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9/4/2013

UBBL 2012 Amendments on EE


Bylaw 38A and MS1525:2014

Ir Ahmad Izdihar

MS 1525
2001; 2007 1st revision; (2013/2014 2nd
revision)

CODE OF PRACTICE
ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY
AND USE OF
RENEWABLE ENERGY
FOR
NON-RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS

9/4/2013

UBBL 2012 Amendment on Energy Efficiency


38A. Energy efficiency in buildings.
1. New or renovated non-residential buildings with airconditioned space exceeding 4,000 square metres
shall be
a) designed to meet the requirements of MS 1525 with
regards to the Overall Thermal Transfer Value (OTTV)
and the Roof Thermal Transfer Value (RTTV); and
b) provided with an Energy Management System.

UBBL 2012 Amendment on Energy Efficiency

2. The roof for all buildings (residential and non


residential) shall not have a thermal transmittance (Uvalue) greater than
a) 0.4 W/m2K for Light (under 50 kg/m2) weight roof; and
b) 0.6 W/m2K for Heavy (above 50 kg/m2) weight
roof, unless provided with other shading or cooling
means.

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Introduction to MS 1525

MS 1525
2001; 2007 1st revision; (2013/2014 2nd
revision)

CODE OF PRACTICE
ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY
AND USE OF
RENEWABLE ENERGY
FOR
NON-RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS

9/4/2013

CONTENTS in MS1525
Clause
0 Introduction
1 Scope
2 Referenced Documents
3 Definitions
4 Architectural and passive design strategy
5 Building envelope
6 Lighting
7 Electric power and distribution
8 Air-conditioning and mechanical
ventilation system
9 Energy management control system
10 Building Energy Simulation Method

MS 1525
MS 1525 primarily deals with building energy.
The steps towards Energy Efficient buildings are:
PASSIVE
MEASURES

ACTIVE MEASURES

Clause 4 :

Clause 7

Architectural and
Passive Design Strategy
Clause 5 :
Building Envelope

Clause 6 : Lighting

Power System and Distribution System


Clause 8
Air Cond and Mech Ventilation System
Clause 9
Energy Management Control System

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Introduction
1. Purpose of this Malaysian Standard is to:
encourage the design of new and existing
buildings so that they may be constructed,
operated and maintained in a manner that
reduces the use of energy without straining
the creativity, building function, nor the
comfort or productivity of the occupants and
with appropriate regard for cost consideration
encourage the application of renewable
energy in new and existing buildings to
minimise non-renewable energy sources,
pollution and energy consumption whilst
maintaining comfort, health and safety of the
occupants.

Introduction contd
2. The standard sets out only the minimum standards.
3. Recommendations for renewable energy
applications are classified under the following
areas:
a. maximising the availability of renewable energy
resources such as solar heating, solar electricity,
solar lighting and solar assisted technologies;
b. optimising passive cooling strategies;
c. optimising environmental cooling through natural
means such as vegetation, site planning,
landscaping and shading; and
d. maximising passive solar design.

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Introduction contd
4. The requirements for energy efficiency are
classified under the following areas:
a. designing an efficient lighting system
b. minimising losses in electrical power distribution
equipment
c. designing an efficient air-conditioning and
mechanical ventilation system; and
d. designing a good energy management system

Scope
This code of practice gives guidance on the
effective use of energy including the application of
renewable energy in new and existing nonresidential buildings.
Buildings or portions thereof whose peak design rate
of electrical energy usage is less than 10 W/m2
(installed) of gross floor area for all purposes are
excluded from this Standard.

