You are on page 1of 15

SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN

2011 – 2015
Prepared by:
LUZVIMINDA Z. LABIS, CE Ph. D.

INTRODUCTION
The Mat-I (Naawan) National High School Teaching Staff and community stakeholder
s through its teamwork and collaborated efforts have formulated a Five (5) Year
School Improvement Plan.
This is a document that came out based on the formulated Vision and Mission that
serves as a guiding principle in making the school adopt with different technol
ogies that would cater to the needs of students and teachers towards quality edu
cation.
The intervention strategies and activities lined out in the plan to guide the sc
hool and community in addressing the alarming problems such as low academic perf
ormance, upgrading the capabilities and lack of commitment of teachers and admin
istrator and lack of school-community partnership.
Thus, we enjoined hand in hand in making secondary education interesting, effect
ive and functional and having happy experiences that serves as the venue for uni
ty, peace and progress for global competitive world.

COMMITMENT
We, the primary stakeholders of Mat-I (Naawan) National High School ackn
owledged the efforts being made by the school to bring about improvement in stud
ent performance. We believed that this Five-Year School Improvement Plan (SIP) i
s the means through which these improvements are most likely to occur. Hence, we
commit ourselves toward the implementation of the programs and activities under
scored in this plan.

MEDADO V. SALCEDO
Faculty President
WILFREDO A. JABINES
Faculty Vice President

QUINLAN R. MARIBUHOC
Faculty Secretary

AMIE A. ALMIÑE
Faculty Treasurer

RUELYN M. PADEROG
Faculty Auditor

AMOR A. EMBONE
Faculty PIO

EVANGELINE P. ALIA
Faculty Social Managers

JOSELYN O. MOLEJON
Faculty Sgt.-at-Arms

JANIT A. LLANITA
Faculty Sgt.-at-Arms

RUDY M. SALUTA
School Watchman

LUZVIMINDA Z. LABIS, CE, Ph.D.
Head Teacher III
School Head

I. STATEMENT OF SCHOOL VISION – MISSION
Vision:
Mat-i (Naawan) National High School aims to develop highly competent, discipline
d, productive and peace-loving graduates capable of responding to the ever chang
ing demands of society.
Mission:
Guided by this vision, M(N)NHS earnestly endeavors to be a center of ins
truction that molds the youth to become academically and vocationally competent,
God-fearing and Peace-oriented individuals living in a healthy environment.
School Logo

II. COMMUNITY AND SCHOOL PROFILE
A. Community Profile
Mat-i is considered to be the biggest barangay of Naawan, a third class municipa
lity in the province of Misamis Oriental. The latest Barangay Nutrition Scholar
(BNS) survey shows that it has a total of 402 households and a population of app
roximately 2000. The barangay is basically an agricultural area, hence, farming
is the main source of livelihood of every household
Mat-i (Naawan) National High School is located in a valley of Mat-i, an interior
barangay in the municipality of Naawan, Misamis Oriental. It has a total land a
rea of 2.534 hectares. However, a “dead” creek traversed at the center of the sc
hool site. It is 6.5 kilometers away from the town proper but can be reached by
all types of land transportation. It serves 420 students coming from Mat-i, as w
ell as from Poblacion and from the seven other surrounding barangays.
B. Brief History of M(N)NHS
It was a big dream of the people of Mat-i and its nearby barangays that a second
ary school will be built in their place to give the youth of school age the oppo
rtunity to pursue higher education considering the family’s poor economic status
which became a hindrance for them to send their children to school in other tow
ns.
Years later, that dream became a reality through the joint efforts of Mat-i Bara
ngay Council headed by Brgy. Capt. Benito S. Waga, with the assistance of Mayor
Erlinda G. Niere and Mrs. Lorna B. Dulay, Naawan Central School Principal, who w
ere instrumental in the completion of the requirements of opening a high school.
It was in the year 1995 when a four-classroom building worth P920, 000.00 was co
nstructed through the CDF of former Congressman Victorino Chavez on the lot amou
nting to P300,000.00 acquired through the PSBF under the administration of forme
r Governor Vicente Emano and the late former Mayor Clemente Lim.
The school was opened in 1996 as an annex of Initao National Comprehensive High
School with Mr. Feliculo Japona as the School-In-charge. There were 109 students
who enrolled in the first year.
In the ensuing year (SY 1997 – 1998), second year was opened and the enr
olment increased to 239 students. It was also during this school year, February
27, 1998 to be exact, that the school obtained its independent status by virtue
of Republic Act No. 8574 and operates in its present name- Mat-i (Naawan) Nation
al High School.
The third curriculum was opened the following school year (1998 – 1999) with a t
otal enrolment of 375 students. The following year, 1999 – 2000, a complete four
-year curriculum was offered with its first batch of 104 graduates produced at t
he end of the school year.
Mat-i (Naawan) National High School was born out of hard work, sacrifices and be
nevolence of the prime movers and others who in one way or another had contribut
ed and helped the improvement of both physical facilities and academic developme
nt of the school and its populace. Without them, M(N)NHS is just a dream.
In its 11th year of educating the youth through secondary education, M(N)NHS has
proven enough that being recognized does not need to be well established but it
needs to be dedicated and true to uphold its mission towards educational excell
ence.

