TRENDS Life

Your Health and Wellness Magazine
NIAGARA EDITION
FALL/WINTER 2009
ELECTRIC SCOOTERS
for the elderly
Women’s
HEART DISEASE
Recognizing the signs
of a heart attack
Baking up
MEMORIES
with kids
The health benefits of
LAUGHTER
$3.95 Cdn.
www.merritthousemedia.com
TRENDS Life 2
Two of Niagara’s Finest Retirement Communities
THE COMMUNITY OF
300 Elgin St., Port Colborne, ON L3K 6A3 Tel: 905-834-0322
Offering a host of Retirement Options, Portal Village
provides seniors with a variety of choices for improving their lifestyles.
“A growing Good Life Community”
Portal Village is a leader in the Niagara area. With over 20 years experience
in the Retirement sector, we are confident in our ability to meet
the changing needs of seniors and their families.
Call today to arrange a tour or to receive
an information brochure.
www.portalvillage.com
Portal Village residents
enjoy the comforts of a
complex that offers:
• Beautiful décor, spacious
suites, inviting lounge areas
• Delicious meals set in a
comfortable dining room
• Inviting social settings
• Services such as
housekeeping and laundry
are included
• Emergency Response System,
24 hour access to Registered
Health Care
• Recreational programs
including daily exercise,
entertainment and outings
• In-house Physiotherapy
Service
• Transportation to and from
a host of destinations
• Fridge, stove, washer and
dryer units included in
Garden Terrace Suites
• Free internet service
• Lots of opportunities to
meet people
• Accessible walking paths
TRENDS Life 3
Two of Niagara’s Finest Retirement Communities
Lookout Ridge offers seniors of the area a choice.
This complex features 167 suites with three levels
of lifestyles.
Lookout Ridge is pleased to announce the opening of our Retirement
Lifestyles at our Fonthill location. This complex is a tremendous
compliment to our Portal Village community.
Our communities bring about a greater sense of independence for
our residents and enable them to experience interests, events and
friendships that they would otherwise not be able to enjoy as readily
in their own homes.
Lookout Ridge & Portal Village offers seniors a choice of lifestyle
accommodations within the region. Lookout Ridge looks forward
to continuing our commitment of providing seniors with a host of
gracious accommodations in a safe, secure, and friendly environment.
Lookout Ridge
Visit us today for a tour
For more information, please contact us or call 905-892-9218.
TRENDS Life 4
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TRENDS Life 5
TRENDS Life 6
A Letter From the Editor
Hello and welcome to our Fall/Winter edition of Life Trends: Your Health and Wellness
Magazine. For those of you reading our publication for the frst time, Life Trends is a
magazine dedicated to providing families in Niagara with information on timely health-
related issues. If you have a story you’d like to share, we’d love to hear from you.
Thank you to our readers for your feedback on our last issue. We were surprised to
receive emails from many places outside of the region, including Sarnia, Kirkland Lake,
and Manitoba.
Curious as to how Life Trends made it to Manitoba, I tracked down one of the emails and
found out that our magazine was picked up at the airport, read on the fight to Manitoba,
and then passed along to a friend who emailed us about the Honey & Cinnamon Diet.
It’s nice to know our magazine travels so well 
For those of you waiting for results on the Honey & Cinnamon Diet, I’m happy to
report the following: Six out of ten experienced weight loss; two weren’t sure if their
weight loss was due to cut-back in eating or the diet; two felt they didn’t experience any
weight loss at all. I didn’t have time to try it, but six out of ten sounds promising, so it’s
time to ‘make time’ and try it myself!
I have a number of people to thank in this issue. First off, thank you to Sue Augustine,
international speaker and author of fve best-selling books, for joining us once again
and providing us with a light-hearted look at stress.
Thank you to Sarah Gorsline of St. Catharines for sharing her story on the diffculties
she experienced with weight loss and hypoglycaemia. Sarah’s story is one of courage
and determination, proving that anything is possible with good nutrition, dedicated
exercise, and the willpower to succeed!
And last but not least, thank you once again to our talented art director, Jim Szeplaki,
for his creative design, to Rahat Chugtai of bizComb.ca for his inspiration on our
front cover, and to Merritt House Publishing for reaching out to the community with
important health-related information.
All the best to you and yours over the Christmas holidays and the winter months ahead.
We’ll see you in the Spring!
Sincerely,
Deanna Burke
TRENDS Life
Publisher
Merritt House Publishing Inc.
Managing Editor
Deanna Burke
Creative Director/Publication Design
Jim Szeplaki, J & S Graphic Design
jsgraphicdesign@cogeco.ca
Director of Marketing/Distribution
Deanna Burke
Circulation Manager
Al Laprise
Sales
Al Laprise
mhmsales@merritthousemedia.com
LifeTrends: Your Health and Wellness Magazine,
is published four times annually. For advertising
information, email: merritthouse@cogeco.net.
Please email us at the above address with your
stories, comments, or suggestions.
No part of this publication may be reproduced
without the consent of the publisher.
No responsibility is assumed by the Editor, Publisher,
or anyone associated with the publication. The
opinions of the writers and advertisers do not
necessarily reflect those of Merritt House Publishing.
Subscriptions are available at $9.95 plus GST
($10.44) for 1 year.
Email merritthouse@cogeco.net to subscribe.
Copyright 2009 Merritt House Publishing Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
ISSN # 1916-6230.
TRENDS Life 7
Contents
Fall/Winter 2009
My Story
by Sarah Gorsline
The Lighter Side of Stress
A Recipe for Life
How to Stop Worrying
Self-help Strategies for Anxiety Relief
Baking Up Memories with Kids!
The Health Benefts of Laughter
Women’s Heart Disease
Recognizing the Signs of a
Heart Attack
Bringing a Pet Home for Christmas
Electric Scooters
Freedom for the Elderly
Seniors Can Improve Brain Function
with Exercise
Health and Wellness Directory
9
10
11
12
14
16
20
22
26
28
30
14
20
22
16
Your Health and Wellness Magazine
TRENDS Life 8
Growing up, I was the average kid – I loved to play, I was
active, I played outdoors all the time, and I was full of
energy. Then one day I started to get fatigued very easily.
I started to gain weight and I became very moody. My
mom arranged for me to see the family physician – and
thus started weeks of testing. I was fnally diagnosed as
having ‘hypothyroidism’ at the age of 9.
I really thought nothing of it – I was a little bigger, but I
was still having fun with my friends being a kid. My family
doctor said I would always be bigger and that I would
never be skinny because of the hypothyroidism. Then
came the teenage years. I started to pay attention to
what other people were saying. I was the brunt of many
names because I was a little heavier than the other kids.
Through the early teenage years, I tried to stay active
and participated in some school sports. I often found
myself not making the team. It was discouraging, and I
always thought my weight had something to do with it.
I went to high school – puberty set in and I started to
develop breasts. I again tried to stay active and eat right,
but it was diffcult. I went on to college and made a
commitment that I was fnally going to lose some weight
and become “skinny.” I bought a gym membership and
started working out regularly. This lasted
for a few months. I lost some weight
and I was feeling great, but then I hit a
stumbling block. I was stuck – and no
matter what I tried, I couldn’t lose any
more weight.
I gave up. I was always going to be
big – I would never be “skinny.” That
is what my doctor had said. I made a
few signifcant changes in my life – I
had a breast reduction and gained
a lot of self confdence after
that. I started nursing school.
Fast forward to last August.
I was very sick and admitted
to hospital. While there,
I lost 20 lbs. When I was
home from the hospital,
I decided it was time to
do something. I was now
fnished school and it was
the perfect time in my life
to do something for me. I
hired a personal trainer and
began one of the greatest journeys
of my life.
It has been a lot of HARD work – both
physically and mentally. Even though it
has been emotional, it’s something that
I’m glad I’ve done. I have completely
transformed the way I eat, and I work out
in the gym or at home doing exercises. I’ve
lost over 20 inches off my body and a total of
86 lbs!! I’m so proud of my accomplishments,
but I could not have done it without my
personal trainer who I consider a true friend.
So that’s my story. I really try to inspire others to
be their best – every little bit counts. I still have a
few pounds to drop to reach my goal weight, but
I feel great. The compliments I get from others are
wonderful, and I truly do feel amazing!!! q
Sara Gorsline is a 24 year-old registered nurse
living and working in St. Catharines,
Ontario. She trains at the Body Shop on
St. Paul Street. Her personal trainer is
Nathan Diffin.
My
S
tory
by SaRaH GoRSLiNE
TRENDS Life 9
TRENDS Life 10
by SUE aUGUSTiNE
STRESS
Adapted from Sue’s new book, Sanity Secrets for Stressed-Out Women
The lighter side of
Recent research concludes that four out of five
women dance some version of the funky chicken
when overstressed - whether they mean to or not!
Extreme stress can not only drive you crazy,
but it can steal your joy, ruin relationships,
cause insomnia, make you ill, and drain
your energy.
One man confessed that the only way he’s
found to survive stress and keep his energy
level up is to infuse his daily coffee through
IV drip solution. A stressed-out lady reported
symptoms such as eating too much, driving
too fast, and overspending. (A friend of mine
remarked, “Are you kidding? Overeating,
racing around in my car, and shopping
describes my perfect day!”). Another woman
says she believes a balanced diet is one
cookie in each hand!
Too often, when faced with stressful
circumstances, we look for solutions in all the
wrong places. If you’re thinking the best way
to deal with stress is to run away from home,
change your name, get new ID, dye your hair,
and start over, the following sanity secrets
should help you to act somewhat sane right
where you are, even in the midst of chaos:
1. Pay attention to the warning signs.
The frst step in dealing with stress is to
recognize and heed the symptoms. For
example, you’ll know you are in a condition
of overstress if you:
* Aren’t sure you’ll have the energy to
continue reading this article.
* Feel frustrated, frayed, and frazzled much
of the time.
* Are sick and tired of feeling sick and
tired.
* Find yourself waking up in the middle of
meetings.
* Have lost all your “marbles.”
In addition, you are probably overstressed if
your only motivation for getting out of bed
each morning is to go to the bathroom! If
you’ve developed a “why bother” attitude,
have feelings of hopelessness, or worry
incessantly over things you can’t control,
stress could be the cause. When you fnd
you’re getting unreasonably irritated over
small matters like a toaster that won’t pop,
or the zipper that won’t zip, and feel like
throwing them out the window, it’s time to
make some simple lifestyle changes.
