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Guideline 000.100.

0071
Date 19Apr2012
Page 1 of 8

INSTRUCTIONS FOR PREPARING A PROJECT SCOPE OF WORK

PURPOSE
A Scope of Work is made up of both the Scope of Facilities and the Scope of Services.
This document was developed to assist Fluor personnel in writing Scopes of Facilities
and Scopes of Services, mainly for engineering, procurement, and construction projects.
Using this guideline, the scope documents generated will be more complete and
consistent in format across all disciplines and functions. This document is structured to be
used on all types and all stages of projects and proposals, either Lump Sum or Cost
Reimbursable; large or small.
SCOPE
This document contains the following tools which facilitate writing scopes:

General guidelines to prepare Scopes of Work


Definitions of commonly used terms
Generic scope writing work flow process
Generic Scope of Work outline (go-by document)
Recommended Example Scope Of Work to be used as a reference
Scope of Work document format writing and review considerations

APPLICATION
This document should be used by all personnel writing and editing Fluor Scopes of Work
for proposals and projects. The recommended Scope of Work outline contains sections
for all Engineering disciplines, Project Controls, Procurement, Contracts, and
Construction.
SCOPE PREPARATION GUIDELINES
In accordance with the Operating System Requirements, all projects shall have "an
appropriately detailed scope of work suitable for managing the project through all phases
of execution." This document provides a recommended format to use in writing the
Scope of Work. However, specific projects may dictate a different format due to Client
requirements. It is Project Management's responsibility to communicate to the scope
writing team the philosophy and format to be utilized in writing the scope document at
the project's inception. This philosophy should include, but not be limited to the
following:

Scope Outline
Scope Format
Project / Process Description
The project's General Sections for the Scope of Facilities and the Scope of Services

Copyright 2008 - 2012, Fluor Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

Project Management

Guideline 000.100.0071
Date 19Apr2012
Page 2 of 8

INSTRUCTIONS FOR PREPARING A PROJECT SCOPE OF WORK

Project / Jobsite Data Questionnaire


Basic Engineering Design Questionnaire
Project Requirements Checklists
Level of detail to be drafted into the scope document
Key project objectives and Client hot buttons

DEFINITIONS OF TERMS
The definitions of terms commonly used in this document are as follows:

Scope of Facilities The physical and functional description of the final constructed
and delivered facility.

Scope of Services

The Fluor Execution Approach - How and with what tools, resources, standards,
criteria and techniques we execute our engineering / design, procurement and
construction.

Roles and responsibilities of Fluor and all other major parties (client, partners,
suppliers, subcontractors, etc.) on the project.

Fluor Activities and Deliverables - Drawings, activities and specifications


necessary to execute the project.

Activities and deliverables provided by all other major parties on the project.

Activities and deliverables normally provided that will not be provided by


anyone.

Scope of Work The Scope of Facilities combined with the Scope of Services.

Discovery The work processes of the project team used in determining the details
required to execute the project. These processes include the team formulating the
critical questions, reviewing and prioritizing the questions prior to submittal to
Client; reviewing the Client responses to the questions and repeating the cycle as
many times as appropriate.

WBS (Work Breakdown Structure) The management tool of assigning numbers


to areas, systems or components to break the project work into manageable segments
of the lowest level of detail required for effective project management and reporting.
The Client, engineering, procurement and construction should input to project
management in formulating the project WBS.

Copyright 2008 - 2012, Fluor Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