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4. Architectural and passive design strategy


4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
4.6
4.7
4.8
4.9

Sustainable design approach


Passive design strategy
Site planning and orientation
Daylighting
Faade Design
Natural Ventilation
Daylighting &Ventilation from Windows
Strategic Landscaping
Future considerations for sustainable
design

5. Building Envelope
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5
5.6
5.7
5.8
5.9

General Requirements
Concept of OTTV
Shading Coefficient
Daylighting
Roofs
Roofs with Skylights
Daylight Credit
Submission Procedure
Air Leakage

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CONCEPT OF OTTV
MS1525:2007 Clause 5.2
A design criterion for building envelope known as
the Overall Thermal Transfer Value (OTTV) has been
adopted. The OTTV aims at achieving the design of
building envelope to reduce heat gain through the
building envelope and hence reduce the cooling
load of the air-conditioning system.
The OTTVshould not exceed 50 W / m2

CONCEPT OF OTTV
MS1525:2007 Clause 5.2.1
The OTTV of building envelope is given by the
formula:

A
OTTV=

o1

x OTTV + A
1

o2

on

x OTTV

A + A ...... + A
o1

where

x OTTV ...... + A
o2

on

A1 is the gross exterior wall area


for orientation 1;
OTTV1 is the OTTV value for
orientation 1; and
OTTV for the whole building < 50 W/m2

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CONCEPT OF OTTV
MS1525:2007 Clause 5.2.2

The formula for the OTTV of any given wall orientation is as


follows:

OTTVi = 15 (1 WWR)Uw + 6 (WWR)Uf + (194 x CF x WWR x SC)

MS1525:2007 Table 5

If R1 falls between increments, adopt the next larger ratio.


If R1 is below 0.30, SC2 = 1.
If R1 is > 2.00, SC2 values shall be the same as R1 between 1.30
and 2.00

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MS1525:2007 Table 61

If R2 falls between increments, adopt the next larger ratio.


If R2 is below 0.30, SC2 = 1.
If R2 > 2.00, SC2 values shall be the same as R2 is between 1.30 and
2.00.

Eggcrate Shading Devices


MS1525:2007 Table 7

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ROOF U-VALUE
MS1525:2007 Clause 5.5
The calculation of OTTV does not include the
roof plane, but the thermal transmittance (Roof
U-value) of the roof construction is important.
U-values are worked out from the Thermal
Resistance of the respective materials making
up the Roof, similar to that for Walls.
ie,
U = 1 / Rtotal
The higher the R, the lower the U, the better.

MS1525:2007 Clause 5.5.1


Table 9. Maximum U-value for roof (W/mK)

Roof Weight
Group

Maximum U-Value
(W/mK)

Light
(Under 50
kg/m)

0.4

Heavy
(Above 50
kg/m)

0.6

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6. Lighting
6.1 Applications excluded
6.2 General principles of efficient lighting
practice
6.3 Maximum allowable power for illumination
systems
6.4 Exterior building lighting power requirements
6.5 Lighting Controls
6.6 Operation and maintenance (O&M)
manual and as built drawings

6. Lighting contd
6.1 Applications excluded from this clause include:
a. outdoor activities such as manufacturing,
storage, commercial greenhouse and processing
facilities;
b. lighting power for theatrical productions,
television broadcasting, audio-visual resentations
and those portions of entertainment facilities such
as stage areas in hotel ballrooms, night-clubs,
discos and casinos where lighting is an essential
technical element for the function performed;
c. specialised luminaires for medical and dental
purposes;
d. outdoor recreational facilities;

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6. Lighting contd
a. display lighting required for art exhibition or
display in galleries, museums and monuments;
b. exterior lighting for public monuments;
c. special lighting needs for research laboratories;
d. lighting to be used solely for lighting indoor and
outdoor plant growth during the hours of 10.00
pm and 6.00 am;
e. emergency lighting that is automatically off
during normal operations;
f. high risk security areas identified by local
ordinances or regulations or by security or safety
personnel requiring additional lighting;
g. lighting for signs; and
h. store-front display windows in retail facilities.

