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BLUE BERET

50th Anniversary

Souvenir Edition

I have no doubt that, during your stay


in Cyprus, you will all serve the United
Nations with the discipline, restraint and
compassion which the peoples of the
world have come to expect from all
those who work for the United Nations
Message from U Thant
Secretary-General of the United Nations
The Blue Beret, Issue No. 1
Monday, 20 April 1964

BLUE BERET
The Magazine of the United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus

50th Anniversary

Souvenir Edition

Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon walks the Green Line in Old Town Nicosia during his visit to the island from 31 January to 2 February 2010.

Today marks the fiftieth anniversary of the establishment of the


United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP).
On 4 March 1964, the Security Council, by its resolution
186 (1964), mandated UNFICYP to contribute to a return
to normal conditions following violence and bloodshed between
the Greek Cypriot and Turkish Cypriot communities in Cyprus.
Over the past fifty years, UNFICYP has played a crucial role
in preventing a recurrence of fighting and contributing to the
resolution of issues that affect the everyday lives of Cypriots
across the island.
On this special occasion, I wish to express my gratitude to
the 32 countries that have contributed either troops or police
or both to the Mission and their peacekeepers, but also
pay tribute to the 184 peacekeepers who lost their lives in
support of peace in Cyprus.
I am confident that this fiftieth anniversary will provide
much needed impetus to the ongoing negotiations for a
comprehensive settlement of the long-lasting Cyprus problem.
I trust that in the period ahead, both sides, with support
from the United Nations, will strive for such a comprehensive
settlement so that Cyprus may be united again.
Statement by the Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon
on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the establishment
of the United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP)

Pt. Eddie Skanshus of the Danish Contingent on sentry duty at OP Loutros, Lefka, Cyprus, 1 May 1973.

CONTENTS
FOREWORD
Lisa M. Buttenheim, Special Representative of the Secretary-General in Cyprus and Chief of Mission

THE BLUE BERET


Beginnings: A look back with the first editor of UNFICYPs iconic magazine ..................................... 11

A FORCE FOR PEACE


1964 - 1973 ................................................................................................................................. 13

BUFFER ZONE: A NEW REALITY


1974 - 1983 ................................................................................................................................. 27

MAINTAINING THE STATUS QUO


1984 - 1993 ................................................................................................................................. 37

A CHANGING FORCE
1994 - 2003 ................................................................................................................................. 43

CROSSINGS
2004 - 2013 ................................................................................................................................. 49

UNFICYP AT FIFTY
2014 ............................................................................................................................................... 57

IN MEMORIAM
UNFICYP TROOP AND POLICE CONTRIBUTING COUNTRIES
SECRETARY-GENERAL APPOINTMENTS TO CYPRUS
& FORCE COMMANDERS

SRSG Lisa Buttenheim on a familiarization tour in Sector 4 shortly after her arrival at UNFICYP, September 2010. To her left is Mr. Wlodek Cibor,
UNFICYPs long-serving Senior Adviser.

FOREWORD
LISA M. BUTTENHEIM, SPECIAL REPRESENTATIVE
OF THE SECRETARY-GENERAL IN CYPRUS
AND UNFICYP CHIEF OF MISSION

In this 50th anniversary year of the United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus, I am honoured to pen the foreword to
this rich and informative account of our presence on the island over the last five decades. My tenure here, since August
2010, follows on the back of the dedicated efforts of twenty-one previous Special Representatives of the Secretary-General
and UNFICYP Chiefs of Mission in Cyprus, each of whom has made a contribution to the maintenance of peace and security
on this beautiful island.
In marking this anniversary, we wish to showcase the legacy of the men and women who served UNFICYP, whether as
soldiers, police officers or civilians. This publication is primarily intended as a tribute to the immense contribution of our
uniformed personnel more than 100,000 men and women from the military and police forces of 32 countries. During these
years, 184 UNFICYP peacekeepers lost their lives serving in Cyprus. These few lines will never be enough to capture the
significance of the efforts of all our peacekeepers, and the commitment to peace of their national governments both in words
and in deeds. Not only are these men and women the backbone of our operations. They are the embodiment of the spirit
of international cooperation and collective will for peace, dating to March 1964, when the call went out from the Security
Council for urgent assistance in Cyprus.
Through this retrospective publication, we want to highlight some of the events that occurred in this fascinating period from the
early years of UN peacekeeping. In the pages that follow, we see young soldiers in black and white photographs, volunteering
for service, tending to the sick and displaced, and captivating the local children on the streets of Cyprus towns. Many of
these troops had come from peacekeeping operations elsewhere, and many would go on to other trouble spots. Across the
decades we see Secretaries-General and senior UN officials who came to visit, to observe conditions for themselves, and to
help advance negotiations between the leaders of the Greek Cypriot and Turkish Cypriot communities. One of my predecessors,
Javier Perez de Cuellar, eventually became Secretary-General.
As we all know, after the events of 1974, a new reality set in for UNFICYP. Today, our peacekeepers still patrol the
buffer zone that was created in that era. Though our troop and police numbers have dropped due to changes in operational
requirements, our presence here is testament to the commitment and belief in peace in Cyprus that began our mission and,
we hope one day soon, will complete it. More than anything, we see this 50th anniversary as an opportunity. To echo the
words of the current Secretary-General, Ban Ki-moon, this milestone should provide the impetus needed to move forward on
the talks and to see them through to a mutually agreed comprehensive settlement for the benefit of all Cypriots.

Also marking its 50th anniversary this year is UNFICYPs Blue Beret Magazine. In the
following pages, we feature an account of its early days from the original editor, David
Lees. I would like to take this opportunity to pay tribute to the current Blue Beret team,
pictured at left, who follow in David Lees footsteps and continue to ensure that this iconic
publication goes out on a bi-monthly basis. I would also like to thank the team for putting
together this Special Edition of the Blue Beret. In March 2014, UNFICYP launched an
online archive of the Blue Beret back-catalogue, comprising more than 1,000 editions that
document the history and happenings of the Mission over the course of its fifty years. This
ambitious scanning project was carried out by our Public Information Office, with the support
of colleagues from the Office of the Chief of Mission Support, Office of the Chief of Staff,
and military personnel from the Joint Operations Centre. It was a true team effort and this
rich archive is now accessible on our website to all military, police and civilian colleagues,
past and present, and to the general public. Thank you to all involved in these efforts.

10

THE BLUE BERET


A LOOK BACK WITH THE FIRST EDITOR OF UNFICYPS ICONIC MAGAZINE

Fifty years of UNFICYP also means fifty years of the Blue Beret magazine. The first issue was published on 20 April
1964 and the Blue Beret back-catalogue provides a rich archive of the story of the Mission from its early years all
the way through to the present day. Todays Blue Beret team had the very good fortune to correspond with David
Lees, who as a young British Captain began the publication. He has put into writing his memories of the birth of
the Blue Beret.