Project Management

Guideline 000.100.0071
Date 19Apr2012
Page 3 of 8

INSTRUCTIONS FOR PREPARING A PROJECT SCOPE OF WORK

WORK FLOW PROCESS


This guideline recommends utilizing the applicable Discipline Engineers, Project Control
Engineers, Procurement Managers, Engineering Managers, Project Managers, and Site
Managers working as a team through all phases of the Scope of Work document
preparation and review. This effort is required to ensure coordination between affected
disciplines to prepare a complete scope document, schedules and budget estimates. The
steps required of the scope writing team in document preparation are presented in the
Scope Writing Work Flow Process (Attachment 01).
The attached Work Flow Process chart uses teamwork and brainstorming techniques for
scope writing success. At first, the team reviews together, all available documentation
from the Client, business unit and project management. Next the team prepares written
critical questions to be submitted to the Client to determine project details missing from
the available documentation. The project team should utilize the attached generic Scope
of Work Outline and the discipline Project Requirements Checklist to assist in
preparation of the critical questions. All communication resolving scope issues between
the Client and the project team should be documented as meeting minutes, trip reports
and telephone confirmations, and issued to all parties for review.
The Scope of Facilities can be drafted after the critical questions are resolved with the
Client and reviewed by the project team as a group. After the Scope of Facilities has
been drafted, reviewed and agreed to by the team as being accurate and complete, the
Scope of Services can next be drafted to reflect the Scope of Facilities. After the Scope
of Services has been reviewed and agreed to by the team as being accurate and complete,
the project team may next prepare the project schedules, staffing plans and project
estimates. Both the schedules and estimates should be mirror images of the Scope of
Facilities and Scope of Services. It is important to note the required team participation
together in each of the steps presented above, both in preparation of each of the steps and
the required reviews.
SCOPE OF WORK OUTLINE
A typical Scope of Work outline can be found in Practice 000.100.0070, Project Scope
of Work Go-By, which is generic and applicable for use on all projects and proposals. It
contains a consistent format for all Engineering disciplines, Project Controls,
Procurement, Contracts, and Construction. The outline components are listed as follows:

Executive Summary
Project Description
Scope of Facilities
Scope of Services

Copyright 2008 - 2012, Fluor Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

Project Management

Guideline 000.100.0071
Date 19Apr2012
Page 4 of 8

INSTRUCTIONS FOR PREPARING A PROJECT SCOPE OF WORK

Additional sections may be added as applicable, if desired by Project Management,


such as the detailed project schedule, detailed project estimate, combined equipment
list of all disciplines.

The Scope of Facilities and Scope of Services are divided into individual sections for
each of the Engineering disciplines. Project Controls, Procurement, Contracts, and
Construction are included in the Scope of Services.
The general sections of both the Scope of Facilities and the Scope of Services are to be
written by Project Management. Each of the discipline sections is further divided into
subsections which completely describe the Scope of Facilities and Scope of Services.
Should a particular discipline not have scope included in the project, the scope document
author should simply input "No Work Included" under that discipline's heading.
The outline presented in Scope of Work go-by document describes each of the discipline
subsections and gives specific examples of the type of information that should be
included. The outline presented is generic; therefore, some items may not be applicable
and require editing from the text. The outline should be reviewed by each team member
during the discovery phase of the project scope writing effort to assist in preparing
critical questions.
EXAMPLE SCOPE OF WORK
Included with the Scope of Work go-by document is an Example Scope of Work which
can be utilized as a reference document when writing a Scope of Work. This particular
scope document, which was taken from the Writing Scopes training course, was written
in response to an RFP for engineering, procurement and construction on a lump sum
basis.
This example document is formatted to the generic scope outline in the go-by document
and includes some of the expected language. It is written as guide for other scope
authors. This example document incorporates many of the legal implications in writing a
scope of work.
SCOPE WRITING CONSIDERATIONS
When using this guideline, scope authors should consider the following items:

The Scope of Work document is the single most critical document prepared during
the project execution. It is an attachment to the project contract and becomes part of
the contract. Most of the other documents produced during project execution are
based upon the Scope of Work. The Scope of Work is the project baseline for
identifying and managing change on the project.

Copyright 2008 - 2012, Fluor Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

Project Management

Guideline 000.100.0071
Date 19Apr2012
Page 5 of 8

INSTRUCTIONS FOR PREPARING A PROJECT SCOPE OF WORK

As noted above in this guideline, Clients may require differing formats from that
presented here.

Project Management should retain discipline involvement in writing and reviewing


scopes of work. If Project Management consolidates all the discipline sections into
one, discipline review of the finished work is required prior to submittal to the
Client.

