not graduating class of the college. with his "speedster." He carries l make you good. It depends on 1 The banquet held this year was a mean tan (from his eyes to his are whole-heartedly in accord you. I have seen some fine youngr no exception to the enjoyable "twin chin") and he "says" he with the Alumni Association 'and men and women who became os- 'evening always spent by Seniors, had a wonderful time at the con- are co-operating with them in cention at Kirksville, Mo. every way for the interests and teopaths, who would not give it t Faculty, and guests. Dr. Sam. H. Leibov is staying welfare of Des Moines Ctill Colstudy. They would not keep up r ge f Or~~~~~~. at the house, and expects to lege of Osteopathy. with the times of the profession. ite leave for South Bend, Indiana, Time to begin to be real ostethe first of the week. Overheard in the. hall: night on. II A little'sun, a little rain, .opaths is from this Cochran: "The other day I Dr. Julius E. Wiemers accamknew a woman who never went t A litle loss, a little gain, panied Dr. Howard Sechrist as went fishing and caught one of grade A little joy, a little strife, to school after the eighth far as Toledo, 6hio, and then to those great big fish, let's see, And this is life. tuntil she was twenty-eight years9 1I Columbus, Ohio, where he is to what. is it you call them?" a fac-$ oid. She was a knitter in "Oh, you mneak a Miller: take the State Board examina11 tory. She became ambitious. and I A little work, a little play, s Some kind deed done each pass- tions. Dr. Sechrist is going to whale." wanted to be something in this Cochran: "No, that. couldn't Detroit, Michigan, to take, thes ing day, world. Osteopathy seemed to bee r a setting sun- State Board and an interneship ? have been it, I was using whales rF A few goodbyes, the way. She is a great doctor for bait." at the hospital there. And life is d.one. today. She put in her profes
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The Log:Book
The Official Publication of 'DES MOINES STILL COLLEGE · OSTEOPOTHY.. .... President ...------ S. L. 1aylor Editor__----- -Dr. Jack Hansel Osteopathy Without Limitation

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: iWhat Is a Frienad?,-:
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Baths for the Baby

Soda Bath-The soda bath is I of some service in cases of prick- you. NOTICE! ' He understands those contraly heat, from which many chilPrickly Heat in Babies Heretofore the college has been dren suffer during the summer. dictions in your nature that lead filling, out A tablespoonful of bicarbonate of others- to misjudge you. With put to the expense of Prickly heat is due. to the heat': added -to each him you breathe free. 'You can application blanks and making of summer, or to unduly heavy soda should be " ' complyhalf gallon of water used. -The take off your coat and- loosen transcripts of grades in underclothing.,' It manifests itthe water should your collar. You can avow your ing with the request for 'Board self in a fine red rash whiCli temperature of is not be that to which the child is ac- little vanities and envies, and Applications. The amount comes when the baby is overheatstwo , to four I hates and vicious sparks, your much in any single case, but ed, and fades 'away under cooleri From customed. five to ten minutes in the water suffices. meanness and absurdities, and in when it occurs from conditions. The rash is usually or no fric- opening them up to him they are times a month it means that the over the arms and shoulders. 'There should be little The child lost, dissolved on the white ocean funds are being dispersed at the' Frequent tub or sponge baths of' tion of the skin. to twenty: dolshould be dried with soft towels. of his loyalty. He understands. II rate of from ten cool water will be found benefi'Bran Bath-Fill loosely withL You' do not have to be careful. lars'amonth. which in the course cial. Prompt relief will nearl' , I to considerbran a, bag of thin material six I You can abuse him, neglect him, p of a year amounts always be given by sponging witth seen square. Soak bag in bathI tolerate him. Best of all, you L able and it can easily be 'inches a solution of bicarbonate of sdIt I that it does not go to the ad- da or bran water. (See "Baths"' water and squeeze frequently un- can keep still with him.' There' til water becomes milky. Use- makes no matter.' He likes you. vancement of the school. for, formula.) After drying, dust application or tran- frequently with any boracic-acid: I fore, no ful for prickly heat. He is like fire that purifies all ;script will be sent out unless it dusting powder. A- satisfactory Mustard Bath Mustard baths3 you do. He is like water thatt 3 Ia fee of $2.50 powder is made by mixing one are useful in cases of nervous- cleanses all you 'say., He is likeI is accompanied by To .pre- I wine, that 'warms you to the, payable to the college. ounce each of powdered starch ness or sleeplessness. v Iand powdered oxide of zinc with pare the bath, add a heaping ta- tbone. He uri-derstahds,-he underblespoonf'l' of mustard to six gal- s stands. You can weep with him, : Practice for Sale . 60 grains of boric acid. lons of warm water. The' childI 1 laugi 'with' him, sin with him, should remain in the bath twcD 'pray with him. Through and unHot Shots :a Dr. Ernest H. Brown, of Mulor, three minutes, 'and upon re- -derneath it all he -sees, knows. Nebraska, is- contemplat, lerton, r movahl should receive a brisl k and loves you. for personal reaIf you don't want people :Ao, t' A friend, I repeat, is one with ing a chanrge rubbing and be put to bed alt 'sons, and: is placing his practice think you are a jackass, stop: will usually whom you dare to be yourself. y once. This method ] for sale. Glad to use our influ- kicking. produce restful and refreshing9 ence to make this sale to the 'If you are contented, go up-, ' sleep. A Good Creed profession. stairs and wake up your ambiAgain we wish to remind the tion. ' ' People -Who Hurry Di You can't make a real successs profession that the Log Book is When jealousy gets busy,' ove . Young · without making real enemies open for their use. If you have takes a vacation. ; f Moderation is the secret o0: You can't hold a strong posi a practice for sale, or are wantBe fired by enthusiasm-not/by. I long life. ' An English physicia n tion without strong opposition . ing an assistant for the summer the boss. You can't seem right to an,Y moriths, we will be glad to insert I Turn "P" upside down in pull calls / attention ;to' some -'of th,e hurry about an, d if you don't seem wrong to many . your wants in the Log Book and you have '"bull," and :that' things people A useful life can't be entirel:Y without charge. g then die. One -of them is bolting all that pull ever was, anyway. I W 1 breakfast and running for a peaceful and carefree. A bore is a man who has nothYou must do your duty as you train. Combined, -they frequent ing to say and insists on saying, .EyesFront ly make a death bed of a car sealt. see it. 0 it ' Every earnest man in ever y Swift exhaustion of nervou s be done I o "Finish every day and energy is the price,.of hurry.' As generation has padi the price f with it. You have done what you What Is Your nervous energy is man's most valV individality. I could. Some blunders and absurYou can't dodge. uable physical asset, he can do Percentage dities, no doubt, creep in; forget The gerater you are, the great better to cut hurry from his con ' Tomoryou, can. S. er the penalty of your progress them as soon as duct. begin it well 0% I won't. Anxiety ta catch a train fo'1- The farther you go, the wide,r row is a new day; 10% -I cant. tto your range, the more you ir and serenely and with too high a lowed by hurry is analagous with your 20%-I don't know how. i stabbing a ' blood vessel. 1 crease the points of contact wit h spirit to be cumbered 30% -I doubt it. , out of ges r which you tnust reckon, an d old nonsense. This day is all that throws his digestion your balt- is good and fair. It is too dear, 40%-I wish I could.; sometimes spoils the wholLe therefore, you multiply and 50%-I think I might. of Con a-ties against misconception' an d with its hopes and aspirations, to day.-Chicago. Journal 60%- I might. waste a moment upon the yestere. me ce slander and envy and malice. 70%:-I think I can. ' ir day." * You can't avoid or evade you 80%-I can destiny-you can onlly A college education is supposend allotted There are more real opportun90%o-I will. your share of troublees ities today than there are real to fit you for a position-not eia- hold down I did. holding back. men. P. S. Do you get that? I 100%by ' title you to one
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What is a friend? I will tell you. It is a person with whom you dare to be yourself. Your soul can go naked with him. He seems to ask of you to put on nothing, only to be what you are. He does not want you to be better or worse. When you are with him you feel as a prisoner feels who has been declared innocent. You do not have to be on your guard. You can say what you think, as long as it is genuinely

I -n every sphere men gibe sneer even the peace of the: i I ditchdigger is threatened by the unemployed laboror who covets his job So long as you aspire, others will conspire-so long as you try, others will vie.You'll have hostility to face in every place and at every pace., Gostraight ahead to your goal. So long as your conscience isn't ashamed to acknowledge you as a frieind, don't give a rap for your enemies.

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Surgery Interest :You?::,;
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' *D. M. S. C. 0. would like ;to t1 know how many of the profes'ss sion are really interested: in a I POST GRADUATE SURGICAL (COURSE which lead up to the . practice of major surgery. If I 3 you are interested, write us. If I you are not interested in surgery, 4 I except in some little DINKY, -I worthless course, do not write ' I us. We would like to hear from 'I you at once, if you want REAL' , II surgery.,

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I0' III

The Subject of "Nothing9
It is strange but true that one of the principal subjects many people think about is "nothing." It can be safely remarked that millions of people are thinking about "nothing." Of course we know a great many people are doing it. Nobody knows how manybut too many. In some society circles "nothing" is the chief topic of conversation. Hundreds of people go abroad for it. Nine-tenths of the magazine stories of fiction are written about it. Yellow and sensational newspapers are full of it. Hundreds of motion picture films project it on the screen. About half the time a man who sits and gazes off into space is thinking about "nothing."

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Radio stations broadcast a lot of it, A lank, disconsolate-looking person stood on the steps of the town hall during a po-

litical meeting. A stranger asked him: "Do you know who is talking in there now, or are you just going in?" To which he replied, "No, I've just come out. Congressman Bluffer is talking in there." "What about?" said the stranger. "Well," continued the man, passing his hand across his forehead in a puzzled manner, "He didn't say." "Nothing" is a familiar subject with some campaign orators, who dress it up in strange and alluring language. There is probably more time wasted on "nothing" than any other subject. And that's what I am perhaps doing by reducing these t houghts to type, but the point I started out to make was that life is too short to waste it on "nothing" and we ought to be thinking and doing things really worth while and of value and. not allow our brains to rust out. What are you doing for your Alma Mater? "Nothing."

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Entered as second class ,
matter, February -3, 1923,, : at .the post office at Des . Moines,. Iowa, under .the act of Augu'st. 24th, 1912.
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Acceptance for mailing, at: special rates of postage provided for in section 1103, act of Oct. 3,- 1917, authorized Feb. 3, 1923.

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PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY BY THE DES MOINES STILL-COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHY Volume 1

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June 15th, 1.924 1- I~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~II

Number 2 Number 2-.--

Dr.-H. V. Halladay

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THE GREAT A NATOMIST
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Dr. John R. Woods

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. -Dr. Halladay is a four-year graduate of the American School of .Osteopathy. His teaching began as head of the Anatomical Laboratory in the A.- S. 0. from i 1915 to 1916. From 19116 to 1924 Dr. Halladay was on the faculty of the same college, during this time teaching applied and prac' tical -anatomy, principles of technic -and orthopedics. He also conducted the Anatomical Research laboratory. for the past several years., Dr. Halladay is author of the 'textbook, "Applied Anatomy of : the Spine," and also of a. dissection manual now widely :used in a number of colleges. The Doctor also conducted the A. S. 0. band for a number of years. -- The trustees of Des Moines . I--; Still College of Osteopathy have elected Dr. Halladay to the faculty' as associate professor :of anatomy.

A Great Anatomist
Dr. H. V. Halladay,- formerly known by his friends as "Virgil ,- . Halladay," has cast his fortunes with the Des Moines' Still College of Osteopathy. Dr. Halladay is known the, country over as probably the greatest anatomist of.. the osteopathic profession. ! -He has been head of the anatom, .... ical department .of, the A. S. 0. for many years. and -is' very well known for his many splendid dissec.-- '

THE FOUNDER OF OUR SCIENCE
"AS ''YOU CONTEMPLATE STUDYING THIS SCIENCE AND HAVE ASKED TO KNOW THE NECESSARY. STUDIES, I WISH -TO IMPRESS IT UPON YOUR MINDS THAT YOU BEGIN WITH ANATOMY AND END WITH ANATOMY."-Andrew T. Still.
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"An Osteopath is only a human '' has won prominence engineer who should understand the- medical frater- all the laws of governing the hudevelopment of the man engine and thereby master disease.-Andrew T. :Still ied on page 2

. TYvv us strengtnens the Anatomical Department of : our College. The Doctor, together with Dr. Halladr, will have entire charge: of this course. -Dr. Woods has taught at Des MoinesStill College for the past three years, during' which time.ne nas confined himself entirely to the subject of anatomy. The combination of Dr. Woods and Dr,: Halladay will be a most agreeable one, inasmuch as they have worked together before. Des Moines Still College recognizes that Anatomy is the very foundation of Osteopathy and for that reason has built: up an Anatomical Department 'that, cannot be surpassed in any college teaching the healing, art. Much credit is due Dr. Woods for maintaining and increasing this department for the last three years. He is especially well liked by the 'student body. His ability to instill his knowled, e into the minds of -.his- st-udnts, -and his clear, concise methods oflecturing, make him one of the ,most popular professors in Des "The Osteopath -reasons, if he Moines Still College. reasons at. all, that order and health are inseparable and that Letter from an Alumnus when order in all parts is found, 17 Brady St. disease cannot prevail, and if orDetroit, Mich, , der is complete and disease June 11, 1924. should be found, there is no use Des Moines Still College- for order."-Andrew T. Still. of Osteopathy. . Des. Moines, Iowa. ' "Osteopathy walks hand in Dear "Still"-' hand with nothing but nature's I have just heard fror laws,. and -for that reason alone your students that T' it marks the most significant has been added tprogress in the history of scien- the coming tific research."-Andrew T. Still, C,
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Dr. F. B. McTigue
Association

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President Still College Alumni'

It, -- Was a wonderful reunion of the Still College Alumni Associa':tion that 'was held in Kirksville -on evening- of'May 28, 1924. the 'There were- over a hundred present' -. and every one there was of ?'the unanimous opinion that our / Organization shoud be made per· manent and that every mm.ber get back of our Alma Mater and do what we can to make it one of the leading colleges in the profession.-- Dues-were fixed at -$1 a year, and at the election of officers Dr. B. M. Hudson of Charles City, Iowa, was elected secretary-treasurer, Dr. F. B. McTigue was elected president. Everyone present joined the organization and paid their dues. A committee of three was appointed -to meet at the college- and find out from the officials the condition of faffairs and what the alumni organization can ,do to assist with the program for a greater - Still -College. The chairman 'of this committee is Dr.' A. W. Clow of Washington Iowa, and the oth'er .members are Dr. Mary Golden of Des Moines, and Dr. C. M. Proctor of Ames, Iowa. We hope tihat if you :: ~have not 'paid your tdues for 1924 -you will' .please send $1 to Dr. B. -M.. Hudson at Charles City, Iowa, today. If you will do this we will send you reports from time to time and 'thiswill be 'a great assistance in L our -work. F. B. McTIGUE, President.

pathic lesion in no uncertain way. . . Dr. Halladay's gift is best expressed in demonstrative anatomy. His intimate knowledge of the structures of the human body enable him to talk to the students in a pleasing and fascinating manner. Dr. Halladay comes to Des Moines/with a great purpose. He believes in Des Moines and in its future. H-e thinks that Des Moines is the logical osteopathic center of the middle west and particularly Is this a strong pull on him since Des Mdgtnes has developed wonderful clinical advantages. We want to congratulate Des Moines Still College of Osteop:athy first, the .alumhni of Des Moines Still College of Osteopathy second, and the osteopathic profession third. The student body is to be particularly congratulated because of the advantages which will accrue directly to them by having him as-sociated with the college and being able to listen, to his' splendid lectures. The Alumni shpd be happy and congratulated because of -the great' advantage which will accrue-tO6 their Alma Mater by -reason' of his reputation The Osteopathic profession atf large should be congratulated because a great teacher has been saved to the profession by Des -Moines 'Still College of Osteopathy. Plans had already been- made by Dr. Halladay: to locate. in Gedrgia, but by timely interview he was persuaded to /continue the splendid school work which he has been doing for. so many years. May the work of the. great teacher go on forever. -~

-A Great Anatomist
'(Continued from page 1) nmethod of preserving the flexiof the ligaments of the -cticall~ as they are in "ody. This has en'-nstrate osteo-

(Continued from page 1) I wantI to congratulate the Still College Trustees in this new move to make the "old school"' hum with Osteopathy, Dr. Woods and Dr. Halladay will make a' department that will be the envy of all of our colleges. I have' only been out of schoil-' a few years, but the more I practice, the more firmly convinced I am that anatomy means more to an osteopath than any other sub-. ject taught in our curriculum. It is the very foundation of our science. It is a great pleasure to know that my old "Alma Mater" is making great strides in the teaching of pure osteopathy. There is one other matter--that I want to get off my chest at: this time, that is, the good clinics of D. M. S. C. 0. Every patient who comes-to me for treatment,'I can 'Fraternity Notes refer back in my mind to similar cases seen in: our clinics at Phi Sigma Gamma school. The methods of diagioBrother T6rnell was married imsis, prognosis and treatment/ mediately after graduation. Dr. learned at school so easily apply Elston also took the fatal step. to my patients every day. As a We know that these two brothers matter of fact I have felt from will be greater successes with the thetime my first patient came to addition of a wife. me that I had at least two years' We are in receipt of word experience in my junior and senfrom Dr. Elston of Girard, Ohio, ior years at College, which gave that he -anfd his wife Were badly me the confidence of an "old shaken up in an automobile actimer" rather than a beginner. cident last week. Nothing seri-Once more, copgratulations to ties." ous, however. . ..--.. ' good old Des Moines Still College -D'r. Kent has finished his pracBrother'Yates of the Kirksville of Osteopathy. May it continue chapter is working in Des Moines, tice in Fa'rmer City, Illinois, and to grow and prosper. and staying at the chapter house is leaving for 'his home in Bosraternally yours, ton. for the summer. Brother Yates (Signed) Mark Herzfeld, D. 0. Brother Cochran writes that is a senior at! the A. S. 0. Brothers Schneider and Thom- he spent one day in Canada. Why age Lake James sun 'her resort. .qr) .. as~T I ........ Hoss's figure helps as are playing uaseuaiu at henoy, ucli ne go to uanaua,Minnesota, for the summer. Hoss Odell is helping /to man- the bathing beach.
1-.~-f7. - Adl~_h _ql~_1 _.