In March 1964, UNFICYP was a hive of activity. I was assigned to the Press Department and suggested that an UNFICYP
newsletter would be an excellent means of internal communication in a multi-national organization. The idea was approved
and I was duly appointed Editor. I was given an assistant, a Sergeant, who also acted as a driver. The one common symbol
we had was the United Nations blue beret worn by all members of the various contingents. I recommended that we use it
as the name for our publication. We were given a table and chairs, a typewriter, and a small room in Wolseley Barracks,
Nicosia. And that is how the Blue Beret began!
All editorial copy - the editorial itself, press releases, statements from UN headquarters - had to be bashed out on a
typewriter. For the first edition, we asked U Thant, then Secretary-General, to send us a dedicated message to serve as the
very first item in the inaugural Blue Beret. I strongly believed that all UNFICYP members would be interested in what other
peacekeepers in the Force were doing, so press representatives in each contingent were asked to send articles for inclusion.
Every week we visited each contingent and attended their press conferences. We also liaised with reporters from all over the
world, mostly in the Ledra Palace Hotel. English was the main language of the Blue Beret but we also featured articles in
French, German, Swedish, Finnish, Danish and Gaelic. On one occasion there were 9 different languages in an edition. Proof
reading was quite a task we had to compare each character with the original!
In fact, our production set-up was rather cumbersome compared with todays technology. After I had compiled the copy and
made a rough layout I took the opus to Zavallis Press, in the Old Town of Nicosia. The compositors set the type, taking
one character at a time from a tray and laying them in reverse order for printing. Our layout was restricted by the size of
the letters and any photo blocks burnt from the original photo. It was truly amazing how quickly the articles were put to bed
for the draft print run. The assiduous proofreading and corrections were made before the final print run could begin. The
whole process from copy to print could take a few days. The Blue Beret was published every week, initially on Mondays and
later on Tuesdays. This long process did have an advantage that I thoroughly enjoyed. On publication days, I was invited to
lunch at the family home of our printer, Achilleas Zavallis. As the weeks went by, I tasted the delights of every Cypriot dish
known, all superbly prepared by Mrs. Zavallis!
Whenever I visited the contingents throughout the island I was always very pleased to see the Blue Beret displayed prominently.
I was assured that it was highly valued, particularly because it provided an opportunity to share experiences and news with
other members of UNFICYP. We ran a series of articles featuring the contributing countries and this helped weld all members
together into a coherent UN Organization. It is an honour to serve in the cause of peace and I am absolutely thrilled that
the Blue Beret has flourished for 50 years. It has undergone many changes and is a vibrant and superb publication. I wish
all members of the Blue Beret staff and all readers the very best for the future.

Facing page: Photographs from the early days of the Blue Beret. Clockwise from top left: Capt Lees in Cyprus in 1964; The compositor that was used
to set the type for the Blue Beret; David Lees at his desk in the Blue Beret offices; A 1964 press conference; David Lees at Zavallis Press, working
on the layout for the Blue Beret edition number 6 of 25 May 1964; A film crew captures some of the damage done to local Cypriot buildings following
fighting in 1964.

11

About this Publication


In a departure from the usual Blue Beret format, this souvenir edition aims to illustrate the efforts
of UNFICYP to contribute to the maintenance of peace and security on the island of Cyprus over a 50
year history. The publication is arranged chronologically across five core chapters that each cover a
ten-year span. A timeline of key events provides a framework for a selection of images that can only
begin to showcase the tremendous commitment, the hours of hard work, and the peacekeeping spirit
which has flourished here in Cyprus against a backdrop of ongoing political efforts to achieve a Cyprus
solution. Excerpts from the Blue Beret itself have been included to underline milestone events and
provide a snapshot of the time period from which they are drawn. Every effort has been made to ensure
the accuracy of the contents and historical details contained herein, and to display photographs that
reflect the diverse and invaluable contributions of the men and women, military, police and civilian,
from all 32 member states, subject to the availability of archival materials and their quality.

12

A FORCE FOR

PEACE
1964-1973

1964 - 1973

13

A FORCE FOR

PEACE
1964-1973

"The officers and men of the Force have a very special task
to perform. They are soldiers of humanity, pledged, without
national or other interests, solely to the prevention of bloodshed
and violence and to the restoration of normality in Cyprus. They
have no territories to win, no enemies to conquer. They serve
the noblest purpose that an armed force could serve.

Secretary-General U Thant, April 1964

Gen Carlos Flores Paiva Chaves (Brazil), Commander of the United Nations Emergency Force (UNEF) and Commander-Designate of UNFICYP in
advance of its first Force Commander, greets Canadian troops, March 1964. Previous page: A peacekeeper escorts an elderly woman in Ayios Theodoros,
Larnaca District, April 1964.

21 December 1963
An outbreak of violence between Greek
Cypriot and Turkish Cypriot communities
provokes a round of talks in the United
Nations Security Council in New York.

4 March 1964
Resolution 186 creates the United
Nations Force in Cyprus for a period
of three months. It has a mandate
to use its best efforts to prevent a
recurrence of fighting, to contribute
to the maintenance and restoration of
law and order and a return to normal
conditions.
14

Above left: On 25 February 1964, the Security Council hears statements in the Continuing
Debate on the Situation in Cyprus. Studying a document are Ralph Bunche (left), UN
Under-Secretary for Special Political Affairs, and Ambassador Adlai E. Stevenson, Permanent
Representative of the United States to the UN. Above right: Secretary-General U Thant
delivers a statement on UN Television concerning the situation in Cyprus, 27 March 1964.

A FORCE FOR PEACE

A company of 44 Swedish soldiers arriving on a Mats Hercules plane, 15 April 1964. They will be stationed in Polis.

13 March 1964
The first UNFICYP peacekeepers are
deployed. Over the next few months,
military from the United Kingdom,
Canada, Ireland, Sweden, Finland,
Denmark and Austria join the Mission.

27 March 1964
The Force becomes operational and
Lt General Prem Singh Gyani of India
assumes his post as the first Force
Commander.

1964 - 1973

15

Two Canadian soldiers serving with UNFICYP patrol the shopping area of Nicosia, 8 April 1964.

22 April 1964
The first UNFICYP civilian police take
up their duties. Through May and June,
civilian police from Austria, Sweden,
Australia, New Zealand and Denmark
deploy in Cyprus. By 25 May, the
combined Force in Cyprus reaches
7,000 personnel. It has taken 79
days for all contingents to deploy.

Civilians are directed by UNFICYP troops to seek safety off the streets, near the Ledra
Palace Hotel, 18 April 1964.

16

A FORCE FOR PEACE

British Pt Hindley & Capt Leedham evacuate an elderly


Greek Cypriot from Ayios Theodoros, 27 April 1964.

Children play near armoured vehicles from the British Contingent, stationed outside a school
in the Turkish Cypriot sector of Ayios Theodoros where women and children are housed for
protection, 27 April 1964.

Two Swedish UNFICYP soldiers talk with locals in Ktima,


1 April 1964.

Irish soldiers escort Turkish Cypriots from an area in Famagusta, 24 April 1964.

11 May 1964
Galo Plaza Lasso, former President
of Ecuador, is appointed as the first
Special Representative of the SecretaryGeneral in Cyprus.

20 June 1964
The Security Council decides to
extend the mandate of UNFICYP for a
further three months, the first of many
renewals.