C. School Profile (Baseline)
1. Student Development
School Year
Enrolment
Survival
Rate
Drop-out
Rate
Failure
Rate
Promotion
Rate
Graduation
Rate
Completion
Rate Teacher-Student
Ratio
M F Total
2003-2004 288 257 545 72.22 1.09 11.64 88.07 83.15
58.73 1:42
2004-2005 290 268 558 56.50 0.54 08.96 85.37 81.00
45.76 1:43
2005-2006 283 246 529 46.63 0 09.88 90.12 91.56
46.06 1:41
2006-2007 261 227 488 50.00 0 08.50 91.50 89.58
46.94 1:41
2007-2008 205 199 404 51 0 8.25 91.85 93.00
64.95 1:37
2008-2009 93 156 349 98 0 7.45 92.45 97.00
92.00 1:36
2009-2010 209 141 350

NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENT TEST RESULTS
Second Year
Subject 2005 – 2006 2006 – 2007 2007 – 2008 2008 – 2009
Math 30.04 26.11 41.85 49.45
English 30.58 31.93 26.82 59.60
Science 28.72 26.82 43.21 54.60
Filipino 22.98 35.67 44.95 55.82
AP 25.41 31.05 47.15 44.68
MPS 27.58 31.11 45.19 52.85
2. Teachers’ Academic Preparation

NAME OF TEACHERS
EDUC. WHEN & WHERE OBTAINED
MAJOR
MINOR
ADVANCED
CREDITS
IN MAJOR
CIVIL SERVICE STATUS ANNUAL SALARY
EXAM PASSED R.E.P.E.
ALIA, EVANGELINE P.
BSIED
MSU-IIT 2000
H.E.
NONE Units in M.A. Ed.Ad.
LET
PERM.
P 173,706.00

ALMIÑE, AMIE A.
BSE BSC, Manticao 1997
ENGLISH
NONE Units in M.A. Ed.Ad.
LET
PERM.
P 173,706.00

MARIBUHOC, QUINLAN R. BS Marine Bio
BSE MSU
BSU
Marine Bio
MATH
NONE Units in M.S.
Ed. Gen Sci.
LET
PERM.
P170,376.00
EMBONE, AMOR A.
BPE
MSU-IIT 1998
P.E.
NONE Units in M.A. Ed.Ad.
LET
PERM.
P180,364.00

LLANITA, JANIT A.
BSE
MSU-IIT 1990
BIO
NONE Units in M.S.
Ed. Gen Sci.
LET
PERM.
P170,376.00

JABINES, WILFREDO R. BSE/
BS Mar. Bio. BSC,Manticao 1999
MSU-Naawan 1998 ENGLISH/ BIOLOGY
NONE M.A. Eng
(CAR), Units in M.S.
Ed. Gen Sci.
LET
PERM.
P185,664.00
MAGLASANG, JOSELYN M.
BSE BSC, MOGCHS 1998
P.E.
NONE Units in M.A. Ed.Ad.
LET
PERM.
P180,364.00

PADEROG, RUELYN M.
AB/ M.A. DJMEF, Surigao Norte 1990
ENGLISH
NONE
M.A. Ed.Ad.
LET
PERM.
P177,300.00

