What am I?

(Geocaching and Vocabulary)

Overview-- This lesson would be one of several in a unit on using geographic information systems and tools. Students have already been introduced to the vocabulary terms and will be exploring the use of a GPS to locate coordinates while solving clues together. The students will need to problem solve (figure out the answers to the clues describing the geography terms) after they have “discovered” the caches containing those clues. Once each team has determined the geography term that is being described they will then write the number of the cache and the term in each slice (see graphic organizer). After completing the scavenger hunt each team will need to hand in a completed organizer after checking their answers with their teacher. Goals: Working together as a team to problem solve while reviewing and discussing vocabulary terms while exploring how GPS receivers work Materials: Clipboards for each team, empty objects or canister to use for caches, multiple copies of the clues to locate the caches (depending on the number of GPS devices available), 8-10 GPS devices, and puzzle worksheet for teams to fill out. Teachers would need to mix up the clues for each team so they would be starting at different coordinates facilitating less confusion between the teams. Team Members Roles*: Materials Coordinator/reader – collects necessary materials—GPS, etc. and reads the directions for the task. Navigator – operates GPS (Switch off after each cache is located). Recorder – records the cache number and vocabulary term * Note that roles can be switched depending on the number of students on each team.

Judy Newquist 2009

What am I?

(Geocaching and Vocabulary)

Working as a team you will need to navigate the course below following the coordinates provided. As you explore how to read and use a GPS your challenge is to figure out the mystery geography vocabulary terms using the clues located in each cache. Using your keen observations skills will be required in order to find the locations of the various caches that hold the clues for the terms. 1. 849 Easting, 571 Northing— Look around and you will see-- Look low, look high beneath the tree. 2. 833 Easting, 628 Northing— Turn the corner and what do you observe? I am small and round. Look closely on the ground. 3. 838 Easting, 596 Northing— Low lying and rectangular am I. Usually I am filled with water but I am dry. Look closely and the cache you will spy. 4. 909 Easting, 593 Northing— Walk through the doors and discover all the wonders of the world. 5. 770 Easting, 624 Northing— Directing your way is always fun; what do you find here? Look closely as the cache is near.

Judy Newquist 2009

What am I?

(Geocaching and Vocabulary)

Here are the clues hidden inside a small box, brown envelopes or whatever container you may have available to describe the geography term. Parallels/latitude lines --geographic tool --measure horizontally in degrees --used to locate points on earth --positive values north of equator --negative values south of equator --measures vertically in degrees --meet at north and south poles --east of Prime positive values --west of Prime negative values --used to locate points on earth --points on earth --make a grid --can be positive or negative --used to locate absolute locations on earth --intersecting lines create a grid --image of a globe (sphere) on a flat surface --image of earth --determines latitude and longitude -- navigation system involving satellites and computers --24 satellites --system of hardware and software --used to store, retrieve map and analyze geographic data -- used to describe places on earth --uses pictures or graphics

Meridians/longitude lines

Coordinates

map projection

GPS

GIS

Judy Newquist 2009

Team Member Names:

What am I?
Each “piece of the pie” is to be numbered with the number on each cache. Then the recorder will also need to write each term in the numbered slice. **Remember you are working together as a team to find the locations of the caches and to figure out the appropriate vocabulary terms.

Judy Newquist 2009

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