A member of the British Contingent on guard duty at a post in Limassol, 1 October 1964.

1964 - 1973

17

18

A FORCE FOR PEACE

1964 - 1973

19

Ralph Bunche, United Nations Under-Secretary-General for Special Political Affairs, listens to the concerns of the townspeople on a visit to the town of
Ktima. He is accompanied by officers serving with UNFICYP, 9 April 1964.

A New Zealand Police Officer at work, 1965.

20

Finnish soldiers, bicycling to Nicosia from Dhekelia, pass a sentry post, 1 May 1964.

A FORCE FOR PEACE

A Cypriot patient is carried by UNFICYP ambulance to hospital in Nicosia, 1 April 1965. The Austrian Contingent has command of the UNFICYP
field hospital and ambulance services, and often carries Cypriots as part of its duties.

16 September 1964
Galo Plaza is appointed UN Mediator
on Cyprus, replacing Sakari Tuomioja
of Finland following his untimely death
on 9 September. Carlos Bernardes of
Brazil steps in as the new Special
Representative.

1965
As UNFICYP takes shape operationally,
there are now seven military contingents
stationed across the island in Nicosia
and the foothills of the Kyrenia range,
Paphos, Lefka, Polis, Ktima, the
Troodos Mountains, Ayia Irini on the
north-west tip of the island, Salamis
and Famagusta.

Chief Superintendent F. G. Hollande, Commander of the Australian Police Contingent with


Officer Glen Hallahan on the verandah of their Xeros Headquarters, January 1965.

1964 - 1973

21

New Commander of UNFICYP assumes post: Major General Martola of Finland (centre) calls on Archbishop Makarios, shortly after taking up his post.
At left is Carlos Bernardes, the Secretary-Generals Special Representative in Cyprus, 1 May 1966.

23 June 1965
The Secretary-Generals Mediator Galo
Plaza submits his report.

22 December 1967
The Security Council adopts Resolution
244 which tasks UNFICYP with
supervision of disarmament and
arrangements to safeguard internal
security.

24 June 1968
Intercommunal talks begin.
Together with Special Representative Bernardes, Major General Martola makes a call on Dr.
F. Kucuk (centre), 1 May 1966.

22

A FORCE FOR PEACE

A Cypriot youth enjoys the rock-and-roll music of soldiers from UNFICYPs Canadian Contingent billeted at Kyrenia, 1 June 1967.

10 December 1968
UNFICYPs mandate is extended once
again, for a further 6 months, with
Secretary-General U Thant hailing the
progress made in the intercommunal
talks, and welcoming the reduction of
the Force by one quarter as a sign of
the improved situation.

14 February 1970
UNFICYP
undergoes
a
major
redeployment of its troop contingents.
The Finnish Contingent is redeployed
to Kyrenia, Canada takes over the
Nicosia area, Denmark heads to Lefka
and Ireland to Larnaca and Kophinou.

Nicosia International Airport is opened in an official ceremony on 27 March 1968.

1964 - 1973

23

The conscientious and sustained efforts of the members of the Force, both civilian and military, and
the admirable devotion to duty displayed by each one of you has ensured that no major incidents
occurred in spite of tension and sensitivity from time to time.

Major General D. Prem Chand, UNFICYP Force Commander, end of 1972

Secretary-General Kurt Waldheim visits UNFICYP Headquarters at Blue Beret Camp. Guard Commander Major Arthur Klocker of Austria salutes the
Secretary-General who is accompanied by Force Commander Lt General D. Prem Chand of India. Representatives from the seven contingents are in
the Guard of Honour, 6 June 1972.

1971
Talks are deadlocked.

7 June 1972
Secretary-General Kurt Waldheim visits
Cyprus to discuss the situation with
all concerned. Intercommunal talks are
re-launched during his visit.

Soldiers and KP cars (A.P.C.) of the Swedish Contingent, Alert Squadron in the vicinity of
Agios Yeoyios Village during their field exercises, 1 May 1973.

24

A FORCE FOR PEACE

We are an Organization for peace and we do our utmost to be helpful to gain a political solution;
that is why we are here.

- UN Secretary-General Kurt Waldheim,

speaking to the press during his first visit to Cyprus in June 1972

Pvts. Ingvor Happaniemi (lower left) and Hans-Roger Persson (centre) of the Swedish Contingent on sentry duty at Othello Tower OP located in
the Old City of Famagusta, 1 May 1973.

4 October 1972
There are now 55 UNFICYP manned
military Observation Posts spread
across the island.

Joint Operations Centre at UNFICYP HQ. Duty Officers are from the Austrian Civilian Police,
Finnish Contingent, British Contingent, and Danish Civilian Police, 1 April 1973.

1964 - 1973

25

Swedish soldiers, waterside Famugusta, c. 1971.

Members of the Danish Civilian Police patrol a street in Ayios Theodoros, Larnaca District,
1 May 1973.

Patrolling the Green Line in Ayios Theodoros, members


of the Danish Civilian Police, 1 May 1973.

Members of the Austrian Civilian Police check vehicles alongside a Cypriot Policeman, at the
check point of a UN Nicosia-Kyrenia convoy in Nicosia, April 1973.

25 October 1973
The Security Council authorizes an
emergency peacekeeping force, known
as UNEF II, to monitor the ceasefire
between Egyptian and Israeli forces in
the Suez Canal sector and the Sinai
Peninsula. Members of UNFICYPs
Austrian, Irish, Finnish and Swedish
contingents are transferred temporarily
to form the advance of the emergency
force.

Signalman Fred Tedby (foreground), of the British Royal Signal Corps, at the Telephone
Exchange of the 644 Signal Troop, UNFICYP Headquarters, 1 April 1973.

26

A FORCE FOR PEACE

BUFFER ZONE

A NEW
REALITY

1974-1983

1974 - 1983
A Force for Peace 1964 - 1973

27

BUFFER ZONE

A NEW
REALITY

1974-1983

The Security Council... Having considered at its present meeting


further developments on the island... Deeply deploring the outbreak
of violence and the continuing bloodshed... Calls upon all parties
to the present fighting as a first step to cease all firing and
requests all States to exercise the utmost restraint and to refrain
from any action which might further aggravate the situation.


UN Security Council Resolution 353, 20 July 1974

Explosion near Nicosia International Airport, July 1974. Previous page: UNFICYP Chief of Staff Brigadier Francis Henn briefs Secretary-General Kurt
Waldheim and Under-Secretary-General for Special Political Affairs, Brian Urquhart on the roof of the Airport, 25 August 1974.

15 July 1974
The National Guard, under the direction
of Greek officers, stages a coup dtat
and deposes Archbishop Makarios.

20 July 1974
Turkey launches an extensive military
operation in Cyprus.

23 July 1974
Fighting is especially fierce in the
vicinity of Nicosia International Airport;
UNFICYP declares the area a United
Nations Protected Area (UNPA).
28

Evacuees arriving at the Hotel and Catering Institute in Nicosia are embraced by relatives and
friends. Members of the Cyprus Red Cross and Civilian Police assist, 21 November 1974.

