A REPORT ON

ACADEMIC TRIP TO BATU MAUNG PORT (MITP) AND FISHERIES RESEARCH INSTITUTE AT PULAU PINANG
ON 4 ± 5 MARCH 2010

Prepared by

R B KENNEDY ENIS BACHELOR¶S DEGREE IN MARINE TECHNOLOGY

UNIVERSITI TEKNOLOGI MARA PERLIS

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

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TITLE

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Table of Contents

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List of Figures

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Introduction

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Findings

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Recommendations

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Conclusion

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References

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LIST OF FIGURES

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TITLE

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Share in MITP Management

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Tuna Landing Area

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Cutting Process

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Cleaning Process

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Packaging Process

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R&D Project at Fisheries Research Institute

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1.0

Introduction 1.1 Background of Study On 4 and 5 March 2010, my friend and I had the opportunities to undergone an academic trip to Penang Port, Batu Maung Fisheries Port, Jabatan Laut Wilayah Utara, National Fish Health and Research Centre (NAFISH) and Fisheries Research Institute (IPP) at Penang. These academic trip were compulsory to each student of Bachelor in Marine Technology to fulfill the academic requirements under the Fishing Techniques and Operation (MAR 570) and Shipping and Port Management (MAR 510) subjects that taught by Miss Anis Sabirin bte Mohd Radzi (MAR 570) and Miss Rosnani bte Nazri (MAR 510). 1.2 Objectives The objectives of this study were: a. to view, learn and understand the operations of Batu Maung Fisheries Port, b. to view, learn and understand the studies conducted by Fisheries Research Institute (IPP), and c. to view business opportunities. 1.3 Problem Statements Following were some problems faced during the study: a. tuna fish catches were less, caused the operations of landing and packaging has became short at Batu Maung fisheries port, b. do not understand about the ³grading´ technique of tuna fish , and c. confused and do not know what task need to do, and d. sleepy

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1.4

Scope of St Thi st onl covers as following:

a. Bat Maung Fisheries Port Batu Maung Penang, and b. Fisheries Research Institute (IPP), Batu Maung Penang. 1.5 Significant of Study As a student, these kinds of activities are able to further increase the knowledge about fishing industries in Malaysia. As consequently, students can also view and assess business opportunities of this food product. Besides that, students could make a comparison on the technology of fishrelated in Malaysia with the technology in overseas. Hence, students could think and create a new technology of fish-related for improvement in Malaysia. 2.0 Findings 2.1 Batu Maung Fisheries Port Penang 2.1.1 Background Batu Maung fisheries port was managed by Malaysian International Tuna Port Sdn. Bhd (MITP) as a part of the country¶s effort to transform Malaysia into a world class tuna landing port that currently dominated by Thailand, Philippines and Indonesia. MITP took over the port from LKIM in April 2005 and was expanding to increase its handling capacity.

Malaysian International Tuna Port Sdn. Bhd. (MITP)

e baga Ke ajuan Ikan Malaysia ( KIM) 40% Shares

Bindforce Sdn. Bhd. 60% Shares

Figure 1: Shares in MIT management
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2.1.2 Facilities The Batu Maung fisheries port was a specialized port for tuna landing and handling in Malaysia and it was facilitated with a tuna management facilities. From my point of views and observations, this port did not have complete facilities for handling tuna landing and it was obsolete. It was obviously incomplete facilities when the port management has to rent a crane for lifting tuna from a fishing vessel to port¶s fish landing area.

Fi

2: Fi

landing area

2.1.3 Tuna Landing Operations The operation of tuna landing was handled by Hoom Xiang Industries Sdn. Bhd. Following were the processes of tuna landing at Batu Maung port: a. Tuna Landing The tuna landing was done at a night time to preserve its freshness because tuna¶s freshness is affected by heat. The methodology of tuna landing was used a portable crane to transfer a tuna from fishing vessel to fish¶s landing area.

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Figure 2: Tuna landing b. Cutting and Cleaning The process of cutting was used a cutter as shown in figure 3 where the cutting of fish parts was involved a caudal fin, an anal fin and a dorsal fin. Meanwhile, the process of cleaning was done by part-time workers where they will be paid amount of RM50 per job. This process was to cleaning a tuna¶s gills and tuna¶s remaining stomach.

Figure 3: Cutting process

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Figure 4: Cleaning process c. Weighting and Classification The average weight of tuna landed was between 50-55 kg, while the bigger ones can reach up to 80 kg. However, size alone does not guarantee tuna meat quality. Thus, fish classification plays a vital role in tuna marketing. The classifiers meticulously check the tuna for outside bruises and cuts before extracting the meat from the fish using a metal tube designed to be long enough to reach the different cross sections of the tuna. The extracted meat was examined for its texture, colour, smell and taste. The export-quality fish was classified as Grades A and B. Grade A tuna was exclusively sold to the international market and was usually exported whole or with heads and entrails taken out. Grade B tuna was also of export quality, but only its prime meats were exported. Some of it also goes to the high-end buyers in the domestic market like restaurants and hotels. Tuna classified as Grade C were those that go to the local market for public consumption, while some were bought by canneries and processing plants.

