You are on page 1of 16
KANS2024 Petra Berg r92044 Ibrahim Yigit Kolbasi t94792 Elena Ksenofontova t94793

KANS2024

Petra Berg r92044 Ibrahim Yigit Kolbasi t94792 Elena Ksenofontova t94793

Introduction

  • The global energy sector is responsible for about two-thirds of total greenhouse gas emissions and this amount is increasing faster than for any other sector.

  • Combating climate change is a vital issue for each country on our planet, as we only have one atmosphere.

  • Embracing renewable energy and adapting ambitious energy saving measures is the best way to achieve emission reductions.

  • “There is a time, when panic is an appropriate response.“(Eugene Kleiner, 2007).And we reached that time.

  • KWh = Kilowatt-hour = 1000 Wh

  • MWh = Megawatt-hour = 1000 KWh

  • GWh= Gigawatt-hour = Million KWh

  • TWh = Terawatt-hour = Billion KWh

FINLANDS ENERGY CONSUMPTION BY SOURCE 2009 Total: 1 330 PJ (31.8 Mtoe) Final:1 086 PJ (25.9
FINLANDS ENERGY CONSUMPTION BY SOURCE 2009
Total: 1 330 PJ (31.8 Mtoe)
Final:1 086 PJ (25.9 Mtoe)
WOOD FUELS
OIL
25%
& PEAT
25%
RUS 87% NOR 10%
KCH, DEN, LATV ~3%
~1,5%
10%
RUS 100%
NET IMPORT
ELECTRICITY
3%
12%
RUS, POL, AUS, PRC,
South America ~ 100%
~1,5%
19%
CAN, AUS ~100% Import
FINAL CONSUMPTION BY SECTOR:
3%
Industry 47%
Space Heating 23%
Transportation 17%
Other 13%

FINLAND

  • Electricity Production in 2009 Gross 72 062 GWh Total 69.208 GWh

  • Electricity Consumption 2009 Gross 81.293 GWh 15.1 MWh/capita

  • 85% covered by domestic production and the remaining 15% by imported electricity. Total Supply 84.668 GWh

  • Import (GWh): Sweden 1 855, Norway 112, Russia 11 708 and Estonia 1 785. Total 15 460 GWh

  • Export (GWh): Sweden 3 162, Norway 126 and Estonia 87. Total 3 375 GWh

Electricity Production 2009 Finland

0 16 % 19 % 11 % 26 % 11 % 15 %
0
16 %
19 %
11 %
26 %
11 %
15 %

0.3%

Hydro

Hydro

Wind

Wind

Nuclear

Nuclear

Net import of Electricity

Net import of Electricity

Consensing power

Consensing power

CHP Industry

CHP Industry

CHP district heat

CHP district heat

Hydro Wind Nuclear Net import of Electricity Consensing power CHP Industry CHP district heat

FINLAND

  • In 2009, Finland's crude oil imports were 11.5 million tons, the total

value of Finnish crude oil and oil products imports was euro 5.4 billion and exports euro 2.7 billion.

  • Total Finnish consumption of natural gas was 4.1 billion cubic

metres.

  • Total installed wind power capacity in Finland is 197 MW, 130 wind turbines.

  • Finland has about 120 electricity companies and 400 power plants with a total installed capacity of 16. 703 GWh

  • 207 are hydropower plants, total installed capacity 316 MW)

  • The electricity production is “spread out” and quite diverse which helps secure availability.

FINLAND

  • Greenhouse gas emissions in Finland amounted to 66.4 Mt of CO2 equivalents in 2009. Compared with 2008 emissions decreased by six per cent.

  • Finnish energy policy rests on three fundamentals: energy,

economy and the environment. Securing energy supply,

competitive energy prices and meeting the EU’s common

Energy and Climate goals are core elements. Another key principle is the integration of other forms of sustainable development, and environmental goals, with the energy

economy

  • Long term climate and Energy Strategy in 2008. The strategy follows the EU emission goals about energy efficiency and growth of renewable energy.

RUSSIA

  • Currently, the share of thermal generation is about 70% of the total electricity production in the country. The total installed capacity of cogeneration units is 154.7 GW. The main types of fuel for thermal power plants are gas and coal.