BUFFER ZONE: A NEW REALITY

Secretary-General Kurt Waldheim addresses the Security Council during an urgent meeting on Cyprus. To his right is Javier Perez de Cuellar of Peru
who would go on to become the Special Representative of the Secretary-General in Cyprus, and later, Secretary-General, 15 August 1974.

13 August 1974
Several weeks of talks in Geneva end
with no result.

14 August 1974
Turkey launches a second military
intervention. Three Austrian peacekeepers
are killed while negotiating a ceasefire
near Goshi.

16 August 1974
Turkish Forces declare a ceasefire;
UNFICYP marks the ceasefire lines and
takes on the responsibility of patrolling
the buffer zone between them.

Members of the Canadian Contingent in a LYNX armored vehicle patrolling the Green
Line in Nicosia, 1974.

1974 - 1983

29

The stresses and strains of the recent conflict are, fortunately, on the decrease and it is good to
know that a degree of normality is steadily returning Tragically, we have suffered some casualties,
but nothing has deterred any UN soldier from doing his duty to the utmost We are now entering
a new chapter in which we shall have to cope with a different situation in Cyprus. I am confident
that you will achieve full success in the new tasks ahead of us.

- A message from the Force Commander, Lt Gen D. Prem Chand


25 September 1974

Secretary-General Kurt Waldheim makes a statement upon his arrival in Nicosia. At his right is Force Commander Lt General D. Prem Chand, and at
his left is Luis Weckmann-Muoz, Special Representative of the Secretary-General in Cyprus, 25 August 1974.

25 August 1974
During his visit, the Secretary-General
arranges for weekly humanitarian
meetings to take place between Glafcos
Clerides and Rauf Denktash, and the
United Nations High Commission for
Refugees.

Food supplies are unloaded at the tent village Happy Valley, set up by the International
Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) and the British Forces at Episkopi to provide shelter
for Cypriots, 18 August 1974.

30

BUFFER ZONE: A NEW REALITY

The Swedish Contingent visits two Greek Orthodox


monks at the Varnabas Monastery, 1 November 1974.

UNFICYP and the International Committee of the Red Cross assist with evacuations of Greek
and Turkish Cypriots to safe areas, 21 November 1974.

A Swedish Police Officer at a site in Famagusta district,


2 September 1974.

The tent village Happy Valley, British Sovereign Base area in Episkopi, 18 August 1974.

September - December 1974


UNFICYP continues to support the
transport of Greek Cypriots and Turkish
Cypriots fleeing the conflict, and the
distribution of humanitarian aid. The
Blue Beret reports that between
18 August and 16 October 1974,
UNFICYP delivered 470 tons of food
and relief supplies to Greek Cypriots
living in the northern parts of the island
and 1,360 tons to the Turkish Cypriot
communities in the southern parts of
the island. In total, an equivalent of
364 truckloads of aid.

116 Greek Cypriot and 127 Turkish Cypriot sick and wounded prisoners of war and
detainees are exchanged as a result of an agreement reached between the parties, 16
September 1974.

1974 - 1983

31

32

BUFFER ZONE: A NEW REALITY

1974 - 1983

33

The Blue Beret announces the arrival of new Special Representative Javier Perez de Cuellar of Peru, who would later go on to become SecretaryGeneral from 1982 to 1991.

1975
Intercommunal talks in Vienna lead to
the Vienna III agreement, and partial
implementation.

12 February 1977
The High Level Agreement is made by
Archbishop Makarios and Rauf Denktash
under the auspices of SecretaryGeneral Waldheim during his second
visit to Cyprus, setting parameters for
a bi-communal federation.

On patrol near Othello Tower, circa 1975.

34

BUFFER ZONE: A NEW REALITY

Male and female members of the Swedish Infantry Battalion attached to UNFICYP on parade at Battalion Headquarters, Larnaca. The 12 female members
of the Battalion are the first women to join the Force in Cyprus, Autumn 1979.

19 May 1979
The 10 Point Agreement is made by
Spyros Kyprianou and Rauf Denktash
under the auspices of SecretaryGeneral Waldheim.

April 1981
The Committee on Missing Persons in
Cyprus is established.

22 October 1981
The Gobbi Initiative is introduced
by the Special Representative of the
Secretary-General Hugo Gobbi of
Argentina.

The Security Council votes on a resolution to extend the United Nations Peacekeeping Force
for another six months, 13 June 1980.

1974 - 1983

35

As the 1980s get underway, and UNFICYPs mandate continues to be renewed, British artist Ken Howard visits the island and captures many of the
new operational realities of the Mission, above and below.

April 1982
Secretary-General Perez de Cuellar
meets with the Greek Cypriot and Turkish
Cypriot leaders, Spyros Kyprianou and
Rauf Denktash, in Geneva.

August 1983
Another Initiative is tabled by the UN.

36

BUFFER ZONE: A NEW REALITY

MAINTAINING THE

STATUS QUO
1984-1993

1984 - 1993

37

MAINTAINING THE

STATUS QUO

1984-1993

Peacekeeping, the great experiment in which you are all taking part is, in
my view, a very important and very promising instrument of peace for the
future... All of you here in UNFICYP are an essential part of this great task.
You are, in the words of your Commander, fair, firm and friendly. What a
magnificent example that is in a troubled world... I think there can be no
better or more noble task for soldiers.
- Brian Urquhart, USG for Special Political Affairs, BRITCON medal parade, Nicosia, 1985

British troops discuss their patrol route near Nicosia, 1986. Previous page: UNFICYPs Force Military Police at the entrance to the Headquarters building
in Nicosia, 1985.

1984
The Vienna Working Points lead
to Proximity Talks and a Draft
Agreement.

29 March 1986
Secretary-General Perez de Cuellar
presents a new Draft Framework
Agreement.

A Swedish soldier on the line. Front cover of the Blue Beret magazine, June 1987.

38

MAINTAINING THE STATUS QUO

Mine-blowing in DANCON, 1987.

Liaising with farmers in the buffer zone is becoming an important part of UNFICYPs work,
1986.

Gurkhas from the British Contingent work on the upgrade


of a UN observation post, 1986.

Canadian troops outside Ledra Palace Hotel, 1986.

September 1988
Direct talks begin between Greek
Cypriot leader Georgios Vassiliou and
Turkish Cypriot leader Rauf Denktash
at the residence in the UN Protected
Area of Special Representative Oscar
Camilin of Argentina.

Community outreach in the bi-communal village of Pyla with the Irish Civilian Police, 1989.

1984 - 1993

39

A British peacekeeper chats with a Cypriot farmer in the buffer zone as he checks his identity card, 19 November 1990.

1 May 1989
UNFICYP reaches an agreement on
both sides to unman positions and
cease patrols in certain sensitive
locations in Nicosia.

June 1989
Secretary-General Perez de Cuellar
introduces his Summary of Ideas as
the basis of a comprehensive settlement.

The UN Peacekeeping Forces are awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1988. UNFICYP Force
Commander Maj Gen Gunther Greindl, second from left, attends the ceremony in Oslo with
colleagues from the Australian and Danish Police, and a Canadian peacekeeper.