2. Recognize when it’s time to take a
break from stress. When I was on a media
tour for my book, When Your Past is Hurting
Your Present, I arranged for non-stop TV and
radio interviews, book signing events, and
corporate seminars all over North America. I
few from city to city without a break. When
I discovered I needed some minor dental
work done that would keep me at home for
a week, I found myself looking forward to
it. It was obvious I had overdone it when I
noticed myself excitedly counting down the
days left before dental surgery because it
meant time off! Don’t wait until you’re having
“hospital fantasies” that include having some
minor surgery done in order to experience
breakfast in bed, reading your favourite
magazine, and taking afternoon naps before
making the positive choices that will relieve
you of stress.
3. Know your limits. The word stress was
originally an engineering term referring to
the amount of pressure steel could withstand.
Today we apply that expression to our lives.
How much pressure can you withstand? The
answer is quite a bit actually. Miraculously
our bodies and minds are created so that we
are able to withstand intense trials and harsh
conditions. The problem comes when we
continue to add tension to our lives without
taking a break to recover and re-energize.
In my stress survival workshops, I use an
elastic band to demonstrate what happens if
we don’t deal with stress in a healthy way.
When we continue to stretch ourselves
beyond normal limits, we eventually snap
and break. Then, instead of making changes
that allow us to recharge and recuperate,
we simply tie a knot and keep going. Soon
we snap again and repeat the process, until
ultimately we are “all tied up in knots.” It’s
important to take a break before you snap.
4. Remember … laughing matters!
Sometimes you just have to laugh ... and
often, at yourself! It took me a few years to
arrive at this place, but today I no longer
fnd it strange that some of my most stress-
free memories involve fnding the humour
in my most embarrassing moments,
catastrophes, or calamities. I remember the
time my granddaughters and I were in the
kitchen baking, which we’ve been doing
since they were barely more than toddlers.
This day, we were making frosting for our
favourite cupcakes. While they took turns
holding the mixer, I added more icing sugar
directly from the package. The beaters
suddenly grabbed the corner of the bag and
began whipping it around, wildly hurling
icing sugar all over the kitchen like some
white powder blizzard. We laughed so hard
we forgot to turn off the mixer. In the end,
we spent the remainder of our time together
cleaning up, yet to this day we laugh
ourselves silly whenever anyone merely
mentions “icing sugar!”
The lighter side of
TRENDS Life 11
It’s good to laugh at our own mishaps now
and then. As someone reminded me, angels
fy because they take themselves lightly.
Besides, if you haven’t had a good laugh at
yourself lately, someone else probably has!
Another form of funny stress relief is playing
games. Whether it’s an hilarious board
game with friends, a more serious round of
Scrabble with a partner, a game of Solitaire, or
a crossword puzzle, it’s possible to escape to
a calmer place where you’ll be diverted from
the causes of your stress and temporarily set
free from mental and emotional tension.
Humour has healing and therapeutic
benefts. Even the medical profession agrees
and recommends a full 15 or 20 minutes of
laughter daily for a healthy heart and mind.
When it comes to stress, humour is your best
ally – physically and emotionally.
5. Don’t worry; be happy. Worry is the
most useless emotion we can experience.
Like rocking in a rocking chair, it uses a lot
of energy and you don’t go anywhere. If you
worry about something and it never happens,
you’ve wasted a lot of time and effort. If it
does happen, you haven’t changed a thing
by worrying. Instead of worrying, talk things
over – with a trusted friend or a trained
professional, or in the form of a prayer.
6. Treat your body as an energy system.
If Tums with added calcium have become
your sole source of nutrition, you’ll want to
make some positive changes in your diet.
One powerful guideline is to choose foods
that are as close to their natural state as
possible. You won’t fnd sugar-coated cereal
with purple marshmallows growing in felds,
or caffeine-laden cola drinks laced with
artifcial sweetener fowing in streams. Aside
from providing the best fuel for your energy
system, get up and move. Exercise won’t kill
you! Besides, the more out of shape you are,
the quicker you’ll see results.
And don’t forget the chocolate. Recent
studies conducted by the chocolate industry
conclude that dark chocolate is good for you.
In fact, it may even constitute a new food
group. Besides, stressed spelled backwards is
desserts! q
Sue Augustine is an international motivational
speaker at conferences and retreats, a frequent
television guest, and author of several
bestselling books including Sanity Secrets for
Stressed-Out Women, Simple Retreats for a
Woman’s Soul, and When Your Past is Hurting
Your Present. Visit Sue at www.sueaugustine.
com or contact: info@sueaugustine.com
A RECIPE FOR LIFE
– Anonymous –
✓ Take a 10-30 minute walk every day. And while you walk, smile.
It’s the ultimate anti-depressant.
✓ Sit in silence for at least 10 minutes each day. Talk to God about
what is going on in your life. Buy a lock if you have to.
✓ Eat more foods that grow on trees and plants, and eat less food
that is manufactured in plants.
✓ Drink green tea and plenty of water.
✓ Try to make at least three people smile each day.
✓ Don’t waste your precious energy on gossip, energy vampires,
issues of the past, negative thoughts, or things you cannot control.
Instead invest your energy in the positive present moment.
✓ Know that life isn’t fair – but it’s still good.
✓ Life is too short to waste time hating anyone.
✓ Don’t take yourself too seriously. No one else does.
✓ You are not so important that you have to win every argument.
Agree to disagree.
✓ Make peace with your past so it won’t spoil the present.
✓ Don’t compare your life to others. You have no idea what their
journey is all about.
✓ Frame every so-called disaster with these words: “In fve years,
will this matter?”
✓ Forgive everyone for everything.
✓ What other people think of you is none of your business.
✓ God heals everything – but you have to ask Him.
✓ However good or bad a situation is, it will change.
✓ Your job won’t take care of you when you are sick. Your friends
will. Stay in touch.
✓ Envy is a waste of time. You already have all you need.
✓ Remember that you are too blessed to be stressed.
✓ When you are feeling down, start listing your many blessings.
You’ll be smiling before you know it.
✓ No one but YOU is in charge of your happiness.
TRENDS Life 12
Worrying can be helpful when it spurs you to
take action and solve a problem. But if you’re
preoccupied with “what ifs” and worst-case
scenarios, worry becomes a problem of its own.
Unrelenting doubts and fears are paralyzing,
not motivating or productive. They sap your
emotional energy, send your anxiety levels
soaring, and interfere with your day-to-day
life – all this with no positive payoff!
The good news is that chronic worrying is a
mental habit you can learn how to break. You
can train your brain to stay calm and collected
and to look at life from a different and more
positive perspective.
The following are worry and anxiety self-help
tips to help you regain control of your worried
state of mind.
Tip #1: accepT uncerTainTy
The inability to tolerate uncertainty plays
a huge role in anxiety and worry. Chronic
worriers can’t stand doubt or unpredictability.
They need to know with 100 percent certainty
what’s going to happen. Worrying is seen as
a way to predict what the future has in store,
a way to prevent unpleasant surprises and a
way to control the outcome. The problem is,
it doesn’t work.
Thinking about all the things that could go
wrong doesn’t make life any more predictable.
You may feel safer when you’re worrying,
but it’s just an illusion. Focusing on worst-
case scenarios won’t keep bad things from
happening. It will only keep you from enjoying
the good things you have in the present. So if
you want to stop worrying, start by tackling
your need for certainty and immediate
answers.
Tip #2: creaTe a worry perioD
It’s tough to be productive in your daily life
when anxiety and worry are dominating your
thoughts. Trying to stop worrying doesn’t
work – at least not for long. You can distract
yourself for a moment, but you can’t banish
your anxious thoughts for good. Trying to
do so often makes them stronger. But that
doesn’t mean there’s nothing you can do
to control your worry. You just need to try
a different approach. Rather than trying to
totally suppress an anxious thought, develop
the habit of postponing worrying.
Learning to postpone worrying:
Create a “worry period.” Choose a set time
and place for worrying. It should be the same
every day (e.g. In the living room from 5:00 to
5:20 p.m.) and early enough that it won’t make
you anxious right before bedtime. During your
worry period, you’re allowed to worry about
whatever’s on your mind. The rest of the day,
however, is a worry-free zone.
Postpone your worry. If an anxious thought
or worry comes into your head during the day,
make a brief note of it on paper and postpone
it to your worry period. Remind yourself that
you’ll have time to think about it later, so
there’s no need to worry about it right now.
Save it for later and continue to go about your
day as usual.
Go over your “worry list” during the worry
period. Refect on the worries you wrote
down during the day. If the thoughts are still
bothering you, allow yourself to worry about
them, but only for the amount of time you’ve
specifed for your worry period. If the worries
don’t seem important any more, cut your worry
period short and enjoy the rest of your day.
Postponing worrying is effective because it
breaks the habit of dwelling on worries in the
present moment. As you develop the ability
to postpone your anxious thoughts, you’ll
experience a greater sense of control.
Tip #3: chaLLenge negaTiVe
ThoughTs
If you suffer from chronic anxiety, chances are
you look at the world in ways that make it seem
more dangerous than it really is. For example,
you may overestimate the possibility that
things will turn out badly, jump immediately
to worst-case scenarios, or treat every negative
thought as if it were fact. You may also discredit
your own ability to handle life’s problems,
assuming you’ll fall apart at the frst sign of
trouble. These irrational, pessimistic attitudes
are known as cognitive distortions.
Although cognitive distortions aren’t based
on reality, they’re not easy to give up. Often,
they’re part of a lifelong pattern of thinking
that’s become so automatic you’re not even
completely aware of it. In order to break
How to
STOP WORRYING
Self-Help Strategies for Anxiety Relief
TRENDS Life 13
these bad thinking habits and stop the worry
and anxiety that they bring, you must retrain
your brain.
Start by identifying the frightening thought,
being as detailed as possible about what
scares or worries you. Then, instead of
viewing your thoughts as facts, treat them as
hypotheses you’re testing out. As you examine
and challenge your worries and fears, you’ll
develop a more balanced perspective.
Stop worry by questioning the worried
thought:
What’s the evidence that the thought is true?
That it’s not true?
Is there a more positive and realistic way of
looking at the situation?
What’s the probability that what I’m scared of
will actually happen?
If the probability is low, what are some more
likely outcomes?
Is the thought helpful? How will worrying
about it help me and how will it hurt me?
What would I say to a friend who is feeling
this type of worry?
Tip #4: Learn how To reLax
Anxiety is more than just a feeling. It’s the
body’s physical “fght or fight” reaction to
a perceived threat. Your heart pounds, you
breathe faster, your muscles tense up, and
you feel light-headed. When you’re relaxed,
the complete opposite happens. Your heart
rate slows down, you breathe slower and
more deeply, your muscles relax, and your
blood pressure stabilizes. Since it’s impossible
to be anxious and relaxed at the same time,
strengthening your body’s relaxation response
is a powerful anxiety-relieving tactic.
If you’re a chronic worrier, relaxation
techniques such as progressive muscle
relaxation, deep breathing, and meditation
can teach you how to relax. The key is regular
practice. Try to set aside at least 30 minutes
a day. Over time, the relaxation response will
come easier and easier, until it feels natural.