  • Electricity consumption 6,97MWh/capita

RUSSIA  Currently, the share of thermal generation is about 70% of the total electricity production

RUSSIA

  • Influence on economy:

All of the extractive industries in Russia together

constitute 33% of Russia’s GDP and account for 60% of

Russia's federal budget revenues. These natural

resources have been and will continue to be a major driving force of the Russian economy.

RUSSIA

  • World's first nuclear power plant was built it was in

Russia in 1954 (Obninsk, Kaluga region).

  • 10 plants, 31 nuclear reactor total.( 4 th place after USA, France and Japan).

  • Nuclear power plants produce 12% of electricity. United States (20%), Germany (over 30%), France (more than 65%).

  • 163.3 billion kWh/year

RUSSIA

Renewable sources:

  • - 1 st solar power plant started operating in 2010

  • - 5 geothermal power plants 450 million kWh/year

  • - 102 hydro power plants165 billion kWh/year

  • - Installed capacity of wind power in the country is about 16.5 MW, the total output does not exceed 25 million kWh / year

RUSSIA

  • Reducing greenhouse emissions by 25-40% by 2020

and 50-80% by 2050(Kyoto protocol)

  • Implementing renewable energy, energy saving and

energy efficient technologies

  • Government support of use renewable energy sources

  • To facilitate the introduction of the tax system which will support “green energy” market development

TURKEY

Sources for Energy Supply

98% of petroleum and 91% of Natural Gas are being imported.

9.3% 31 % 28.8% 30.9%
9.3%
31 %
28.8%
30.9%
  • Coal

  • Natural Gas

Both public and private companies work on energy production.

Electricity:

Turkey produced 194 TWh total electricity in 2009.

Petroleum

  • The consumption is 1,85 MWh/capita.

  • Turkey has a total installed capacity of 44,76 GW electicity in 2009.

Hydro and other Renewable Sources

2009 Turkish Installed Capacity (MW)

65,54% of the capacity is coming from Thermal Plants.

There are 19 of them

868.8 14553.3 29339.1
868.8
14553.3
29339.1

Natural Gas (45,9%), coal (18,4%), imported Coal (6,9%), liquid fuels (2,5%) are sources used in Thermal Reactors.

  • THERMAL

Hydro-Power Reactors has the second place in the

  • capacity. (32,51%)

HYDRO

GEOTHERM.WIN

106 Hydro-Power Plants and new ones are planned to

  • D be constructed.

Wind power (1,35%) , geothermal and biogas (0.47%) are supplementary materials.

TURKEY

  • Renewable Energy sector for

electricity production as wind and geothermal energy as well as biogas are developing in a high speed. There are enough

resources but use of them are

not wide enough yet. Consumption of coal

percentage is planned to be

decreased.

  • By 2020, a new nuclear reactor is planned to be opened by Russian partnership. 5% of

total electric production will be

sourced from nuclear technology.

Consumption of Energy by Sector 2009 45 % 40 % 35 % 30 % 25 %
Consumption of Energy by
Sector 2009
45
%
40
%
35
%
30
%
25
%
20
%
15
%
10
%
Percentages
5
%
0
%

Turkey’s CO 2 emission level

is 253 millions of tons in

2009.

TURKEY

  • Import and Export of Electricity as a trading issue.

  • Export to Syria with 750 MW and to Iraq with 230 MW.

  • Import from Turkmenistan on two lines, 70 MW and 100 MW respectively.

  • Both export and import to countries such as Azerbaijan (100 MW), Georgia (150 MW), Bulgaria (two lines, 700 MW and 550 MW respectively) and Greece (100-180 MW).

  • Increasing demand on energy as the country. Above the 7% GDP growth rate annualy.

  • Future policy is on the renewable sources. The aim is to increase the share to 30% by 2023. 10.000 MW for wind, 300 Mwe for geothermal and additional small hydro plants

with 5.000 MW capacity.

  • 1 dollar investment on more efficient electrical equipment brings 3.5 dollars of supply investment saving.

  • 45 GW is today’s capacity but 56 GW more will be needed by 2020. This means 125 billion dollars investment.

Conclusions

  • We have to make it economic , so that all people and

all nations will have a profitable outcome .

  • Switching towards renewable sources is a good way

to achieve sustainable economy.

  • Climate change performance index 2011

Conclusions  We have to make it economic , so that all people and all nations
Conclusions  We have to make it economic , so that all people and all nations

http://www.germanwatch.org/klima/ccpi11.pdf

THANK YOU!!