40

MAINTAINING THE STATUS QUO

A Danish pilot flies an UNFICYP Gazelle helicopter, 17


November 1990.

Australian Civilian Police man the Duty Room, September 1992.

An Austrian soldier keeps watch in Athna, 15 November


1990.

A member of the UNFICYP Danish Contingent in a Ferret Scout approaches an observation


post near Skouriotissa, 17 November 1990.

February 1990
Negotiations resume but are halted
again later that year.

1992
Secretary-General Boutros BoutrosGhali says Cyprus is a priority. He
launches talks in New York mid-year,
presenting his Set of Ideas for a draft
settlement.

A Canadian soldier checks connections at Signal Squadron Headquarters in Nicosia, 16


November 1990.

1984 - 1993

41

March 1993
Secretary-General Boutros-Ghali meets
Greek Cypriot leader Glafcos Clerides
and Turkish Cypriot leader Rauf
Denktash. Confidence-building measures
are proposed, with negotiations for
implementation to begin in May. Talks
resume but are cancelled in June.

December 1993
The face of UNFICYP is changing. Major
troop contributing countries Canada,
Denmark and Sweden withdraw troops.
Countries like Argentina, Slovakia and
Hungary will step in to fill the gap.
42

Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali (centre) meets with Glafcos Clerides (left), Greek
Cypriot leader, and Rauf Denktash, leader of the Turkish Cypriots, 30 March 1993.

MAINTAINING THE STATUS QUO

A CHANGING

FORCE
1994-2003

1994 - 2003

43

A CHANGING

FORCE
1994-2003

It is the fate of the soldier of peace to serve under


awkward conditions, observing ceasefire situations, patrolling
the buffer zone or monitoring the maintenance of peace...
You should feel privileged and proud of the contribution you
are making. I would like to take this opportunity to assure
you that your offering is recognized and appreciated.
- UNFICYP Chief of Mission Gustave Feissel, end of year message to the Force, 1994

A Hungarian peacekeeper receives his blue beret during a ceremony to welcome the Hungarian Contingent in 1995. Hungary would make a significant
contribution to the force in Sector 4. Previous page: Peacekeepers from Argentina at Sector 1 HQ in San Martin Camp, Skouriotissa, 1996.

February 1994
The UN begins proximity talks to
negotiate the implementation of
confidence-building measures following
confirmation of acceptance by both
sides.

UNFICYP Chief of Mission Gustave Feissel, centre, participates in inter-communal talks with
the leaders of the two Cypriot communities, Glafcos Clerides (right) and Rauf Denktash
(left), October 1994.

44

A CHANGING FORCE

Visitors gather around an UNFICYP vehicle on display for United Nations Day, 24 October 1995.

October 1995
Successful bi-communal events take
place at Ledra Palace. An Open
House on the UNs 50th anniversary
draws over 5,000 visitors and a bicommunal friendship concert entertains
over 1,000 people.

May 1997
Another bi-communal concert draws
3,000 music lovers.

The new diversity in UNFICYPs force. Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Paraguay, Peru and Uruguay
host a stand at the UN Day events in 1995.

1994 - 2003

45

UNFICYP peacekeepers deliver humanitarian assistance, 1997.

July 1997
Greek Cypriot leader Glafcos Clerides
and Turkish Cypriot leader Rauf
Denktash meet for five days of UNsponsored talks in Troutbeck, New
York, followed by a further round of
talks in Switzerland in August.

Between 1997 and 2001, the Netherlands contributes almost 100 troops per year to
UNFICYPs military force.

46

A CHANGING FORCE

Police officers play an important role in providing humanitarian assistance. Here, Irish Police Officers are on duty, March 1994.

4 December 2001
Special Adviser Alvaro de Soto hosts
Clerides and Denktash at the Chief
of Missions residence in the UN
Protected Area. The two leaders agree
to resume face-to-face talks on the
Cyprus problem.

Argentinean peacekeepers on patrol in Sector 1, 1999.

1994 - 2003

47

A British soldier looks down toward the crossing, 2003.

Secretary-General Kofi Annan shakes hands with a UN Civilian Police Officer from Ireland
at UNFICYP Headquarters, 16 May 2002.

Between 1997 and 2001, Slovenia is an important


troop contributor.

In 2002, Slovakia joins UNFICYP and takes up a key role, assuming command of Sector
4 from the Austrian Contingent.

November 2002
UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan
presents a comprehensive peace plan
for Cyprus.

23 April 2003
After nearly thirty years, the first
crossing points are opened. Some 2
million people cross without incident
before the end of the year.

UNFICYP facilitates the first crossing, April 2003.

48

A CHANGING FORCE

CROSSINGS
2004-2013

2004 - 2013

49

CROSSINGS
2004-2013

This plan is inevitably a compromise. It does not satisfy


everyones demands. But I believe it meets the core interests,
and addresses the key concerns, of people on both sides.
Let us be clear. The choice is not between this settlement plan
and some other magical, mythical solution. In reality, the choice
is between this settlement and no settlement.
- Secretary-General Kofi Annan at Brgenstock, Switzerland, 31 March 2004

Secretary-General Kofi Annan visits Switzerland, where the talks involving the Greek Cypriot and Turkish Cypriot parties, with the participation of Greece
and Turkey, are underway. A wide shot of the closing of the Cyprus talks, 31 March 2004.

24 April 2004
Greek Cypriots and Turkish Cypriots
vote in separate referenda on The
Comprehensive Settlement of the
Cyprus Problem, a plan informally
referred to as the Annan Plan, after
then Secretary-General Kofi Annan.
64% of Turkish Cypriots vote in favour
of the plan and 75% of Greek Cypriots
vote against it, defeating the proposal.

Copies of The Comprehensive Settlement of the Cyprus Problem ready for distribution,
April 2004.

50

CROSSINGS

UNFICYP peacekeepers help non-essential UN staff


based in Lebanon to evacuate to Cyprus, 20 July 2006.

Marking International Peace Day at Ledra Palace with Greek Cypriot and Turkish Cypriot
guests from the Cyprus Veterans Association. World War II veteran Glafcos Clerides lights
his candle with the help of an UNFICYP policewoman from India, 21 September 2006.

A Police Officer from El Salvador. In 2004-2005, police


from India, the Netherlands, Bosnia and Herzegovina,
Croatia, Italy, and Montenegro would all join the Mission.

In 2004, the United Nations begins a significant project to clear mines from the buffer zone.
By 2010, over 25,000 mines have been removed and destroyed.

1 January 2005
UNFICYPs new Force 860 concept
of operations goes into effect, reducing
the number of military troops from
1,230 to 860. UN Police serving with
UNFICYP increase from 45 to 69.

8 July 2006
Under-Secretary-General for Political
Affairs, Ibrahim Gambari, brokers an
agreement between the leaders of the
two communities.
Michael Mller (centre), Special Representative of the Secretary-General in Cyprus, meets
with Tassos Papadopoulos (left), Greek Cypriot leader, and Mehmet Ali Talat, Turkish
Cypriot leader, in Nicosia to discuss the 8 July Agreement, 5 September 2007.