SALCEDO, MEDADO V.
BSIED
MSU-IIT 1997
ELECTRICITY
NONE Units in M.S.
Ed. Gen Sci.
PBET
PERM.
P180,364.00

3. Physical Plant Development
Data as of 31 August 2009
SY 2008-2009
SUMMARY REPORT ON UPDATED DATA ON INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA AND EQUIPMENT

Computer Set
Computer Printer
TV Sets Number of
Mimeo-
graphing Machine
Fax Machine
Copier
Typewriter
Number
Source
Number
Source
Number
Source
Number
Source
Number
Source
Number
Source
Number
Source
26 A 3 1 A 0 0
0 1 A
1 B 1
Code for the Sources:
A - Nat’l Budget D - Civic Org./ NGO G - CDF
B - LGU/LSB E - ABS-CBN H - DOST/DTI
C - PTCA/ School Project F - PA-PROBE I – Others (personal, et
c.)

EXISTING NUMBER OF ROOMS IN THE SCHOOL
Instructional Rooms
Used as academic classrooms Used as Science Laboratories
Used as HE rooms Used as I.A./ Workshops Used as computer rooms Not curr
ently used Total instructional rooms
8 2 1 1 1 0 13
Non-instructional Rooms
Used as Libraries
Used as Clinic
Used as Canteen
Used as offices
Other uses Not currently used Total non- instructional rooms
1 0 0 1 1 0 4
EXISTING CLASSROOM FURNITURE & NUMBER OF TOILETS

Classroom furniture for students
Desks Sets of chairs and tables
Armchairs
Number of Toilets
Girls
(toilet bowl) Boys Shared
(girls and boys)
(urinal) (toiletbowl)
0 0 389 0 0 0 10

4. School-Community Partnership
With the provision of the parents, the school is able to raise an annual PTCA Fu
nd of more or less P18, 000.00.
The school was able to acquire 1 unit of multicab, a 200-m. polyethylene pipe an
d a fund of P100, 000.00 for the fabrication and installation of window grills f
rom the Brgy. LGU. It also is a recipient of 10 units of computer and 1 service
provider from the GILAS Foundation and another 4 units and a service provider fr
om the USAID. A 2- classroom building through PSBF was also constructed for the
school’s use.
Another 11 units of computer and a 3 in 1 printer was acquired by the school thr
ough the donation of Department of Education.

The following is a list of those who exerted much effort for the improvement of
the school:

General PTCA Officers 2009 -2010
President - Mr. Adolfo dela Peña
Vice President - Mr. Edwin Jagonal
Secretary - Mrs. Amie Hambre
Treasurer - Mr. Rudy Saluta
Auditor - Mr. Robinson Barrientos
Committee Chairmen for 2009-2010
Mr. Medado V. Salcedo - Committee on Program and Projects
Ms. Quinlan R. Maribuhoc - Committee on Finance
Mrs. Amie A. Almiñe - Committee on Election
Mrs. Ruelyn M. Paderog - Committee on Audit
Mrs. Evangeline P. Alia - Committee on Ways and Means
Board of Directors 2009 – 2010
Mr. Mario Mendez
Mrs. Andrea Bagas
Mrs. Emma Ratunil
Barangay. Mat-i Officials 2007-2010
Hon. Juancho A. Macalong - Brgy. Ca
ptain
Hon. Benito S. Waga - Brgy. Co
uncilor
Hon. Emma Consolacion C. Roja - Brgy. Councilor
Hon. Rene Catiil - Brgy. Co
uncilor
Hon. Adelaido Tanque - Brgy. Councilor
Hon. Rosie D. Paderog - Brgy. Councilor
Hon. Ruel D. Mabaylan - Brgy. Councilor
Hon. Dario Medio - Brgy. Co
uncilor
Hon. Bemar Macalong - SK Chairman
Elected Municipal Officials
Hon. Dennis L. Roa - Municipa
l Mayor
Hon. Dan E. Bombeo - Municipal Vice Mayor
Hon. Jaime C. Roa - SB Member
Hon. Ike L. Suyo - SB Member
Hon. Lea G. Buhian - SB Member
Hon. Elisa Gutierrez - SB Member
Hon. Errol C. Dadole - SB Member
Hon. Henry C. Mendez - SB Member
Hon. Bernardino M. Ratunil - SB Member

5. Resource Generation and Fund Management
The school has financial support from the LGU, SEF, PTCA, and MOOE from the DepE
d Division. It is also sustained by donations from the private sector and other
DepEd project funds. It also has its own Income Generating Project, like the amo
unt taken from its agricultural products, for school maintenance.