Thomas is making- himself a resident of the town by chopping down the grass in Oakdale Park. Brother Roy Davis is developing himself in the steel mills in Niles, ' Ohio: Workihg nights keeps him away from the fair sex. Brother Morgan is- preparing himself for a job on the fire department. He is able to fall out of a "top-decker" for an 0. B. call without going through to the floor beneath. Atlas Club Brother Rastede spent a fine week at the Kirksville convention. He was the Des Moines representative at the meeting of the grand chapter. Brother Rastede reports an enthusiastic meeting, well attended. We are all enthusiastic at the news of Brother H. V. Halladay coming to our college next fsmester. We know that it'will mean a big advancement for the college and our own chapter. Brother Halladay was one of the most active jrembers-of~ e Axis ,chapter in Kirksville, and it was through his efforts mainly that they were able to get a spacious new home. Brothers Lustig and McIntosh stepped into the marriage line in the past few weeks. Brother Lustig -will be greatly aided by his new partner in his senior year. Brother McIntosh has three more years with us. ' ' Iota Tau Sigma We have heard from Dr. Gus Wiemers to the effect that he is taking over Dr. James A. Bowmans' practice at Marietta, Ohio. Dr. Bowman is coming to Des Moines to store up some of the lavish supply of obstetrical material during5 the summer/months. Dr. Manley took the Pennsylvania board last week. Brother Poucher reports a:n extensive practice in Elgin, Illinois, with Dr. Geis. Fifteen to' twenty-five patients a day are taking off some of the superfluous avoirdupois. A letter from Dr. Sechrist tells us how good an interneship he is getting at the Detroit Osteopathic hospital. Dr. Sam Leibov has accepted an interneship in the Liberty hospital, St. Louis, Missouri. He left' June 21st to begin his du-

Mrs. S. L. Schwartz
A New Member' of the Board of

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Mrs. Sara Young Schwartz was elected as a new trustee of the

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college. Mrs. Schwartz is very familiar with the working of the college board, having been associated with it for a number of years as secretary. -

Letter from an Alumnus

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Facts Which All Students and- Prospective Students -Ought to Know

"The Still Match Box"
McKinney-Elston Dr. Harry Elston, June graduate, was united in marriage to Miss Ruth McKinney of DesMoines on May .21st. O., L. Wright, fraternity brother o6f' Dr. Elston, acted as best man.' Dr. and Mrs. Elston ' left immediately after graduation to begin practice at Girard, Ohio. : : 'Bennett-Tornell A trip to. Indiaonla. and- married was the fate of Miss- Faye. Bennett "and Dr. Torriell. --The happy event took place 'on June 6th., -E'. L. McInnis was best, man. Dr. 'and Mrs. Tqrnell will ibave for California in a few- days .":to visit Dr. Tprnell's parents. :: Curtis-Lustig:' :' Dr. Robert Lustig. was' married to Miss Evelyn Curtis on June 2nd, at Grand Rapids, -Michigan. Miss Curtis was a teacher in the Grand Rapids schools, and :is- a cousin of Cecil and Max Warner,, Still College seniors. The new-, lyweds will spend their honeymoon in the east, and then come back to Iowa for the summer. Duffield McIntosh Jean McIntosh, sophomore stu-' dent at Still, was united in marriage to Miss Edith Duffield, ofKeosauqua, Iowa, on May 31st, 1924. Mr. McIntosh is also a native of the same town. Dr. andMrs. F.- D. Campbell.' of Des Moines. acted' as best man and matron of honor. After an'-extended western trip, Mr. and-Mlrs. McIntosh will be at home in Des
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Official Publication of ., : ... ' TUITIONDES MOINES STILL COLLEGE Freshman, Registration Fee_________ $ 25.00 Freshman, Tuition - ----: X O.STEOPOTHY. ______-__ ___ _ 160.00 Upper Classmen, per year ----_________ 175.00 President ..-... : .. S. L. Taylor Entire Tuition, if' paid in advance- ------_____ ____ 600.00 Editor___ ____-Dr. Jack Hansel An additional $5.00 will be charged for each week of delay in registration. Osteopathy Without Limitation Dissecting material, on commencing dissection .__ __ 20.00 Laboratory, Deposit for each of the first two years of labAt the last meeting of the Cororatgry work ---_______ ____ ____-__' 10.00 porate Board of Des Moines Still Athletic:' Payable at the: beginning of eachl- semester. College, Mrs. Katherine Robinson (This fee entitles the-. student to admission to all local ' was elected Secretary for the enCollege athletic events)--- ---__ '_______…__- 5.00 suing year. Mrs. Robinson has -_________-_10.00 been with :the college for the Graduation: Diploma, etc. ________-____ past two years and has been act- Refund: No refund of tuition is allowed, except in case of serious illness. If, on .that account, a student withdrawg before the ing secretary since the resignamiddle of a semester, one-half of his semester's tuition will be tion of Dr. Cramer in February. refunded, providing he is in honorable standing. Mrs. Robinson has demonstrated Iher business ability and 'keen judgment ever since becoming Profession to our Colleges," me'nts in that district. '.Their associated with our college. She which 'was enthusiastically re- staff of physicians, each .a specialist in his line, are the com. is well liked by all members of ceived. the faculty, and is very popular The doctors were very sociable pany physicians and surgeons of with the student body. We feel and hospitable, and in' his few practically all the manufactursure that the coming year will days'- stay Dr.' Bachman formed ing companies anrd oil fields :of prove Mrs. Robinson's worth as some very appreciable .acquain- the surrounding. territory '. At secretary of the college. tanceships. He reported that the the time Dr. Bachman was 'there, press was --unusually favorable the Sanatorium was- in the midst and was to be commended for of moving to- Topeka, 'Kansas, Dr. Robt. Bachman .where they will be in teMrporary liberal Goes to Oklahoma theirwere verysupport. The arti- qaurters until their new.. .build. * . cles well written, and weer given first consideration on ing is erected.:: Railroad accomOklahoma has a lively bunch of the front page of all issues. He' 'modations have always been a
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Osteopathic

,.physicians,, so

-ports Dr. Robert Bachman on his return from Enid, where the association held their annual state meeting. The meeting was hed on May 13th and 14th, a short time before the national convention at Kirksville, making the attendance a little smaller than it. would have been had hot the meetings been so close together. Dr. Bachman statedi however, that those present. were a good representation of tlhe state's members. He was very much inpressed by the practical and scientific character of the I klahoma Osteopaths.` The Osteopaths 'stand very high in the state.-.' |. ~'The. program, he stated, was ' well' arranged, giving the mem-. -'bers an opportunity to hear discussions& every topic essential on to the practicing physician. There were ttWo imported speakers: Dr. George Laughlin and Dr. Robert Bachman. Dr. Bachman , spoke on one of his hobbies, "Routine Diagnosis and Technic in Obstetrics," using his three color charts to illustrate his -points. The interest was very good: throughout the entire con. vention.. The banquet, he reports, was : .indeed a sociable hour. . Dr. ' Bachman made a few remarks on the subject:. "The Relation of the

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as many -facts about Osteopathy, written-up so -clearly in an .- nu antagonizing manner as appeared in the Enid publications. From Enid Dr. Bachman went to Blackwell, where he' spoke to a class of graduating nurses of the Osteopathic Sanatorium. His subject .was, "Cost, Value, and Discounts." The Sanatorium, he, states, is by far the best spoken .-. institution in that of part- of the country, having the support of the largest establish. . i-

stitution. ..... Dr. Bachman says that he was royally entertained both at Enid and Blackwell, having been taken to the oil field in the vicinity of each' city, and to other points'of interest, From Blackwell he went to Norman, Oklahoma, to 'visit some friends and the :state university. Dr. Bachman reached home in time to give his classes at D. M. S. C. 0. the final shake-up at the, end -of the term. -.
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Wadell-Breese Miss Stella Wadell, of 4017 Pleasant Street, Des Moines, was married to' "Dr. A. -0. Breese at the bride's home on JiJune 13th,. 1924. Dr. and Mrs. Breese leftimmediately for Chicago, 'where they will remain 'until 'the. Doc-i' tor leaves for West"! Virginia to take the. State Board. Dr. andA Mrs. Breese will later locate in some Pennsylvania town. -- : Five weddings in 23 days was,: the record set up by Still Col-lege for marriages. Quite a showing, we believe. Des Moines, is fortunate in having an insti-'_ stitution bringing such deperda-, ble men and wbmen into the city. . The, student body certainly take; some of; the citizens out of Des Moines, as the above items 'show.'
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"I find that the great thing in this world is not so much where we stand as in what direction we are-movin." -Oliver Wendell Homes.
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Our Direction

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Still College- prospects - have never before been so bright. Our aim is for Four Hundred Students in the Fall.
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CLIP COUPON BELOW Are You Doing . Your Part? IENOT _.__OUTJOIN NOWCLIP OUT -AND BELOW COUPON
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To the Editor of the Log Book: :jEnroll my name -as a member of the "Greater Still College Club." I agree to pay the- amount indicatedc on this coupon annually, upon receipt of a "payment due"' notice from your office until-such time as I may notify you of my desire to cancel or change the amount of my subscription. I. _.. A . . . ._ ... .... ._................. .... .. ..

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To the Editor of the Log Book: Enroll my diame as a member of the "Greater- Still College Club." I -agree to pay the amount indicated on this coupon annually, upon receipt of .a "payment due" notice from your office until such time as I may notify you of my desire to cancel or change the amount of my subscription, Name ... . ...... . ....

To the EHditor of the Log .Book: Enroll my name as a member of the "Greater; Still College Club." I agree to pay the amount indicated on this coupon annually, upon receipt of a "payment due" notice from your of-fice until such time as I may notify you of 'my desire to cancel or change the amount of my subscription Name ....... Address
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Entered as second class i matter, February' 3. 19,23. at the post office at- Des i Moines. Iowa, under the act of August 24th. 1912.

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" special 'rates of posta& section in for provided 1103, act- of Oct. 3, 1917. authorized Feb. 3, 1923. '

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PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY BY THE DES MOINES STILL COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHY.
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Volume 1
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February 15th, 1924 I*
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Still Captures Close Victory

'i"alenttuneg"
DADDY (M. E. B.) Our Dean
mansions

Still College Wins Over St. Ambrose Five II
Locals Win by FIve-Pointt Mmgin :.' .

Defeats Penn College By 36 to 35 I Score in Last Few Min"There in his noisy I To morning class, we come each utes of Play skilled to rule

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Equaling its early season contest at Oskaloosa, the Still college basket ball team again took thte measure 9f the Penn college team at the Drake gym Saturday afternoon in a sensational and hard fought game, when a last minute rally game them the narrow margin of a 36 to 35 victory.The bonesetters started out strong, scoring the first basket in the first ten minutes of play when Davis dropped in a goal from the side of the floor. Penn when retaliated immediately Muhl sank in a long one from Still the center of the floor. again took the lead -and had things its own way until the last four minutes of the first half when Penn started to overcome a five point lead. At the close of the first half, baskets by Muhl and Hauser had given the visitors a 23 to 19 advantage. Beginning with the second half both teams displayed a better brand of ball, fighting hard and sinking sensational shots from all angles. Both teams using the long pass attack. Penn seemed unable to get by the Still defense. Penn continued to hold its ad-

Davenport, Ia., Feb. 6.-Stili I day, The village master taught his college of Des Moines defeated To hear what Daddy has to say. little schoql." the St. Ambrose five at basketAs with a calm and portly Oliver Goldsmith. ball here last night by the score mien, iof 18 to 13. It was a nip and He talks of liver, "guts" and A man of wisdom and of wit .s tuck game, all the way. he, spleen; Still won the game in the first' Or tells us how to sight a nose, He knows all human ills from half by scoring fourteen points? : A to Z. to seven for the locals. In: the Line :up' their heels and twist Can diagnose them too, nor ever second half of the play:as. their toes. bluff, much rougher and the0, local He shows us how a rib may slip, And how to set a twisted hip. Nor make mistakes, because he tallied six points to four for knows his stuff. Des Moines. And say! His neck technique is I The people come to him to tell Weimers and Nicholas starred greatWhat's wrong with them and if for the winners. It's just side-bend, ex-tend, rothey can get well. -The lineups: tate, He tests, their reflexes, examines St. Ambrose-13 '-':Of course we like to hear him all the spine, West :tell Stands them with eyes closed Costello F. .....- , How we may get our patients .. pon a line, u ' ........ ' :...:F.:-well.' Lawler -- ._.-.. I Then tells the wonderful results Murphy ---...-.. Bu't Oh! We. love to hear him I we'll get Hippeler roar , If we tweak the coccyx or the Green, -. . __ G. When some M. D. has made him atlas yet. G Kelly sore. Such bunk .and hokus pokus as is It makes his Dutch blood fairly Still-18 taught, WeimersP boil- { Are stumbling stones, with many .I Nicholas __-__F. Those "Kill-o-paths" don't know dangers fraught. Friend .. F. their oil. For "Sure as - made little ap- Hannon... C. ..And yet the "Zebra's" have the ples," he will say, brass, Davis __.G, ... "You've got to use your heads in Meyers -. _..... .,...- G. ... . (A Zebra being a sport model treating such as they." ass.) "And setting something, even To knock US every chance they Financial Arrangement the innominate, get, of the Revolving Fund Will never get you anywhere They call us ignorant-and yet, (except in debt.)" When they with all their knowThus to impress his students, he I The checks and money received ledge great vantage until the, last minute of as "Membership dues" in this doth use play when Still turned what I,Have left some guy to meet his I Much Biblical language to ex- "Greater Still College OsteoI fate, seemed a sure defeat into a vicpathic Club" will be mailed topress his views. tory. With the visitors holding And said his soul would drift "Great Caesar's Ghost!" You Mr. C. F. Frazier, of Commeraway, a 30to 35 lead the Osteopaths I cial Savings Bank, who, as treashear the doctor roar, gave one final spurt which brot ~No dope they had could make it "Some folks will never learn, urer of DES MOINES STILL stay. COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHY will the margin of victory. Hannan, until - freezes o'er." Nicholas and Thomas hitting the Then we step in with simple -Olive Matthews. take care of the fund:. means, The coupon may be mailed to ring three times in three atthe Editor of the Log Book, t: empts making tje score 36 to (Just common sense, WE use I our beans,) Still College. who will send re36x in the last ten seconds of the And bring him back to Health 1007%Membership ceipt for "membership dues" and play. I I and Life; I will be notified of deposit of the Muhl and Hauser were the outMay, 1926, class has set a good check or money with Mr. Frazier. standing players for the losers. (They fail with serums, drugs and knife,) pace in the matter of subscripOr the check may be mailed Hauser, the big center, seemed i to be able to get baskets from Then how they rave and tear tions to the Revolving Fund of direct to Mr. Frazier,, Commertheir hair, Still College, by placing theirs I cial Savings Bank, and a notice any place. He caged seven goals. -Muhl was the high point man Thei.r propaganda's most un for $100.00. This is the first sent to the editor, who will acsubscription from classes as such, knowledge it and return receipt fair. for both teams. Thomas played C iis usual floor game and scored But they know well--and so do and the example is worthy of for the amount. h duplication by each and all of we. I< goals for Still. Hannan also Send an "annual subscription."; They've nothing on our M. E. B. the several classes now in school. Continued on page 2 I
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Iota Tau Sigma Notes
Dean Johnson addressed the members of Iota Tau Sigma on Monday night, Feb. 11th on the subject of "Professional Ethics." Leroy and Dave Skidmore were guests for the evening. Dr. Johnson's talk was a most interesting and instructive one and was thoroly enjoyed by everyone present.