2004 - 2013

51

As you know, I have come to Cyprus to show my personal support to the


Cypriot-led and Cypriotowned process to reunify the island. And I wanted
to be here now because I recognize how important it is to continue to build
momentum on what the leaders have achieved up to now.

- Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, at a press conference during his


visit to Cyprus, January 2010

An Australian policewoman talks with an elderly Cyrpriot woman during a humanitarian run to Greek Cypriot and Maronite communities in the north,
conducted by the Civil Affairs Section together with the Police Component and with the support of the military, 2008.

3 April 2008
The crossing point at Ledra St opens.

23 May 2008
In a joint statement, Greek Cypriot
leader Dimitris Christofias and Turkish
Cypriot leader Mehmet Ali Talat
reconfirm their commitment to a bizonal, bi-communal federation with
political equality as defined by relevant
Security Council resolutions.

1 July 2008
In a joint statement, the two leaders
announce that they discussed the issues
of single sovereignty and citizenship
which they agreed in principle.
52

Opening of the Ledra-Lokmaci Street crossing in central Nicosia, 3 April 2008.

CROSSINGS

George Iacovou & Kudret Ozersay, Representatives of


the Greek & Turkish Cypriot leaders, visit UNDPs project
for a Limnitis-Yesilirmak Crossing, 25 June 2010.

UNFICYP Chief of Mission Taye-Brook Zerihoun (2nd from left), Turkish Cypriot Representative
Ozdil Nami (3rd from left), & Greek Cypriot Representative George Iavocou (4th from left),
watch the two leaders plant peace trees in the grounds of the Good Offices, October 2009.

A British peacekeeper on duty in an abandoned part of


the buffer zone, February 2010.

Inside the Green Line in the Old Town of Nicosia, February 2010. This part of the buffer
zone remains as it was left in 1974.

17 July 2008
Alexander Downer is appointed Special
Adviser to the Secretary-General on
Cyprus.

8 September 2008
Full-fledged negotiations begin between
the two leaders.

26 May 2010
A new round of inter-communal talks
begins with the first meeting of Greek
Cypriot leader Dimitris Christofias and
Turkish Cypriot leader Dervish Eroglu.

14 October 2010
The Limnitis-Yesilirmak Crossing opens.

Special Adviser to the Secretary-General on Cyprus Alexander Downer launches the Joint
Communications Room (JCR), a bi-communal policing initiative. Greek Cypriot and Turkish
Cypriot Police can now work hand in hand, supported by UNFICYPs Police, 29 July 2010.

2004 - 2013

53

For decades, the world has heard about the Cyprus problem. Now is
the time for the Cyprus solution. The United Nations will continue to provide all the support we can. But this is a process that is by the people
of Cyprus, and for the people of Cyprus. I carry the worlds support for
Cyprus in my heart. But the future of Cyprus is in your hands.

- Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon during his visit to Cyprus in 2010

A wide view of the meeting in Geneva, 7 July 2011. The two leaders, Dimitris Christofias and Dervish Eroglu, sit side by side. Secretary-General Ban
Ki-moon, Under-Secretary-General for Political Affairs B. Lynn Pascoe, Special Adviser on Cyprus Alexander Downer, and Special Representative in
Cyprus Lisa Buttenheim, are all in attendance.

18 November 2010
The two leaders meet in New York,
together with the Secretary-General.

26 January 2011
Ban Ki-moon hosts a meeting of the
two leaders in Geneva.

6 May 2011
The Home for Cooperation is opened in
Nicosia to host bi-communal activities.

7 July 2011
The two leaders meet again with the
Secretary-General in Geneva.
54

Police and military - including this group of Slovak soldiers - work together on a project to
clean up the buffer zone at Troulli, August 2011.

CROSSINGS

UN Flight celebrates 20,000 flying hours with the Mission, 30 September 2011. From 1993, Argentina provides UNFICYPs flight capabilities, comprising
3 helicopters that are used to conduct buffer zone patrols from the air. Prior to 1993, the British Contingent was responsible for UN Flight.

1 November 2011
A first meeting takes place between the
two leaders and the Secretary-General
at Greentree.

25 January 2012
A follow-up Greentree meeting takes
place.

27 April 2012
Special Adviser Alexander Downer
announces that talks have come to
something of a standstill.
Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon meets with Greek Cypriot leader Dimitris Christofias (left)
and Turkish Cypriot leader Dervish Eroglu (right) at Greentree, Manhasset, New York, for
two days of talks on Cyprus, 30 October 2011.

2004 - 2013

55

The Mission Support Component, headed by Paul


Aghadjanian (in hardhat, front right), keeps UNFICYP
ticking over.

UNFICYPs Civil Affairs Section is an integrated civilian team working closely with the military
and police components.

Integrating women in peacekeeping is a key goal for


the UN. In 2013, women made up 7% of UNFICYPs
military, 22% of police, and a third of civilian staff.

UN Police medal parade, November 2013. UNFICYPs Police Component comprises 11


different contingents from Australia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, India, Ireland, Italy,
Lithuania, Montenegro, Serbia, Slovakia and Ukraine.

October 2013
Work begins on a joint declaration that
would form the basis for the relaunch
of formal talks.

Brigadier Francis Henn (centre), UNFICYPs Chief of Staff between 1972 and 1974, is
welcomed on a visit to the Blue Beret Camp by Force Commander Major General Chao Liu
and current Chief of Staff Colonel Angus Loudon, October 2013.

56

CROSSINGS

UNFICYP
AT
FIFTY
2014

2014

57

UNFICYP

AT
FIFTY
2014

While the area of responsibility of our peacekeepers - the


buffer zone - appears relatively calm, there should be no
misconception about the many challenges they face in their daily
work. Violations by the opposing forces continue albeit at a low
level both in nature and in number. Conscientious and rigorous
attention to detail is one of the main reasons behind UNFICYPs
success in maintaining the status quo.
- Special Representative of the Secretary-General Lisa Buttenheim
at UNFICYPs Winter Medal Parade, January 2014

Members of UNFICYPs Police Component from Italy, Ukraine, and Bosnia and Herzegovina, on patrol in Ledra Street, Nicosia. Previous page: SRSG
Lisa Buttenheim looks on as Greek Cypriot leader Nicos Anastasiades and Turkish Cypriot leader Dervish Eroglu shake hands following the signing of
the Joint Declaration.

30 January 2014
UNFICYPs mandate is renewed for a
further six months.

11 February 2014
Greek Cypriot leader Nicos Anastasiades
and Turkish Cypriot leader Dervish
Eroglu announce their agreement on a
Joint Declaration for the resumption of
Cyprus Peace Talks.

In the service of peace: Countless United Nations peacekeeping medals have been
distributed to UNFICYP troops over the decades. The ribbon attached to the medal was
designed for UNFICYP in 1964 and represents the colours of the Mediterranean Sea.