Table 13:
Recommended average illuminance levels
Task
Lighting for
infrequently
used areas

Illuminanc
e (Lux)
20

Examples of
Applications

100

Minimum service
illuminance
Interior walkway and
carpark
Hotel bedroom

100

Lift interior

100
150

Corridor, passageway,
stair
Escalator, travellator

100

Entrance & exit

50

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Table 13:
Recommended average illuminance levels contd
Task
Lighting
for
working
interiors

Illuminance
(Lux)

Examples of Applications

200

Infrequent reading and


writing

300 - 400

General office, shop &


store, reading & writing

300 - 400

Drawing office

150

Restroom

200

Restaurant, canteen, caf

150 - 300

Kitchen

150

Lounge

Table 14:
Unit lighting power (incl. ballast loss) allowance
Type of Usage

Max lighting power


W/m2

Restaurant
Office
Classroom/Lecture Theatre
Auditorium/Concert Hall

15
15
15
15

Hotel/Motel Guestroom
Lobby/Atrium/Concourse
Supermarket/Dept
Store/Shop
Store/Warehouse/Lavatory
Stair/Corridor/Carpark

15
20
25
10
10

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6. Lighting contd
6.5

Lighting controls

The minimum number of lighting control for


daylight energy savings scheme shall take into
consideration the following criteria:
a) all spaces enclosed by walls or ceiling height
partitions shall be provided with at least one
operated-on-off lighting control for each
room;
b) one switch is provided for each task or group
of tasks within an area of 30 m2 or less;
c) the total number of switches shall be at least
one switch for each 1 kW of connected load;
and
d) lighting zoned control for energy savings.

6. Lighting contd
Hotel and motel guest rooms shall have a
master switch which automatically turns off all
lighting, power outlets and reduce operating
air-conditioning loads except for essential
loads.
Exterior lighting not intended for 24 hour
continuous use shall be automatically switched
by timer and/or photocell.
Local manual controls or automatic controls
such as photoelectric switches or automatic
dimmers shall be provided in day lighted space.
Controls should be provided so as to operate
rows of light parallel to the facade/ exterior
wall.

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7. Electrical Power & Distribution


7.1
7.2
7.3
7.4
7.5

Alternative Current (A.C.) Electric motors


Cabling
Transformers
Inverters
Power factor correction capacitors

Table 15:
Class definition for 4-pole motors
Motor
Capacity
(kW)

Motor Efficiency
Motor Class EFF2

Motor Efficiency
Motor Class EFF1

1.1
1.5
2.2
3
4

76.2
78.5
81.0
82.6
84.2

83.8
85.0
86.4
87.4
88.3

5.5
7.5
11
15

85.7
87.0
88.4
89.4

89.2
90.1
91.0
91.8

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Table 15:
Class definition for 4-pole motors contd
Motor Capacity Motor Efficiency
(kW)
Motor Class EFF2

Motor Efficiency
Motor Class EFF1

18.5
22

90.0
90.5

92.2
92.6

30
37
45
55

91.4
92.0
92.5
93.0

93.2
93.6
93.9
94.2

75
90

93.6
93.9

94.7
95.0

Table 17:
Location of Distribution Transformers

Load fed by
Transformer
> 600 A

Distance of
Transformer from
Load Centre
Not more than 20 m

300 A to 600 A

Not more than 100 m

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7. Electrical Power & Distribution

contd

7.5 Power factor correction capacitors


Power factor correction capacitors should be
the low loss type with losses per kVAR not
exceeding 0.35 W at upper temperature limit
excluding the losses in the discharge resistors.
7.6 Sub Metering
To facilitate monitoring of energy consumption
and energy management, electrical energy
meters should be installed at strategic load
centres to identify consumption by functional
use (air conditioning, lighting, etc).

8. Air-conditioning and mechanical


ventilation (ACMV) system
8.1 Load calculations
8.2 System and equipment sizing
8.3 Separate air distribution systems
8.4 Controls
8.5 Piping insulation
8.6 Air handling duct system insulation
8.7 Duct construction
8.8 Balancing

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8. Air-conditioning and mechanical


ventilation (ACMV) system
8.9
8.10
8.11
8.12

ACMV systems
ACMV system equipment
ACMV system components
ACMV system equipment/component
heat operated (absorption), cooling
mode
8.13 System testing and commissioning
8.14 Operation and maintenance (O&M)
manual and as-built drawings
8.15 Preventive maintenance

8.1.2 Indoor design conditions


Recommended:
Design dry bulb temperature
Minimum dry bulb temperature
Design relative humidity
Air movement
m/s
Maximum air movement

23 C 26 C
22 C
55 % 70 %
0.15 0.50
0.7 m/s

8.1.3 Outdoor design conditions


Recommended outdoor design conditions:
Dry bulb temperature
33.3 C
Wet bulb temperature
27.2 C.