Progressive muscle relaxation. When
anxiety takes hold, progressive muscle
relaxation can help you release muscle tension
and take a “time out” from your worries. The
technique involves systematically tensing
and then releasing different muscle groups in
your body. As your body relaxes, your mind
will follow.
Deep breathing. When you’re anxious, you
breathe faster. This hyperventilation causes
symptoms such as dizziness, breathlessness,
lightheadedness, and tingly hands and feet.
These physical symptoms are frightening,
leading to further anxiety and panic. But
by breathing deeply from the diaphragm,
you can reverse these symptoms and calm
yourself down.
Meditation. Many types of meditation have
been shown to reduce anxiety. Mindfulness
meditation, in particular, shows promise
for anxiety relief. Research shows that
mindfulness meditation can actually change
your brain. With regular practice, meditation
boosts activity on the left side of the prefrontal
cortex, the area of the brain responsible for
feelings of serenity and joy.
Tip #5: Take care of yourseLf
A healthy, balanced lifestyle plays a big role in
keeping anxiety, fears, and worry at bay.
Reach out for support
Anxiety and worry get worse when you feel
powerless and alone, but there is strength in
numbers. Focus on building a strong support
system. The more connected you are to other
people, the less vulnerable you’ll feel. If you
start to feel overwhelmed with worry, call a
trusted family member or friend. Just talking
out loud about your worries can make them
seem less threatening.
Adopt healthy eating habits
Start the day right with breakfast, and continue
with frequent small meals throughout the
day. Going too long without eating leads to
low blood sugar, which can make you feel
anxious and irritable. Eat plenty of complex
carbohydrates such as whole grains, fruits,
and vegetables. Not only do complex carbs
stabilize blood sugar, they also boost serotonin,
a neurotransmitter with calming effects.
Limit caffeine and sugar
Stop drinking or cut back on caffeinated
beverages, including soda, coffee, and tea.
Caffeine can increase anxiety, interfere with
sleep, and even provoke panic attacks.
Reduce the amount of refned sugar you eat,
too. Sugary snacks and desserts cause blood
sugar to spike and then crash, leaving you
feeling emotionally and physically drained.
Exercise regularly
Exercise is a natural and effective anti-anxiety
treatment. For maximum anxiety relief, try to
get at least 30 minutes of aerobic activity on
most days. Aerobic exercise relieves tension
and stress, boosts physical and mental
energy, and enhances well-being through the
release of endorphins, which are the brain’s
feel-good chemicals.
Avoid alcohol and nicotine
Alcohol temporarily reduces anxiety and worry,
but it actually causes anxiety symptoms as it
wears off. Drinking for anxiety relief also starts
you on a path that can lead to alcohol abuse
and dependence. Lighting up when you’re
feeling anxious is also a bad idea. While it may
seem like cigarettes are calming, nicotine is
actually a powerful stimulant. Smoking leads
to higher, not lower, levels of anxiety.
Get enough sleep
Anxiety and worry can cause insomnia, as
anyone whose racing thoughts have kept
them up at night can attest. But lack of sleep
can also contribute to anxiety. When you’re
sleep deprived, your ability to handle stress
is compromised. When you’re well rested, it’s
much easier to keep your emotional balance, a
key factor in coping with anxiety and worry.
Special thanks to Helpguide, whose mission is
to help people understand and resolve life’s
problems by empowering them with knowledge
and hope. For more information on anxiety, visit
www.helpguide.org.
TRENDS Life 14
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s
!
1. Safety first. Kids need to understand the
importance of safety. Teach young children to
stay away from the hot stove, sharp knives,
and other kitchen dangers. Every child loves
to pour the milk and add the four, so take
a couple extra seconds to turn off the mixer
and let them! Even better, do the mixing by
hand when you can!
2. Good hygiene. This is an essential kitchen
lesson to teach your kids. Make sure they
understand the importance of washing their
hands often, sneezing away from food, and to
use clean dish cloths and cutting surfaces to
avoid cross contamination. If you do, it they
will too!
3. The simpler the better. Kids love to dig
in with both hands. Choose recipes that are
easy – hand-formed cookies are a fun start
that keeps them involved.
4. Don’t watch the clock. If the recipe says
it takes 20 minutes to prepare, count on 40
with kids in the kitchen. Plan accordingly
and keep it fun. You and your child will have
a much more enjoyable experience if you are
not in a hurry, and the extra time is well spent
when you consider those priceless memories
and life skills!
5. Relax and have fun. There WILL BE
funny shaped cakes, maybe a few egg shells in
the batter. Take it all to heart and give praise
often, even if it’s not perfect. This is a great
time to share your own memories – or even a
baking secret!
6. It’s not just about cooking. The kitchen
makes a fantastic classroom for kids. Learning
to read and follow written directions is a very
important lesson. Take advantage of showing
them how fractions work in a recipe, how
many minutes are in an hour when baking a
cake, or the science in making a souffé rise.
The educational opportunities are endless.
7. Why? We all know that’s a child’s
favourite question. Even if they don’t
ask it, you can provide all kinds of useful
information. Explain why you need yeast
The ki t chen i s a t er r i f i c pl ace t o bond
wi t h chi l dr en. Whet her you’ r e pl anni ng t o
r ust l e up br eakf ast or decor at i ng cooki es, you can
cr eat e memor i es t hat wi l l l ast a l i f et i me. Her e ar e 10
super suggest i ons f or cooki ng t hat ar e f un f or ever yone!
BY GAYLE GAGGERO
TRENDS Life 15
B
a
k
in
g U
p

M
e
m
o
r
i
e
s

w
i
t
h


K
id
s
!
in the bread, how baking soda works in
cakes and cookies, and the differences
between similar items like granulated
sugar and confectioners sugar. Give them
an opportunity to see, touch, and smell all
the ingredients you are using in the recipe
as you go along.
8. Food safety. It’s important to teach kids
how to care for food. Make kids aware of the
bacteria that can live in food if not treated
properly. Remind them that hot food should
be kept hot and cold food cold.
9. It’s okay to use a mix. The attention
span of small children can be short to say
the least. Using a mix can take less time,
leave less room for error, and create less
of a mess. Yes, this is one of those times
where less can be more! Keep mixes handy
for when time is of the essence. So what
if it’s not made from scratch – it was time
well spent!
10. Clean up. Teach children that
cleaning up is all part of the process.
Do it as you go along to keep a safe and
sanitary cooking area. Remind them that
no good chef leaves the kitchen until it’s
properly cleaned.
I hope these helpful tips provide you the
recipe for successful kitchen time with
the little ones near and dear to you! Bon
Appetite! q
Chef Gayle Gigi Gaggero is co-owner of Kids
Culinary Adventures, an exciting cooking
school where math, science, reading, and art
mix with kids.
TRENDS Life 16
In addition to the domino effect of joy and
amusement, laughter also triggers healthy
physical changes in the body. Humour and
laughter strengthen your immune system, boost
your energy, diminish pain, and protect you from
the damaging effects of stress. Best of all, this
priceless medicine is fun, free, and easy to use.
LaughTer is sTrong MeDicine
for MinD anD BoDy
Laughter is a powerful antidote to stress, pain,
and confict. Nothing works faster or more
dependably to bring your mind and body back
into balance than a good laugh. Humour lightens
your burdens, inspires hopes, connects you to
others, and keeps you grounded, focused, and
readily alert.
With so much power to heal and renew, the
ability to laugh easily and frequently is a
tremendous resource for surmounting problems,
enhancing your relationships, and supporting
both physical and emotional health.
LaughTer is gooD for your
heaLTh
Laughter relaxes the whole body. A good,
hearty laugh relieves physical tension and
stress, leaving your muscles relaxed for up to
45 minutes after.
Laughter boosts the immune system.
Laughter decreases stress hormones and
increases immune cells and infection-fghting
antibodies, thus improving your resistance to
all types of disease.
Laughter triggers the release of endorphins,
the body’s natural feel-good chemicals.
Endorphins promote an overall sense of well-
being and can even temporarily relieve pain.
Laughter protects the heart. Laughter
improves the function of blood vessels and
increases blood fow, which can help protect
you against a heart attack and other types of
cardiovascular problems.
LaughTer anD huMour heLp
you sTay eMoTionaLLy heaLThy
Laughter makes you feel good. And the good
feeling that you get when you laugh remains with
you even after the laughter subsides. Humour
helps you keep a positive, optimistic outlook
through diffcult situations, disappointments,
and loss.
More than just a respite from sadness and pain,
laughter gives you the courage and strength to
fnd new sources of meaning and hope. Even
in the most diffcult of times, a laugh – or even
simply a smile – can go a long way toward
making you feel better. And laughter really is
contagious – just hearing laughter primes your
brain and readies you to smile and join in on
the fun.
The Link BeTween LaughTer
anD MenTaL heaLTh
Laughter dissolves distressing emotions.
You can’t feel anxious, angry, or sad when you’re
laughing.
Laughter helps you relax and recharge. It
reduces stress and increases energy, enabling
you to stay focused and accomplish more.
Humour shifts perspective, allowing you
to see situations in a more realistic, less
threatening light. A humourous perspective
creates psychological distance, which can help
you avoid feeling overwhelmed.
The sociaL BenefiTs of huMour
anD LaughTer
Humour and playful communication
strengthen our relationships by triggering
positive feelings and fostering emotional
connection. When we laugh with one another,
a positive bond is created. This bond acts as
a strong buffer against stress, disagreements,
and disappointment.
The Health Benefits of
Laughter
Humour is infectious. The sound of roaring laughter is far more contagious
than any cough, sniffle, or sneeze. When laughter is shared, it binds people
together and increases happiness and intimacy.
Laughing wiTh oThers is far
More powerfuL Than
Laughing aLone
Shared laughter is one of the most effective tools
for keeping relationships fresh and exciting. All
emotional sharing builds strong and lasting
relationship bonds, but sharing laughter and
play adds joy, vitality, and resilience. Humour is
a powerful and effective way to heal resentments,
disagreements, and hurts. Laughter unites
people during diffcult times.
Using humour and laughter in relationships
allows you to:
Be more spontaneous. Humour gets you out
of your head and away from your troubles.
Let go of defensiveness. Laughter helps you
forget judgments, criticisms, and doubts.
Release inhibitions. Your fear of holding back
and holding on are set aside.
Express your true feelings. Deeply felt
emotions are allowed to rise to the surface.
LaughTer anD reLaTionships
Mutual laughter and play are an essential
component of strong and healthy relationships.
By making a conscious effort to incorporate more
humour and play into your daily interactions,
you can improve the quality of your love
relationships – as well as your connections with
co-workers, family members, and friends.