58

UNFICYP AT FIFTY

IN MEMORIAM

Sgt.
H Bassam
United Kingdom
18 April
1964
Pte.
J Matikainen
Finland
20 May
1964
Dvr.
L Platt
United Kingdom
7 June
1964
Maj.
E Lacey
United Kingdom
7 June
1964
Tpr.
J Campbell
Canada
31 July
1964
Sgt.
Neilsen Denmark 13 August
1964
Lt.
P Gordon-Smith
United Kingdom
28 October 1964
Pte.
C E Gjedsted
Denmark
26 Nov
1964
Lt.
K E Edmonds
Canada
25 Dec
1964
Sgt.
N Larson
Denmark
11 January 1965
Pte.
F Smith
United Kingdom
10 February 1965
Sgt.
W Macauley
United Kingdom
22 February 1965
Sgt.
J Hammill
Ireland
7 April
1965
Sgt.
R J Kivinimei
Finland
3 May
1965
Cpl.
T Hollingsworth
United Kingdom
7 June
1965
Cpl.
W Heterington
Ireland
19 July
1965
Rfn.
P J Hoare
Canada
14 August 1965
Pte.
P Soininen
Finland
5 October 1965
WO
S Attemalm
Sweden
5 October 1965
Capt.
P K Jarvinen
Finland
12 Dec
1965
Gen.
K S Thimayya
India
18 Dec
1965
Gdsm.
J J P Chartier
Canada
14 March 1966
Pte.
K T Jorgensen
Denmark
18 March 1966
Pte.
J Knudson
Denmark
18 March 1966
Mr.
Z Maydenov
Secretariat
18 March 1966
Pte.
J Antera Huha
Finland
8 June
1966
Pte.
J E Jonsson
Sweden
6 July
1966
Pte.
J P E Bernard
Canada
9 July
1966
Tpr.
J J Synott
United Kingdom
9 July
1966
Pte.
M J Tilus
Finland
7 August 1966
Tpr.
L W Nass
Canada
27 Sept
1966
WO2
N Westberg
Sweden
6 October 1966
Sgt.
O Foulkes
United Kingdom
6 October 1966
Lt.Col.
C Chettle MC
United Kingdom
16 February 1967
Cpl.
O Redmond
Canada
10 March 1967
Cfn.
S Houghton
United Kingdom
13 July
1967
2Lt.
A C N Mitchell
United Kingdom
13 August 1967
Pte.
K K Kangasmaki
Finland
7 Sept
1967
Cpl.
A K Salmon
Canada
24 Sept
1967
Capt.
C McNamara
Ireland
16 January 1968
Pte.
O Soerensen
Denmark
14 April
1968
Sgt.
L G Andersson
Sweden
26 May
1968
Pte.
R L G Gissel
Denmark
29 May
1968
Cpl.
J Fagan
Ireland
10 June
1968
Pte.
B K Kannan
United Kingdom
11 August 1968
Lt.
R Byrne
Ireland
20 Sept
1968
WO
T Samuelsson
Sweden
28 February 1969
Pte.
J T Chelmick
United Kingdom
24 May
1969
WO
T R Jokinen
Finland
3 June
1969
Tpr.
M Kennedy
Ireland
1 July
1969
Sgt.
L J Thomas
Australia
26 July
1969
Pte.
J A Lerue
Canada
9 February 1970
Pte.
D Newstead
United Kingdom
11 February 1970
Pte.
T J Hall
Canada
31 July
1970
Maj.
F R Hansen
Denmark
2 Sept
1970
Cpl.
P C Isenor
Canada
26 October 1970
SAC
E E Mellish
United Kingdom
24 Dec
1970
Rfn.
R P Hill
United Kingdom
2 January 1971
Rfn.
K Chavenor
United Kingdom
4 January 1971
LCpl.
K R Truswell
United Kingdom
4 March
1971
Pte.
S Cummins
Ireland
11 June
1971
Cpl.
J B Neilsen
Denmark
12 July
1971
Insp.
P M Hackett
Australia
29 August 1971
Pte.
H Faickley
United Kingdom
18 Sept
1971
Ranger
F T McLernon
United Kingdom
9 March
1972
Cpl.
H B Oboril
Austria
3 August 1972
Dvr.
B J Lover
United Kingdom
13 August 1972
Pte.
E Mearns
United Kingdom
13 August 1972
Sgt.
L C Fjellstrom
Sweden
20 August 1972
MCpl.
J R Lassard
Canada
1 December 1972
Capt.
M T Toumi
Finland
20 January 1973
Miss
A Valentine
Secretariat
29 January 1973
Sgt.
C H Edenborg
Sweden
29 January 1973
Sgt.
L Enberg
Sweden
29 January 1973
Pte.
J B Masters
United Kingdom
8 February 1973
CSgt.
J L Meacock
United Kingdom
28 March 1973
Pte.
W R A Mallone
United Kingdom
21 June
1973
2Lt.
G A Paterson
United Kingdom
13 October 1973
2Lt.
K B Petersen
Denmark
9 December 1973
Insp.
W Payer
Austria
10 January 1974
LCpl.
J E Laird
United Kingdom
2 February 1974
Cpl.
A Roach
Canada
17 February 1974
Supt.
V J G Fogt
Denmark
15 March 1974
Pte.
N O Pedersen
Denmark
1 June
1974
Sgt.
C A Wamback
Canada
30 June
1974
Gdsm.
G Lawson
United Kingdom
21 July
1974
Pte.
J L G Perron
Canada
8 August 1974
LCpl.
A Isak
Austria
14 August 1974
Lt.
J Izay
Austria
14 August 1974
MSgt.
F Decombe
Austria
14 August 1974
Pte.
C S Andersen
Denmark
16 August 1974
Sgt.
D S Christensen
Denmark
16 August 1974

Pte.
Sgt.
Pte.
Maj.
Pte.
Pte.
Pte.
Pte.
Capt.
Pte.
Sgt.
Sgt.
Capt.
Pte.
Pte.
WO
Pte.
Dvr.
Pte.
Sgt.
Pte.
Cpl.
SSgt.
Capt.
Cpl. of H.
Pte.
MCpl.
Sig.
ALCpl.
Sgt.
Cpl.
Pte.
Cpl.
Pte.
Pte
LCpl.
Tpr.
Pte.
Pte.
Pte.
Pte.
Pte.
ALCpl.
Pte.
Cpl.
Lt.
Pte.
LCpl.
Pte.
Cpl.
Pte.
Pte.
Pte.
MCpl.
Dvr.
LCpl.
Maj.
Gdsm.
Tpr.
Sgt.
Tpr.
LCpl.
LBdr.
Cpl.
Cpl.
LCpl.
LCpl.
Sgt.
Lt.Col.
Tpr.
Sgt.
Sgt.
MCpl.
Cpl.
Mr.
Mr.
WO3
Pte.
Sgt.
Pte.
Sgt.
Mr.
Ms.
Sgt.
Mrs.
Mr.
WO2
Pfc
Mr.
Mr.
Sgt.
WO2