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d. Packaging

Figure 5: Packaging process 2.2 Tuna Prices The price of tuna was determined by factors like classification, size, season, fluctuations in supply and demand, and the operating costs. Prior to landing the fish catch, boat owners and traders were already monitoring the market price of tuna both in the local and the international markets. Such information was used as leverage in the haggle for price between buyer and seller. The price of grade A tuna prevailing at the time of this study ranged from RM 20 per kg. 2.3 Fisheries Research Institute (IPP) Penang 2.3.1 Background The Fisheries Research Institute was under the Research Division of the Department of Fisheries Malaysia. The Headquarters of the Institute was now located at Batu Maung, Penang. It was formally established on 1957 in tandem with the physical development of its premise at Gelugor, Penang. The main objective of Fisheries Research Institute was to undertake research on all aspects of fisheries resources and ecology. Later, the scope was expanded to include aquaculture.

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At present Fisheries Research Institute have 7 divisions, namely:
y y y y y y y

Marine Aquaculture Division Freshwater Aquaculture and Inland Fisheries Division Capture Fisheries Division Fish Product Division Fish Health Division Research Management and Internationalization Division Sarawak and Labuan Division

2.3.2 Research & Development Projects Following were the R&D that has been conducted by Fisheries Research Institute: FISHERY RESOURCES AND ECOSYSTEM
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Study on Benthic Ecosystem in Zone A Waters of Perlis and Kedah.

y y

Biomass of Commercial Fish and Benthos in Kedah Waters. Study on Benthic and Sub-tidal Ecosystems in the Matang Mangrove Area, Perak.

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Socio-economy Study on Fishermen on the West Coast of Peninsular Malaysia.

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Study on Red Tide Occurrences in the Coastal Waters off the Northern States of Peninsular Malaysia.

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A 24-hour Analysis of Plankton at a Fish Cage at Batu Maung, Penang.

y y

Analysis of Harmful Toxic Algae. Tagging Program for Economically Important Pelagic Species in the South China Sea and Andaman Sea.

y y y y

Fish Forecasting Project. Juvenile and Trash Excluder Device (JTEDs). Peranti Kecekapan Acetes Malaysia. Research on Artificial Reefs for Soft Bottom Areas.

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y y

Water Quality Monitoring in Aquaculture Areas. The Assessment and Development of Fisheries Resources in Sarawak: Coastal Demersal Resource Assessment with KK Manchong.

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Development of Oceanic Tuna Fishery in the South China Sea. Development of Fishing Technology for Reefs and Rough Grounds.

y y y y

Development and Management of Recreational Fishery. Research on Coral Reefs in Sarawak. Development of Fisheries Biotechnology in Sarawak. Study on Population of Seabass (Lates calcarifer) in Sungai Kilim, Langkawi.

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Monitoring of Sea Cucumber Reefs at Pulau Singa, Pulau Langkawi.

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Monitoring of Reefs Launched to Prevent the Operation of Trawlers in Waters off Cherating and Ma'daerah,and a Study on the Durability of Boat Reefs at Pulau Tioman and Pulau Tenggol.

y y

Stack of Reefballs in Pulau Layang-layang's Lagoon. Development of Information System "Marine Invertebrates of Sarawak (MloS)".

AQUACULTURE
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Mass Production of Triploid Oyster (Crassostrea iredale). Use of Poultry By-product Meal and Poultry Feather Meal to Replace the Use of Fish Meal in Formulated Feed for Cobia.

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Coral Culture Using Transplantation on a Laboratory Scale. Screening of Tiger Prawn to Produce Brood Stock Free of White Spot Virus (WSSV).

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Programme to Develop Specific Pathogen Free (SPF) Tiger Prawn (Penaeus monodon) Brood Stock.

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Improved Breeding Programme for Giant Freshwater Prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii).
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Study on the Effect of Density of Culture of White Prawn (Litopenaeus vanname) in Ponds.

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Study on Density of Zooplankton in White Prawn (Penaeus merguensis) Culture Ponds.

y y y

Culture of Seabass Larvae in Earthen Ponds. Study on Impact of Aquaculture in Sg. Merbok, Kedah. Induction of Triploidy and Culture of Triploid Oyster Larvae in Hatchery.

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Comparative Study in Growth of Triploid and Diploid Oyster Larvae in a River.

y y y y y y y y y y

Study on Suitability of Water for Mollusc Culture. Study to Isolate Algal Species from Sea Water. Effective Method for Harvesting and Storing Alga. Intensive Culture of Rotifers. Study on Ecology of Sea Cucumber. Study on Reproduction of Sea Cucumber. Nursing of Cobia Fry in Tanks. Nursing of Seabass in the Aquaoptima System. Breeding of Tiger Grouper, EpinepheJus fuscoguttatus. Improved Breeding of Tilapia through Improved Genetic Selection.