Creating opportunities to laugh
• Watch a funny movie or TV show.
• Go to a comedy club.
• Read the funny pages.
• Seek out funny people.
• Share a good joke or a funny story.
• Check out your bookstore’s humour section.
• Host game night with friends.
• Play with a pet.
• Go to a “laughter yoga” class.
• Goof around with children.
• Do something silly.
• Make time for fun activities (e.g. bowling,
miniature golfng, karaoke).
DeVeLoping your sense of
huMour: Take yourseLf Less
seriousLy
One essential characteristic that helps us laugh
is not taking ourselves too seriously. We’ve all
known the classic tight-jawed sourpuss who
takes everything with deathly seriousness and
never laughs at anything. No fun there!
Some events are clearly sad and not occasions
for laughter. But most events in life don’t carry
an overwhelming sense of either sadness or
delight. They fall into the gray zone of ordinary
life – giving you the choice to laugh or not.
ways To heLp yourseLf see The
LighTer siDe of Life
Laugh at yourself. Share your embarrassing
moments. The best way to take ourselves less
seriously is to talk about times when we took
ourselves too seriously.
Attempt to laugh at situations rather than
bemoan them. Look for the humour in a bad
situation, the irony and absurdity of life. This
will help improve your mood and the mood of
those around you.
Surround yourself with reminders to
lighten up. Keep a toy on your desk or in your
car. Put up a funny poster in your offce. Choose
a computer screensaver that makes you laugh.
Frame photos of you and your family or friends
having fun.
Keep things in perspective. Many things in
life are beyond our control – particularly the
behaviour of other people. While you might
think taking the weight of the world on your
shoulders is admirable, in the long run it’s
unrealistic, unproductive, and unhealthy.
Deal with your stress. Stress is a major
impediment to humour and laughter.
Pay attention to children and emulate
them. They are the experts on playing, taking
life lightly, and laughing.
checkLisT for LighTening up
When you fnd yourself taken over by what
seems to be a horrible problem, ask yourself the
following questions:
• Is it really worth getting upset over?
• Is it worth upsetting others?
• Is it that important?
• Is it that bad?
• Is the situation irreparable?
• Is it really your problem?
using huMour anD pLay To
oVercoMe chaLLenges anD
enhance your Life
The ability to laugh, play, and have fun with
others not only makes life more enjoyable – it
also helps you solve problems, connect with
others, and be more creative. People who
incorporate humour and play into their daily
lives fnd that it renews them, as well as all of
their relationships.
Life brings challenges that can either get the
best of you or become playthings for your
imagination. When you “become the problem”
and take yourself too seriously, it can be hard to
think outside the box and fnd new solutions.
But when you play with the problem, you
can often transform it into an opportunity for
creative learning.
Playing with problems seems to come naturally
to children. When they are confused or afraid,
they make their problems into a game, giving
them a sense of control and an opportunity
to experiment with new solutions. Interacting
with others in playful ways helps you retain this
creative ability.
As laughter, humour, and play become an
integrated part of your life, your creativity will
fourish and new discoveries for playing with
friends, coworkers, acquaintances, and loved
ones will occur to you daily. Humour takes you
to a higher place where you can view the world
from a more relaxed, positive, creative, joyful,
and balanced perspective. q
Special thanks to Helpguide for
encouraging people to take
charge of their health and well-
being. For more information,
visit their website at www.
helpguide.org.
Boosts immunity •
Lowers stress hormones •
Decreases pain •
Relaxes your muscles •
Prevents heart disease •
Adds joy and zest to life •
Eases anxiety and fear •
Relieves stress •
Improves mood •
Enhances resilience •
Strengthens relationships •
Attracts others to us •
Promotes group bonding •
Enhances teamwork •
Helps difuse confict •
TRENDS Life 17
the power to achieve!
THE RIGHT TO LEARN,
a MEMbER’S SToRy
I will never forget that cold February day, a
week after my son’s 10th birthday, sitting in my
car, staring at my husband Brian, and crying.
They just told us that Justin had dyslexia,
and we could not have been happier. Six long
years of doctor’s appointments, never-ending
tests, and the anxiety as to why my child
could not read, was all over.
Like most parents, we took this information
and ran with it. We searched the internet,
read books, sought advice from teachers,
signed up for newsletters, and did just about
anything else we could think of that would
help us fnd the “key” to helping Justin. It did
not take long to become very well versed in
the how’s and why’s of dyslexia. The anxiety
and the overwhelming struggles with reading,
discipline issues, academic guidance, and
social behaviours were something we were
not going to fnd answers for on the internet
or in a newsletter, but we continued to search
for guidance.
A couple of months had passed and things
were not getting easier, and the family tension
was getting worse. I exhausted every avenue I
could think of, and my only hope was that the
interview I had arranged with the LDA would
prove to be benefcial. Hopefully they would
put me in contact with the “right” people.
From the moment Brian and I walked into
the offce and met with Janice and Dawne,
we both knew we were in the right place. We
immediately signed up for their workshop. I
don’t want to sound all sappy, but I do want
you to know that moment was life-altering.
Once a week, as a family, we attended the
session hosted by the LDA.
Janice and her team worked with Justin
as they focused on reading, social skills,
answered his questions, and helped him
understand the process of dealing with things
that frustrated him. Justin enjoyed himself,
there was no pressure or stress, and the other
kids in his group had similar issues so he did
not feel intimidated.
Dawne and her team hosted the parents’
portion of the workshop. I remember Brian
and I were very nervous our frst night. I
remember thinking “what if nobody else is
having the same problems we are?” Well,
it did not take long to see that most other
families were having the same struggles.
Dawne worked with us individually and as a
group to help us make action plans.
Who was going to handle discipline issues,
and how were they going to be handled? Who
was going to handle academic issues, and how
were they going to be addressed? She helped
us identify the core problems and guided us
The following is a paid advertorial for the Learning Disabilites Association of Niagara Region
WHAT DO THESE FAMOUS
PEOPLE HAVE IN COMMON?
• Erin Brockovich
• Tommy Hilfiger
• Leonardo da Vinci
• Danny Glover
• Woody Harrelson
• John Lennon
• Steve McQueen
• Albert Einstein
• Whoopi Goldberg
• Cher
• Henry Winkler
• Lindsay Wagner
• George Washington
• Winston Churchill
• Magic Johhnson
They all have/had a learning
disability!
Learning disabilities are life long,
but success is possible! It is never
too late to seek help. By developing
skills of coping, compensation
and self-compensation, and self-
advocacy, children can become
adults who can take control of their
lives and achieve their potential.
Learning disabilities are
information processing
disorders which may affect:
• thinking, listening, and speaking
• reading, writing, and spelling
• arithmetic and mathematics
• social skills
TRENDS Life 18
Myth:
People with LDs cannot learn.
Fact:
People with LDs are smart and can
learn. LDs mean learning in different
ways.
Myth:
People with LDs are just lazy.
Fact:
People with LDs often have to work
harder, but the results may not refect
their efforts. Some people with LDs
may become discouraged because
they have struggled so hard, and
they may appear unmotivated or
lazy.
Myth:
Accommodations give an unfair
advantage.
Fact:
Fair is not always equal.
Accommodations allow people with
LDs to work to their level of ability
and not disability.
Myth:
All LDs are outgrown by adulthood.
Fact:
LDs tend to be noticed most
often in school, but can affect all
areas of life. Often by adulthood,
people have found ways to use
their strengths to compensate for
their LDs. Many adults seek work
environments that are a good ft for
their strengths.
in making solutions. She reminded us that
we were a family and that it was not just
a problem that Justin was having, it was a
situation that our whole family was having -
and we all had an important role in helping
Justin grow.
Just over two years have past since that cold
day in February, and the growth that Justin
has made has been amazing. The growth that
our family has experienced is immeasurable.
I could not have asked for a better support
system or group of people to work with.
LDA Niagara is a fabulous association
flled with caring people who share their
knowledge and expertise in a highly
positive fashion. They provided my family
with the right tools and the key to making
things better. I would highly recommend
their services to any family who is having
Learning Disability issues.
whaT we Do
LDA Niagara is the one-stop resource centre
for persons with any learning disability. It
is the only organization with the people,
expertise, and connections to help with
almost any issue affecting people with
learning disabilities.
How wE Do THiS
Our Programs That Address
Learning Differences
Soar to Independence is a family program
consisting of parent support meetings, one-
on-one tutorials, social skills programs, and
fne and gross motor skills. The program
is for children 5-12 years of age and their
parents. Each child is given the opportunity
to further develop their literacy, social, and
fne motor skills in a fun and safe learning
environment. This 120 minute weekly
program allows each child to build on skills
and re-enforce their strengths over an 8
week period. Additionally, while children
are in session, parents participate in weekly
information, networking, and learning
sessions.
Teen Transition facilitates each teen’s (13
years and older) awareness of their learning
styles coupled with academic, social, and
literacy skills. Organizational and study
strategies are also explored. Youth who are
either transitioning to high school or are
having diffculty with high school beneft
from this program.
Keyed up for Keyboarding! Children or
youth living with a learning disability are
coached to refne their keyboarding skills
while enjoying interactive and entertaining
games and activities.
Fun with Fundamentals. Young children
receive support and preparation to
successfully transition into Junior and
Senior Kindergarten in a fun and inclusive
environment, learning and enriching their
literacy, social, and numeracy skills.
reaDing rocks!
In collaboration with Dr. John McNamara
and Brock University’s Child and Youth
Studies Department, a literacy skills
enrichment program facilitates a child’s
ability to read, decode, read fuently, and
comprehend the written word. q
For a free consultation or for
information on programs,
supports, and services, go to
www.ldaniagara.org
or contact The Learning
Disabilities Association
of Niagara
Tel: (905) 641-1021
Email: ldaniagara@cogeco.net
TRENDS Life 19
by DEaNNa bURKE
Recognizing the
Signs of a Heart Attack
Women’s
Heart Disease
TRENDS Life 20
Heart disease is now the number one killer of women. In fact, women account for nearly half of
all heart attack deaths. It is the leading cause of death in twice the number of women than all
varieties of cancer combined – killing fve times as many women as breast cancer.
Getting treatment at the frst sign of distress is critical for lifesaving medicines and treatments
to work, and because women’s symptoms vary and are different than those in men, often the
signs of a heart attack go unnoticed – by women, their families, and their doctor.
RISK FACTORS FOR HEART DISEASE
There are a number of risk factors that can lead to heart disease, including post-
menopause, high blood pressure (hypertension), high cholesterol, diabetes, smoking
(or exposure to second-hand smoke), physical inactivity, excess body weight, birth
control pills (in combination with smoking), and a family history of heart disease.