TARGETS BY DEPARTMENT
A. Mathematics Department
1. Increase the students’ achievement by 5% per year.
2. Provide students activity to improve their attitude towards mathematics
and study habits.
3. Integrate technology in classroom instruction
B. Science Department
1. Increase the MPS in Science in all year levels by at least 2% per year.
2. Reduce the number of repeaters in Science by 2%
3. Increase by 5% the number of teachers who advocate ICT integration
4. Increase by 5% accessibility to internet facilities
5. Increase by 5% the number of teachers who prepares good lesson with app
ropriate instructional materials
C. English Department
1. Reduce the number of non-readers in English
2. Increase the number of students who excel in English co-curricular activ
ities
3. Increase the number of students who are proficient in English.
D. Filipino Department
1. Reduce the number of non-readers in Filipino
2. Increase the number of students who will participate in co-curricular ac
tivities
E. MAKABAYAN Department
1. Araling Panlipunan
a. Increase the academic performance of students by 5%
b. Improve comprehension skills of students
c. Identify readers and non-readers and separate the later for further instructi
on in reading
d. Minimize the number of students who are low achievers
2. T.L.E.
a. Refine acquired skills in different livelihood education program
b. Encourage being product-rather than time conscious
c. Inculcate the value of frugality as well as towards work
3. Values Education
a. Develop committed values education teachers who can stand as living witnesses
of what they are teaching and can reflect moral values in their daily lives
b. Nourish the moral and spiritual life of the teachers especially those handlin
g values education subjects.
F. Student Services
1. Educate students on the importance of health to their body especially th
e practice of proper personal hygiene.
2. 65% of the students should be free of common ailments
3. Increase the number of students who successfully passed the college entr
ance exam.
4. Increase the number of poor graduates who go to college
5. Increase the number of students who perform well in college
6. Decrease the number of reported cased of student’s misbehavior
7. Increase the number of parents who register satisfaction on the safety o
f their children while in school
G. Administrative Division
1. Achieve 0% reported cases of teacher’s misconduct
2. Increase by 2% per year the number of employees promoted to next higher
position
3. Decrease cases of teachers’ tardiness and absences by 5% per year
4. Conduct/avail of INSET to at least 95% of all the teachers
5. Data management achieved by 75%
7. Increase linkages with stakeholders by 10% per year
III. PROBLEMS AND NEEDS ASSESSMENT
A. Existing Problems B. Causes
1. Low Academic Achievement
of students • Poor comprehension
• Inadequate textbooks and other IM’s
• Inadequate skills of teachers in the development of ins
tructional materials
• Poor assessment tools and follow-up
• Poor economic status of students’ family
• Teachers lack of knowledge in addressing individual differences.
• Failure to acknowledge the multiple intelligences of the learners.
• Poor parents’ support
• Poor study habits
• Absenteeism
• Cutting classes
• Too tired to listen/participate during classes from work
outside the classroom.
• Lack of interest to go to school.
2. Prevalence of slow readers
and non- numerates. • Poor study habits
• Less monitoring of teachers and parents
• Drills are seldom conducted
• Lack of time to conduct remedial class.
• Students lack interest to attend remedial classes.
• Remedial instruction not given emphasis and
seldom monitored
• Drill on basic mathematics facts/reading skills
seldom conducted
• Negative attitude towards school works
• Mismatch of teachers’ teaching style and students’
learning style
• Unmindful teachers
3. Lacks mastery on the subject
Taught • Teaching subjects not a major.
• Inadequate materials for textbooks as well as
• reference materials especially in TLE, Mapeh, Filipino
• and Araling Panlipunan.
4. Security of the School
Properties.
• Incomplete perimeter fence.
• Absence of security grills on some of the school buildings.
5. Delayed Assessment Reports * Culture of the school
* Ineffective instructional supervision
6. Poor technology integration * Negative attitude towards in
structional technology
* Lack of training on ICT integration
7. Low commitment of
some teachers • Lack of mechanism in giving awards and incentive
s
• Ineffective instructional supervision
• Teachers’ incompetence on effective teaching strategies
and experiences
* Lack of training and experiences related to teaching
8. Deteriorating moral values of students • Exposure to unguided mas
s media and technology
• Lack of parental guidance (absentee/working parents)
• Exposure to different vices
• Indifferent teachers
9. Students’ poor working
habits • Poverty (lack of resources)
• Laziness
• Lack of parental guidance
• Lack of good models at home and in school
• Poor teacher supervision
• Lack of motivation /rewards for good deeds
III. GOALS/OBJECTIVES/TARGETS
GOALS OBJECTIVES TARGETS
1. To enhance the implementation of a comprehensive curriculum relevant to
the learners’ need and abilities, providing a wide range of opportunities for th
e discovery of their hidden talents and empower them to become productive, self
reliant, academically and morally developed and God-fearing elements of society.
2. To increase the Mean Percentage Scores in all subject areas in all year
level by 5% per school year. a. To improve learning outcomes in all learning
areas.

