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PDMS Procedure

2D DRAFT Basics Structural discipline


Onslow, Craig
7/16/2010

This document was prepared as a beginners introduction to PDMS 2D DRAFT. It assumes


the PDMS User is already familiar with PDMS 3D DESIGN. It is based on Structural
Discipline but can also be utilized by other disciplines.

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PDMS PROCEDURE
2D DRAFT BASICS

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1
1.1
1.2

2
2.1
2.2

3
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4

4
4.1
4.2
4.3

GENERAL
Introduction
Objective

DRAWING CREATION
The Hierarchy
Creating a Drawing (DRWG)

DRAWING GRAPHICS
Working with Drawlists
Setting up View graphics
Working with Section Planes
Adding a Local Rule (RRUL)

DRAWING ANNOTATION
Intelligent annotation
Working with Dimensions
Adding intelligent Text

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PDMS PROCEDURE
2D DRAFT BASICS

GENERAL

1.1

Introduction
The purpose of this document is to give a brief introduction to PDMS Draft. This guide
assumes the 3D model is at an acceptable level prior to starting the 2D drawings. Please
note that the naming convention within your hierarchy may differ from what is shown in
this Procedure.

1.2

Objective
The objective for this guide is to describe how to create 2D drawings from the 3D model
and enhance, annotate and update drawings. Individual PDMS Designers should consult
the relevant PDMS manuals for additional information pertaining to their relevant
discipline. Another important purpose is to achieve consistency for all drawings.

DRAWING CREATION

2.1

The Hierarchy
Understanding the hierarchy is fundamental to learning PDMS. Attention is required for
your location in the hierarchy at any time (current element CE). A typical Draft hierarchy
looks like this:

The Department (DEPT) and Registry (REGI) are normally created by PDMS
Administrator. Therefore individual designers normally start by creating a drawing (DRWG)
in the REGI. The DRWG should always be created by using a pre-defined template
(TMPL) to achieve consistency and enhance productivity.

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2.2

Creating a Drawing (DRWG)


Standing on REGI select Create>Drawing>From Template

The next form has several options for templates. There will also be a preview form
adjacent to the one shown below (omitted for clarity). These templates will be pre-defined
by PDMS Admin. Designers should check which TMPL is relevant for their discipline.

After selecting OK the DRWG should now be created with all the correct layers (LAYE)
and settings for Sheet (SHEE) and View (VIEW).

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Each element within DRAFT has attributes similar to DESIGN. Listing the attributes at
SHEE and VIEW level will produce something similar to attributes shown below. SHEE on
left, VIEW on right side.

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PDMS PROCEDURE
2D DRAFT BASICS

DRAWING GRAPHICS

3.1

Working with Drawlists


For a VIEW to display graphics it must have a Drawlist. This Drawlist will contain all the
elements from the 3D model which you wish to see in that VIEW.
With VIEW as CE, select Modify>Drawlist>
The Drawlist Management form is shown below.
Start by creating a new Drawlist. Select Create button>

Give the Drawlist a name MAIN which will include all the items to be shown on the
drawing. Later, you will create another Drawlist called GHOST. Typically, an engineering
drawing consists of Main items and Referenced items (or ghost items). The Referenced
items are usually shown as broken lines, so as not to confuse the drawing layout.
After typing in MAIN as shown below, select OK>

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The Drawlist Management form now looks like this:

The MAIN Drawlist now appears in the Drawlists box and is now set to CE. The box on the
right shows the Drawlist Members are empty. Now we can add the relevant items we want
shown on the drawing as MAIN items. Using the box on the left (Reference List Members)
navigate to the desired location and select the Add button on bottom left of form. This can
be repeated so the Drawlist contains more than one item. For example, a Drawlist can
contain numerous Frameworks (FRMW).
Note: It is not a good idea to add individual elements (for example SCTNs or PANEs)
to the Drawlist as this can cause problems later on when working at an advanced
level. Try to keep the Drawlist simple, so other designers can understand it should
they be working on your drawing.
Repeat the above procedure to create a GHOST Drawlist. This should contain any items
that are to be shown as reference only (If the drawing is going to be for MAIN items only
the GHOST Drawlist isnt required).