MILDER SYMPTOMS TO WATCH OUT FOR
With milder symptoms, about a third of women experience no chest pain
at all. Many report fu-like symptoms for up to a month prior to having
more acute chest discomfort or severe shortness of breath. Many women
believe other health-related issues are the cause, or that their symptoms
are a side effect of the medication they are on.
Most believe these symptoms will go away on their own. On
average, a woman waits almost fve hours before seeking
medical help, even though half of all heart attack deaths
happen within two hours of the frst signs.
WARNING SIGNS OF A HEART ATTACK
There are many warnings of a heart attack. Some women experience a few of
these symptoms, while others may have all of them at the same time. The following
may suddenly appear and then disappear:
• Chest pain is the most common type of pain. It includes feelings of tightness, discomfort,
crushing pain, heaviness, pressure, squeezing, fullness, burning, or stabbing chest pain.
• Spreading (radiating) pain. This type of pain may spread out to include pain from the chest
area, down one or both arms, or pain to the neck, jaw, or shoulders.
• Pounding heartbeat (palpitations) or feeling extra heartbeats.
• Upper abdominal pain.
• Sudden extreme fatigue that gets worse with any kind of activity.
• Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing.
• Heartburn that is unrelieved by antacids.
• Nausea, vomiting, or severe indigestion.
• Sweating for no apparent reason.
• Dizziness with weakness.
• Sudden paleness.
• Anxiety or panic with a feeling of impending doom.
IF YOU SUSPECT YOU ARE HAVING A HEART ATTACK:
• Tell someone immediately!
• Call 911 and say, “I’m having a heart attack!”
• Chew an uncoated aspirin right away (this can reduce damage to the heart muscle).
• Go to the nearest medical facility with 24-hour emergency cardiac care.
• Don’t drive yourself.
• Get treatment quickly! Get to the emergency room without delay. Every
minute counts!
• Don’t worry if it’s a false alarm – not getting help could
cost you your life!
HEALTH TIPS TO PREVENT HEART DISEASE
Making healthy lifestyle changes is important to minimize
your risk of heart disease or to minimize its damage.
Healthy lifestyle changes include exercising regularly,
eating a healthy diet, quitting smoking (if you smoke),
maintaining a healthy weight, and minimizing
stress.
For more information on healthy lifestyle
changes, ask your doctor or visit
www.heartandstroke.ca. Don’t delay!
If you are at risk for heart disease,
make a decision to fnd out
how you can minimize it
today. q
TRENDS Life 21
Heart disease is now the number one killer of women. In fact, women account for nearly half of
all heart attack deaths. It is the leading cause of death in twice the number of women than all
varieties of cancer combined – killing fve times as many women as breast cancer.
Getting treatment at the frst sign of distress is critical for lifesaving medicines and treatments
to work, and because women’s symptoms vary and are different than those in men, often the
signs of a heart attack go unnoticed – by women, their families, and their doctor.
RISK FACTORS FOR HEART DISEASE
There are a number of risk factors that can lead to heart disease, including post-
menopause, high blood pressure (hypertension), high cholesterol, diabetes, smoking
(or exposure to second-hand smoke), physical inactivity, excess body weight, birth
control pills (in combination with smoking), and a family history of heart disease.
MILDER SYMPTOMS TO WATCH OUT FOR
With milder symptoms, about a third of women experience no chest pain
at all. Many report fu-like symptoms for up to a month prior to having
more acute chest discomfort or severe shortness of breath. Many women
believe other health-related issues are the cause, or that their symptoms
are a side effect of the medication they are on.
Most believe these symptoms will go away on their own. On
average, a woman waits almost fve hours before seeking
medical help, even though half of all heart attack deaths
happen within two hours of the frst signs.
WARNING SIGNS OF A HEART ATTACK
There are many warnings of a heart attack. Some women experience a few of
these symptoms, while others may have all of them at the same time. The following
may suddenly appear and then disappear:
• Chest pain is the most common type of pain. It includes feelings of tightness, discomfort,
crushing pain, heaviness, pressure, squeezing, fullness, burning, or stabbing chest pain.
• Spreading (radiating) pain. This type of pain may spread out to include pain from the chest
area, down one or both arms, or pain to the neck, jaw, or shoulders.
• Pounding heartbeat (palpitations) or feeling extra heartbeats.
• Upper abdominal pain.
• Sudden extreme fatigue that gets worse with any kind of activity.
• Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing.
• Heartburn that is unrelieved by antacids.
• Nausea, vomiting, or severe indigestion.
• Sweating for no apparent reason.
• Dizziness with weakness.
• Sudden paleness.
• Anxiety or panic with a feeling of impending doom.
IF YOU SUSPECT YOU ARE HAVING A HEART ATTACK:
• Tell someone immediately!
• Call 911 and say, “I’m having a heart attack!”
• Chew an uncoated aspirin right away (this can reduce damage to the heart muscle).
• Go to the nearest medical facility with 24-hour emergency cardiac care.
• Don’t drive yourself.
• Get treatment quickly! Get to the emergency room without delay. Every
minute counts!
• Don’t worry if it’s a false alarm – not getting help could
cost you your life!
HEALTH TIPS TO PREVENT HEART DISEASE
Making healthy lifestyle changes is important to minimize
your risk of heart disease or to minimize its damage.
Healthy lifestyle changes include exercising regularly,
eating a healthy diet, quitting smoking (if you smoke),
maintaining a healthy weight, and minimizing
stress.
For more information on healthy lifestyle
changes, ask your doctor or visit
www.heartandstroke.ca. Don’t delay!
If you are at risk for heart disease,
make a decision to fnd out
how you can minimize it
today. q
22 LifeTRENDS
It’s important to think ahead when considering
a pet for Christmas. If you’re planning to
introduce the pet as a surprise, you should
have your new pet checked over by a vet in
advance, especially before bringing him into a
home where you already have other animals.
This way you can quickly catch, treat, and
prevent the spread of any diseases that may
have been contracted while in the pet shop or
shelter. You wouldn’t want a joyous moment
to turn into a tragedy. It’s also important to
have the vet take care of any necessary shots
and routine worming treatments.
You should also have your home ready for
your new arrival before bringing him home.
Buy pet beds and food bowls, toys and litter
boxes, brushes and leashes. Have everything
in place when you welcome your pet to its
new home and, of course, buy a good supply
of pet food that will provide him with a well-
balanced diet. Junk food is just as bad for pets
as it is for people!
Before your pet arrives, you should give your
home a good going over to remove anything
that might be dangerous. The image of a
puppy chewing on a slipper is a familiar
one, but that same puppy might also chew
on electrical cords. Poinsettias are poisonous
to cats, plus cats may swallow Christmas
tinsel or pieces of string and yarn which can
block their intestines. Go around your home
and conceal wires, store medications and
household cleaning products, and put sharp
objects out of reach. Learn which house
plants might be poisonous if ingested, and
don’t leave heavy objects where they might
get knocked over. Once your pet arrives,
you can make it into a game in which your
children search for potential pet dangers and
come up with ways to remove each one.
Puppies and kittens will invariably get into
everything they have access to, so be careful
they don’t get closed into drawers or climb
into kitchen appliances. Take the same kind
of precautions that you’d take with very
young children in the house. Teach your
kids to keep your pet’s safety in mind at all
times. Animals have a tendency to be forever
underfoot, so teach your children to move
An animal and its unconditional love is
one of the nicest gifts you can give to
your children, but there are certain things
you should do to prepare for its arrival.
Bringing a
Pet Home
for Christmas
by baRbaRa FREEDMaN-DE ViTo
TRENDS Life 23
slowly and gently and to look before they
take a step or sit down. Teach them to open
doors slowly, in case a furry little someone is
just behind that door.
When your new pet frst arrives, try to
give him a quiet spot and plenty of time to
acclimate to his new environment. Sights,
sounds, and smells will all play a role as your
pet gradually learns his way around his new
home. Don’t overstress a new pet with too
much noisy attention and fussing. Too many
hands reaching out to pat him or pick him up
may be frightening. Let your pet gradually get
accustomed to the children in the house. With
lots of love, affection, and socialization, your
new pet should soon fnd its place within the
family. Supervise young children until they’ve
learned how to be gentle and considerate of
pets’ needs and feelings: no sudden noises,
no tail-pulling, no dressing pets up in human
clothing, no teasing them. As your children
come to understand why they should not do
these things, they will learn to respect their
fellow creatures as autonomous beings, and
they will grow up to be compassionate and
caring adults.
Be cautious when introducing your new pet
to pets that are already living in the house.
Give your older pets plenty of attention
and affection so as to prevent jealousy and
any resulting aggression. Take care not to
ignore them in favour of the new arrival,
just as you would be careful not to ignore
your older children when a new baby is
born into the family. For animals, there may
be territorial issues to work out and strange
new scents to decipher. You must also take
precautions when introducing your new pet
to his outdoor environment and the new yard
or neighborhood in order to avoid undue
disorientation, anxiety, or worse.
As your new pet settles into the routine of
daily life at your house, you and your kids
can put into practice all the pet care tips that
you’ve read about: provide your pet with a
healthy diet, always give him access to fresh
and clean water, encourage plenty of exercise
in a safe environment, and keep up with all
required vaccinations and other medical
treatments.
Take care of every one of your pet’s needs,
from daily brushings, to periodic toenail
trimmings, to annual shots. Give your pet
toys that are safe to play with, with no pointy
edges that could poke eyes or jab throats.
Your pet uses his mouth to play with objects,
so avoid small parts that might be bitten off
or swallowed. You should also respect an
animal’s need for privacy. When your pet
needs some quiet time alone, be sure he gets
it. Give him a nice soft bed, boxes to climb
into, and other safe hidey holes in out-of-the-
way places. Teach your kids to respect your
pet’s moods and not to bother him when he’s
sleeping. The better your children know the
animal who lives in your house, and the more
involved they are in your pet’s care and daily
routines, the closer they’ll be to him, and the
more they’ll love him.
The unquestioning love that animals can give
to humans is one of the nicest gifts you can
give to your children, and the best gift you
can give to your pets is the unconditional
love that you and your kids feel for them.
The love that pets give to humans can also
help kids through diffcult times. Trusted
dogs or cats will actively seek out attention,
play, and cuddling, and their companionship
will be constant when friends, schools, and
other things may change. Pets are always
there to listen to children’s troubles, share
their joys, and keep them company during
times of loneliness, and children can confde
their secrets to their pet with the absolute
certainty that the animal will never betray
their confdence.
That sort of absolute love and devotion
can bring children and animals together in
such a special way, and that inter-species
bond can help your children grow up to
be compassionate adults who feel more
connected to the natural world. Pets give
their best to us and, in return, we should do
our best for them. They deserve all the love,
time, attention, play, and affection that your
children, and you, can give them.