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8.1.4 Ventilation
Outdoor air-ventilation rates shall comply with
Third Schedule (By Law 41) Article 12(1) of
Uniform Building By Laws, 1984.
Exception:
Outdoor air quantities may exceed those shown,
if required because of special occupancy or
process requirements or source control of air
contamination or Indoor Air Quality
consideration.

8.2 System and equipment sizing


Air conditioning systems and equipment shall be
sized to provide no more than the space and
system loads calculated, consistent with
available equipment capacity.
Redundancy in capacity of equipment, if
incorporated into the sizing of the duty
equipment, shall include efficiency devices
such as variable speed drive, high efficiency
motor, efficient unloading devices, multi
compressors etc so as not to diminish the
equipment/system efficiency when operating at
varying loads.

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8.2 System and equipment sizing contd


Where chillers are used and when the design
load is greater than 1000 kWr, a minimum of
either two chillers or a single multi-compressor
chiller should be provided to meet the required
load.
Multiple units of the same equipment type, such
as multiple chillers, with combined capacities
exceeding the design load may be specified to
operate concurrently only if controls are
provided which sequence or otherwise
optimally control the operation of each unit
based on the required cooling load.
Individual air cooled or water cooled direct
expansion (DX) units greater than 35 kWr
(reciprocating compressor) or 65 kWr (scroll
compressor) shall consist of either multi
compressors or single compressor with
step/variable unloaders.

8.3 Separate air distribution system


Zones which are expected to operate nonsimultaneously for more than 750 hours per year
shall be served by separate air distribution
systems.
For air conditioned space requiring exhaust air
volume in excess of 3400 m3/h, not less than 85 %
of non conditioned make up air should be
introduced directly into the space concerned
unless the exhausted conditioned air is utilised for
secondary cooling purposes.
Alternatively, heat recovery devices shall be
provided.

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8.4 Controls
Temperature control
Each system shall be provided with at least one
thermostat for the regulation of temperature.
Each thermostat shall be capable of being set by
adjustment or selection of sensors over a minimum
range of between 22 C to 27 C.
Multi-stage thermostat shall be provided for
equipment exceeding 35/65 kWr in conjunction with
8.2.4.

Humidity control
In a system requiring moisture removal to
maintain specific selected relative humidity in
spaces or zones, no new source of energy (such
as electric reheat) shall be used to produce a
space relative humidity below 55 % for comfort
cooling purposes.

8.4 Controls contd


Energy Recovery
It is recommended that consideration be given to
the use of recovery systems which will conserve
energy (provided the amount expended is less than
the amount recovered) when the energy transfer
potential and the operating hours are considered.
Recovered energy in excess of the new source of
energy expended in the recovery process may be
used for control of temperature and humidity.
Examples include the use of condenser water for
reheat, desuperheater heat reclaim, heat recovery
wheel, heat pipe or any other energy recovery
technology.

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8.4 Controls contd


Mechanical ventilation control
Each mechanical ventilation system (supply and/or
exhaust) shall be equipped with a readily accessible
switch or other means for shut-off or volume reduction
when ventilation is not required.
Examples of such devices would include timer switch
control, thermostat control, duty cycle programming
and CO/CO2 sensor control.

Fan System Efficiency


For fan system with air flowrate exceeding 17000
m3/h and operating for more than 750 hours a year,
the power required by the motor for the entire fan
system at design conditions should not exceed 0.45
W per m3/h of air flowrate.

8.8 Balancing
The system design shall provide means for
balancing the air and water system such as
but not limited to dampers, temperature and
pressure test connections and balancing
valves.