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There is one more step required before we should set up the VIEW graphics. You should
now have 3 Drawlists as shown below. DRWG, GHOST & MAIN.

With DRWG Drawlist as CE select arrow on form below to change Design Members to
Drawlists.

Now navigate to Drawlist Library DRWG>LIBY>DLLB so DLLB is set to CE.

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Select IDLI for MAIN and select Add button.


Note: In the Library (LIBY) the Drawlist is called the IDList (IDLI).
The form should now look like this:

Add GHOST IDLI to Drawlist Members for DRWG Drawlist as above.


Now we have a DRWG Drawlist which contains 2 members:
The MAIN Drawlist and the GHOST Drawlist. This is the easiest way to maintain clean
Drawlists in 2D Draft.
Later on, we can apply a local rule to the GHOST Drawlist which will enable us to show
them as referenced or ghost items.
Dismiss all open forms.

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3.2

Setting up VIEW graphics


We need to manipulate the VIEW now for the desired appearance. Scale, linestyle,
direction, can all be set now from User-Defined View form.
With VIEW as CE, select Modify>View>User Defined and check correct Drawlist is applied
to VIEW by selecting Graphics>Drawlist Ref>

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The form below shows which Drawlist (highlighted) is set for this VIEW:

If in doubt of the Drawlist contents, select Display.


Dismiss this form.
Returning to the User-Defined View form, we can now set all other details for VIEW
graphics. View Type, Style, Scale are some of the items we need to set. Selecting the
Auto Scale button will pick the best scale for the size of the VIEW.
If you select the Apply button and the Update Graphics button is checked then all the
VIEW graphics will be updated on the Drawing. Sometimes it is better to select the No
Update button before applying, especially if there are numerous items in the Drawlist.
Remember to click the Apply button (bottom left) before closing this form.
3.3

Working with SECTION PLANES


Since we are working with a 3D model, it is usually necessary to add SECTION PLANES
in order to achieve the desired appearance for each VIEW, especially when working with
Sections and Details. Working with SECTION PLANES also reduces the required memory
for updating the VIEW and improves system performance when updating VIEW graphics.

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To add a SECTION PLANE:


With VIEW as CE, select Create>View>Section Perpendicular.
Note: There are alternative methods to Section Perpendicular but this is the most common
and easiest to use.

The SECTION PLANES form will open. Start by adding a front plane with logical name.
Check that Retain Data button is set to In front of Plane.

Select the Position button to open new form shown below.


We shall set this position using Explicit option set above as default. Alternatives are
available from pull-down menu including by cursor. This is very useful when working
between several VIEWs.

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Assuming the VIEW is looking down on plan, add desired cut plane value.

Select Apply and Dismiss form.


Select OK on the previous form (Create a perpendicular plane).
Repeat above procedure to add a SECTION PLANE at back, remembering to set the
Retain Data value to behind plane.
With View as CE, select Graphics<Update Design.
3.4

Adding a LOCAL RULE


A LOCAL RULE is a means of manipulating the VIEW graphics to display a different
linestyle. Usually this is done to the GHOST Drawlist to show lines as referenced items.
Select Create>View>Local Rules

The Local Rules form is shown below.

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Select the Create button to open new form.


Enter a logical name for the LOCAL RULE

Select OK.
Now we must apply some settings for the RRUL (LOCAL RULE). From the Names box
select the Modify button. This opens the Names form for which the RRUL should be
applied to. This can be Design members or Drawlists. We apply this RRUL to the GHOST
Drawlist.
Select the arrow at bottom left to change Design Members to Drawlists.

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Now navigate to the GHOST Drawlist and select Add button.