Pets are not toys, they are members of
the family. When new pets are added to a
household, with proper care and with plenty
of love, they will soon fnd their place within
your hearts and your lives, and you’ll all
wonder how you ever could have gotten
along without them! q
Barbara Freedman-De Vito has been involved
with children and animals for many years. She’s
been a teacher, children’s librarian, wildlife
rehabilitator, artist, and writer on topics related
to both children and animals. Her husband, Bob,
has run an animal shelter and is involved in
animal rescue work.
When your new pet frst arrives, try to give him a
quiet spot and plenty of time to acclimate to his
new environment ... Let your pet gradually get
accustomed to the children in the house.
Located at 350 Scott Street in St. Catharines, Canada’s first ‘Optimal Health Centre’ has opened
its doors, providing clients with a screening method of detecting abnormalities in the skin tissue
that may relate to cancer, disease, unexplained pain, and nameless medical conditions. Using
infrared Thermography, Optimal Health Centre is one of the few ‘Thermography’ clinics to use the
latest technology for thermographic imaging.
The following is a paid advertorial for Optimal Health Centre
Digital Infrared Thermal Imaging (DITI), a non-invasive test that
uses an infra-red camera to measure and pinpoint abnormal skin
temperatures, may indicate abnormalities in the breast tissue, as
well as numerous physiological problems. The camera gauges body
tissue heat energy that is reflected on a high-speed computer for
imaging. Generally “problem areas” show high temperatures due to
increased blood flow and increased metabolic activity. The imaging is
then down-loaded and sent for interpretation by physicians trained
by the American College of Clinical Thermography, associated with
Duke University Medical Centre. This report can then be forwarded
to a client’s health practitioner.
How has this revolutionary screening process escaped us? Optimal
Health Centre recognized the absence of this technology in Canada
and made it their mission to open clinics to service local areas.
Thermography is considered to be a mainstream test of physiology
in the United States, England, Australia, New Zealand, and other
countries throughout Asia – and it’s FDA approved. This cutting edge
technology may be a potential leader in early breast screening.
Breast Thermography may detect functional changes in breast tissue
before tumors form and when tumors could be too small to be
detected with X-rays. Completely non-intrusive and void of radiation,
compression, contact, or needles, the process is comfortable and exact.
OPTImAL
HEALTH CENTRE
A Matter of Wellness
WHAT IS INFRARED IMAGING?
Digital Infrared Thermal Imaging is a totally non-invasive clinical imaging procedure for
detecting and monitoring a number of diseases and physical injuries by showing the
abnormalities present in the body.
It is used as an aid for diagnosis and prognosis, as well as monitoring therapy progress for
conditions and injuries, including:
Back Injuries Breast Disease
Arthritis Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
Headache Disc Disease
Nerve Damage Infammatory Pain
Unexplained Pain Skin Cancer
Fibromyalgia Referred Pain Syndrome
RSD (CRPS) Sprain/Strain
Dental and TMJ Stroke Screening
Artery Infammation Whiplash
Vascular Disease Digestive Disorders
TRENDS Life 24
Optimal Health Centre says, “Screening of the breast
may detect the possibility of physiological problems
within six to eight years prior to an abnormality picked
up on a mammogram.” It’s particularly useful during
early phases of rapid tumor growth. Thermography can
be used for women of all ages and with all types of breast
tissue. It’s especially effective when dealing with young
or dense breasts. However, Optimal Health Centre
states, “Breast thermography is not a replacement for
mammography or any other form of breast imaging.”
Thermography is also a welcome aid for diagnosis,
prognosis, and monitoring therapy progress for
conditions that include back injuries, arthritis,
headache, nerve damage, Fibromyalgia, carpal tunnel
syndrome, disc disease, unexplained pain, referred
pain syndrome, sprains, strains, stroke screening,
whiplash, and digestive disorders.
Optimal Health Centre explains, “The test is
phenomenal as it gives a true reading through thermal
imaging of how your body is doing in real time.”
Physiology is dynamic – while anatomy is static.
Thermography gives an immediate picture of any
inflammation of the muscle or fiber – the scan shows
a picture of the patient’s actual pain location.
We are in a time where disease and aging problems
are too rapidly treated with medication. Taking hold
of our own health issues is not only responsible – but
necessary in today’s society. Optimal Health Centre is
an enormous gift to us all – it can be one of the first
steps towards achieving a lifetime of wellness.
The centre always recommends that you include your
health practitioner in any decisions regarding your
health. Thermography technology could work hand-
in-hand with existing medical technologies. q
Visit us at:
350 Scott St., Unit #105, St. Catharines, ON L2N 6T4
Tel: 289-362-1786
TRENDS Life 25
TRENDS Life 26
There would not be much excitement in life if
you had to spend it sitting in a chair or lying
in a bed every day. Relying on somebody
else to perform simple tasks for you, such as
getting a drink of water, can make you feel
like you are nothing but a burden to others.
If you or someone you love needs a boost,
maybe electric scooters are what you should
be investigating.
It wasn’t too long ago that the elderly and
handicapped relied exclusively on others
for their care and entertainment. But with
the recent advancements in scooters, many
seniors or disabled people can now grab hold
of some of their freedom again. Cheap electric
scooters can allow the formerly bed-ridden or
chair-ridden to travel as if they actually had
legs that worked again. No more depression
due to lack of independence. Returned is the
ability not only to get oneself a glass of water,
but to go out and get the morning newspaper,
or even take the dog for a walk. Getting out
in the fresh air is something that may not be
possible for many without the assistance of an
electric scooter.
In my neighbourhood, there is an elderly
gentleman that cruises down the sidewalk
with his control lever in one hand and his
dog leash in the other. Without his electric
scooter there would be no fresh air for him.
There would be no walking the dog or talking
with the friendly neighbours he runs into
(fguratively, not literally). He’s free once again
to roam the streets with his best friend Fido.
What a great feeling that must be, to get out
of the house for a short time each day when
it used to be impossible. There’s practically
nowhere a person can’t go these days with the
help of these magnifcent little vehicles.
There are a wide variety of scooters available
these days. Besides electric types, there are
gas, utility, and foldable models. They all have
their advantages under certain conditions.
Some love the compact and easy-to-handle
foldable or Razor scooters. They are very
by DR. LaRRy a. JoHNSoN
Freedom for the Elderly
Electric Scooters
TRENDS Life 27
inexpensive, often under $100, and make
getting places a snap. They are also very
inexpensive to operate once you own one.
Some kids use scooters as a motorcycles, but
a scooter is so much more than a miniature
motorcycle – it’s a means of obtaining freedom
for the elderly.
Gas powered scooters are more powerful,
allowing the driver to travel further distances
away from home. There are even larger touring
models manufactured for the sole purpose of
long distance travel. The touring types are
bigger and heavier, and they consume a little
more fuel, but they allow for long distance
travel unlike the foldable utility or mobility
models.
Utility scooters are becoming very popular
with different types of institutions such
as school campuses, professional sports
stadiums, golfers, and big businesses. Have
you ever seen a person driving a cart in a school
parking lot, going from car to car looking for
parking violations? In all probability they
were driving a utility scooter. And golf carts
are just a modifed version of this type.
The electric models are very versatile and
are used to perform many functions. They
are used in the foldable and utility types
most often. But perhaps where they perform
their greatest task is in assisting the elderly
or disabled. It wasn’t too long ago that these
mobility vehicles had a very limited distance,
but with the advancement of batteries and
their capacities, they can now be used for an
entire day before needing to be recharged.
They can be driven all day and then plugged
in at night for recharging while everyone
is fast asleep. Then in the morning they
are ready to perform their duties again for
another day. What a wonderful gift to those
that no longer have the ability to get around
on their own.
Mobility electric scooters are different than
gas powered models. For one thing, they will
have at least three (but usually four) wheels.
The reason for the extra wheel is stability. It’s
not too hard to lose your balance on the two-
wheeled variety, but it’s almost impossible
with four. With the extra stability that a four
wheel adds, it makes the mobility electric
scooter very safe for travel in and around the
home. These handicapped models are bigger
and heavier than other types which allows for
better control and more storage.
Electric scooters are here to stay. If chosen
carefully, they can become one of the best
purchases ever made for the elderly. q
by MiKE RoSS
Seniors Can
IMPROVE
BRAIN FUNCTION
With Exercise
When it comes to how the brain reacts to aging, scientists
have always thought that as you get older, neurons in your
brain die, causing your memory and mental quickness to
suffer. Neurons are basically the telephone lines that make up
the bulk of your brain and allow different parts of your brain
to communicate.
Just imagine if you cut the phone lines between you and your
neighbours. You wouldn’t be able to communicate with them
over the phone. Likewise, when your brain’s telephone lines
die, various areas of your brain can’t exchange information,
wreaking havoc on your memory, sharpness, and balance, to
name a few.
But there’s hope! Recent studies have revealed that the brain can
grow new neurons. This concept was considered impossible
just a few years ago. It was always thought that
you started with so many neurons, and then
as you got older, some died off.
So how exactly can we grow new neurons?
Through exercise – cardiovascular exercise
in particular. Cardiovascular exercises, like
biking, walking, swimming, and rowing
get your heart pumping. It’s believed that
this brings more blood fow to the
brain. Scientists think cardio may
even stimulate the production
of a hormone that promotes
the growth of neurons.
Cardio exercise does not
have to be so incredibly
intense. Basically, you
just want to get your heart
rate up higher than when you
are at rest, and then sustain
that elevated heart rate for an
extended amount of time.
If you haven’t been doing any
cardio, start with three times
per week for twenty to thirty
minutes. Eventually, you’ll want
to be doing four or more times
per week for over a half hour.
Remember that as you’re doing
this exercise, you’re not just
helping your heart and muscles –
you’re also helping your brain. q
Certified trainer Mike Ross develops
innovative senior strength training
programs for seniors as well as
balance exercises for fall prevention.