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8.10 ACMV system equipment contd


Table 19. Unitary air conditioners, electrically
driven:
Equipment

Size

Sub-category

Min. COP

Air cooled
with
condenser

<19kWr

Split system single


package

2.7 COP
2.7 COP

19kWr
<35kWr

Split system single


package

2.6 COP

35kWr

Split system single


package

2.5 COP

Water and
<19kWr
evaporatively
19kWr
cooled
<35kWr

Split system single


package

3.0 COP

Split system single


package

3.5 COP

35kWr

Split system single


package

3.6 COP

Shop Office

Budget Hotel

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VRS
Restaurant

Table 21: Water chilling packages, electrically driven:


Equipment

Size

Min COP or IPLV

Air-cooled
With
condenser

<105kWr (30RT)

2.6 COP(1.36kWe/RT) or 2.8 IPLV

105kWr <530kWr

2.7 COP(1.3kWe/RT) or 2.8 IPLV

530kWr (150RT)
<1060kWr (300RT)

2.8 COP(1.26kWe/RT) or 2.9 IPLV

1060kWr

2.9 COP(1.21kWe/RT) or 3.0 IPLV

Water-cooled
Recip or scroll

All capacities

4.0 COP(0.88kWe/RT) or 4.0 IPLV

Water-cooled
Rotary

<530kWr (150RT)

4.0 COP or 4.2 IPLV

530 < 1060kWr

4.4 COP(0.8kWe/RT) or 4.7 IPLV

1060kWr

5.4 COP(0.65kWe/RT) or 5.8 IPLV

<1060kWr

5.2 COP(0.68kWe/RT) or 5.5 IPLV

1060kWr

5.7 COP(0.62kWe/RT) or 6.1 IPLV

Water-cooled
Centrifugal

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Water-cooled chiller
Air-cooled chiller

9. Energy Management Control System


9.1 Energy Management System (EMS)
9.2 Control of equipment
9.3 Monitoring of equipment
9.4 Integration of equipment subsystems
9.5 Energy consuming areas
9.6 Application of EMS to the ACMV system
9.7 Application of EMS to the lighting system
9.8 Application of EMS to Energy Audit
9.9 Characteristics of EMS

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9.1 Energy Management System (EMS)


The Energy Management System (EMS) is a subset of
the Building Automation System function. It should
be considered for buildings having area greater than
4000 m2 of air- conditioned space. Generally, the
Building Automation System has three functions:
a) control of equipment;
b) monitoring of equipment; and
c) integration of equipment sub-systems.

BAS

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9.2 Control of equipment


The purpose of the control of equipment is to save
energy.
This is performed by the EMS function of the
Building Automation System.

9.3 Monitoring of equipment


The purpose of monitoring the equipment is to
improve the efficiency of operations personnel by:
a) providing centralised information of current
equipment conditions;
b) providing historical information of equipment
conditions;
c) providing a management by exception
function to alert the operator of any abnormal
equipment conditions; and
d) providing analysis tools to aid in the study of
equipment operations.

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9.5 Energy consuming areas


Air conditioning and mechanical ventilation
(ACMV) system
This system is typically the largest energy
consumer in the building and has the largest
savings potential
Lighting system
The lighting system is typically the second largest
energy consumer in the building
Others
Any other large energy consuming equipment
such as water pump sets, electric heaters and
others should be included under the EMS
programme. However, it is typically not
appropriate to apply an EMS to control other
equipment, such as computers etc.

BAS

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BAS

Peak Demand
PE AK DE MAND (kW)
800
700
600
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004

500
400
300
200
100
0
JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP
SEP

OCT
OCT

NOV
NOV

DEC
DEC

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10.0 Building Energy Simulation Method


The building energy simulation method is an
alternative to the OTTV & RTTV
This section requires a building energy simulation
of 2 buildings.
The first building as per design, called the design
building.
The second building is a fictional base case
building called the base building.
The base building shall be as functional as the
design building and shall share the all the same
characteristic of the design building with the
exception to the following:
a) building form;
b) building envelope; and
c) daylighting & lighting control.

Thank You

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