Delta Omega Notes

The Students' Rubiayat

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Osteopaths Wanted

We would like to have a live apologies to Omar You folks who missed Mr. (With humble 0 steopathic physician locate in Khayam) Hart's address to students of Dean of wisdom and 01ur town. Our M. D. is leaving Still College Friday evening, Feb- 0, Johnson, n,ext week. He expects to study of wit, ruary 1st, at Hotel Chamberlain Couldst thou but be with us to- tikin and specialize, and we think Rose Room ,are the losers indeed. tthis would be a good time for a day and sit The speaker covered a wide O. Beneath the roof of old Still Col- D 0. to locate here. Send us range in his remarks, all the way 01 ne of your students. We will lege Place from "How to Go About Making our shadows as they be glad to do what we can for a Loan," to "Pointers for the Listening to him, and would be glad to have pass and flit. Busy Professional Man or Woman h im come for a week end as our in Making Investments," all from Hark to a tale of mingled grave g uest. Dr. M. E. Bachmann and Dr. a banker's viewpoint. Mr. Hart Yours very truly and gay, Taplan of Boston were guests at is vice president of the Iowa Mr. Joe Alden, Facts, thoughts' and fancies of lunch at the Chapter House on National Bank, and thoroughly Shellsburg, Iowa. its student heroes, the occasion of Dr. Taplan's vis- informed on all matters pertainThey who will dedicate to the it to D. M. S. C. 0. ing to banks and banking. Francis E. Jones, D. O., M. D., "Healing Art" He gave us a tip on how to Their lives and toil for others 0f Demarest, Ga., wants woman Messrs. Harry Newmann and pick out a bank from its very ti0steopath to join him in opening night and day. T. Jones of the Newmann Con- tle, or name, which should mark iffices in Maryland. Write him 0 struction Co. were dinner guests it as a safe institution. and f !or further information. heard While yet a tyro full of hope at the Chapter House WednesWell, you should have i pride day evening, Feb. 13th. it, that's all. This address was NOTICE Del- Methought a feminine Nemesis arranged for by girls of the within the office cried, ta Omega sorority of Still ColP. S. G. Notes is Still College, whadda ya Heretofore the college has been lege, and they are to be congrat- "This want? ulated on having secured theI Iput to the expense of filling out Lee from Paw Paw, Mich., has services of so competent a man t "Are you registered in clinic, or application blanks and making why me haunt?" given up hunting for the cause of on such a timely topic. About I ttranscripts of grades in complyI iing with the request for Board the mysterious rumblings at P. 50 students were in attendance. But no success comes to those I S. G. house, has decided thatt Applications. The amount is not j who stand before there is a colored gentleman in 1 much in any single case, but I Wins The office shouting, "Open then ~ the kindling somewhere. He has3 Still College I when it occurs from 'five to ten k the door. also changed laundries. Reason?7 Over St. Ambrose Five.11 I times a month it means that the "You must know we have great ifunds are being dispersed at the Oh, yes, he has a good one. The3 business other day ,instead of receiving T rate of from ten to twenty doli Continued from page 1 his other shirt together with all had his eye on the basket when I "We would transact before 'tis I lars a month, which in the course too late. Perhaps there is a I a year amounts to considerthe other things that go to make he dropped in four counts in the of letter. up the attire of the dapper final period. able and it can be easily seen young man Alfred is, he had dethat it does not go to the adThe lineup: The arbiter of our life and death vancement of the school. Thereb--ered to him a package whicb Still-86 is she contained a complete array olr f GT. FT. fore, no application or- transb-;by clothes, from the hide out Thomas rf 0 0 IE Who stands 'twixt us and all script wilil be sent out unless it 6 Eternity, -eelee said it was a darned mear 1 Friend rf 0 1 0 is accompanied by a fee of $2.50 ni:ick to play on a fellow wh( Weimers If 0 Who halts our coming and our payable to the college. 1 0 going speeds, i-Asn't a prospect in the world Hannan If 4 0 0 !it we are not inclined to be Nicholas c 2 Whose verdict we must needs ac2 0 Silence is Golden cept implicitly. that part of it. wiieve 1 0 0 Pyleman c Mother: "Betty, Sam brought 1 0 2 Davis rg you home very late last night." 0 Her moving fingers write and 0 1 1926 class elected officer s Olson rg "Yes, it was late, May, Betty: having writ, 3 10 mother. Did the noise disturb for second semester, as followS Myers lg i No mortal student can change a President, Doyle Richardson. you?" word of it, 17 2 6 Totals Mother: "No, dear, it wasn't Vice president, A. E. Smith. Except the Dean, mayhap the Penn-35 the noise, it was the silence." Secretary and treasurer, Ann:a Board, GT. FT. IF. Doyle. hath waxed her power 7 0 0 So strong cornL- Muhl rf A proud young father teleThe class entertainment over all. *0 2 0 graphed the news of his happimittee has just about complete(d Whitlock If 7 1 1 to his brother in these plans for a class party, to be Hauser c we do our ut- ness 2 2 In spite of this 0 words: "A handsome ,boy has held in the near future. Thes e Patterson rg most to succeed, 1 0 0 come to my house and claims to affairs were held monthly las Anderson lg Harrassed and full of bitterness 1 2 0 be your nephew. We are doing semester, and were very enjoyY- Macy lg because )0 our best to give him a proper able ,and attended by nearly 10 For our most cherished hopes we 15 5 7 welcome." per cent membership. Totals are called down, The brother, however, failed Missed free throw:s-Weimer *s, While our feminine Nemesis to see the point and wired back: The doctor's small son was en- Hannan 2, Nicholas 2, Davis 2, calmly chews on. "I have no nephew. The young tertaining a friend in his fa- Muhl, Hauser 2, Patterson, Macy. man is an imposter."-Boston Reason Enough Referee-Dubridge. and they were lookther's office, Transcript. "Is your father home, little ing with awed admiration at the Had Nothing on Him the closet. boy?" articulated skeleton in An Awful Reign She: "Sir, do you realize whom "No, he ain't been home since "Where did he get it?" asked Harry: "Quite a Ku Klux deme you are speaking to? I am the maw caught Santy kissing the the guest in a whisper. onstration last night, wasn't it?" cook." "Oh, he's had it a long time. daughter of an English peer. Jerry: "Yeah, even the rain I i He: "Not so fast. I am the first paI guess maybe it's his Send an "annual subscription." came down in sheets." son of an American Doc." tient!"-Life.
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THE LOG BOOK
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The Log Book
The Official Publication of DES MOINES STILL COLLEGE OSTEOPOTHY. President .................... S. L. Taylor Business Manager ....M. D. Cramer Editor Jack Hansel

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Osteopathy

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The Observer Says:

I had the pleasure of hearing Rev. Craig of the First Baptist church of this city a few weeks ago. The subject of his sermon was "Leanness of Soul." He drew some very applicable parallels to every-day life, one of them on students being conscientious and consistent, and brought out quite plainly that we get out of this life just what we put into it, and opposite. that the measure of success we As soon as we see that every attain will be commensurate with action is the result of hundreds the effort we exert now ,and if of thousands of psychomotor imwe just slip through by the skin pulses, which are in definite relaof our teeth we will have "leantion to antagonistic energies, and ness of soul," and not the full V. that the result depends upon the measure of the abundant or plus Avails it whether bare or shod, struggling and balancing of this life that should be our heritage. These feet the path of duty trod? most complex apparatus, then we If from the bowers of ease they understand more easily how outPoor Humanity fled er influences may help the one or To seek Affliction's humble shed; the other idea to preponderance, More than half a century ago If Grandeur's guilty bribe they as soon as the balance turns to the following lines were found spurned, the one side, a completely new in the Royal College of Surgeons, And home to Virtue's cot re- adjustment must set in. London, beside a skeleton, returnedTo be suggestable means to be markable for its symmetry of These feet with angel's wings provided with a psychophysical form. They were subsequently shall vie, apparatus in which new proposipublished in the London Morning And tread the palace of the tions for actions close easily the Chronicle, and a vain effort made skies. channels for antagonistic activto ascertain the author, even ofity. This explains why some peofering a reward of fifty guineas. ple are more easily influenced by The Brain They were later found in the suggestions and psychotherapeu(From "Psychotherapy" by pocketbook of G. H. Laughlin methods. Under abnormal Munsterberg) I tic and published in an osteopathic I condiitons such as severe hyste"Anatomy in a Nutshell," book, The so-called association cen- ria cases, the dissociated conby William Ross Laughlin, M. D., ters of the brain are like com- tents may form large clusters of D. 0. plex switchboards, between the Ihmental experiences, in the midst I. of which a new idea of their own Behold this ruin! 'Twas a skull various mental centers. Their I own activity is not accompanied 1 personality may develop. ConOnce of etherial spirit full. sidering that through such disThis narrow cell was Life's re- by any mental content, but has3 of regulating p connection many channels of disonly the function treat, are blocked, while others This space was Thought's mys- transmission of the excitement charge I11are abnormally opened, it seems from the one to the other. Above terious seat. the idea of the own What beauteous visions filled this all their operation would make it only natural possible that through the asso- acting personality becomes very spot L With dreams of pleasures long ciative processes the wonderful I greatly changed. . complexity of the trains ofE The basis of psychotherapy is forgot! an analytical psychology which Nor hope, nor joy, nor love, nor thought may be reached. The cortex is the apparatus of E conceives the inner experience as fear, Have left one trace of record transmission between the incom- a combination of psychical eleing and outgoing currents, be- ments. The more we abstract here. tween the excitements that go from everything which suggests II. Within this hollow cavern hung to the brain, and the discharges 3 either the mysticism of the subThe ready, swift and tuneful that go from the brain, and the3 conscious or the moral issue of 1 mental accompaniments of these 31 the mind which is independent tongue. of the body, the more we shall be If falsehood's honey it disdained transmission processes. And when it could not praise was Through the sensory nerves the3 able to answer the question as chained; brain receives; through the mo- W..to the means by which health If bold in Virtue's cause it spoke tor nerves the brain directs, andI I can be restored. Not a few of
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Yet gentle concord never brokeThat silent tongue shall plead for thee, When time unveils eternity. III. Beneath this moulding canopy Once shone the bright and busy eye. But start not at that dismal void! If social love that eye employed; If with no lawless fire it gleamed, But through the dews of kindness beamed, That eye shall be forever bright When sun and stars are sunk in night. IV. Say, did these fingers delve the mine, Or with the envied ruby shine? To hew the rock or wear the gem, Ca n little now avail to them. But if the page of truth they sought, Or comfort to the mourner broughtThese hands a richer meed shall ' claim Than all who wait on Weal or Fame. v

this whole arc from the sense organs, through the sensory nerves, through the brain, through the motor nerves, and finally to the muscles, is one uniform apparatus of which no part can be thought away. We must keep this intimate and necessary relation between the sensory and motor parts constantly in mind, and must understand that there can not be any sensory process that does not go over into the motor response. The opening of one channel of discharge automatically closes the opposite channel. This is the characteristic feature of attention. We can think of a great many things at the same time as long as they are closely associated and not opposite in kind. The attended-to idea does not exclude every other idea, but it does exclude the

the disturbances that appeared irreparable to an earlier time yield to the treatment of today, and no one can determine whether much which appears irreparable today may not be accessible either to psychotherapeutic or physicaltherapeutic means of tomorrow. A degenerated brain cell looks differently under a microscope than a normal one; but the ideas of a paranoiac, the emotion of a maniac, the volition of the hysteric, the memory idea of ,a paralytic, is each in its own structure not different from such elements in any one of us. The total change lies only in the proportion; there is too much or too little of it. The misjudgement and the depression of the insane are only an exaggeration of that which may occur in any man. You have looked at your watch and certainly had in glancing at the dial a conscious impression, but the next moment we no longer know how late it is. The impression did not connect itself with our continual personal experience, that is with that chief group of our conscious contents which we associate with the perception of our personality. Under abnormal conditions of the brain, larger and larger parts of the completely conscious experience may thus be cut 6ff from the continuity of conscious life The silly girl and the stupid boy, the man who has the bluies, and the reckless creature, are certainly worse equipped for the struggles of existence than those who are intellectually, and emotionally and volitionally well balanced. The criminal is never born as such. He is only born with a brain that in some directions is inefficient and which, thus under certain unfavorable conditions will more easily come to a criminal end than a normal brain. W. E. LUDWIG.
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Scandal There were muffled sounds of a struggle in the other room, and a girl's voice squealed, "Stop." No response. Mother "Oh, please don't. said-" No response. "Oh, wait just a minute, please." No response. "Let me go this minute." "One more yank and I'll have it out," consoled the dentist. Send an "annaal subsecription."

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INTROD UCING

ELIZABETH ANN
Who will tell about the Little Folk's Department of The Greater Still College Revolving Fund

IN THE NEXT ISSUE
$5.00
To the Editor of the Log Book: Enroll my name as a member of the "Greater Still College Club." I agree to pay the amount indicated on this coupon annually, upon receipt of a "payment due" notice from your office until such time as I may notify you of my desire to cancel or change the amount of my subscription. ....-Name Name .....................-- -..

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To the Editor of the Log Book: To the Editor of the Log Book: To the Editor of the Log Book: Enroll my name as a member of Enroll my name as a member of name as a member of Enroll my the "Greater Still College Club." I the "Greater Still College Club." I the "Greater Still College Club." I on agree to pay on amount indicated the agree to pay on agree to pay the amount indicated the amount indicated this coupon annually, upon receipt of this coupon annually, upon receipt of this coupon annually, upon receipt of a "payment due" notice from your ofa "payment due" notice from your ofa "payment due" notice from your office until such time as I may notify fice until such time as I may notify fice until such time as I may notify you of my desire to cancel or change you of my desire to cancel or change you of my desire to cancel or change the amount of my subscription. the amount of my subscription. the amount of my subscription. ............................................ ...... ....... ... ........ .. Name ................... .......... Nam e... Nam e .............. A idress
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Entered as second class matter. February 3. 1923. at the post office at Des Moines. Iowa. under the act of August 24th, 1912.

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March 1, 1924
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Acceptance for mailing at special rates of postage provided for in section 1103, act of Oct. 3. 1917. authorized Feb. 3, 1923.

PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY BY THE DES MOINES STILL COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHY. Volume 1 - --lp P-

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STILL DEFEATS CATHOLICS IN HARD STRUGGLE
The Still college basketball team secured revenge for an early season defeat when Coach Sutton's quintet defeated the Des Moines Catholic college five on the Catholic court in a hard fought, rough struggle 24 to 18. '^rce, field 'oals ;,n iJh; nral mutes of play enabled Still to in by a margin of six points. ie score was tied 18 to 18 when the Bonesetters rallied and put the game on ice. Myers husky Still college guard, was the star performer for the winners, and it was his ability to sink three baskets late in the game that won the contest for the Bonesetters. With the score tied, 16 to 16, Myers dropped one through the net from close range. The Catholics came back and tied the count when Fitzgerald made good on two free throws. Myers again put Still in the lead when he made another field goal from under the basket. He came back with a long goal from near the center of the court, the basket putting Still in the lead by four points. The contest, which was a hard struggle all the way, gave the fans many thrills. Still started out with a rush and managed to pile up a 9 to 2 lead at the end of the first quarter. In the second period the Catholics scored five points while Still made only two markers and the score was 11 to 7 at half time. TbI ln.o1pr s.1mv bhack with a e rush in the third quarter and soon tied the score, 11 to 11. The score was later tied at 14-14, 1616 and 18-18. Wiemers and Thomas were also good performers for Still in addition to Myers. They made three field goals each. The Catholics were guarded closely by their husky rivals and they managed to make only four field goals, one in the first half and three in the second half. The losers scored ten points on free throws. Hoffman was high point maker for the Catholics. Morasco and Fitzgerald were other star players for the losers. Morasco played a great defensive game until he was put out for rough work. Hannan was also ousted in the mixup with Morasco.

Big Pit Restored
Dr. C. W. Johnson showed his old form when he appeared before clinic last Wednesday in the big pit which has been recently restored after the fire. Our recent graduates would hardly know the big pit now, for it is just as it was the day it was built. Everything is fresh and clean. Even the odors from the dissection room have been -nov.ed. MAny of our old graduates would be pleased to return and see where they got their education.

Our Enviable Clinic

The D. M. S. C. 0. clinic, as conducted last semester did not work out as sucessfully as was expected; therefore, the old time clinic, the clinic that made Still College famous, has been re-established. By the old time clinc, we mean a real clinic conducted by some of the best Osteopaths of the country The doctors from the field found it difficult to leave their practices to come to the college in the afternoon for clinic. But after one semester of the new clinic arrangement, they decideid that it would be well worth their while to come back. The doctors who are giving us their time so willingly are: Drs. S. L. Taylor, C. W. Johnson, M. E. Bachman, who are the regular clinicians; Drs. E. E. Steffin, C. F. Spring, J. Woods, Mary Golden, Lola Taylor, who acts as alternates. All of the students who attend cliinics consider themselves fortunate in having these doctors give them the best they have. And we would like very much to have the doctors in the field make this fact known to all prospective students. By having these different doctors, we don't get the same "stuff" each day, but there is always a change. On Monday, Dr. Bachman has the floor and lets nothing be omitted which is includtd in general osteopathic examination and treatment. On Wednesday, Dr. Johnson, who knows nervous diseases from A to Z, always gives us something we will be sure to use in our practice. Just because he specializes in reflexes is no reason why he should not know osteopathy. He knows it-and also technic. And on Friday, we get everything, even those things which might have been omitted on the other two days Dr. Taylor never leaves anything for Our new assistant clinician, guess work.' Sam H. Leibor, says he will see Besides these three clinic sesthat no one is cheated out of his sions each week, Dr. Johnson or her patient. holds his clinic for "nerve cases"

during the regular class hour on Monday. Then on Friday afternoon, Dr. Lola Taylor conducts "gyn" clinic, either private or general Dr. Mary Golden and Dr. A. B. Taylor are always glad to see the little children brought in. These two doctors seem to have a way about them that always makes a crying child change the cry to a smile. Dr. G. C. Taylor's clinic for eye, ear, nose and throat, and Dr. Robt. Bachman's 0. B. clinic are going Von L;i beiov -, ' We are all proud of the. Still College clinics and are always glad to tell about it. There are always patients waiting for each clinic and frequently are compelled to wait several days for their appointment which is sufficient evidence of the good service rendered at D. M. S. C. 0.

SNAPPY PLAYING BY STILL QUINT BEATS THE IRISH
By a constant barrage of short passes and fast floor work, the Still College quintet defeated St. Ambrose college of Davenport by a score of 28 to 13, at the Drake gymnasium Friday night. Both teams played a
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D. M. General Hospital
The hospital is keeping up its reputation for surgery. Time and again patients who have been "mulled" over for a series of years without a diagnosis, clear understanding or a definite treatment of their cases, come to Des Moines General hospital, and:) go away satisfied. The institution is proud to have such an organization as the Taylor Clinic connected with it.

Birthday
Dr. Lola D. Taylor, professor of the department of gynecology, had a birthday recently. Some one said that she was a year older than she really is and that made her red-headed. Strange. Suffice it to say that due ipolog'ieb were made and. there will be no -- angings deh manded. A little party was held at her home and some little presents were given as a peace offering. It may take a year for things to be properly adjusted. The Log Book offers its services. Foot Ball Captain Elected At a meeting of the Athletic Board and foot ball letter men, Robert Murphy, 3 year letter man in foot ball was elected as captain for the season of 1924. Murphy's fighting spirit and excellent generalship will lead the gridiron warriors through a successful season. Fifteen Rahs for the team. Fifteen Rahs for Capt. Murphy. Rah! Rah! Rah! The following men were awardsd letters for season 1923: Swezey, Graham, O'Connor, O'Keefe, Higelmeier, Myers, Staples, Walker, Sheets, Nicholas, F. Thomas, Brown, Dice Buirge, Murphy, Hannan, McNish.

The Irish drew first : when Kippler threw a free .. e , From that point the half was full of nip and tuck play. The score first favored the Bonesetters and then the visitors. The remarkable five-man defense emn ployed by the Irish kept the Still five from a close shot at. the basket and Still then resorted to short passing that advanced the ball to where the matter of tossing was easy. The first half ended 9 to 7 with Still on. the long side of the score. St. Ambrose came back for the last half with the same style; of play used in the first half. The Osteopath team opened up with a volley of snappy underhand passing and were soon leading the visitors by a safe margin. Hannon, the Still pivot man, led his team in. scoring during the last half of the game. He made four counters out of six tosses. The steady, fast attack of the Bonesetters; proved a strong defense to the Irish, and they scored only one field goal during the last half. Hannon with his tossing ability played in the limelight for the local team. Weimers and Nicholas played good ball, both on the defense and offensive. Custellc, Green i i -Ki pp 1 i the outstanding stars of the St Ambrose team.

STILL DEFEATS WESTERN UNION
LEMARS, IA., Feb. 15.-Still college of Des Moines, defeated the Western Union college cage quintet here Thursday night by thescore of 31 to 14. The gamewas closer than the score indicates. The Osteopaths were leading at half time, 16 to 8. Weimers, Thomas and Nicholas performed creditably for the visitors as far as scoring is concerned. Rockwood played a brilliant floor game and caked two field goals for the Telegraphers, The -local collegians were unable to penetrate the five-man defense of the Still team with, consistency. Send an "annual subscription.,

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Phi Sigma Gamma Notes
The new fraternity house sign shows to advantage in the big window in front. It. is of gold letters on beveled plate glass. An open house smoker in honor of the January Freshmen was held at the Chapter hlouse oi Friday evening, Feb. 15. "Daddy" Bachman was there and gave us some fine points on "Things Thai make for success" and in his own unimitable style drove home some plain truths. Coach Sutton also honored the gathering and spoke short and to the point as he knows how, on 'The Value of Fraternal Association in One's School Life,." Pledges Bebe and Jacobs contributed to the evening's program by staging a three round boxing bout. Ralph Davis was referee. Everybody ate of apples, pie hi lpe'dhidea a lot of cider if Donald Weir don't let up on the monopoly of the phone the boys are considering very seriously pooling their funds and installing a Radio for D. B's exclusive use, to be known as Station W. A. T. (Weir All the Time.)