TRENDS Life 28
TRENDS Life 29
TRENDS Life 30
HOSPITALS
Douglas Memorial Hospital
230 Bertie St., Fort Erie, ON
905-871-6600
Greater Niagara General Hospital
5546 Portage Rd., Niagara Falls, ON
905-358-0171
Port Colborne General Hospital
260 Sugarloaf St., Port Colborne, ON
905-834-4501
Ontario Street Site
155 Ontario St., St. Catharines, ON
905-682-6411
Shaver Hospital
541 Glenridge Ave., St. Catharines, ON
905-685-1381
St. Catharines General Hospital
142 Queenston St., St. Catharines, ON
905-684-7271
Welland County General Hospital
65 Third Street, Welland, ON
905-732-6111
URGENT CARE CENTRES
Urgent Care - Fort Erie
660 Garrison Rd., Fort Erie, ON
905-994-9417
Urgent Care - Niagara Falls
104-6150 Valleyway, Niagara Falls, ON
905-371-1881
Niagara Falls After Hrs. Walk-In
6453 Morrison St., Niagara Falls, ON
905-374-3344
Access MD Walk-In Clinic
532 Lake St. @ Linwell, St. Catharines, ON
905-646-0015
Urgent Care - St. Catharines
211 Martindale Rd., St. Catharines, ON
905-641-1141
Urgent Care - St. Catharines
411 Louth St., St. Catharines, ON
905-641-3115
Minor Emergency Walk-In Clinic
180 Vine St., St. Catharines, ON
905-682-5411
Pelham Walk-In Clinic
245 Pelham Rd., St. Catharines, ON
905-988-1933
Urgent Care Niagara - Welland
800 Niagara (Seaway Mall), Welland, ON
905-732-4451
ACUPUNCTURE
Acupuncture Chinese Medicine & Rehab Centre
4501 Queen, Niagara Falls
905-358-6888
Acupuncture & Massage Clinic
6150 Valley Way, Niagara Falls
905-371-0775
Acupuncture & Natural Therapy
180 Vine S (Room 309), St. Catharines
905-682-8861
Ashi Acupuncture
62 St. Paul W, St. Catharines
905-641-2100
Chinese Health Clinic
4256 Portage, Niagara Falls
905-358-8188
Chiropractic Home Care Services
15 Rideau Cr, St. Catharines
905-935-4663
Comprehensive Health Clinic
125 Welland, St. Catharines
905-688-6289
Eles Maria Acupuncture and
Chinese Herbal Medicine Clinic
213 King St., St. Catharines
905-984-5311
Healing Vine Clinic
226 Queenston, St. Catharines
905-988-9355
Levay Ronald A Dr
52 River Rd., Welland
905-735-9344
Martindale Chiropractic & Wellness Centre
211 Martindale, St. Catharines
905-685-5635
Perossa Daniel Dr
504 Line 2, Niagara-on-the-Lake
905-468-4959
Roberts John O T Dr
236 Glenridge, St. Catharines
905-685-0733
St. Catharines Physiotherapy Centre
120 Welland, St. Catharines
905-685-4733
Shedden Linda
191 Welland, St. Catharines
905-684-0871
AGENCIES
The Arthritis Society
300 Bunting Rd., St. Catharines, ON
905-646-7284
Big Brothers & Big Sisters
428 Niagara St., St. Catharines, ON
905-646-3230
Brain Injury Assoc. of Niagara
111 Church St., St. Catharines, ON
905-984-5058
Health & Wellness Directory
TRENDS Life 31
Canadian Diabetes Association
391 Vine St., St. Catharines, ON
905-646-4843
Canadian Hearing Society
111 Church St., St. Catharines, ON
905-984-4412
CNIB
211 Martindale Rd., St. Catharines, ON
905-688-0022
Child and Adolescent Development
107 Yates St., St. Catharines, ON
905-682-8608
Community Support Services of Niagara
209 Hwy 20 E., Unit 7, Fonthill, ON
905-892-7779
Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of Canada
30 Ravine Dr., St. Catharines, ON
905-682-2218
Diabetes Education Centre
139 Ontario St., 2nd Floor St. Catharines, ON
905-682-4200
Enasco
26 Facer St., St. Catharines, ON
905-646-6555
Family & Children’s Services of Niagara
93 Hannover Dr., St. Catharines, ON
905-937-7731
First Step Clinic
243 Welland Ave., St. Catharines, ON
905-684-9339
Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario
3-300 Bunting Rd., St. Catharines, ON
905-938-8800
Heart Niagara Inc.
5673 North St., Niagara Falls, ON
905-358-5552
Hospice Niagara
205 King St., St. Catharines, ON
905-984-8766
Housing Help Centre of St. Catharines
14 North St., St. Catharines, ON
905-984-8955
The Lung Association
40 Front St. N., Thorold, ON
905-227-8800
Lupus Foundation of Ontario
294 Ridge Rd., Ridgeway, ON
905-894-4611
MS Society of Canada
12 Grove St., St. Catharines, ON
905-937-7772
National Network for Mental Health
55 King St., Suite 604, St. Catharines, ON
905-682-2423
Niagara Life Centre
237 Lakeshore Rd., St. Catharines, ON
905-934-0021
Niagara Stress & Trauma Clinic
93 Ontario St., Suite 201 St. Catharines, ON
905-687-6866
Schizophrenia Society of Ontario
15 King St., St. Catharines, ON
905-684-2081
Welland Heritage Council
26 East Main St., St. Catharines, ON
905-732-5337
Wellspring Niagara
3250 Schmon Pkwy., Thorold, ON
905-684-7619
Women’s Place Inc.
PO Box 1387, St. Catharines, ON
905-684-8331
HEARING AId SUPPLIERS & CLINICS
Brosnan Ear Clinic Inc.
5-3350 Merrittville Hwy., Thorold
905-684-1015
Canada Hearing Centre
15-4025 Dorchester Rd., Niagara Falls
905-356-3200
Canadian Hearing Society Voice
111 Church St., St. Catharines
905-984-4412
Carolyn Green Hearing Aid Service Ltd.
279 Niagara St., St. Catharines
905-937-7413
Carolyn Green Hearing Aid Service Ltd.
132 Main St. E., Grimsby
905-309-5345
Family Hearing Clinic
33 Lakeshore Rd., St. Catharines
905-938-2479
Hear Again Balance & Hearing Clinics
145 Carlton St., St. Catharines
905-684-0100
Hear Again Balance & Hearing Clinics
6800 Morrison St., Niagara Falls
905-354-2757
Hear Again Balance & Hearing Clinics
660 Garrison Rd., Fort Erie
905-871-4242
Hear Better Niagara
5652 Main St., Niagara Falls
905-357-2227
Hear For Life / Hearing Centre
221 Glendale Ave., St. Catharines
905-988-1052
Hotel Dieu Shaver Health and Rehabilitation Centre
541 Glenridge Ave., St. Catharines
905-685-1381
Niagara Hearing & Speech Clinic
282 Linwell Rd., St. Catharines
905-938-1661
Niagara Hearing Aid Centre
135 Niagara Boulevard, Fort Erie
905-871-6404
Niagara Hearing Aid Centre
4535 Queen St., Niagara Falls
905-356-8261
TRENDS Life 32
Niagara Hearing Solutions Inc.
5501 Drummond Rd., Niagara Falls
905-353-1552
Provincial Hearing Consultants
3 Lowell Ave., St. Catharines
905-684-6185
Provincial Hearing Consultants
155 Main St. E., Grimsby
905-309-8778
Provincial Hearing Consultants Fonthill
1451 Pelham Rd., Pelham
905-892-6068
Smith Optical Vision & Hearing Care
482 Steele St., Port Colborne
905-835-6607
Stamford Hearing Aids
238 Bertie St., Fort Erie
905-871-6566
Stamford Hearing Aids
4113 Portage Rd., Niagara Falls
905-357-6166
Stefan Fridriksson, Dr. of Audiology
145 Carlton St., St. Catharines
905-684-0100
The Hearing Aid Dispensary
570 King St., Welland
905-734-3380
The Hearing Clinic
6800 Morrison St., Niagara Falls
905-354-2757
Welland Optical & Hearing Centre Ltd.
95 Lincoln St., Welland
905-735-2020
HOLISTIC HEALTH CENTRES
Alternative, The
233 Garrison Rd., Fort Erie
905-994-6603
B. Elliott & Associates
706 E. Main St., Welland
905-788-3214
Basic Source
13 Stoney Brook Crescent, St. Catharines
905-935-3473
Besides Lavender Aroma
& Energy Therapy
46 Thomas St., St. Catharines
905-646-2546
Better Health Naturally
11 Forest Rd., Welland
905-714-0701
Bridgeburg Spa Inc.
168 Garrison Rd., Fort Erie
905-871-3471
Centre for Acupuncture & Ancient Healing
429 Thorold Rd., Welland
905-735-5888
Circle of Health
6150 Valley Way, Niagara Falls
905-371-3331
EMF Healing
57 Division St., Welland
905-734-4448
Essential Health & Beauty
80 King St., Welland
905-788-3999
Hands On Treatments
87 Lakeport Rd., St. Catharines
905-934-6803
Heal Yourself Naturally
18 Cross St., Welland
905-714-0298
Healing Vine, The
226 Queenston St., St. Catharines
905-988-9355
NaturoMedic.com
296 Welland Ave., St. Catharines
905-684-4934
New Hope Laser & Wellness Centre
379 Gorham Rd., Ridgeway
905-894-3247
Niagara-on-the-Lake Natural Health Clinic
1410 Niagara Stone Rd., Niagara-on-the-Lake
905-468-9041
Sacred Earth
23041 Feeder Rd., Wainfeet
905-899-7117
Samurais - The Healing Place
18 Cross St., Welland
905-788-0320
Wholistic Body Care
42 Ontario St., Grimsby
905-309-1978
HOmE CARE & NURSING SERvICES
Bayshore Home Health
205-282 Linwell Rd., St. Catharines
905-688-5214
Care Partners
279 Lake St., St. Catharines
905-346-0322
Paramed Home Health Care
235 Martindale Rd., St. Catharines
905-682-6555
Premiere Home & Nursing Care
570 Buffalo Rd., Fort Erie
905-871-8491
Pro Wellness Health Services Inc.
110 Hannover Dr., St. Catharines
905-682-1059
Saint Elizabeth Health Care
444 Scott St., St. Catharines
905-704-4580
We Care Home Health Services
277 Welland Ave., St. Catharines
905-988-5262
Victorian Order of Nurses Niagara
3300 Merrittville Highway, Thorold
905-641-1077
Visiting Angels
12-111 Fourth Ave., Suite 172, St. Catharines
905-685-4242
TRENDS Life 33
mEdICAL COSmETICS
Blair Laser & Cosmetic Centre
180 Vine St., St. Catharines
905-685-7200
Contours Face & Body
100 4th Ave, St. Catharines
905-704-1446
Cosmedicus Medical Cosmetics & Laser Centres
6150 Valley Way, Niagara Falls
905-371-1881
Lasik MD Niagara
Niagara Falls
905-371-3217
Niagara Falls Dermatology and Skin Care Centre Ltd
6453 Morrison St. Suite 201, Niagara Falls
905-356-8013
Sandra Elsley MA MEd MFT
Niagara Falls
905-356-3335
True Emotions Artwork Plus - Carolyn Shannon
PO Box 29043, St Catharines
905-646-0757
NATUROPATHS
Wayne J Chindemi
3911 Victoria, Vineland
905-562-3636
Tara Clapp N.D.