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Increasing Male to Female Ratio in Nile Tilapia by Thermal Treatment and Selective Breeding to Study Sensitivity to the Treatment.

y y

Improved Breeding of Red Tilapia. Integrating Biotechnological and Breeding Approaches for the Genetic Enhancement of the Keli Bunga (Clarias

macrocephalus).
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Monitoring of Antibiotic Residues in "SPS and the Fisheries Industry" Programme in Sarawak and a Study on the Accumulation of Chloramphenicol in the Life Cycle of Tiger Shrimps (Penaeus monodon).

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Tiger Prawn Culture using Biosecurity Techniques at Ban Merbok.

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Research on the Development of Jelly Bubbles in the Ban Merbok Aquaculture Ponds.

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Domestication of Tiger Prawn and Development of "Specific Pathogen Free" (SPF) Stock.

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Development of Banana Prawn (Penaeus merguiensis) Stock. Research on Population Genetics of Local Banana Prawn (Penaeus merguiensis).

y y

Culture of Seabass in Open Ponds. Comparative Biochemical Analysis of Wild and Domesticated Penaeus merguiensis Brood Stock.

y y

Production of Artemia Biomass. Study on Nursing of Tiger Grouper Fry in Recirculating Water Tanks.

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Effects of Hormone 17 alfa-methyltesterone on Sex Change in Giant Grouper (Epinephelus lanceolatus).

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Induced Breeding of Sea Cucumber, Gamat, in Pulau Perhentian.

y y y

Induced Breeding of Sea Cucumber, Gamat, in Hatchery. Preservation of Concentrated Green Algae. Study on Development of Microbound Diet (MBD) for Tiger Grouper (Epinephelus fuscoguttatus) Larvae.

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Study on Development and Formulation of Diet for Tiger Grouper (Epinephe/us fuscoguttatus) Brood Stock.

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Effects of Stocking Density on Growth and Survival of Tiger Grouper (Ephinephelus lanceolatus) Larvae Nursed in Tanks.

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Development of Method for the Preservation and Storage of Pure Algae.

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FISH HEALTH
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Development of Iridovirus Detection Kit in Marine Fish. Epidemiology of Viral Nervous Necrosis (VNN) Infection in Marine Fish.

y y y

Epidemiology of Koi Herpesvirus Disease (KHVD) in Perak. Disease Surveillance (Parasitology & Histopathology). Monitoring of Parasitic Diseases in Freshwater Giant Prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

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Control of Infection by Monogenean Ectoparasites in Marine Fish Cultured in Cages through Immunisation and Use of Immunovector.

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Monitoring of Pathogenic Bacteria such as Salmonella, Escherichia coli and Vibrio spp.

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VNN Epidemiology Study on Marine Fish Cultured on the East Coast of Peninsular Malaysia.

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Monitoring Water Quality and Fish Health in Three Lagoons on the East Coast of Peninsular Malaysia.

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Water Quality in Fish Kill Areas.

TURTLES AND ENDANGERED SPECIES
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Identification of Population Stocks of Sea Turtles in the Southeast Asian Region.

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Study on Detection of Multiple Paternities of Male Green Turtles at Mak Kepit Beach, Terengganu.

y y

Regional Sea Turtle Tagging Study. Expedition to Determine the Presence of Marine Mammals, Coral Reefs, Sea Grass and Seaweeds from the Waters off Lawas.

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FISH PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT
y y

Study on Quality of Tilapia Fillet. Screening Local Herbs for Extraction of Anti-microbial Compounds.

Figure 6: R&D project at Fisheries Research Institute

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Recommendations Following are some recommendations: a. Upgrading the facilities of tuna port in Malaysia As recommendation, the facilities of tuna port in Malaysia should be upgrade where the facilities of tuna port in Malaysia are very far behind when it compared to neighboring countries such as Thailand, Indonesia and Philippines. b. Improve the awareness of safety, health and environment at Batu Maung Port Malaysian International Tuna Port Sdn. Bhd. should improve the awareness of safety, health and environment at Batu Maung port. It was found that the level of safety and health amongst workers was severely. Besides that, the workers have been found to remove the waste into the shore, thus this matter will be harmful to marine life. The parties involved should enforce the laws that have been made by the parliament to prevent this kind of irresponsible act.

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Conclusion On the whole, the objectives of this academic trip have been achieved by students. The students had a taste of their own experiences, as well as, this experience and learning will be the starting point for students to venture into business soon. Tuna port in Malaysia was very behind in terms of port¶s facilities when compared with neighboring countries, namely Thailand, Indonesia and the Philippines. So that, tuna port in Malaysia should be upgrade to compete with foreign countries in which it can provide benefits to the country¶s economic. The awareness of occupational safety and health in Malaysia was. Such thing has become customary in Malaysia and it has become a bad habit by the citizens of Malaysia.

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References Campbell H. F., 2006. Tuna Resource Management: Measuring the benefits of domestic tuna processing. School of Economics, University of Queensland. Pacific Economic Bulletin. Vera C. A., and Hipolito Z., 2004. The Philippines Tuna Industries: A Profile . International Collective in Support of Fishworkers. Quezon City, Philippines. Lent R., Rogers C., and Brewster-Geisz K., 2000. Tuna Fishing, Processing and Trade: Role of the Indian Ocean. Website: http://www.fri.gov.my

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