b. To sustain and intensify the implementation of schools’ Reading Program and R
emedial Classes in Mathematics. * Establish a baseline data in all subject areas
as a basis for planning and designing as effective remedial activity.
* Students with reading deficiencies shall have been identified and categorized
into different levels by the end of July.
* To reduce the number of slow readers and non-numerates by 50% every school yea
r.

3. To provide a comprehensive curriculum that caters for the individual needs an
d abilities of all students and supports their academic and personal development
. a. To develop program for children with reading difficulties in First an
d Second Curriculum levels.
* Students with reading difficulties will have been identified and class
ified and placed on reading enhancement program by the end of August.
4. To establish personnel/policies that will enhance collaborative effort in imp
lementation of the school improvement plan. a. To ensure professional develo
pment is available to all teachers.
b. To maximize school-based INSET for school year 2009 – 2010. * All teachers h
ave undergone trainings and workshops according to their expertise and needs.
* School-based INSET shall be conducted once a quarter.
5. To support the professional development and capacitate teachers competence to
encourage their positive contribution in academic performance and decision maki
ng. a. To encourage teachers teaching non-majors undergo certificate trainin
g courses. * Train teachers teaching non-major subject.
6. To develop a positive stimulating environment, where mutual respect is demons
trated between students, teachers and parents. a. To improve the social climate
of the school where parents, teachers and stakeholders co-exist harmoniously an
d cooperatively.
b. To provide parents with strategies to develop the social skills of their chil
dren. * Responsible parenting program conducted at the end of October.
7. Maintain enough appropriations to sustain the school’s physical and financial
resources giving more consideration to the immediate needs for learners’ develo
pment. a. To create a school multi-media center for the information and communi
cation technology program.
b. To design a plan for an effective data management for references and reportin
g purposes. * A workable plan for effective data management will be establis
hed before the end of the first semester.