Formal Client agreement to the Scope of Work document, at the beginning of the
project, is required and is the responsibility of Project Management to obtain.

Always read, study and understand the formal contract prior to writing Scopes of
Work. If the contract is not available, access the letter of intent or contract synopsis.

The scope document should contain only terse, concise statements relating to the
Scope of Facilities and Scope of Services. Language that imitates marketing for
Fluor services should be included in a side document and not in the Scope of Work.
For example, Value Awareness is one of the many Fluor programs that needs to be
identified and discussed with the Client, but these are not to be included in the Scope
of Work document, unless it is to be included with the project and formally agreed
to.

The Assumptions and Clarifications section of the Scope of Facilities and Scope of
Services should also list exclusions. Exclusions can be received by the reader as
negative and for that reason is omitted from the Heading. Scope authors should
consider using different wording, when appropriate, to achieve the same end. For
example, if no training manuals are required, instead of writing that the training
manuals are excluded from Fluor's Scope of Services, indicate that training manuals,
if required, will be provided by the equipment vendor.

Scope authors should understand the difference between the information presented in
the Design Basis section and the Assumptions and Clarifications section in the Scope
of Facilities. If an item has been formally agreed to or it is a fact, it should appear in
the Design Basis section. If it has not been formally agreed to or there is uncertainty,
it probably should appear in the Assumptions and Clarifications section. On
occasions, the writer may want to reaffirm an item presented in the Design Basis by
repeating that item under the Assumptions and Clarifications section.

Scope authors should understand the difference between the information presented in
the Design Approach section and the Assumptions and Clarifications section in the
Scope of Services. If an item has been formally agreed to or it is a fact, it should
appear in the Design Approach section. If it has not been formally agreed to or there
is uncertainty, it probably should appear in the Assumptions and Clarifications
section. On occasions, the writer may want to reaffirm an item presented in the
Design Approach section by repeating that item under the Assumptions and
Clarifications section.

Copyright 2008 - 2012, Fluor Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

Project Management

Guideline 000.100.0071
Date 19Apr2012
Page 6 of 8

INSTRUCTIONS FOR PREPARING A PROJECT SCOPE OF WORK

Strive for consistency when writing scopes, not only within the author's discipline
scope, but with the scopes of the other disciplines.

Warranties, guarantees and quality The scope author should take these into
consideration as he writes his portion of the Scope of Work. Reading the formal
contract, contract synopsis or at least the Fluor standard contract allows the scope
author to understand what the Fluor standard of quality for that project is. The
contract will define the three (3) important parts of the warranty:

Standard of Performance
Time Period
Remedy or Correction

The scope author should be extra careful not to provide warranties or guarantees for
schedule or performance in the Scope of Work without senior management approval.
In the written scope document, reference the contract which contains language to
address situations which can adversely impact the success of the project, such as
natural disasters.
Examples:

Do not give specific schedule dates without adding "estimated" or "as set forth
in the contract."

For performance, do not use "best" or "free of all defects" or "a specific machine
operating efficiency rate" or "plant production rate." Use "the basis of the
design will be" or similar language.

Be careful when using "will" and "shall." Sentences with these words could be
implying warranties or guarantees. It is permissible to use these words, just
consider their context and application when using them.

Consider the Client's hot buttons and key Project Objectives and address when and
where appropriate.

Consider that the methods that Fluor uses to execute our designs are what set Fluor
apart from the competition. The Scope of Services is an opportunity to communicate
to the Client the added value that Fluor brings to the Client's project.

All disciplines are to provide a listing of the author's discipline general codes and
standards which are common to all or most disciplines to be incorporated into the
General Section of the Scope of Services (Section 4.1.2). Codes and standards that
are discipline specific should appear in that individual discipline section with
reference to the appropriate section of the code if that code could impact other
disciplines.