The form should now look like below.

Select OK.

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Now select the Style for the RRUL. These should be pre-determined by PDMS Admin.

Apply then Dismiss.


The DRAFT Hierarchy should now look like this:

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Typing Q ATT while standing on the RRUL will list the items that we just set.

Standing on VIEW select Graphics>Update>Design.

From the above Drawing extract you can see the final result of the LOCAL RULE.
The yellow broken lines represent the RRUL for the GHOST Drawlist.

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DRAWING ANNOTATION

4.1

Intelligent annotation
When adding annotation to a drawing it is of utmost importance that the designer is adding
this information to the correct VIEW, unless the annotation is being added at the Sheet
(SHEE) level. Sheet annotation is generally dead information which is not connected to
any Design Members unlike VIEW annotation.
PLEASE NOTE: ONCE A DRAFT DRAWING HAS BEEN STARTED AND ANNOTATION
ADDED, ALL PDMS USERS SHOULD AVOID DELETING DESIGN ELEMENTS IN THE
3D MODEL WHERE POSSIBLE.
If this is unavoidable, these model changes must be followed through carefully on the
DRAFT drawing. Updating annotation on a VIEW or SHEE after the owning element has
been deleted in the model can result in dead annotation. This may cause problems alter.
It is also good housekeeping to ensure all annotation is connected to model elements
where feasible.

4.2

Working with Dimensions


Dimensions should be added to drawing graphics intelligently unless there are extreme
circumstances where it is impossible to connect to a Design Member. PDMS Admin or
Supervisors should be consulted prior to using dimensions that are not intelligent.
Select Create>Dimension>Dimension Toolbar>

This opens the toolbar for dimensions shown below. The PDMS DRAFT manual should be
consulted for all dimension options. For this Guide we shall add linear dimension only.

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Standing on the correct VIEW, select Linear dimension, horizontal, shown highlighted
above. This adds a LDIM below the VIEW in hierarchy and opens a new form.
There are several options for adding dimension points (DPPT) but for this exercise we
shall use Item only.

Standing on the LDIM in hierarchy, select the Create button on above form. Keep a close
eye on the bottom status bar for instructions. After clicking Create you are prompted to
identify item to dimension with the cursors. Select Design Item and repeat for second item.
The dimension is now created. In the hierarchy there should be 1 LDIM with 2 DPPT
(dimension points).
On the Linear Dimensions form above, DPPTs can be modified or added at any time. A
LDIM can contain numerous DPPTs, for example, a Dimension chain. Dimension
extension lines and position can be adjusted here also. Try to explore this form and
experiment with the different options.

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4.3

Adding intelligent text


When working with Structural drawings it is necessary to add profile sizes and plate
thicknesses. This can be done using various tools in DRAFT. One common method is by
using General Labels (GLAB). The label can reflect any of the attributes of the Design
Element.
Stand on correct VIEW then select Create>Label>General/Symbolic>

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Select Create NEW>


Identify Section for GLAB.
The above form can control various other attributes of the GLAB. Frame on/off, text
contects, text settings, colours, leader lines, etc.
Select Attributes button and pick text Contents>

Change the text a shown on form to suit the SPRE of the Design Element in the 3D model
This results in the label displaying the correct section specification. An extract from
Drawing is shown below with typical GLAB added on SCTN.

This process for adding GLABs and other intelligent text items can be repeated. However,
a faster method of copying GLABs between Design Elements is shown below. The use of
syntax in DESIGN and DRAFT is commonly used as a means of improving productivity.
With GLAB as CE, in command window the following syntax can be typed>
NEW GLAB COPY PREV ON ID@
Selecting the new design element in VIEW will result in the new GLAB being located
adjacent to that element and the SPRE being updated automatically.
Note: There are numerous commands/syntax that can be used throughout DRAFT (and
DESIGN) which increase productivity. These can be supplied upon request.

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