Senior A Notes
Officers for this semester: J. E. Weimers, P'res. Herma A. Earley, Vice Pres. A. 0. Breese, Secy Treas. We are glad to have Dr. Kent from Boston with us because of the new ideas he brings to us. There are sections of the middle west in which the water contains much alkali, but according to Dr. Kent's report, water (evidently in the east) contains much protein. Lyman Johnson somewhat doubts Kent's statement. Most of us were glad when the time came when we didn't have to roll out of bed at 2 a. m., stumble around in the dark and answer the call of the stork. Harry Elston is different. He likes it so well that he accepted the title of assistant 0. B-ist for this semester. All reports are favorable so far. Keep it up Harry. At the rate the lower classmen are treating and appropriating things in general, it won't be long until all that the seniors will have to do is to read their text books and attend lecturers. The Freshmen will answer all 0. B. calls.

Dave Skidmore in Nervous AnIota Tau Sigma Notes atomy class the other day gave Beta Chapter of Iota Tau Sig- us an exhibition' of a case he saw
ma announces the pledging of Leroy and David Skidmore, "Ted" Reiter, and "Jerry" Lauck to Iota Tau Sigma. Mrs. Miss guests House

Katherine Robinson and on the back of a seat). When Rosemary Kurtz were at dinner at the Chapter questioned by Dr. Woods as to on Sunday, February 25. whether the lady was young and beautiful, Dave blushed and adBrother F. J. Trenery, D. 0., mitted the truth. Dr. said, "It Superintendent of Des Moines General Hospital was with us o0n looks like a case of occupational Monday evening, February 19, paralysis." Then Dave was sorry and following the regular meet- that he spoke. ing, gave a talk on "The Value of the Hospital to the Practicing Physician". Following his If Dr. Johnson had only seen talk, Dr. Trenery, at the request the wide-eyed, open-mouthed exof some of the members demonstrated the use of the hypoder-- pression on the dark complexmic and explained the use and ioned sons of toil (?) when he was discoursing on neurones and misuse of same. axis cylinders, he might not have ie that some of the ciI Dr. M. E. Bachman of the wOilnaeC faculty of D. M. S. C. O. will be were so much interested i nt the guest of the Chapter on job of taking the paper off t _V onday evening, March 3, when he will give a talk taking as his assembly room walls preparatory Those black boys subject "Successes or Failures." to painting. sure did get their money's worth.

on the train recently, as to how the lady held her arm straight out from the shoulder ,eibow bent ,hand dropped (about the position one would have the arm

*Osteopathic Technique
Dr . M. E. Bachman loves technique. No student goes out from Des Moines Still College without an inspiration potentially adequate to carry him through a long professional career. Enthuiasm is Dr. Bachman's watchword.

The house recently acquired a We are all glad that our clinic brand new punch bowl and glasses. A gift from a sister of is again conducted as it was last year. We are always on one of the members. hand to get what the clinicians have for us. Drs. S. L. Taylor, The fraternity has gone on C. W. Johnson and ITM. E. Bachrecord as being among the 100 man are the clinicians for this per cent bodies in favor of the semester. Not long since ,in pathology Greater Still College Revolving class, Dr. Steffen asked, "Now, Fund. They placed initial subAtlas Club Notes Smith, in case we do thus and scription at $1.00. so, what do we get?" Rags was the style at the Smith: "Search me." Hard Time Dance, given by the School Notes Dr. Steffen: "I'm going to do Atlas Club the night of Feb. 15, at the Rose Lorenz studio. that very thing some fine day." The College dance put on by Of all the ragged clothes that And, by gosh, he did. by the Masonic Club of Still were worn, Lustig's were the College of Osteopathy held at worst. The Club decided to help Grotto Hall on Feb. 22nd, was a him out and presented him with Cause Enoughl pronounced success, despite the a pair of pink suspenders to hold Patien: "There is an awful number of counter attractions. his dilapidated trousers togethTom Van DeGrift was chair- er. rumbling in my stomach, boctor, man of the committee. You all A "Floating Balloon Dance" just like a wagon going over a know Tom and the best was was the feature of the evening. street car track." none too good. So we had SereMr. and Mrs. Ghost. Messrs. Doctor: "H'm! Probably it's iadeis orchestra ana everybody Lyddon and Howe were among that truck you ate last night." said the dance was the best the guests. ever. Eighty couples participated. The Freshman A Class elected Albert Graham says: "Walker their officers at a special meet- has such enormous 'dogs' (meanIn anatomy, Art Smith hao ing last week. They are: ing feet) on him, that if he ever told Dr. Woods that a certain President-W. E. Ludwig. nerve supplied the knee joint. wore white shoes to a dance peoVice President-L. J. Eessex. When Dr. Woods asked what Secretary- Miss Trimble. ple would think the floor was other joint this same nerve whitewashed." reaches, Art said right quick: Louie Kuchera is suffering "The other knee." from a broken second rib. No, Deep he says a Freshman did not try Rose: "Did you have the porch to "set" it. seat painted yesterday?"

While Dr. Taplin was going through his stunt of showing the merit of his pneumatic table he said, "I never work on a man over 135 pounds," and reached

for the mobilizer. While his back was turned ,Red O'Connor and a couple of other light(?)weights beat it. Bill is center on Still football team, and was next in line for "treatment" by Dr. Taplin. Sprague: "Smith, I hear you are not going back to Youngstown this summer. How about
it?" Smith: "You heard wrong sure enough. I have three good reasons to take me back to Youngstown." Sprague: "Three?" Smith: "Sure--iy wife, little girle, and-a job." Sprague: "Oh!" During rabbit season Ralph Stone spent several week ends But at Perry or thereabouts. now rabbit season is out and still Ralph makes the visits. Wonder if there could be a "dear" up

there that Ralph is trying to catch up with.
The best little brother' story I

Osteopathic Principles

F. Spring has Dr. Claude spent years teaching principles. He probably understands principles as well as any teacher in the profession. The fire did not consume his enthusiam. He comes back with new energy. The more students he has in his classes the better he likes it. Send an "annual subscription."

Thoughtlessness

Mother: "Yes, why?" Rose: "Well, Nick and I sat
on it last night and Nick got

ever heard is the one of little
Charley telling his sister's beau

committed a very great act thoughtlessness the other day No Mother to Guide Her when he neglected an opportunity to offer criticism. All Doc- -and so she hung up her sheer-

Dr. E. E. Steffen, pathologist, paint on his trousers." of

he'd just as soon stay home and
watch them as to spend a quarter to go to "The Shiek."

tor Steffen's friends have al- est silk stocking, and it was sc $4,000 practice for sale. Write ready forgiven him, knowing invisible that Santa never ever Dr. J. A. Barnett, Booneville, will not be remiss at that he saw it. Missouri. any future time.

THE LOG BOOK
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that has been der the control of one central responsibility shifted on the shoulders of a few board, representing the profesloyal men, who have labored and sion as .a whole. We have an American Osteo- Dr. S. L. Taylor, given freely of their time. and Des Moines, Iowa, money, that osteopathic students pathic Association with its vari- Dear Doctor: The Official Publication of might have a course of instruc- ous bureaus, a society for the ,DES MOINES STILL COLLEGE tion worthy of the profession for Prevention of Spinal Curvature. 1 was certainly shocked to preparing? a Society for Lymphatic Re- learn of the disasterous loss, by they were which OSTEOPOTHY. Probably the great majority of search, a Society for the Ad- fire, which the school sustained. the practitioners in the field to- vancement of Osteopathy, a Na- It grieves me more than I can S. L. .-..-..-..-..- Taylor day have never given one penny tional Advertising Association, tell, primarily because. I have President Business Manager -- M. D. Cramer or one hour of their time, or and several others. Why not a not been able to assist my Alma Jack Hansel even a thought, since gradua- Society for the Advancement of Mater in the manner in which Editor --..-tion, toward osteopathic educa- Osteopathic Education, with the I hoped. I left the school with that I Osteopathy Without LimitationI tion, unless it be postgraduate slogan, "Five million dollar en- the firm determination power courses for themselves. They are dowment for Osteopathic schools would do all within my too busy gathering in the golden and Research institutions?" Ev- to assisit; but reverses have preshekels to bother their heads ery Osteopathic schools needs a vented me, and, while I still about schools. They paid their substantial endowment. Would have the determination, I am Every one conversant with Os- paltry $150 tuition (looks big to eight separate and distinct cam- not able to demonstrate it. The teopathic life today, is cognizant us students) while in school and paigns for funds realize as much Log Book which I enjoy so much of the fact that the Osteopathic their duty was done. Oh, yes, as one national campaign for comes to me regularly and to not be able to fill in one of the profession is confronted with a they send a few students back all? old school, which As long as there are private- blanks pains me indeed. I want vast array of problems which it to the must work out on the slate of brought in a few more tuitions. ly owned institutions, divided in- you to know, Doctor, that I am brought in a few more tuiucations.al growth professional experience, in order Our splendid educational growth terests and bitter rivalry be- most sincere in this and I look expectantly, to the that this great profession may has been attained almost entire- tween schools, we cannot expect forward, recgnition and ly on meager tuitions and the great results from endowment time when I can do a little at the maintain arns Reeaed r om endowmlicita- least. standards already won, and raise loyal support of a few men. b2iJL 5. k;5vMi-i;:'K, J (. Lnese standards to a higher plane I Faculty members give their tions tend to weary the, profesthan that of any other school of time gratis, and in many in- sion and thus yield unsatisfacthe healing art. Perhaps the stances dig down in their own tory results, A united campaign NOTICE chief problem confronting early pockets for books and supplies conducted by a national organiJsteopathic practitioners, was necessary to furnish proper in- zation, composed of nationally Heretofore the college has been that of legislative recognition, struction to their students. known men from our 'schools and although we have won and Those faculty members, who are and profession, for one large en- put to the expense of filling out secured laws in most states plac- paid are very inadequately paid dowment would tell a different application blanks and making ing us on an equal footing with and could do much better for story. We do not have the pri- transcripts of grades in complyour medical friends, we still their families financially, if vilege of levying taxes like our have much to do in the legisla- they gave their entire time to medical friends, but surely a ing with the request for Board tive field. But the problem of practice instead of instruction. campaign of proper magnitude, Applications. The amount is not paramount importance to the Why do they do it? Because conducted by the right men much in any single case, but profession today is the school they love the osteopathic pro- would gain the support of the when it occurs from five to ten problem, for assuredly we must fession and realize that its profession and attract some of have schools of first rank to sup- growth depends entirely upon the moneyed friends of Osteo- times a month it means that the funds are being dispersed at the ply the increasing demand for growth of the schools. It ought pathy. Usteopaths. rate of from ten to twenty dolto make every man and woman -M. D WARNER. A few days ago, I was permit- in the field ashamed to see any lars a month, which in the course ted to view the first Osteopathic osteopath school with an unpaid of a year amounts to considerschool building ,and as I looked or inadequately paid faculty. The above is an idea worthy able and it can be easily seen at the little wooden structure Why are faculties unpaid or of consideration, but one neces- that it, does not go to the adnow relegated to a back lot,as a paid? Because sarily requiring time to perfect. relic of early Osteopathic school inadequately vancement of the school. Theredays, I could not help but mar- there never was an educational Meanwhile we must look after fore, no application or transof a present needs, and as no nationinstituttion, especially vel at the progress Osteopathy has made educationally-from scientific nature, which could al organization for endowment script wilil be sent out unless it one room shack to eight splen- build and equip builidings and exists, we wish to remind you of is accompanied by a fee of $2.50 did institutions; from three or laboratories properly on tuitions our campaign for the Revolving payable to the college. four students to two thousand; alone. Every large, well equip- Fund, with which we hope to school in the establish a Chair of Osteopathy and best of all, from one year ped scientific endowed. to be filled by a man who is at course of study in anatomy, phy- country is liberally HIAWATHA UP TO DATE siology and osteopathic thera- The tuitions (and in nearly all once an Osteopath and schoolman but State Universities, they are and everyone knows what it putics to a four year course, covBy the shores of Cuticura ering all the fundamental more than in our osteopathic would mean to Still College and By the sparkling Pluto Water, sciences necessary to a thorough schools) do not even pay all of Osteopathy for such a man to Lived the Prophylactic ChicKnowledge of the healing art; the running expenses. The. en- spend his entire time at the letand college. But it necessarily reeach institution requiring a high dowments not only build Danderine fair Buick's da-ughli:school diploma or college work equip the buildings but furnish quires considerable remuneration ter, for entrance and maintaining a permanent incomes, which help to induce a man of calibre to re- She was loved by Instant Posnounce his practice and give his defray current expenses. high standard of scholarship. tum, We have at least one splendid- entire attention to school work. Sun of Sunkist and Victrola; Osteopathy has not had a institution, that giv- The students, to a man, are be- Heir apparent to the Mazda, mushroom growth, built on a ly endowed financial basis of high tuitions, en to the profession by Dr. Geo. hind this movement both moral- Of the tribe of Coca-Cola, require- Laughlin. There is not a better ly and financially. How about the Thru the Tanlac inadequate entrance strolled the ments and correspondence or equipped college building any- alumnae and other friends of the lovers, short residential, unscientific where than the new ATSCO, but school? We need your moral Thru the Mapleine Groves they courses of study, but its growth its possibilities are -limited by support but spice it up with a wandered, has been substantial and worthy the size of the town in which it monetary subscription andboost "Lovely little Wrigley Chiclet," Every osteopathic for a Greater Still College. of its science. Had the, osteo- is located. Were the Fairy words of Pospathic profession held its educa- school should be as fully equiptum, tional standards to the low level ped and as liberally endowed, id the Freshies take the "No P'yrene can quench the fire, D ld th e re s m e s ak e th e of our imitators, there would and above all, should be a non gentle hint F the recent issue Nor any Aspirin still the heartt and above all, should be a non in be no question as to the number profit institution, owned bythe of the Log Book and jump in ache, of practitioners that would now profession as a whole rather a the o k nd p Oh! My Prestolite desire, be flooding the field. Osteopathy than by private individuals and and do the work incident to put- Let us marry, little Djer-Kiss." merited educational standards run for private agin. Privately ting the next issue in the mails? equal to that of any other school owned osteopathic schools have Yes, they did. NOT. Ye Knights of Old of theraputitcs, and it is the served their purpose and served Some of us are of the opinSquire: "Did you send for me, realization of this standard that it well, but the time has come ion that they are waiting tc has placed Osteopathy on a high when they are a stumbling block take the place of the Sopho- my Lord?" plane in the theraputic world. in educational progress. Each in- mores when they have moved on t Launcelot: "Yes, make haste, But how many Osteopathic stitution must necessarily have and some of them are Sophopractitioneers realize the tre- its own local governing board, mores. Can't tell; nothing sur- bring me the can opener; I've got a flea in my knight clothes." mendous amount of work and IIbut all institutions should be un- prises us anymore.

The Log Book

Sympathy

Osteopathic Endowment

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How Do You Do, Folks!
I certainly enjoyed being introduced to so many of you in the the last Log Book. The Log Book comes to our home regularly and I thought I would like to add my bit as a subscription to the Revolving Fund of Still College. I have heard that as yet there are no other little folks who have subscribed, and I feel awfully lonesome being in such big things all by myself. Now I wonder if I1couldn't have some company, a whole lot of company; for the more the merrier, and the more good we can do. Would you not like to belong to the LITTLE FOLKS 'DEPARTMENT o-f the REVOLVING FUND for a GREATER STILL COLLEGE? Of course if you are a little boy or girl in the home of a Real Doctor, or a student who is going to be a Real Doctor soon, you will want to be a subscriber. Then too, wouldn't it be nice if we could interest folks who believe in Osteopathy and have been benefited by Osteopathy to take out a membership for their Little Folks, so that our gift might be the means of helping some other children who do not have the strong, healthy bodies we have. Send in your subscription and we will acknowledge it in the next issue of the Log Book and tell all the folks your name and where you live and how old you are. ELISABETH ANN,
Of the LITTLE FOLKS' DEPARTMENT' of the REVOLVING FUND.

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$5.00
To the Editor of the Log Book: Enroll my name as a member of the "Greater Still College Club." I agree to pay the amount indicated on this coupon annually, upon receipt of a "payment due" notice from your office until such time as I may notify you of my desire to cancel or change the amount of my subscription.
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$10.00
To the Editor of the Log Book: Enroll my name as a member of the "Greater Still College Club." I agree to pay the amount indicated on this coupon annually, upon receipt of a "payment due" notice from your office until such time as I may notify you of my desire to cancel or change the amount of my subscription.
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$25.00
To the Editor of the Log Book: Enroll my name as a member of the "Greater Still College Club." I agree to pay the amount indicated on this coupon annually, upon receipt of a "payment due" notice from vour office until such time as I may notify you of my desire to cancel or change the amount of my subscription. ........
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To the Editor of the Log Book: Enroll my name as a member of the "Greater Still College Club." I agree to pay the amount indicated on this coupon annually, upon receipt of a "payment due" notice from your office until such time as I may notify you of my desire to cancel or change the amount of my subscription.
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$75.00
To the Editor of the Log Book: Enroll my name as a member of the "Greater Still College Club." I agree to pay the amount indicated on this coupon annually, upon receipt of a "payment due" notice from your office until such time as I may notify you of my desire to cancel or change the amount of my subscription.
Nam e ..................... Address ......... D ate ....
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To the Editor of the Log Book: Enroll my name as a member of the "Greater Still College Club." I agree to pay the amount indicated on this coupon annually, upon receipt of a "payment due" notice from your office until such time as I may notify you of my desire to cancel or change the amount of my subscription.
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rm atter. Fe3bruary -3. :1923,a the post office at Des

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under theiL 24th, 1912.

Acceptance f6r imailihn t ratesk .of:;' posta-g® -: special section: for:' in provided 1103, act of ':Oct. 3.' 1:91i?. ' authorized Feb. 3, 1923.:.

