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Asia e University

Malaysia institute 0f logistics

Intermediate logistics officer course


(Executive bachelor in logistics management)

Assignment no3

Logistics support analysis


Ltcdr hamed Alghafri
Royal Navy of Oman

Date:23 MAY 2011

Contents
Definition of logistics supply analysis.........................................................................2

Introduction................................................................................................................ 2
Level of Repair Analysis (LORA)..................................................................................3
Whole-life cost............................................................................................................ 3

Definition of logistics supply analysis


LSA is the iterative process of identifying support requirements for a new system,
especially in the early stages of system design. The main goals of LSA are to ensure
that the system will perform as intended and to influence the design for supportability
and affordability. LSA is the iterative process of identifying support requirements for a
new system, especially in the early stages of system design. The main goals of LSA are
to ensure that the system will perform as intended and to influence the design for
supportability and affordability

Introduction
The planning for ILS for a system may be contained in an Integrated Logistics Support
Plan (ILSP). ILS planning activities coincide with development of the system acquisition
strategy, and the program will be tailored accordingly. The Logistics Support Analysis
(LSA) process is tailored in accordance with the maturity of the system/equipment
design. The LSA provides a foundation for the ILS program by generating source data
and maintenance plans, which will direct other ILS elements such as training, technical
publications and provisioning1. Typical Logistic Support Analysis (LSA) tasks that are
performed are as follows:
Life Cycle Cost Analysis (LCC);
Level of Repair Analysis (LORA);
Maintenance Task Analysis (MTA);
Meantime to Repair Analysis (MTTR);
Reliability, Maintainability and Availability (RAM);
Spares (Optimization) Modelling and Analysis (SM);

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Aim
The aim of this paper is to highlight the LSA processes form the basic building block for
the maintenance management system, supply management.

Scope
This paper will concentrate on Level of Repair Analysis (LORA) and LCC as both a
fundamental tasks of Logistic Support Analysis (LSA) to achieve effective supply
support.

Level of Repair Analysis (LORA)


Level of Repair Analysis (LORA) is an analytical methodology used to determine where
an item will be replaced, repaired, or discarded based on cost considerations and
operational readiness requirements. For a complex engineering system containing
thousands of assemblies, sub-assemblies, components, organized into several levels of
indenture and with a number of possible repair decisions, LORA seeks to determine an
optimal provision of repair and maintenance facilities to minimize overall life-cycle costs.
Logistics personnel examine not only the cost of the part to be replaced or repaired but
all of the elements required to make sure the job is done correctly and cost effectively.
This analysis can be implemented as a standalone analysis, but is generally integrated
in the Logistics Support Analysis activity on an iterative basis to determine an optimal
provision of repair and maintenance facilities to minimize overall life-cycle costs.

Whole-life cost
Whole-life cost is one of the elements of the LSA which is often used for option
evaluation when procuring new assets and for decision-making to minimise whole-life
costs throughout the life of an asset. It is also applied to comparisons of actual costs for
similar asset types and as feedback into future design and acquisition decisions.
The primary benefit is that costs which occur after an asset has been constructed or
acquired, such as maintenance, operation, disposal, become an important consideration
in decision-making. Previously, the focus has been on the up-front capital costs of
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creation or acquisition, and organizations may have failed to take account of the longerterm costs of an asset. It also allows an analysis of business function interrelationships.
Low development costs may lead to high maintenance or customer service costs in the
future.