St. Catharines
905-988-9160
Laura Imola BSc ND
6746 Morrison St., Niagara Falls
905-354-0267
Sandra Koch BSc ND
24 Olive St 2nd Fl Lakeside Plaza, Grimsby
905-309-7979
Ana Lara Naturopathic Clinic
69 Queen St., St. Catharines
905-682-9636
Jane Lauermeier N.D.
12 Secord Drive, St. Catharines
905-935-6460
Ronald A Levay
52 River Rd., Welland
905-735-9344
Shimon Levytam N.D.
168 Mary, Niagara-on-the-Lake
905-468-7656
Natural Therapies Clinic
5026 King, Beamsville
905-563-5444
NaturoMedic.com
296 Welland, St. Catharines
905-684-4934
Carol Nigh BSc N.D.
106 West Main St., Welland
905-714-0998
Stephen J. Tripodi N.D.
197 Ontario Street, St. Catharines
905-688-9900
OPTICIANS
Canvision Optical
285 Bunting Rd., St. Catharines, ON
905-646-1395
Custom Lens Xpress
547 Ontario Rd., St. Catharines, ON
905-935-7595
Custom Lens Xpress
7637 Lundy’s Lane, Niagara Falls, ON
905-357-0003
Eye Exam Centre
420 Vansickle Rd., St. Catharines, ON
905-684-5544
Focus Eye Wear
4025 Dorchester Rd. #4, Niagara Falls, ON
905-354-5678
Hakim Optical
551 Ontario St., St. Catharines, ON
905-937-2530
Laurier Optical
221 Glendale Ave., St. Catharines, ON
905-988-9797
Lenscrafters
Pen Centre, St. Catharines, ON
905-682-8000
Lifetime Vision Centre
1405 South Pelham, Fonthill, ON
905-892-5191
Mason Opticians
111 Fourth Ave., St. Catharines, ON
905-682-5367
Optometric Clinic
191 Welland Ave., St. Catharines, ON
905-688-5361
Pearle Vision
800 Niagara St. Seaway Mall, Welland, ON
905-734-8820
Precision Optical
420 Vansickle Rd., St. Catharines, ON
905-684-2342
Port Optical
83 Clarence St. West, Port Colborne, ON
905-835-8688
Sandercott & Evans Opticians
30 James St., St. Catharines, ON
905-684-3953
Smith Optical Vision & Hearing Centre
482 Steele St., Port Colborne, ON
905-835-6607
Speer Opticians
399 Ontario St., St. Catharines, ON
905-988-6160
Vision Clinic
8 Niagara Locations, Grimsby, ON
905-309-2233
Royal Optical
595 Carlton St. Unit 4, St. Catharines, ON
905-938-5288
TRENDS Life 34
PHARmACIES
Beamsville Medical Pharmacy
4729 Huixon Street, Beamsville, ON
905-563-1234
Community Pharmacy
16 Ontario St., St. Catharines, ON
905-685-3051
Dell Lewis & Krall
325 Thorold Rd., Welland, ON
905-732-4456
Dell Pharmacy
144 Griffin St., Smithville, ON
905-957-3943
Dell Pharmacy
155 Locke St., Dunnville, ON
905-774-6222
Dell Pharmacy
111 Queenston St., St. Catharines, ON
905-641-0101
Drugstore Pharmacy
285 Geneva St., St. Catharines, ON
905-646-1316
East Main Pharmacy
626 East Main St., Welland
905-735-1500
Fonthill Pharmacy
165 Hwy 20 West, Fonthill, ON
905-892-4994
Glenridge Pharmacy
209 Glenridge Ave., St. Catharines, ON
905-984-6345
Henderson’s Pharmacy
15 Front Street South, Thorold, ON
905-227-2511
Herbies
318 Ontario St., St. Catharines, ON
905-684-2305
Hopkins Pharmacy Ltd.
3387 King St., Vineland, ON
905-562-4661
King St. Pharmacy
110 King St., St. Catharines, ON
905-988-1286
Lewis & Krall IDA Pharmacy
325 Thorold Rd., Welland, ON
905-732-1663
Linwell Medical Pharmacy
282 Linwell Rd., St. Catharines, ON
905-938-0147
Meadows IDA Pharmacy
3493 Portage Rd., Niagara Falls, ON
905-358-3913
Meadows IDA Pharmacy
3770 Montrose Rd., Niagara Falls, ON
905-357-6577
Neighbourhood Pharmacy
532 Lake St., St. Catharines, ON
905-935-2273
Niagara Health Centre Pharmacy
180 Vine St., St. Catharines, ON
905-684-1181
Pharma Plus Drugmart
4995 King St., Beamsville, ON
905-563-7122
Pharma Plus Drugmart
3100 Garrison Rd., Fort Erie, ON
905-994-9000
Port Weller Pharmacy
260 Lakeshore Rd., St. Catharines, ON
905-934-2023
Queen Street Pharmacy
4421 Queen St., Niagara Falls, ON
905-354-5604
Remedy’s Rx
390 Lincoln St., Welland, ON
905-788-2700
Scott Street Neighbourhood Pharmacy
532 Lake St., St. Catharines, ON
905-935-2273
Shoppers Drug Mart
800 Niagara St., Seaway Mall, Welland, ON
905-735-7525
Simpson’s Pharmacy
1882 Niagara Stone Rd., Virgil, ON
905-468-2121
Valley Way Pharmacy
6150 Valley Way, Suite 103, Niagara Falls, ON
905-354-1979
To be added to our directory or to update your listing, email merritthouse@cogeco.net
WWW.MERRITTHOUSEMEDIA.COM
K E N ’ S A U T O A P P R A I S A L S
Specializing in Vehicle Evaluations for Antique, Classic,
Muscle and Special Interest Automobiles
– Insurance Appraisals
– Retail Sales Tax
– Vehicle Locating
– Pre-Purchase Inspections
– Estate, Divorce
Ken LeBlanc
21 Edgewood Ave.
Welland, ON L3C 1N6
905-714-1403
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Lucy Rocca
Owner
300 Lincoln Street
Welland, ON
L3B 4N4
Mon-Wed 9-6
Thurs-Fri 9-8
Sat 8:30-5
Specializing in
All Hair Services
TRENDS Life 35
WWW.MERRITTHOUSEMEDIA.COM
Merritt House Media is Niagara’s newest media agency specializing in ‘affordable’ video advertising
for small to medium-sized companies. We are dedicated to helping clients increase their visibility by
combining the two most powerful forms of advertising – print and broadcast media.
LIFE TRENDS HEALTH AND WELLNESS MAGAZINE
Targeted at consumers 35 and over, Life Trends offers health
articles for the entire family! Our distribution boasts an extremely
high visibility in reception areas across Niagara, a high pass-on
rate, and an extensive shelf life!
COMMERCIALS
Our broadcast-quality commercials are ideal for companies
seeking a high-impact way of reaching the consumer visually.
Video can be broadcast on many different media outlets in the
region, used on a website, or showcased at one of our unique
HOST* locations!
POINT OF SALE VIDEO WITH DIGITAL SIGNAGE
We recommend our unique ‘in-house’ video to up-sell products
and services directly from your location! Highlight your
promotional video on its own, or combine it with the news, sports,
entertainment, and weather. Point of Sale video generates revenue
and increases turnover by encouraging consumers to buy!
HOST* LOCATIONS
Generate on-going revenue for your company by ‘hosting’
commercials from non-competitive companies! Showcase your
own products and services, support the business community,
and encourage economic growth! If your company qualifies, we
offer generous discounts on promotional video.
Deanna Burke
Director of Media
905.732.6333
merritthouse@cogeco.net
Al Laprise
Media Sales Executive
905.714.9571
sales@merritthousemedia.com
For more information, please contact:
OR
TRENDS Life 36
Who says
there's no

magic wand
for
anti-aging?
Well, there's no need to look any further. Microcurrent is non - invasive and can actually
turn back the clock. This specially designed waveform, introduced in Canada two years
ago, is making women and men feel better about themselves - and it's slowing down the
aging process.
This technology is based on muscle re-education. Just like going to the gym, your face also
requires the same workout. It's the best kept secret and it’s safe and effective on both the
face and body - unlike other forms of rejuvenation that are isolated to one area and cost the
same - or more.
Microcurrent is totally harmless and improves skin tone, colouration,and much more,
including a:
That youthful glow you once had will be back, and the tired look will be gone. It's a facelift without
surgery - and it only takes an hour. It's totally painless and relaxing, requiring approximately 5 to
10 treatments 2 to 3 times a week.
With regular maintenance every 4 to 6 weeks, it's more than affordable - it's unbelievable. You'll
stay looking and feeling your utmost best. You can't find this in a bottle. It's a great alternative to
conventional invasive treatments.
Join the thousands of men and women that have turned back the clock safely and effectively.
IT'S NEVER BEEN THIS EASY!
35% increase in blood circulation 35% increase in the number of blood vessels
40% increase in the production of new glucose 28% increase in lymphatic drainage
45% increase in the number of elastin fibers in 10% increase in collagen thickness in the
the dermis connective tissue
127 Church Street, St. Cathari nes, Ontari o
905 684 4210 1 877 735 0004
www.fountai nofyouthcanada.com
TRENDS Life 37
Who says
there's no

magic wand
for
anti-aging?
Well, there's no need to look any further. Microcurrent is non - invasive and can actually
turn back the clock. This specially designed waveform, introduced in Canada two years
ago, is making women and men feel better about themselves - and it's slowing down the
aging process.
This technology is based on muscle re-education. Just like going to the gym, your face also
requires the same workout. It's the best kept secret and it’s safe and effective on both the
face and body - unlike other forms of rejuvenation that are isolated to one area and cost the
same - or more.
Microcurrent is totally harmless and improves skin tone, colouration,and much more,
including a:
That youthful glow you once had will be back, and the tired look will be gone. It's a facelift without
surgery - and it only takes an hour. It's totally painless and relaxing, requiring approximately 5 to
10 treatments 2 to 3 times a week.
With regular maintenance every 4 to 6 weeks, it's more than affordable - it's unbelievable. You'll
stay looking and feeling your utmost best. You can't find this in a bottle. It's a great alternative to
conventional invasive treatments.
Join the thousands of men and women that have turned back the clock safely and effectively.
IT'S NEVER BEEN THIS EASY!
35% increase in blood circulation 35% increase in the number of blood vessels
40% increase in the production of new glucose 28% increase in lymphatic drainage
45% increase in the number of elastin fibers in 10% increase in collagen thickness in the
the dermis connective tissue
127 Church Street, St. Cathari nes, Ontari o
905 684 4210 1 877 735 0004
www.fountai nofyouthcanada.com
Al ternati ve Heal th Servi ces
and Chi ropracti c Care
127 Church Street
St. Cathari nes, Ontari o
TRENDS Life 38