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SEMI-MONTHLY BY THE DES MOINES STILL COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHY. -PUBLISHED ';1
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TO. THE PROFESSION: ! It , c'iomes to us through different 'sources that the rumor has it ?that D. M. S,. C. 0. was so wreckedr by the fire she is not yet recovered. We would like to an: "ou:nce that all our loss was ful,':,:ly :covered by insurance and was a:-'-djusted at once and all repairs -,have. been made.- The entire has been restored- to its f:.building: :Original condition. In this issue ·-ef The Log Book, we are giving a picture of. the big pit as re'stored. Students of twenty years : i ago will have a warm feeling and A ' sympathetic .recollection .of '::. . t his-: old pit 'where so many of ,the-ir -interesting clinical ses"" ; were held. The, pit had . .i-. '' ro,-'n.."fn gray with age, but now it ' li b'ight and clean, and teems .fwit "old memories.

Taylor Clinic Graduate Attempted Hold-Up of Dr .R. Bachman Session
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Completely Recovered Now Dr. Robert Bachman, 0obstetrician, met with a robbery mishap. He was returning to his home one night about 1 otclock from an obstetrical call, 'and was just closing the doors to' hji garage when someone stepped from behind the building and- approached him. He had h-is revolver in his- left hand, but. the robbers were too quick for. him, and struck him over the lhead with some soft instrumenti and Dr. Conklin is well known.for knocked him senseless. They ran ":loes Prob- .away, and Doctor Bachman his treatment of epilepsy,-know how long he lay tIere, ably no oneeof: the .profession not has given more time and has had but thinks he must have bee:,p treat- conscious thirty minutes or 0o. greater suocess withe ment .of epilepsy than he. We He crawled to the back d4oor'ah hope.he wll have time to ap- manaed to make noise- en'::h before' the student "body to Wa-ken his wife, wyho wa terTurn to page'4 and mail your pear: were .notified The pol while in t:he-city. : f : '- .: . '-- ';!:! .fied':' . .. ,eopon, now. ,, :.. y ;. . ........ .. . ; . Field membership of the Taylor Clinic'has announced its next post, graduate session for March Some. distin19th and 20th, guished :men -of the profession are to appear on this program, including Dr. C. B. Atzen of Omaha, Nebraska, Dr. A. Becker, of Kirksville, Missouri, Pean: of the Laughlin School, Dr. Hugh Conklin, of Battle Creek, Michigan, and -r. J. W. :Maclin,' of Anita, Iowa.
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and came out, but found no trace of the robbers. They got- n.: :soirt- ' money or valuables of:any Dr. Bachman suffered 'cosiderably from the injuries. '-'',:: some days he was bothered '..ithl dizziness, but he is prac-ticiay;-: ' recovered, and is back at his"ec^ .. ': . tue work.

Announcement

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The members of the:' Grater'.' Omaha Osteopathic AsSoi:tio ' desire to express through. T.h.apprec6i-:. Log Book, their sincereation to all the agencies.Sthat - ' ' splendidly cooperated With-;th ': members of the- Greater Omrnaa .' Osteopathtic Association in,.ma'. ie. ing the Radio Program .ofruary 18th the splendid ::su:c I that it has proven; tobe. T'...:? address by Dr. Gaddis 'wilpear in either th'e ^Mac:hi't.: A-pril Asso-e o the 0. M.
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Field Notes
Dr. Lola D. Taylor, professor of gynecology at the Des Moines Still College of Osteopathy, had her tonsils removed March 8th at the Des Moines GIeneral Hospital. She is convalescing nicely. She says she does not have much respect for the man who invented local tonsilectomy. No doubt her expression is impulsive, for it won't be long before she will recommend someone to have tonsils removed and that they be removed locally. Dr. Fannie S. Parks, Winterset, Iowa, is spending the winter in Los Angeles, California. We received a letter from her this week in which she says she is D. M. S. C. 0. is fast becoming the center of scientific Osteop- enjoying the flowers of that great athy. Line up your prospective students now send us their names western state. and urge them to come to Des Moines. Dr. H. A. Coulson of Ottum------ - ---- - I--- -c--- R ------ L -- I--_I_ wa, Iowa, states in a letter that A Dublin Bargain Football Material he has just returned from a two Some time ago a genial Irishmonths stay in the Sunny Souih, Wanted man needed an empty bottle to where he hunted and fished to contain a solution he was preFOOTBALL season was such a his soul's content. His health is paring, and went to an uptown success last fall that we have much improved, and he is back drug store to make the purchase. visions of greater achievements on the job. Finally selecting one that suited for the coming year. We are his purpose, he asked the clerk very desirous of getting into Dr. Martha Hansen, now Dr. how- much it was. "Well," re- ocmmunication with available sponded the clerk thoughtfully, men who are not only interested Hansen-Olson, of Cedar Falls, "if you just want the empty bot- in football, but who are interest- writes us a long an interesting tle it .will be five cents, but if in osteopathy as well. We ap- letter of her activities, and you want anything in it, you can preciate that anyone can play among other things sends us the name of a prospective student. have it free of charge." football who has the physical "Begorra, an' that's fair," said prowess and ability, but he who I am sure her old friends will be the grinful Pat, "Put in a cork." is interested in osteopathy can glad to hear Doctor Hansen is married and that she retains make a more efficient part of a her personal interest in Still football machine for us. He will The following are the rules College. posted in a hotel in la western not only be interested in football, but will also be interested

At the last meeting of the club, Dr Campbell was present and delivered a lecture on "colds." His talk was supple,mented by demonstration of his method of procedure. If you want relief from colds, see Dr. Campbell. The club wishes to announce that Lustig is wearing his pink suspenders only on Sundays. This shows that he appreciates the gift of the club and is saving the suspenders.

Phi Sigma Gamma Notes
A typographical error regarding the faternity subscription printed in the last issue of The Log Book had it $1.00, whereas it was $100.00. This is to the revolving fund of Greater Still College. The house now supports a one (high) chair barber shop. Lee from Paw Paw is the tonsorial artist, and he operates a strictly open-shop business. Any time, just so you don't ask him to get out of bed. Lee says he can't keep a stock of Stacomb. Open house was held on the evening of Saturday, March 8. A good percentage of members were in attendance, and a number of invited guests were there also. There are now semi-monthly parties.

The sophomore A class party at the Y. W. C. A. on Friday eve- city:

Guests are requested not ning, March 7, was a most en- to speak to the dumb waiter. joyable affair. Music for danc- Guests wishing to get up withing was furnished by the Blue out being called can have selfBird Harmony Boys orchestra. rising flour for lunch. Guests Novel and unique games and pas- wishing to do a little driving times engaged the attention of will find hammer and nails in those not dancing. A lunch was the closet. If the room gets too served in the cafeteria, and all warm open the window and see those who attended say it was the fire escape. If you are fond the best yet. Dr. and Mrs. of athletics and like to see. jumpWoods, Dr. and Mrs Schwartz, ing lift the mattress and see the and Mr. and Mrs. Frank Sutton bed spring. Baseballists desiring were guests. Anna Doyle, Chas. a little practice will find a pitchBaker and Joe Rader were the er on the stand. Anyone troubcommittee. led with a nightmare will find a halter in the barn. Don't worry about paying your bill; the house is supported by its foundations.

in the reputation and prestige of the college. Doubtless the same policy in athletics will prevail the coming year that was in force last season. Let everyone who
name to the desk.

Dr. L. H. Eske also sends us
the name of a prospective. Dr. Eske is one of our successful practitioners in Columbus, Ohio.

Many good men either has a good man in view send his from or go to Ohio. This Was Imported Sam:. "What am you
now?"

come

Iota Tau Sigma
doin' The actives will give a Formal
House Dance on March 14th in

honor of pledges Dave. Skidmore, Bo: "Ise an exporter." Roy Skidmore, Jerry Lauck and "An exporter?" "Yep, the Pullman Company Lawrence Reiter. just fired me." "Hoyle" Gephardt says: "If you get the last card when dealing
I Love Me He: "Last night I dreamt I was married to the most beautiful girl in the world." She: "Oh, George! Were we happy?" you have dealt right." (The correct numebr of cards does not matter.)

Correcting a $999.00 Mistake

The fraternity has gone on record as being among the 100 per cent bodies in favor of the Greater Still College Revolving Fund. They placed initial subscription at $1.00. This should have been $100.00. Thanks.

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Our own funny-paper characters: Joe Quince, James Peter Kent. Moco, "Johniocious" Benien. North-Has Marjorie Any eduPewee, "Runt" Russell. cation along musical lines? "Hoss" Odell walked out of Dr. West--I should say so! Naime any record and she can tell you Schwartz's class at the wrong time. what's on the other side!

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The Lo Book
The Official Publication of DES MOINES STILL COLLEGE OSTEOPOTHY. President ................... S. L. Taylor Jack Hansel Editor -,.----.---_ Osteopathy Without
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Don't Close Your Office for the Summer

Loyalty Song
Tune: Fair Harvard. Words by Howard Charles Gale, D. 0. There's a college unites all our hopes and delights In a friendship that's noble and strong. It's a college that guides as it truly provides For our work in the years that are long. As it holds a high place, may it so, by God's grace, Ne'er be sullied by aught that is wrong. And as years come and go may it ever be soThat our college shall live in our song.

. . Alumnus of D M SC. 0. Notice
Still College of Osteopathy, Des Moines, Iowa: I am a graduate of Massachusetts College of Osteopathy, and of course my main efforts are used to help my own alma mater, but I am enclosing a small contribution because of your recent loss by fire. I wish I could make it many times as much. Dr. Anna Louise Hicks, Portland, Maine.

Limitation
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Little Folks Department
Revolving Fund for a Greater Still College

At time of going to press we have not heard from many in response to our invitation to become enrolled in this department as contributors to this most worthy fund. Perhaps your Log Book outlining the plan was delayed a bit, or perhaps you are debating about the amount you would like to subscribe. Now we have no age limit in this department, and if you think it should be called "The Young Folks' Department" rather than "The Little Folks' Department," somebody please say so; or shall we start a new department? Would it not be a great thing, a big surprise to many, to have a half of the back page given over entirely to names and addresses of those who want to see a Greater Still College of Osteopathy? Names will be published in the order they are received. See if yours won't be among the first. Elisabeth Ann.

Massachusetts Osteopathic Hospital
Knowing the interest of every osteopath in the new Osteopathic Hospital soon to be constructed in Boston, we will pass along from time to time such information as comes o our desk. In the last mail we received a letter telling o fthe meetings of the eighty charter members and the exchange of ideas and ideals which are to be the warp and woof of the new struceure. Such enterprises that have no other interest than to help enlarge the opportunities of Osteopathy to give its benefits to the world have been an inspiration to all of us who have met with them.

Turn to page 4 and mail your coupon now.

There is no question of a doubt in the minds of any osteopath about the need of a vacation for a few weeks during the summer months. Most o fthe field members are in the habit of taking a certain time off each season and during this time their offices are closed. Such a condition need not be! Just insert a small notice in the paper saying that you will be gone for a f,ew weeks and during you absence your practice will be conducted by Dr. So and So. We will gladly supply the last named from our senior class and you may rest assured that he will There's a calling that binds all conduct himself and the practice our hopes and our minds; in a way that will, prove he has A profession that's noble, yet had a large clinical experience. new. Let us know of your needs, Doc- We're united to serve, and, we tors. pray, never swerve From the "concept" we know to be true, Where to Spend Your May the memory we love; that Vacation great name shrined above, Be our guide and inspirer The school as a whole was asanew. sembled in the Big Pit Friday By the great name of "Still" we forenoon, March 7, and after Anpress on with a willgus had darkened the the winPioneers through untrod ways dows we were treated lo several to hew. reels of movies, showing the beauties of the Canadian woods Alma Mater, speed on, in the and inland waters, lakes and years when we're gone; streams. In the days that are coming to Rex Beach, the writer, was be. shown in action, and if pictures Though we bid thee farewell and count for anything, he is a masour parting we tell; ter in the art of handling both Though these halls we may rod and gun. never more see; Nothing like hunting and fish- Yet our life's widest range shall us never estrange ing to make even an osteopath From the place where stands forget his troubles, and these knowledge's fair tree. pictures were enough to arouse the blood of all the Nimrods and Thus we bid thee "adieu," with our pledge to be true, disciples of Izaak Walton and Alma Mater, dear college, to make them long for free air. thee. The showing of these pictures was through the publicity committee of the Department of the Surgery Interest You? Interior of Canada, and we were . D. M S.C. . would like to fortunate in being included in know how many of the profestheir list of places in their itin- sion are really interested in a erary. The freshmen are sure POST GRADUATE SURGICAL they will spend a month every COURSE which lead up to the year at these spots after they get practice of major surgery. If into the field. The seniors hope you are interested, write us. If they will have a couple of weeks you are not interested in surgery, at some such recreation spot, except in some little DINKY, and the practical D. O. wishes he worthless course, do not write could take the time off and en- us. We would like to hear from joy nature in all her beauty. you at once, if you want REAL surgery. If you want to know how soon D. M. S. C. O. says now is the "possible" is, ask O'Connor. Maybe he will tell you Bill knows, time to send in the name of that but Dr. Johnson don't; Bill new prospective student. Do not forget to attend to this at once. wouldn't tell him.

Heretofore the college has been put to the expense of filling out application blanks and making transcripts of grades in complying with the request for Board Applications. The amount is not much in any single case, but when it occurs from five to ten times a month it means that the funds are being dispersed at the rate of from ten to twenty dollars a month, which in the course of a year amounts to considerable and it can be easily seen that it does not go to the advancement of the school. Therefore, no application or transscript wilil be sent out unless it is accompanied by a fee of $2.50 payable to the college.

NOTICE

When the early frosts of autumn Crisp the leaves to ruddy brown, And the squirrels, tireless workers,

Autumn and Life

Store their treasures in the ground, When the birds are wheeling southward, Gathering numbers as they fly, Then the voice of nature calls me, To her freedom I must hie. Like the migratory blackbird, I shall seek a comrade soul, One who in the woods of autumn, Reads her words as on a scroll; To the one who heeds her calling, I shall give a gift most rare, Give the power of deeper living, Give the heart that knows no care. Gifts to bird and beast are numbered, Fixed by nature's frugal measure,

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But to man there is no limit, His is life's abundant treasure, Health and strength to reap the increase, From the earth's most fruitful sod, Grace to love his fellow creatures, More than all to love his God.

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HAT is what we owe, in dollars and cents, to our college. If you graduated from D. M. S. C. O., the records in the office show that the college invested in your education between $100.00 and $150.00 a year. At the minimum $400.00 was the cost to your Alma Mater over and above what you paid her for your education. It would take you sixteen years at $25.00 a year to repay the principal and you would still owe compound interest on the investment. The total figure would be approximately $1000.00 by the time you finished repaying the principal. These are not only interesting but "fact figures. If you are an alumnus, who has received unstintingly of the aid and benefits provided by the college-it matters not where you live now-ask yourself the question: "What do I owe my Alma Mater should I not do my best to repay her? Let us hear you say, "Here's my membership in the Greater Still College movement."

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To the Editor of the Log Book: Enroll my name as a member of the "Greater Still College Club." I agree to pay the amount indicated on this coupon annually, upon receipt of a "payment due" notice from your office until such time as I may notify you of my desire to cancel or change the amount of my subscription. Nam e
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$10.00
To the Editor of the Log Book: Enroll my name as a member of the "Greater Still College Club." I agree to pay the amount indicated on this coupon annually, upon receipt of a "payment due" notice from your office until such time as I may notify you of my desire to cancel or change the amount of my subscription.
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$25.00
To the Editor of the Log Book: Enroll my hame as a member of the "Greater Still College Club." I agree to pay the amount indicated on this coupon annually, upon receipt of a "payment due" notice from your office until such time as I may notify you of my desire to cancel or change the amount of my subscription.
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To the Editor of the Log Book: Enroll my name as a member of the "Greater Still College Club." I agree to pay the amount indicated on this coupon annually, upon receipt of a 'payment due" notice from your office until such time as I may notify you of my desire to cancel or change the amount of my subscription.
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$75.00
To the Editor of the Log Book: Enroll my name as a member of the "Greater Still College Club." I agree to pay the amount indicated on this coupon annually, upon receipt of a "payment due" notice from your office until such time as I may notify you of my desire to cancel or change the amount of my subscription.
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PUBLISHED SI EMI-MONTHLY BY THE DES MOINES STILL COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHY. I Volume 1
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April 15, 1924
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Number' 3

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Radio Program

Through the generosity of the :BANKERS' LIFE broadcasting ,::' station, W H 0, Des Moines, Iowa, : ithe TAYLOR CLINIC QUAl- TETTE will put on a program April 30th, 7:30 to 9:30 P. M. :A'short talk will be given by .Jdge H. H. Sawyer, president of Ju':i :::- the Des Moines General Hospital Building Association. The full program will appear in this issue of.the Log Book.: It will 'be |worth your while. Get your bati : teries renewed, _:your aerials up i [_ and. your ground, wires connectiThe Des Moines broadcasting station is one. of the best in the country and has a 526 meter wave length. It can be heard from ocean oc ocean. It is expected that this. will put Des Moines General Hospital on the map. We would like to have younotify' all--your friends to "tune - 'in ".o' that night and as many as possible write us and tell us what' they think of the program.
Personnel

Regular Assemblies: From Now On
rThe committee of sixteen members of the different classes in the college, after several meetings and much discussion and careful consideration elected -the chapel or assembly. committee, Dr. J. P. Schwartz as faculty member and.IMr. Lustig and Mr. Miller'as: student body representatives. This committee has full charge "of assembly meetings,. which -are held 'each Wednesday following the third period,---periods being cut correspondingly shprt so: that all are worked in and no classes missed. The committee also elected Mr. Warner, 'Mr- Leonard and Mr. Ludwig to formulate plans for- a student council and present same at assembly meeting for consideration of the, student body.

Osteopathic Colony
To develop an osteopathic vacation colony on one of the many lakes -in Crow Wing county, 1Minnesota,: is the hope-of Dr. E. C. Herzog, of Brainerd. In a letter to members of the profession, Dr. Herzog sets out, some of the advantages to be gained by such a colony aside from the recreative features. Only those familiar with the beautiful lakes -with which the region abounds can appreciate what a permanen':t. vacation camp for osteopaths' and their families can mean. Dr. Herzog has secured a -option on a forty-acre tract on a beautiful lake, which he proposes, if there is any encouragement, to cut into lots, and sell to membe-s -of the profession at actual cost. His plan is comprehensive, and should interest those who like fishing, hunting, swimming,: and the' many outdoor pleasures which- abound so plentifully in -that region, If interested, write Dr. E. C. Herzog, at Brainerd, Minnesota.