8. To maintain and develop the school’s physical and financial resources to supp
ort students learning. a. To improve efficiency of available equipment and inst
ruments to enhance teaching-learning process.
b. To optimize opportunities for students to use reading materials in the librar
y. * Appraised equipments every end of the year.
* Functional facilities
* 1:1 ratio of reading materials to students every year.
9. To establish a strong school community relation through cooperative integrati
on for the success of the projects. a. To improve parents involvement and su
pport for academic and co-curricular development of the students.
b. To gain support from LGU and NGOs for the realization school projects and pro
grams.
c. To increase library resources and maximize its utilization by students and te
achers.
* Conference with the homeroom PTA will be conducted at least once a sem
ester.
* Parents will be informed about their children’s performance every grading peri
od.
10.To provide safe, well-equipped, well-structured classroom and good relation t
oward students and co-teachers. a. To improve students’ academic achievement lev
el.
b. To decrease the drop-out and retention rate.
c. To develop teaching aids that will facilitate the learning of the students.
d. To use the varied teaching strategies. * Increase the Post test in all
subject areas to 75%.
* Make every student be in instruction level by end of the school year.
* Construct two (2) sets of Instructional materials.
* Adopt other teaching strategies.
11. To provide safe, well-equipped, well-structured classroom and good relation
toward students and co-teachers. a. To implement and enforce the school r
ules and regulations.
b. To ensure that cleanliness inside and outside the classroom is maintained.
* Implement the rules and regulations of the school.
* Maintain the cleanliness of the classroom and the garbage should be properly d
isposed.
12. To implement the mathematics curriculum relevant to the needs and abilities
of the students to empower them and become self productive, self-reliant, academ
ically and morally developed citizens of the society. a. To improve students’
achievement level in mathematics.
b. To establish sustainable activities/programs in mathematics that will help st
udents at risk.
c. To prepare teaching aids /materials that will facilitate the learning of the
students in mathematics. * Establish a baseline data in mathematics as a
basis in designing an effective remedial activity/program.
* Increase post test in mathematics to 75%.
* Construct two (2) sets of instruction materials in mathematics every grading p
eriod.
13. To seek professional growth a. To apply the knowledge acquired from the trai
ning/seminars attended to maximize students’ learning.
b. To enroll on post graduate studies or any specialized training for profession
al advancement. * Attend summer classes and all required seminars or training li
ke INSET.
14. To increase the computer literacy rate among teachers and students. a. To ke
ep abreast with their contemporaries in the filed of teaching-learning specially
through the use of ICT.
b. To encourage teachers to incorporate the use of technology in their everyday
lessons. * Attend basic computer literacy trainings.
* Offer computer literacy to all secondary students.

IV. IMPLEMENTATION PLAN/INTERVENTIONS
(See Separate Sheets)

V. MONITORING AND EVALUATION PLAN
Tools Frequency Analysis of Findings
1. Periodic Examination Once every Grading Period • Report o
n the list of honor students.
• Report on the list of students with failing marks.
2. NCAE, NAT, RAT & DAT Once a year • Rating report on the ach
ievement rate
3. Pre-Post test Once a year
• Achievement Rate
4. Co-curricular areas in the participation of contests (athletics, STEP, P
RESSCON, MTAP, etc.) Year round • List of winners who qualified to
higher competition.
VI. COMMUNICATION PLAN, DOCUMENTATION & REPORTING TO THE STAKEHOLDERS
A. Communication Plan to Stakeholders
1. General PTCA Assembly
2. Report Cards
3. Terminal Report
B. Documentation
In every PTCA Assembly, be it general or homeroom, agenda and parents’ attendanc
e are recorded. Terminal Report is then submitted.
Records of the meetings and pictures will be kept to support the activities perf
ormed.
C. Schedule and Plan for End-of-Year Reporting to Stakeholders
A General PTCA Assembly is scheduled to take place somewhere every class opening
for acquaintance with the school policies, rules and regulations, and school ye
ar-end for final evaluation of students’ performance during the curriculum year
wherein report cards are shown.
Aside from the public assembly, report cards are also shown to parents after eve
ry grading period to determine the success of targeted area for improvement. Stu
dents’ activity notebooks are also shown.
VII. SIGNATORIES
To sustain Mat-i (Naawan) National High School’s existence, the school h
as to innovate the plan to continuously uphold its mission and vision towards ed
ucational excellence. This improvement plan serves as a road map or the means of
improvement and development which the school hopes to realize within a span of
three years.

MARJUN A. ANIÑON
President, SSG
EVANGELINE P. ALIA
Auditor, Teacher’s Association

MEDADO V. SALCEDO
President, Teacher’s Association

RUDY M. SALUTA
Representative, Religious Sector

AMIE HAMBRE
President, PTCA

ROSIE D. PADEROG
Chairman, Committee on Education

ADOLFO DELA PEÑA
President, PTA JUANCHO A. MACALONG
Brgy. Captain/ Co- Chair, SGC

LUZVIMINDA Z. LABIS, CE, Ph.D.
Secondary School Head
Chairman ,SGC
Reviewed by:

ELENA T. ABREA
ES – I, District Adviser
FLORA B. ESCALONA
ES – I, SBM Coordinator
Recommending Approval:

MARIO A. BASALO, Ph.D.
Assistant Schools Division Superintendent

APPROVED:

SINFOROSA A. GUÑARES, CE, Ph.D., CESO IV
Schools Division Superintendent