Copyright 2008 - 2012, Fluor Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

Project Management

Guideline 000.100.0071
Date 19Apr2012
Page 7 of 8

INSTRUCTIONS FOR PREPARING A PROJECT SCOPE OF WORK

Consider that, in some cases, the requirements of governing codes and standards
could significantly affect the Scope of Facilities and Scope of Services. Should the
requirement of a particular code be the project estimate basis for the author's
discipline, and the use of an alternate code would have a detrimental impact, identify
that requirement in the Scope of Facilities and Scope of Services. More general
discipline specific governing codes and standards should be identified under
References and Standards, 4.X.2 of the Scope of Services.

Consider that some items could appear in both the Scope of Facilities and Scope of
Services. Examples could be hot taps or field routing for piping. Not only would
these items be the design basis which the project estimate is based on, but also the
installation technique which affects the discipline engineering execution plan and
budget.

Consider writing your scope, using the phrase "anticipated quantities" when listing
drawings or specifications to allow flexibility in the actual, final design execution.

The number of discipline specific purchase orders and the name of discipline
construction contract packages should be described in the author's discipline Client
Deliverables section of the Scope of Services. The Procurement and Contracts group
will use this information to formulate their effort-hour estimates.

In accordance with the requirements of the OSR, the interdisciplinary coordination


section of the Scope of Services addresses the requirement that interfaces between
disciplines or with outside sources must be clear and agreed by reference to company
procedure, or, if necessary, by project specific formal statements. It also reminds
disciplines of the coordination activities required as a part of interdisciplinary
coordination and minimizes missed items.

Do not include normal Fluor internal meetings, (such as interdisciplinary or


departmental) in the Scope of Services.

Calculations are noted in the Scope outline (go-by) as a reminder. The scope author
must consider that calculations are Fluor restricted, confidential information and are
not to be given to outside sources until approved by senior management. It is
identified here because of the potential extra effort-hours required when delivering
calculations.

P.E. stamped drawings are noted in the Scope outline (go-by) for scope authors to
consider the additional efforts required when providing P.E. stamping of prints.
These efforts could include, but may not be limited to the following:

Additional drawings and calculations review


Stamping and signing
Printing and shipping costs

Copyright 2008 - 2012, Fluor Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

Project Management

Guideline 000.100.0071
Date 19Apr2012
Page 8 of 8

INSTRUCTIONS FOR PREPARING A PROJECT SCOPE OF WORK

REFERENCES
General Corporate:
Practice 000.000.1000

OSR (Operating System Requirements)

Project Management:
Practice 000.100.1000

Project Management Manual (Section 2.2.2, Scope of Work)

Form 000.100.F1000

Project Requirements Checklists, which also includes:


Project / Jobsite Data Questionnaire
Basic Engineering Design Questionnaire

Practice 000.100.0070

Project Scope of Work Go-By

Attachment 01

Scope Writing Work Flow Process

ATTACHMENTS

Copyright 2008 - 2012, Fluor Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

Project Management

Guideline 000.100.0071
Date 19Apr2012
Attachment 01 Page 1 of 1

INSTRUCTIONS FOR PREPARING A SCOPE OF WORK

Scope Writing Workflow Process

Fluor Receives
Project Information
from Client

Discipline Leads draft their


"Scope of Facilities"

Disciplines review SOF drafts as a team to


identify missing info, for consistency, to
resolve conflicts and ensure completeness

Project Manager drafts the Project


Description, the General sections of the
SOF & SOS and competes the General
sections of the Project Requirements
Checklist

Team receives documents and instructions


at Scope Kickoff Meeting

Yes

Any remaining
questions of
client?

No
Discipline Leads make lists of Discovery
questions based on the SOW Outline and
Project Requirements Checklists.
Review questions together as a team.

Fluor contacts client to answer questions

Discipline Leads draft their


"Scope Of Services"

Disciplines review SOS drafts as a team


to identify missing info, for consistency,
to resolve conflicts and ensure
completeness

Yes
Disciplines, together as a team, review the
client's answers to questions

Any remaining
questions of
client?

No
Prepare cost estimates and schedules

Any remaining
questions of
client?

Yes

Review SOW, Cost Estimates and


Schedules with department managers

Issue SOW and other documents


to Client

No
Fluor team to conduct formal SOW
review with Client Team

Copyright 2008 - 2012, Fluor Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

Project Management