Baseball Season Opens With 2 Games at Ames
Ames Wednesdacy to play the opeinng game of ~the 1924 season. With three good pitchers to al-, ternate on the mound, and a: fast ' infield to pick' up- the scrubby. ones that will be allowed the-:batl: : ters, we know we will :have a:: great season. A game will :als be played there Thursday.: --::) April 19th, Saturday, the team /-:will go after Central's scalp. -- ' Many plan to~ drive there if the -: weather is good. A return; game is scheduled'for May 3rd. 'Des voines University wants two games with Still. The dates will be anounced later. Looks as if we might get a chance to beat :- . them in baseball, even if they:-: wouldn't take. us on in football. :
The "bonesetters" traveled': t:

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Rev. Mr. Reeman Addresseses Students

Tag Day for Benefit Of Ball Team Success
We had' an' old-fashioned' a: Day at school on April 10th, for the benefit of the baseball team.: Of course all the students bought :":
a tag. Now you folks out in ther7 field who have sort of been. giv-' ing the whole thing the "go-by" and some of you the "good-ye," wouldn't it be quite the nice thing to have a part in this athletic expense program dnd-ino ntput it up to the folks in school to shoulder the whole thing. Still College is on the map in athletics. You can help keep itjthere. Send your contributiopn along with the Revolving Fund subscription, and we will see tha't it reaches the proper spot. Do it now. No time like the present. You know what one felow said about old friend Preras. We'd hate to te you

Wednegsday, April 9th, was regular assembly day, and we had an Taylor Clinic Quartette: ideal meeting._ Dr. Steffen preThomas 'Mann, 1st tenor. sided. Mr. Miller led singing. -Doyle Richardson, 2nd tenor. Report of committee of 16 and Robertson, -baritone.: -Ross , report of chairman of student Louis Miller; bass. council committee were presentRodney- Carlisle, accompanist. ed.( Then-Dr. Steffen introduced D · r. Bean, saxophonist. Rev. Mr. -Reeman of the Unitar:popular songs., ian church,_ who in a few happily .Samn H. Liebov, Judge H. H. Sawyer, speaker.- chosen remarks gave us some of Program his observations of vWat preach}-'- ~"1. Marching Song, Taylor'Clin- ers and-physicians hav-e in common. We would not presume to -ic -Quartette. |.s: :; 2.. (a) The Barefoot Trail, (b) attempt a resume of the speaker's remarks, but can pass it on Turnkey Song, Louis Miller. I i - 3. (a) To a Wild Rose, (b) to you that he had. the subject ' Prom One Till Two,: Rodney Car-' well ih hand, and at no time until the gong sounded did he lack 4. I Love a Little C6ttage, the attention of his audiece. .:: 'If we are any judge,of age by Taylor Clinic Quartette. f:::; :i:5.- Selected Popular Melodies, personal appearance,, we would say that Rev. Mr. Reeman must ^:-:3Sam.- H. Leibov.' i. 6. The Gypsy Trail, Taylor -have started at the preaching game-early, considering the numflinic Quartette. : -.- Address Judge H. H. Saw- ber of years he has been associated with it. We hope to have 8.Indian " Lyrics (a) Pale an opportunity of hearing him '::·! Moon ;.(b) By the WaterS of Min- again. _:netonka, Thomas Mann. Someone has said-"He has Selected, Taylor Clinic g_ 9. achieved success -who has lived Quartette. Qu-: Valse Bluette, (b) well, laughed often' and loved 10. (a) much; who has gained the trust i:Caprice, Dr. Bean. 11:l.i,'(a) Song of India, (b) Say, of pure women 'and the love of little children; who has filled his [%::: !Say .iSadie, Rodney Carlisle. ij:S/.:'12::' Selected, Taylor Clinic niche in life and accomplished his task; who has :left the world i:ieQuartette. hbetter than' he found it, whether by. an. improved poppy, a beautiful poem, or rescued;a soul; 'who has looked for the best in others, Tiurf toPage Four anrd given the best: he had; .whose :ose life .was a inspiration; wh dandail Your memory is ag'bnedicti6n. IThis constitutes success' .
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Don't Close Your Office For the Summer
There is no question of a doubt in the mind of any osteopath about the need of a vacation for a- few weeks during the summer months. Most of the field mnembers are in the habit of taking a certain time off each 'sason and during this time their offices:are closed. Such a condition need-not be! Just insert a small notice in the paper saying you will be gone for -a fewweeks, and during your absence your -practice 'will- be conducted by-iDr. So and So. :We will gladly supply the last named from our senior class and you may rest assured that he will conduct himself -and the practice in. a way that will prove -'he has had- a large clinical experience. Let us know of your needs, doctors.;

Introditcing tfhe l`Next |^A. Polk County Coroner
Dr. Charles W. McCiutchn, :a. prac6Still College alumnus now,:p ticing in Des Moines withl o-ffli e in the Kraft building, annouinces e* his candidacy for coroner of-Pol county. It ma-y be of interest; that Dr. McCutchen,' has the` sipport of some of the medica brothers, who believe him 1^ ^ the man fitted for the place a in his abliity to administer the, affairs of the office as theyshould be. He should, of course,% have the hearty support of every osteopath who has a vote or ; ,fluence. A ARE REAL -YOU.NTERES^E COURSE' INM'JO

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Heretofore the college has been put to the expense of filling out application' blanks and making transcripts of grades in.cornply.ing with- the request for Board Applications. The amount is not much in -any single case, but when, it occurs from five to ten times a month, it means that the funds are being dispersed at the rate of from ten to twenty dollars a month, which in the course of a year amounts -to considerable and it can be' easily ,seen that it does not go to the.- advancement. of the' schiooLrTherefore, noapplication or.transcript will be sent out unless it is acAlways, leave them- smiling ecompanied by a fee of $2.50, paywhen vou sa;v "aoodbv." , able to the college. - v".. y --. y 2, -j ..

SURGERY? WRITE D.0M. S. C.S 0

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Sigma Notes

of th echapter, will be held: at Cesar', Cafe on Fourth street. Friday, April 25th, is the date set for the next house dance, when guests who are in the city for the Drake Relays will be honor guests. Ray Harrison's orchestra will furnish the music.

Phi Sigma Gamma Notes
The open house parties held at the fraternity house on Friday nights are now quite a part -of our regular routine, and'participants report that interest and numbers are on the increase, and each week end is fittingly ,celebrated with proper entertainnent. j We are in receipt of a note from Dr. Mark Herzfeld from Detroit saying that things are breaking well for him, and that he could report same for Laird Dr. Herzfeld is and Schaefer. secretary of the Detroit OsteoDathic association, and is doing his part to put osteopathy properly before the people. He knows his stuff, and believes in advertising.

Hint to the Wise .iA -man went into a bakery the
other day. "I'm getting married

evening, April 7th, Dr. addressed the P.- Schwartz memnbers of the chapter, and the ::Vpledges. Dr. Schwartz chose as : :his subject at this time "The -- ;:h :;Kidney," and explained in de: :/- ... tail the presence of the osteo:pathic lesion present in any kidney affliction, proving the suf ::?r-dId:_ premacy of osteopathy in the S: treatment of all such cases. : As is Dr. Schwartz' custom, his .:.; ]:: ::': rem-arks were brief and concise A:i- in the short time he spoke, nd territory than :i: covered more -<;:-. :: 'many would have 'done in sev: -- :::V-eal hours' time. :-/;,: His :evening with the chapter ::::::;was greatly appreciated, and it :I- -.: ? ; is hoped that another visit may :-/ - :-- :be mnade by the Doctor, before end :- "!<..-the: of school activities this year. Sunday, April 13th, the follow:t | _ingwere guests of the chapter / n l"i::.- ?t-::i for dinner: 1i.r. and l:yrs. Fellows, XMr. and Mrs. Messerschmidt and i:?(): lMarion Trimble, M]rs. .iss son, -VT ' sn Cleo - AWedel -and Miss Helen :-; -: M oore. -:Easter Sunday the chapter will .have as their guests for dinner ' Dis. S. L. and 'Lola Taylor and ;-family,'Dr. and IMrs. George Carr \-i . .'--: :Taylor and Dr. ayid Mrs. A. B. 01 i!-'i:; ' :Taylor. -Anouncelment has been made ! : :' A-':of--the engagement of Miss Marion Trimble of Des Moines, Iowa, : and Mltr. Charles H. Potter, of Beta' chapter- of Iota Tau Sigma, which will culninate in a wed; i:i;

:-DTMonda :;''

Atlas Club Notes
Dr. John Woods spoke to the Club on Physical Diagnosis. He startedC at the head and went down to the feet, emphasizing themost important things. The part of his talk concerning heart murmurs was particularly good. The club gave a dance in honor of the pledges last week at the- Rose Lorenz Studio. Everyone had a great time, especially Joe Koscalk. He was, as usual, the shiek of- he evening. Doc Eades, who claims he- never dances, was whirling some girl every dance. He told the writer the next morning th'at he dreamed of dancing all night. Dean Johnson was present at the last meeting and addressed the club on Ethics. Some fifty men were there to hear how the experienced physician solves the ticklish problems that arise in his practice. A feed of cake and ice cream finished the evening. Ten pledges rode the goat, at the first initiation last Thurslay. They all promised to show uTl. niext week for the second trlial. Those who were too crippled to walk were hauled home in the club's ambulance.

next week," he began, "and I want to buy a wedding cake." "I suppose you know," said-the girl behind' the counter, that it's the latest thing to choose wedding cakes which harmonize with one's business or profession. For instance, an athlete would have a
cup cake, a man who gouges his friends a sponge cake, and so on. What, may I ask, is your calling?" "I am a doctor," the bridegroom answered. "In that case, then," said the girl, smiling, "we would, of course,. prescribe an angel cake.

When I meet one of these inGrosjean Any abnormal stuquisitive fellows, I am reminded dents in your class? "Pat" Matthews Yes, indeed, of the old dog that was moving her family across a railroad t-wo of them have manners. pup inquisitive ne track. to stick his nose against Mary Jane Porter Do you take stopped the third rail. While he found me for an imbecile? there was to know about at all, but you out all Poucher -Not electricity, it never did him not infallible. will admit I'm much good. Vande Grift says that some of the roasts. in this column are about as fresh as the multiplication table. In all probability we should never have known the reason for Capt. Murphy's enthusiasm about his church work if we had not been enlightened by/ Rev. Mr. Reeman the other day in assembly.

Planning.Class Reunions
If you are a member of the class of 1911 or 1919 of D. M. S. C. 0., wrtie to either Dr. F. B. Emmettsburg, 1911, McTigue, Iowa, or Dr. S. A. Helebrant, 1919, Kasson, Minnesota,'and say you will be with the gang at the class reunion in Kirksville dur-

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THE LOG BOOK

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The Lo Book
The Official Publication of

DES MOINES STILL COLLEGE OSTEOPOTIIY.
'President .....-........... S.i L. Taylor

Editor----- ,--,-fOsteopathy Without

Jack Hansel Limitation

Help! Help! Help!
A few short, terse sentences in the last issue of the Log Book brought some comment, but no contributions. Are you one of those who comment and criticize and are forever riding on the band wagon and enjoying the result of some other's effort, or will you be one who digs in and sends us some stuff for the sheet and will toot a horn and lend a hand and make a bit of effort to put this paper You in the class it should be. have the news and talent; let us have a sample of your work along this line and let your paper show that you have a part in its makeLup.

List of Vitamines You Need for Good Health
Malnutrition is a subject that has received a great deal of attention recently since the discovery of vitamines or the vitamine theory has been expounded. It has been discovered that while there may be a sufficient quantity of food, it is quite possible to be undernourished with a full stomach thr ee times a day. The reason is the absence of vitamines, according to the vitamine theory, and the other end of the argument is the absence of mineral salts necessary for the proper nutrition of the body. Whichever it may be, vegetables fur-

nish the needed factor in proper nutrition. The vitamines which are classed as A, B, C and D, are contained in milk and leaf vegetables, particularly the leaf vegetables or those the leaves of which are food articles. It is also known that the vitamine content and value is gerater when they, are eaten raw. The A vitamine is a promoter of growth, and its absence is the frequent- cause of malnutrition, particularly in children who are backward in growth and subject to various ailments. Vegetables are this element furnishing string beans, cabbages, carrots, corn, Swiss chard, beet greens, lettuce, green peas, spinach and tomatoes. The B vitamine is important in that its absence from the diet induces stomach and intestinal troubles, neuritis, and other ailments. It is supplied by cooked vegetables as well as raw, beans, beets, cooked cabbage, corrots, cauliflower, raw onions, peas, potatoes, in short, most of the cooked root crops. Vitamine C has considerable to do with the temper. Its absence leads to irritability and in extreme cases leads to scurvy. Cabbage ad the cooked root crops also furnish this vitamine. The vitamine D is a yeast growth. Green and cooked vegetables if eaten as a regular part of the diet will furnish the vitamines necessary for good health and development. If the vitamine theory is not accepted they furnish the , mineral salts which are equally essential, and without which the human machine cannot be kept in repair and in efficient working order. One of the first yelps that comes from a failure who is on his way out is "They wouldn't give me a show." Nobody gave Barnum a show, but he had the biggest on earth. Let a shave and a shine be the first morning investments.

A. 0. A. CONVENTION
(Continued from last issue) THURSDAY 8:00 to 9:45 A. M. Clinics at hospitals and colleges. Complete Your Exami9:00. nation. Dr. Oscar T. Buffalow, Chattanooga, Tennessee. 9:20. The Kidneys. Dr. Myron B. Barstow, Boston M]assachusetts. f:40. Treatment of Throat and Neck in Some Acute Conditions. Dr. James M. Fraser, Evanston, Illinois. 10:00. The Ilio-Costal Lesion. Dr. Edgar D. Heist, Kitchener, Ontario. 10:20. Acute diseases. Dr. Heber M. Dill, Lebanon, Ohio. 10:40. Neuritis and Bursitis of the Shoulder Joint. Dr. Charles H. Spencer, Los Angeles, Calif. 11:00. Bone and Joint Surgery. Dr. John M. Hiss, Columbus, Ohio. 11:20. Osteopathy and the Various Cults of Healing. Dr. H. C. Engeldrum, Chicago, Illinois. Forum and 11:40. General Dr. Harry L. Questionnaire Chiles, Orange, New Jersey, leader. 12:00 to 1:30 P. M. Visiting exhibits and luncheon. 2:00. Pilgrimage to Still-HilBy dreth Sanitorium, Macon. special Wabash train. Barbecue. Addresses by president of A. 0. A. and others. Swimming contest, Athletics, Sports and Dance. FRIDAY (Miemorial Day 8:00 to 9:00 A. M. Clinics at hospitals and colleges. 9:30 to 12:30. Osteopathic DiDiagnosis, Physical agnosis, Treatment, Clinics, Actual Cases. 12:30 to 2:00 P. M. Visiting exhibits and luncheon. 2:00 to 4~00 . Osteopathic DiDiagnosis, Physical agnosis, Treatment, Clinics, Technique, Dr. Clarence V. Actual Cases. Kerr, Cleveland, Ohio, and Dr. S. V. Robuck, Chicago, Illinois, supervisors. assisted by prominent internists of the profession.

SATURDAY 8:00 to 12:00 A. M. Technic day. Dr. aCrl J. Johnson, LouisAssisted ville, Ky., Chairman. by the various professors of technec in the osteopathic colleges and prominent technicians. 8:00 to 9:30. Clinics at hospitals and colleges. 12:30 to 1:55 P. M. Visiting exhibits, and luncheon. and Fibro-Cartilages 2:00, Dr. W. H. AlSpinal Lesions. bright, Edmonton, Alberta. 2:20. Applied Osteopathy. Dr. Carl P. McConnell, Chicago, Ill. 2:40. Diseases of the Colon, Rectum and Anus. Drs. Charles A. and. Grace Dodson, Little Rock, Arkansas. 3:00. Border Line Cases and Osteopathic Surgery. Dr. Harold M. Herring, New York,.N. Y. 3:20. The Cancer Problem. Dr. Robert D. Emery, Los Angeles, California. 3:40. The Physical Principles of Osteopathic Adjustment. Dr. J. H. Styles, Jr., Kansas City, Mo. 4:00. Grave's Disease. Dr. W. T. Cox, Biddeford, Maine. 4:20. Cervical Technique. Dr. J. Oliver Sartwell, Dean of MI. C. O., Boston, Massachusetts. 4:40. Technique and Its FunHarrison Dr. C. damentals. Downing, Kansas City, Missouri. 5:00. Gallstones. Dr. John N. Waggoner, A. S. 0., Kirksville, Missouri. Of course you may logically prove to yourself that you cannot do as much this year as you did last. I have done it, but logic is a mighty dangerous thing to rely on. I heard of a perfectly logical little girl, but her conclusions were wrong. Her teacher asked her what a furlough-was, and she said it was a mule. On in quiry it was found out that the girl had seen a picture of a soldier riding on a mule, and .under the picture was the label, "Off on a furlough." The little girl was logical. You are not dressed for work until you put on a smile.
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PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY BY THE DES MOINES STILL COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHY. Volume 1 Volume 1
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May 1, 1924
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Numer 31. Number-3-L '

Still Brings Home the Bacon in 2 Slug Fests
All that saved - the Ames varsity from defeat at the hands.of

2:30 Thursday afternoon, May 15, Dr. Smith, superintendent of at the West High Stadium. All the Still sluggers last Thursday the standard events will be in- Iowa Methodist hospital was thewas the fact that the parties of cluded except the hurdles and speaker, and if there is anything the first part were en route to and -Central used three 'pitchers the- javelin, due to the lack of. that Dr. Smifh can do as well-be-: St. Louis for a game with Wash- in the course of the game. The this equipment. sides run a hospital, it is to'- tel ington U. Consequently the Stil- Dutchmen made nine errors as Much interest is being shown a group of embryo physicias-ith contented themselves against Stilll's. five, but their in this meet, and daily work-outs magnitude of their chosen- worls-lonians with' a little batting practice at clumping of hits-when hits were are now in order. A few tro- picturing to them the very bri:ght the'.expense of the Ames seconds. needed made for evening the phies, and at least ribbons to side of the work because of a -A cold northwest wind that score, which resulted finally in a winners of each event is doing satisfaction of an unselfish servcongealed the marrow of the 13-10 win for Still. .much to stimulate this good ice to humanity -as well as the spectators made the day far from competition. According to the somber side incident to ingratiideal for baseball, but the bonedope sheet, the freshmen, with tude of those who are benefited Still Nine Beats setters were -"hot" across the Tiger Team 10-8 their numerous athletes seem to in Dr. Smith's remarks abounded platter in the -initial frame, short., snappy witticisms, showbe most likely contenders for enough to put' the game away faculty' The Still college baseball team first place. The Seniors, who ing that he has the happy 'safely. As a ball game, the specgame from won this meet last year, still of befig of the optimistic temseven-inning ...-tacle -was a good winter sports won a Des Moines university on the lat- have many of their strong point- perament, and as he said, "it is carnival, but it served to show Wednesday afternoon, winners, and should place high. not the fellows who try to smile the fans that Still has an excel- ter's field April--22, by a score of 10- to-8., Funds will be raised if possible trouble away who are -the. oneslent lball team, albeit very much eup who best succeed, but the fellow 'Fl'aharty of Des to finance the getting of a:::!Craven 'tan9d in the rough as yet. Moines, .and Lustig and Nicholas trophy for winner of the meet, who meets trouble squarely and Walker toiled on the mound, Still play- and ribbons bought and printed works with a happy disposition, ' · for;- StilT, hit homers. : and acquitted himself very cred I ers made six errors and the ''Ti- for first, second and third place confidence in himself --but not itably, besides pulling off a nifty self conscious, glad for the opin each event. ' a. gers made three. pilfering of second base. "CarCoach Sutton has complete portunity to render a -whleI tie's" work behind the bat was I The Bonesetters took an early charge of the meet,- and a com- hearted service to a .big job."^' i : all that it should be, while Thom- lead in: the first inning by scor- mittee of five has been sele&ted The gong sounded all too sooni: as' stick work was the the high Ling two- runsj-four more came in to help him, arranging the de- and the doctor promised to- come second, and the Tigers made I light of: the contest. The de- the tails and running off the meet. back some time and give us--thefense wobbled qn one or two oc- ,Ione each in the second and third -lr. Robert Bachman will prob- "main address.". The rounds 1 of fifth each team casions, although -the rough in- frames. " In the Iiably be'the official starter again applause were indicative 'of the II made appair of markers and Still field no doubt contributed to the appreciation of the student :body. added two- more in- the sixth. this year. erratic' work. Dr.- 'Schwartz, faculty .repreThe Tigers threatened to tie up . When the last howling blast sentative of the assembly com-: h I Assembly April 30th mittee, and Still College Athlet-: had swept down from the Siber- the gaime in the sixth with three i ian steppes ahd the final count I runs, .aPtd again in the seventh L This period was given ov6r to ic director, then gave out letters ascertained, it was discerned that I with orie. R. H. E. a performance by Angus and awarded by the college- to men. . Score by inningsStill had the long end of a 13 to 022-0 -10 11 6 Company. The "company" end who had by their effort and perStill.-240 4 count. D. M. 'U.- 011 023.1 - 8 7 3 of the. organization is Patrick formance signally -distinguished The next outfit to cross bats 3 Walker and Cartright; Hansen I Robinson, an ebony-haired Irish- themselves on the basketball - .with Still was Central College. man. Born, bred and brought up floor this past season.-'Gus'Wei-': and. Esslinger. The game was played on the D. in Missouri, used to play -in a mers, Russell Nicholas, :HarryU. 'M.: T field Saturday, April 19. Hannan, Roy Davis, Gerald Mey Walter McWilliams -is tread- string band with Angus and his ers, and Homer Thomas were the. : The day, although a little-warmaway back there. Mu'-: er than on the date of the ini- ing oni-air these days and answer r brothers recipients. sic? Well, nothin' else but.i AnI I i tial contest, was very windy aid to Why? "It's a girl, and weI:1 The student' body then gave ahave named her Hazel Elizabeth." 7 gus favored. with songs all the demonstration . not- conducive to good baseball. of the calibre of? I "Mac doing well as could be ex- way from "Mary Don't You Weep, . -: 0Olsen hurled for Still, and alpep possessed by Still Collegei Moan" to ''Just Be; not in control of his us- pected" was announced on the Don't You : '-though Leading off cause She Made Dem GdQo-goo men and women. I i-''ualstuff, he should have'emergedI bulletin'board the next day. I with 15 urahs. for Dr. Smith, the by .:-'-victor a wider score-margir a - Lloyd Woffenden, Mrs. Woffen- Eyes." Angus plays the guitar speaker of the morning, and theay and , - than he did. The work of theE) den and- Margaret are rejoicing =1and Patrick the accordionrh I all the way through the line to e in the' addition to their family both artists are masters of their i. Still infield was either sublime, "Bones and Ligaments." I instruments. -r --. or ridiculous, there was no happyv circle of a brand new 100%o boy, 6 Miss Trimble performed at the As a minor attraction,! Mr. ::':medium. Two or three bad bob- who has been named Stewart. Piano. Warner announced that polls II :'-:-.:bles -when hits meant runs, conq ARE- YOU INTERESTED -IN were open until noon forthe II Do w.hat you have to -lo0 and .-j tributed materially to the Dutchbut two brillianit A REAL COURSE -IN- MAJORI election of representatives on do it now. Spell "now" backm- -score, ?:-nieen's wards and you have the answer. i:? double plays, one McIntosh t( D SURGERY? WRITE D. 1.. S. C. 0 00the student council, .
6 0

Lustig to Nicholas and another, Olsen to Nicholas to Mc-Intosh, were good to look upon. Thomas did some good work in center garden, but didn't have as gala a day at bat as he did at Ames. The team as a whole, however, hit more, consistently,

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5th Annual Track Meet Dr. Smith of Iowa -: Methodist Hospital ' The annual interclass track Addresses Students: meet will be held this' year at

I II_ _ _ _ _P _ _ _ _ Phi Sigma Gamma
Angus and his assisting artists, together with Doctors Abner, Graham and Walker, furnished a very entertaining program of guitar and accordion music. The doctors acquitted themselves most creditably and we all were remarking that we didn't think it was in the boys. Elsewhere in this issue the performance of Angus and his "pardner" is reviewed. Dan Weir and Dick Gordon are going to spend the summer months in Europe. Someone slipped it to us the boys are going to earn their way as they go. Isn't it fine to enjoy walking and not care particularly about reg'larity in eating? Did you see Smith's new cap? Neither did we. Must be some sentiment connected with that old cap, A. E., for we have heard at least two offers to buy you a new one. Still you refuse to'lay the old one aside. How come? Did you know that we have in Angus a very versatile man? In addition to his being a very efficient housekeeper, custodian, landscape gardener and all that goes with the job of keeping Still College , buildings, campus and grounds in A-i shape, Angus is an artist, a gem of the first water, performing on the guitar and singing thereto in a high lyric tenor. He sure swings a wicked mit on that instrument, as you would admit if you were privileged to enjoy a performance. Angus has a "pardner" who pulls the accordion, and though the combination is good, Angus is the big attraction.

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THE

LOG BOOK
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two chlidren, Dr. Irene Bachman, dMrs. Katherine M. Robinson, and Miss Rosemary Kurtz were guests of the fraternity for dinner on Sunday, May 4th. Forty couples enjoyed a Relay Dance at the fraternity house on April 25th, with Ray Harrison and his orchestra furnishing the music.

Still Students Follow Bill Bryan's Pastime
"The Bagdad Four," a male quartet that will appear over one of the Redpath-Vawter Chautauqua circuits this summer, will have in its personnel two students of D. M. S. C. O., J. C. Cochran, first tenor and manager, and Louis Miller, basso. The other two members of the quartet are students at Drake Conservatory. M5ay 31st at Sandstone, Minnesota, is the opening date for the quartet, and the season will extend over fourteen weeks, covering Minnesota, North and South Dakota, Iowa and IMlissouri. The name of the organization has been adopted on account of the second part of the program, which depicts a desert scene with the members of the company in Arab costumes and the music used carrying out further the Arabian idea.

Ludwig, A. E Smith, John H. Voss. The Council became active at once, and appointed a committee for our annual picnic to be held on May 9th; also elected officers for the coming year, with M. D. Warner as president, Bob Lustig as vice president, and W. E. Ludwig as secretary and treasurer. The student council has a geat deal to accomplish in the few short weeks that are left of this term, among which are the making of rules governing the conduct of students within our halls; regulations for the incoming Freshman Class; and offering such suggestions as will be beneficial for the student, the college and osteopathy. Thus everything should be in fine working order before the close of the school year, and we are all looking forward to the next year, which with your assistance will be the biggest and best year D. iM. S. C. 0. has ever known. When you join a club with the thought of having some place to go to spend your lunch hour in rest and relaxation, doesn't it make you madasell to have some fellow member take advatnage of a club acquaintance to solicit you for business? Confidence is the backbone of all business. Don't do or say anything that would tend to destroy. When you hear a man boast "I say just what I think"-just put it down that he doesn't think. Win. a man's confidence as quick as you can, and hold it as long as you can. Always be courteous face of discourtesy.. in the

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Doc Hansel Enroute to West Va. One Minute After Graduation

Heard in the Cloak Room
Sophomore: Freshie, atrophy and disappear. Freshman: I'm not that dumb. Soph.: If you had a few more brains you would be dumb. Fresh.: If you had a few more brains you would be a freshman. Soph.: If you'd have a few more brains you'd be a half-wit. Fresh.: If you'd have a few more brains you'd be narrow minded. Soph.: You're so narrow minded there's no room on the top of your head for the dust to settle. Fresh.: You're so narrow minded you can't see for the dust I make. Fresh.: By the dust you make, your occupation must be confined to the business end of a broom. Fresh.: By the dust yau make, your occupation keeps you in the city streets, dressed in hite overalls. Soph.: By the dns t you make, you can't see far el.tniuh hea to see how far behind you are. Fresh.: By the dust you make, you are so far behind you never will catch up. Soph.: By the dust you make you are as dead as mummy dust. Fresh.: By the dust you make, you are as dead as a mummy. Soph.: You're so dead you owe the undertaker for your funeral expenses, Fresh.: You're so dead the undertaker has forgotten you. Soph.: You're so dead your folks have collected your insurance. Fresh.: You're so dead you couldn't take out insurance. Soph.: You're so dead-it's published in the Log Book. Fresh.: You're so dead you never get your name in the Log Book. Soph.: You're so dead you can't put the Log Books in the mail any more. Fresh.: You're so dead you'reSoph.: You're so dead it's too late to hold a post mortem. Et cetera ad infinitum. We have all met men who were too litttle to be big. You know the fellow I mean, the one who mooches lunches, smokes, gum, etc., and walks ten blocks in the middle of a busy day to save car fare.

Student Council
For a long time the institution has felt the need of an active student council to assist in the carrying out of the rules and regulations, to promote a better feeling between the classes, to protect the interests of our college, to cement the good feeling between the students and the faculty, and to make such suggestions to the Dean or Executive Board as seem worthy and beneficial to the college, the student, and osteopathy. On April 23rd, the Constitution of The Organized Student Body of D. M. S. C. 0. was presented to the students in assembly and later ratified by the signature of one hundred and eighty-three students. According to the constitution it was necessary for one hundred and forty-four, or two-thirds of the student body to ratify the constitution for acceptance. One week later the members of the student council were elected and are as follows: Upper Classmen (4) Bob Lustig, E. T. Eades, M. D. Warner, Ray Price. Lower Classmen (3) W. E.

Iota Tau Sigma Notes
Doyle Richardson had as his guests for Drake Relays, Kenneth Richardson and Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Johnson of Austin, Minnesota. "Pete" Barnes and Carl Brolin of Beloit College, Beioit, Wis,consin, were entertained by W. R, Marlow and H. B. Poucher. J. C. Cochran entertained Lawrence Romine of Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Dr. J. L. Craig, '23, Cresco, Iowa, accompanied by Norman Bradley of Cresco, Iowa, spent the week end at the chapter house and took in the Relays. Dr. and Mrs. E. E. Steffen and cdaughter, Dr. and Mirs. G. C. Taylor, Mr and Mrs Skidmore and son, and MIrs Higelmire were Sunday dinner guests on April 20th, at the chapter house. Dr. Robert Bachman, wife and

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Vande Grift's Entrance Into Minneapolis

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The Log Book
The Official Publication of DES MOINES STILL COLLEGE OSTEOPOTHY. President .................... S. L. Taylor Editor ---.-.-.-- Jack Hansel ,Osteopathy Without Limitation

Smoking
(By Dr. David H. Reeder, LaPorte, Indiana) As I sit here writing to you I always feel an earnest desire to tell you something that will be of real benefit to you. During the thirty or more years that I have been teaching self help, I have seldom written about tobacco. I feared always that I might let my personal feelings influence what I had to say. Many times I have beer asked by women if I did not love the odor of a good cigar, and I have always been forced to answer that "I do not know, I have never smelled one." I admit that some cigars or kinds of tobacco are worse or more vile than others, but, to me at least, none are good. I believe that 95 per cent of the non-users of tobacco, and that includes women and children, not only find it very offensive, but injurious. I found a number of cases of heart" in so-called "tobacco women and children, who were compelled to inhale the fumes of burning tobacco in small, illventilated rooms, where they must live, eat and sleep. My reason for talking about tobacco is that in the next room there lies on a treatment table, a splendid business man. A trained nurse is watching him constantly while a prolonged application of the red rayp of the spectrum are penetrating his throat and lungs. When he came in this morning, and before he could say a word, he was seized with a severe fit of coughing which so exhausted him that he staggered to a chair, then sat and gasped for several minutes before he could say a word. He had three more "spells" before we got him quieted, and I just now heard him tell the nurse that he would like to lie there all day. She told him to go to sleep and she would call him in time for a business appointment. He has been taking osteopathic treatments whenever he thinks he can spare an hour or so for nearly two months. I could have removed the cause and nature would have cured him in two weeks, if he had been willing to quit the use of tobacco at the start. He can only get temporary relief now, as I am forced to treat symptoms instead of causes. Most of his friends and some physicians think he has con-

Sympathy
Dear Ed: Your kick reminds me of the Hebrew boy who had lost his family through sickness, his business through adversity and was even forced, in the end, to carry a pack on his back to make a living. One day in his desperation he approached the Rabbi, recited to him the trials and tribulations he had to endure, and asked if there was anything he should do to remove the stain on his name that was causing the bad luck. "Father," he said, "I have always been a good boy and contributed to the support of the church, was good to my family. Why should I be thus punished? What is there for me to look forward to for hope? "My son, it does seem hard to bear all this, but you will have to carry this pack for seven
years."

sumption, but I can find nothing of the kind. Autogenous therapy would remove the cause if it could be The secretions of his used. throat contain the antigens, the would, when aggresions that properly used, give him quick and permanent relief, but those secretions are so saturated with tobacco that they are neutralized and innocuous. Much as I like the man, I shall be forced to tell him that unless he will do as I tell him to do and stop the use of tobacco, I will refuse to treat him. Perhaps when he fully realizes that it is a choice between tobacco and choking to death, he may summon sufficient will power to quit it and get well. It seems unthinkable that anyone would allow themselves to become a slave to a habit, and yet it is true. People get the drug habit, coffee and tea habit, even the candy habit. Not so much alcohol habit as there was, and it is growing rapidly less, but habits that enslave and injure are all subject to cure, even the morphine habit, if the victim is willing to co-operate enough to even try.

For Sale
Well equipped office and practice in Montana town of 5000 located in the heart of the Rockies. Live business town, fine climate, high elevation, wonderful scenery, camping, hunting, and fishing. Only osteopath in the county. Price $1250 cash. Dr. L. E. Tichenor, Red Lodge, Montana.

Surgery Interest You?
D. M. S. C. O. would like to know how many of the profession are really interested in a POST GRADUATE SURGICAL COURSE which lead up to the practice of major surgery. If you are interested, write us. If you are not interested in surgery, except in some little DINKY, worthless course, do not write us. We would like to hear from you at once, if you want REAL surgery. The young fellow who has a coffee and doughnut breakfast in town, an armchair lunch, and eats a delicatessen dinner out of paper bags when he gets home in the evening, nine times out of ten has married some fool girl because she was a good dancer. Keep in touch with the world, with all right activities, with fresh air and sunshine, with good natured and contented human beings, and you will be a long time getting old. A man's personal appearance has much to do with his business success. And, a man's business success has much to do with his personal appearance. Seeing is not always believing seen a lot of people I -I've wouldn't believe. SOMETHING YOU WILL NEVER SEE-

Sounds Good
Dr. E. M. Schaeffer delivered a dandy girl in Detroit the other day. Of course that happens often, but the thing that we like about this delivery wasn't the delivery at all, but there was a medical nurse of twenty years' experience on the case, and after the Doctor left she told the mother that she had never witnessed a case handled any better. She meant it, too, as is proved by the fact that in a few days after the daughter of the nurse engaged Dr. Schaeffer to deliver her. Sounds good for the Obstetrical course in the Des Moines Still College of Osteopathy. The above comment has a universal application and can be made so by high standards all along the line. Individual work and individual discipline and study only can accomplish this end. A southern darky when asked why so few colored people ever committed suicide answered, "As I gits it, Boss, it's worry w'at makes people kill 'emselfs, en' when a niggah's worried en' sits down ter think, why, he jist nacherly goes ter sleep." Moral: Don't worry. Turn to page 4 and mail your coupon, now.

"What then, Father?" "My son, you will be so used to it that you will not mind it any more.' Keep a stiff upper lip, Ed, and even though the burden is hard to bear, you will be like the boy in the above, it will cease to get under the skin after a while, and you will get a deal of fun out of the work. Yours osteopathically, A. B. Stoner, Phoenix, Arizona. The above was received to help cheer up the editor. The story is so applicable to almost all jobs in life we pass it along. The first 100 years are the hardest sure nuf! Wasn't it a bit gratifying to see how some of the student body jumped in and put the Log Book into the mails in response to a special appeal the last issue? It feels gond to see a piece of work tackled in the spirit of "Let's all lend a hand and put the cleaner on it," now doesn't it? In surgery: From a freshman: "I have a patient."

Swezey On a Lecture Tour

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To the Editor of the Log 'Book: Enroll my name as a; member of the "Greater Still College Club." I agree to pay the amount indicated on this coupon annually, upon receipt of a "payment due" notice from your office until such time as I may nibotify you of my desire to cancel or change the amount of my subscription.
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$25.00
To the Editor of the Log Book: Enroll my name as a member of the "Greater Still College Club." ' agree to pay the amount -indicated on this coupon annually, upon receipt of a "payment due" notice from your office until such time as I may notify you of my desire to cancel or change the amount of my subscription.
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To the Editor of the Log Book: Enroll my name as a member of the "Greater Still College Club." I agree to pay the amount indicated on this coupon annually, upon receipt of a "payment due" notice from your office until such time -as I may notify you of my desire to cancel or change the amount of my subscription.
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PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTIILY BY TI-E DES MOINES STILL COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHY.
Volume 1'
May 15, 1924
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Number 32

Paul H. Swezey, Atlas Club. Dora S. Morgan, Axis Club. Marietta, Ohio; Decorah, H. S.; The following list is of the their home town, Humbolt, Ill.; Eastern Ill., State Marietta College; A. S. O. 1 year; ,graduates,

MVlass.; fMarlboro H. S.; Stop for a moment and glance Prep. School; Mercersburg Prep. over this list of soon-to-be doc- School; McLane Training School; D. tors. They are members of the Mass. College of Osteopathy; class M. S. C. O.; Australia. May, 1924, class, the "best" Julius E. Wiemers, I. T. S. that ever finished their work at (It took lots of Bunker Hill, Ill.; Bunker Hill H. D. M. S. . 0. nerve to write that.) This being S.; Ill. State Nomral Univ.; D. M. a real fact, we thought it well S. C. O.; Ohio. to inform the' readers of the Louis H. Kuchera, Atlas Club. iog Book where they will find Glenville, Minn.; Albert Lea H. any of these doctors-either for S-.; Iowa U.; D. M. S. C. O.; Altreatment or consultation. bert Lea, Minn.

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Cornell D. M. S. C. O.; Pagosa* Springs, on, Ohio; Colorado. - .. Paul, H. Manley, I. T. S. Randolph, N. Y.; Randolph H. S.; D. M. S; C. 0.; Pennsylvania. Boston, J. P Kent, I. T. S. Mass.; Slyod -Normal, Mass. College of Osteopathy, 3 years; D. Mil.S. C. 0.; New England. Walter B. Gould, Atlas Club. Portland. Me.; Corinna H. S.; Shaw Business College; D. M. S.

A. B. May, Atlas Club. LebaiKings Mills H. S.; -D. M. S. C. O.; Ohio.

Alvin O. Breese, I. T. S.

Mari-

etta, Ohio; Marietta H. S.; Ohio Wesleyan; D. M. S; C. 0.; Ohio. Harry E. Elston, P. S. G. Niles, Ohio; Niles H. S.;-Carnegie Tech.;

C. O.; Colorado.

high school, college, and where they intend to practice. Robert R. Tornell, P. S. G. Estherville, Iowa; Estherville H. S.; Iowa State College; D. M. S. C, 0.; California. Howard W. Sechrist, I. T. S. Shenandoah, Ia.; Shenandoah H. S.; Grinnell College; D. M. S. C. 0.; Interne, Detroit Osteopathic Hopspital, Detroit, Mich. Cleo C. Wedel, I. T. S. South Bend, Ind.; South Bend H. S.; D
M. S.' C. O.

Teachers' College; A. S. 0. 21,2 years; D. M. S. C. O.; Illinois.Herma A. Early, Axis Club. Wauseon, Ohio; Wauseon H. S.; Wooster U.; D. M. S. C. 0.; Des Moines, Iowa. Lyman A. Crew, Atlas Club. Sam. H. Leibov, I. T. S. South Bend, Ind.; Erasmus Hall, New York City; South Bend H. S.; D. M. S. C. 0.; Ohio. Charles H. Potter, I. T. S.

D. M. S. C. 0.; Ohio. Seymour J. Higelmire, I. T. S. Eaton Eaton Rapids, Mich.; eral Hospital. Rapids H. S.; D. M. S. C. O. Frank B. Heckert, P. S. G. BaLyman A. Johnson, Atlas Club.
Nebr.; Norfolk H. S.; D. kerstown, Pa.; Sharpsburg H. SI D. M. Univ.; D. M. S. C. O.; Des O.; Nebraska. Kerwood, P. S. G. Iola, Moines General Hospital. S. J. Herst, P. S. G. Warren, Iola H. S.; Baker U.; D.

D. M. S. C. 0.; Girard, Ohio. John S Hecekrt, P. S. Q. Bakerstown, Pa.; Slippery Rock State Normal; Duff's College, Pittsburgh; D. M. Univ.; D. M. S. C. 0.; Interne, D. M. G. Hospital. J. H. Hansel, Atlas Club. Parkersburg, W. Va.; Parkersburg H. S.; Marietta College; A. S. 0.; D. M. S. C. 0.; Des Moines Gen-

Norfolk, M. S. C. Ira F. Bozeman, Mont.; Gallatin Co. H. Kansas; S.; D. M. S. C. 0.;; Montana.

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Ohio; Warren H. S.; A. S. 0., 2 M. S. C. O.; Iola, Kansas. F. R. Morris, Atlas Club.. Grove years; D. M. S. C. O.; Ohio. Thomas O. Vande Grift, Atlas City, P. A.; Grove City College; Perry H. S.; D. M. S. C. O.; Penn- Club. Austin, Minn.; Austin H. S.; Minnesota U.; Austin, Minn, Isylvania. -s
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Iota Tau Sigma Notes
The farewell dance to'the: nine senior I. T. S.'s who will-graduate this year from D. M. S. C. 0., was held at the chapter house on Friday night, May 16th. Thirty-five couples danced to the strains of music furnished by the . Serenaders," under the able di'-rection of Al. -Levich. Punch - was served throughout the dance, i:anpd at ifnternmission, entertain.- A.e.nt was afford'ed to those pres~ f-i , etht :'by different individuals. B rohers-. Trenery and Bean and 'r .r J. P. Schwartz-were guests- of -the fraternity at this time.'

"Worms;" Brother Benien, speaking for --he "Goats;" Bro. Odell, t speaking for the "Near Mighties;" and Bro. Kent, speaking for the "Mighties." Bro. A. G. Prather, D. M. S. C. 0., '23, was present and gave a few well-chosen remarks- on "Iota Tau Sigma---Past a'nd Present."

CliSBBlrul-·o-·-·--·ar --- -- , P;i Sigma Gamma Notes .Trimble-Potter
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Bros. Staples, Odell and Olsen left Sunday in Staples' RollsRuff" for South Bend, Indiana. Following a few days' visit in South Bend, .Bros. Staples and Olsen will drive to Kirksville, Missouri, to attend the .annual A. O.' A. convention. From there they. will- return to Des Moines :. Saturday: evening the final de- and remain at the chapter house - K- e:wo:rk -was given to the three throughout the summer. p-e- es&to Iota T:a-Sigma-Da dg I4 : -:Leroy:Skidmore ahid Law d Bro:. Wa-dkins leaves on Wednes- .T"i-: c: Reit:er,- at, :the .chapter -o s:': aft:er which -the: entire day for: Pittsburgh, where' -he will: attend the ."Pitt Relays," : r &emb~eraship-of- :the chapter reBro. Wadkins' hbrother being -one : caied :'themselves to thKe Kirkof -:the members of the Pitt Re:- ood hotel, where the senior banlay Team 'and a student -of the - ,et:'was 'held. . : : ' :: college :Qf dentistry of the Uni'' , iThe seniors :who were thus honversity of Pittsburgh. sed, 6and their future destinations,^ follow: Bros. Gephart, Russell, Benien H. W. Sechrist- to Detroit. Osand- Skidmore leave Wednesday opaethic hospital for an internfor their homes in Ohio; Bros. iip. Poucher, Marlow, and Nowlin for .. E. eimers -East' to see if Illinois; Bros. Dave and- Jim Burnly knows 'what he is talking ton.for California; Bro. Richardabout. anda then to Dear Old I1son for Miinnesota; Bro. Green linois (?) to practice. for Sac City, Iowa: Bro. Belf for |P, H, Manley -- back to Little Michigan, and Bro. Valley, New York (or something Detroit, like that) and later to Pennsyl- Shaw for Minneapolis, Minnesota. vania to take the state board and practice. C. C. Wedel-to South Bend, Indiana, for a brief visit, and then to parts unknown "west of the Mississippi" to practice. C. H. Potter-accompanied by the. new MRS. to Kansas and Oklahoma for the customary honeymoon, and then to Colorado to make money. S. H. Leibov-back to South BRend, Indiana, and- then some place to practice osteopathy. A. O. Breess-stop-offs in Ohio -for introductions to the "home folks," with Pennsylvania as the destination for future practice. S.' J. Higlemire--with Mrs. S. J. by his side in his trusty Ford coupe, to the "west" to find the most promising location. J. P. Kent-to Farmer City, I1linois, to take over a practice for -a month and then back to "Bawston" for a brief but much-needed rest. Throughout, the hanquest was interspersed with toasts to the seniors. Brother . C. Wedel acted as .toastmaster, and afterdinner speeches were made by Brother Novwlin, speaking for the Bro. Cochran leaves May 27th for Cedar Rapids, Iowa, to begin his summer season with the Redpath-Vawter Chautauqua system.

Taylor Clinic
Dr. Nichols of Boston has been secured as a lecturer for five days at the next post-graduate session of the field membership of the Taylor Clinic, which will be held at Des Moines October 20 to 24, inclusive. Dr.. Nichols is only one of several men who will speak at the post-grafiuate course in October. A wonderful boost for Des Moines and Des Moines Still College, as. these men will all give at least one lecture to the student body. It was left to thf Axis Club to take. the first step in supplying anything of a memorial nature honoring Dr. A. T. Still. The girls caused to be hung on the assembly room wall, back of the platform, a good sized picture of the Father of Osteopathy. Mighty fine of the girls.

The Iota Tau Sigma fraternity Harry Elston, J. S. Heckert, F. B. Heckert, R. B. Tornell, and E. house at 2007 Grand Avenue was F: Lynch, graduates, have settled the scene of a very pretty weddown to a few days' rest, prepar- ding on Friday, May 16th, at 5:30 atory to taking up work in their o'clock, when Miss Marion Trimrespective fields. Harry is going ble, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. back to Niles, Ohio. and estab- L. Trimble, of 653 Thirty-eighth lish practice, specializing 0. B. Street, Des' Moines, Iowa, was John- and Frank are taking iln- united in marriage to Dr. Charles terneships in Des Moines General H, Potter, son of Rev. and fr.t, Hospital, and Ed. is going back E. V. Potter, fo Blackwell, Ok.to Boston. Bob is going to stay lahoma. Rev. C. E. Rash. of the Urbanin Iowa. The influence of these dale Federated church officiated, men has been a factor in the fraternity, and will be surely missed.-,tin the presence of 80 guests, afThe semi-annual dinner for the' ter which the bridal party and graduating members was held at- friends repaired to the home of Younkers'. Dr. Johnson and Dr.' the bride, where -the wedding Schwartz were speaker-guests; supper was served. The fraternity house was proPledges -E.lsea, Hellman and Friend were also guests. Dr. A. ·fusely decorated in ferns,, palms D, .,Cornelius -from Knoxville hos- :and roses, and music was contribpital, was inl atteidance, and gaive uted by Miss Elsie Harris, whho glowing accounts of his opera- played -the wedding march', Miss Bernice Russell, who sang, "I tions .in the field. Dr. Cornelius is a' candidate fori Cioroner of Love You Truly," and James' C. Cochran, who sang "Because." Marion county..' :The bride's gown was of: orchid -georgette and lace over blue Dr. Johnson:. Did you fo 1ks crepe, and she carried a bouquet take Physics?' of orchids and lilies of the valSoph: Yes, but not since tak- ley. She was attended-by Mrs. ing up Osteopathy. Isn't neces- C. C. Wedel, who wore orchid tafsary. feta and carried a bouquet of lavender sweet peas and sweetJoe Rader and Ralph E. Davis heart roses. Mr. Wedel served are going to sell Pictorial Re- w groom as best man. the views again this summer. HoThe groom is one of the gradumer Sprague is going to help out ating class -of this year at D. M. the Board- of Education at Cleve- S. C. 0., and after a trip through land, having charge of a play- .Kansas and Oklahoma, the pair ground for the summer months. will reside in Colorado. A. E. Senitt will keep his eye on Harry, Elston, Homer Thomas, Curious Reflex Owen Wright and Roy Davis at "The human anatomy is a'wonNiles this summer, in capacity derful bit of mechanism." of r,eal estate salesman for the "Yes, pat one kind of man on steel mills there. the back -and you'll make his

a

head swell." Doyle Richardson will do the rounds for Uncle Sam in that D. M. S. C. 0. says now is the Minnesota . -town where they time to send in the name of that thought the first mail man was new prospective student. Do not a Confederate soldier. forget to attend to this at once. A. J. Smith sells fruit during summer months. Ross Roberts will continue his old line, meat and groceries salesman. Rusty and Thell will again put the Pictorial into hundreds of homes where it never was before. Lloyd Woffenden is going to keep Henry Ford's ship from sinking this summer. Woof says since. the acquisition of Stewart he has to turn out a few" mnxe Fords per day, now. ' ARE .YOU INTERESTED IN A. REAL COURSE IN MAJOR SURGERY? WRITE B. M. S. C. 0. "Go to a friend for advice, a stranger for charity, and a relative for nothing," is a little piece of advice an "old timer" gav e years ago. me Show a -man you are interested in his business, and he will become interested in yours.
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THE LOG BOOK
II

The Official Publication of *)ES MOINES STILL COLLEGE OSTEOPOTHY.

Des Moines Still College of OsThe Corporate Board had its annual meeting May 20th, 1924, teopathy held its commencement Tune "That's Where My Money and officers for the ensuing-year May 22 at the college building. Goes" S. L. Taylor, Thus closed one of the most sucwere elected. Dr. Presdent, Mrs. K. M. Robinson, cessful years in the history of Notwithstand- Where does our money go S. L. Taylor Secretary, CF. Frazer, Treasur- the institution. President ..........er, Trustees;' S. L. Taylor, K. M. ing the fact that there were At D. M. S. C. O.? Jack' Hansel Editor- . ....- Dr. Robinson, S. L. Schwatz, M. E. many discouragements in the We'll tell the world we know part of the school year, the Money has wings. Osteopathy Without Limitation Bachman, U. M. Hbbetts, Bertha early . latter part closed with a won- You'll hear the students tell R. Crum, E. E. Steffen. It simply goes like-Well? More than the usual number derful burst of enthusiasm. were represented at the meeting. -Many students as they departed Oh boys, we'll *say our money goes. of the The financial report made by the to their respective homes bade We ofttimes speak weather coming in like a lion president showed a marked in- the office goodbye with the reand going out like a lamb. The crease in the income that the in- mark that they were bringing Oh how our money goes and clothes, school year, 1923-24, came inlike stitution received during -the one, two or three back with them To pay for books This, of in the fall. Indications are for To buy our shirts and hose, a lion and went out like a lamb. school year 1923-24. any Our great difficulty and "buga- course, was due to the larg* in- a large class. If you thave mat And pay our dues. iraa t anew weevr prospectiv names, see body. Much prospective names, see to it tnat We never Knew a Irat boo" was our debts.. The offi- crease in the student keep us broke so flat. cials of the institution wrote all of the old-time determination they get to the desk, so that we Could money over telling the said financial was exhibited by members of the may co-operate -for the advance- Oh boys, we'll say our goes. status and predicted dire events, organization, and there was a full ment of osteopathy. but as uiual, the old school, like expression of sentiment for the Any man might conquer the When all our jack is spent, a cat of nine lives, lived through old school. The new organization is a de- world if he had half as" much Then to our friends we went, it all. Here must be mentioned cash they lent professors who have giv- termined bunch, and it is to be IIperseveiance as a female book Foolishly their several I agent. Now they're broke too. en their time this year for "a expected that the school year We never have a cent, scrap of paper," and due credit 1924-25 will be the most successIt's gone for board and rent. must be given to them for their ful in the history of the instituDr. Moore says: "Housemaid's say our mone deserve all the tion. The expressions from the IIKnee seems to be more prevalent Oh boys, we'll generosity. They .goes. commendation the profession can different members indicate a de- every fourth year" (leap year). It is not an easy termination to make the school 1 give them. Oft in our dreams we roam:matter to give of your life and ,the foremost osteopathic insti-7 I M1rs. Messerschmidt is taking Back to the dear old home, a living, tution in the country, and utilize I1 '.trerngth and also. make over the practice of Dr. Mar- Back to the care-free days for this is a practical world, and to the fullest the wonderful adIowa, We knew of yore. rl -i arcngt, es a vantages the D': Moines StillI a -retSpencer, people do not appreciate as for the summer months. Nuvw though we laugh and joke, rule the things you do and the College of Osteopathy has over Oft are wo sadly broke. in its splensacrifices you make until you be- similar institutions imoney ARE YOU INTERESTED IN Oh boy, we'll say uar gin to push up the daisies. We didly developed clinics. goes. A REAL COURSE IN MAJOR think the institution should have -Cecil Warner. D. M. S. C. 0. Announcement has been made SURGERY? WRITE as its insignia a black cat, for it Stella spells both good luck and contin-1 of the engagement of Miss uation.. It is not a question of 1 Waddell, of Des Moines, Iowa, whether or not we will 'have I1 and Mr. A. O. BYeese,' of the 1924 enough students to fill the in- class of D. M. S. C. O., to culmistitution, but our problem is to nate in a June wedding. fid room enough to accommoThis fall will findI date them. our building chuck full. Can theI1 profession suggest anything in1 D . M. S. C. O. would like t(a, the way of relief? Let us hear r know how many of the profes from our old alumni who are vision are really interested in tally interested in the instituPOST GRADUATE SURGICAI L tion. e COURSE which lead up' to the I practice of major surgery. Prospective Students you are interested, write us. I:f you are not interested in surgery Do not forget to send everyy except in some little DINKY prospective student name to D1. worthless course, do not writ(e M. S. C. O. The efficient officePI us. We would like to hear fron force will see that the get liter- you at once, if you want REAIL a ature. This is a real bee-hive att surgery. ,_. Students and evDes Moines. erybody are working for the biggest class in the history of thee institution, and there is no doubt t Dr. L. L. Cornell, osteopathi Cat all that this will be accomphysician', Falls City, NebraskE plished. has notified us that he has a T Q1QfUR0W TO FRE girls will at - splendid proposition in a tow: n A number of Axis ( e tend the convention at Kirks -of 6,000. We will be glad to se is the author - some worthy young physicia n ville. Anna Doyle take this practice. ized delegate.

The Log Book

Corporate Board Meets

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We'll Say our iMoney Goes

Successful Year

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Let Us Arouse -Ourselves
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