J J C Berger
J D Ward
J J Huttenen
D R Wingefalk
K O Mogensen
P Thygesen
H D Ollinen
D C Hurley
J E Patten
S J Kholman
R G McGeown
B V Sondergaard
K C Crawford
K J Uuttu
D R Kreiger
T Moen
T E Kornberg
C J Ellerby
F Lorentzen
A J R Dupont
O Britz
D Hansen
F A Christensen
S A R Martinsson
B R Meade
J Lackner
J D G McInnes
P C Child
R D Perry
C H Hardcastle
J McAfee
L Brown
R J Munton
F S A Thomas
J E R Archambalt
J Oberberger
K W E Randall
A J Prins
D M Wilson
P M Thomassen
R Silek
P P Salender
W Dickenson
A Glaser
M A Wagstaff
K Kleminten
M Kern
D P Key
W Ter
W Hagel
S R Hylander
J Hingesberg
P J Trottier
M MacRae
S Garland
N Tulloch
P M Christensen
L D Sinclair
J J Costello
F Maier
T G Burkat
A H Rimmer
M A Moorcroft
G H Garrad-Cole
K J Easter
M D Owen
S G Shrubsole
G Poms
E Anderson
S McGee
M Schmuck
D L Kloss
W Leeb
J Schopfer
B.Garrett

G.Sigas
L A Dagata
L J H Harrison
N D Davies
J M Escalante
A O Chocobar
A Demetriou
S Kyriakides
M Hruska
S Kariuki
P Loizou
S Goldsmith
A Simkovic
P Fennelly
A Alleyne
A D Ojeda
G Bean

Canada
Australia
Finland
Sweden
Denmark
Denmark
Sweden
United Kingdom
Canada
Canada
United Kingdom
Denmark
Canada
Finland
Canada
Sweden
Finland
United Kingdom
Denmark
Canada
Austria
Denmark
Denmark
Sweden
United Kingdom
Austria
Canada
United Kingdom
United Kingdom
United Kingdom
United Kingdom
United Kingdom
United Kingdom
Denmark
Canada
Austria
United Kingdom
Canada
Canada
Denmark
Austria
Sweden
United Kingdom
Austria
United Kingdom
Austria
Sweden
United Kingdom
Sweden
Sweden
Sweden
Denmark
Canada
Canada
United Kingdom
United Kingdom
Denmark
United Kingdom
United Kingdom
Austria
United Kingdom
United Kingdom
United Kingdom
United Kingdom
United Kingdom
United Kingdom
United Kingdom
Austria
United Kingdom
United Kingdom
Austria
Canada
Austria
Austria
United Kingdom
Cyprus
Argentina
United Kingdom
United Kingdom
Argentina
Argentina
Cyprus
United Kingdom
Slovakia
Kenya
Cyprus
United Kingdom
Slovakia
Ireland
Barbados
Argentina
United Kingdom

19 Sept
1974
12 Nov
1974
25 Dec
1974
25 Dec
1974
10 February 1975
21 February 1975
17 March 1975
17 March 1975
1 April
1975
11 April
1975
4 May
1975
12 Dec
1975
20 Dec
1975
26 June
1976
17 August 1976
14 Dec
1976
16 January 1977
14 April
1977
20 April
1977
24 April
1977
8 November 1977
18 February 1979
18 February 1979
4 August 1979
31 August 1979
5 November 1979
30 March 1980
7 December 1980
17 January 1981
22 March 1981
22 May
1981
22 August 1981
4 Sept
1981
26 Nov
1981
30 Nov
1981
16 January 1982
23 January 1982
25 Sept
1982
22 January 1983
5 July
1983
23 February 1984
3 March
1984
27 May
1984
4 July
1984
29 Sept
1984
8 Nov
1984
1 Dec
1984
25 Dec
1984
26 January 1985
7 Sept
1985
15 Sept
1985
26 March 1986
25 April
1986
5 December 1986
5 May
1987
22 October 1987
14 April
1988
20 April
1989
12 Dec
1989
27 January 1990
20 May
1990
15 July
1990
8 August 1990
7 Sept
1990
7 Sept
1990
7 Sept
1990
7 Sept
1990
20 February 1991
14 May
1991
21 May
1991
4 December 1992
8 April
1993
2 May
1993
23 July
1996
8 July
1997
16 January 1998
1 March
1999
15 March 2000
8 July
2000
12 Dec
2003
12 Dec
2003
22 April 2004
22 May
2004
8 June
2004
22 January 2005
1 January 2006
23 Nov
2007
05 October 2008
14 March 2008
14 July
2008
27 Nov
2009
3 May
2011

59

UNFICYP TROOP AND POLICE


CONTRIBUTING COUNTRIES
1964 - 2014

60

Argentina

Australia

Austria

Bolivia

Bosnia and
Herzegovina

Brazil

Canada

Chile

China

Croatia

Denmark

El Salvador

Finland

Hungary

India

Ireland

Italy

Lithuania

Montenegro

Nepal

The Netherlands

New Zealand

Paraguay

Peru

Republic of Korea

Serbia

Slovakia

Slovenia

Sweden

Ukraine

United Kingdom

Uruguay

61

SECRETARY-GENERAL
APPOINTMENTS TO CYPRUS
Lisa Buttenheim
Special Representative and Chief of Mission, United States of America, 2010 - present
Alexander Downer Special Adviser (non-resident), Australia, 2008 - 2014
Taye-Brook Zerihoun

Special Representative and Chief of Mission, Ethiopia, 2008 - 2010
Elizabeth Spehar
Acting Special Representative and Chief of Mission, Canada, 2008
Michael Mller
Special Representative and Chief of Mission, Denmark, 2006 - 2008
Zbigniew Wlosowicz Acting and later Special Representative and Chief of Mission, Poland, 2000 - 2006
Alvaro de Soto
Special Adviser (non-resident), Peru, 2000 - 2004
James Holger
Acting Special Representative, Chile, 1999 - 2000
Ann Hercus Deputy and later Special Representative and Chief of Mission, New Zealand, 1998 - 1999
Diego Cordovez
Special Adviser (non-resident), Ecuador, 1997 - 1999
Han Sung-Joo
Special Representative (non-resident), 1996 - 1997
Gustav Feissel
Deputy Special Representative and Chief of Mission, United States of America, 1994 - 1998
Joe Clark
Special Representative (non-resident), Canada, 1993 - 1996
Oscar Camilin
Special Representative, Argentina, 1988 - 1993
James Holger
Acting Special Representative, Chile, 1984 - 1988
Hugo J. Gobbi
Special Representative, Argentina, 1980 - 1984
Reynaldo Galindo Pohl
Special Representative, El Salvador, 1978 - 1980
Remy Gorge
Acting Special Representative, Switzerland, 1977 - 1978
Special Representative, Peru, 1975 - 1977
Javier Perez de Cuellar
Luis Weckmann-Muoz
Special Representative, Mexico, 1974 - 1975
Bibiano F. Osorio-Tafall
Special Representative, Spain, 1967 - 1974
P. P. Spinelli
Acting Special Representative, Italy, 1967
Carlos A. Bernardes Special Representative, Brazil, 1964 - 1967
Galo Plaza Lasso
Special Representative and later Mediator, Ecuador, 1964 - 1966
Sakari Tuomioja
Mediator, Finland, 1964
*From 1994, the Special Representative or Deputy Special Representative also filled the role of Chief of Mission, a title previously
held by the Force Commander. The change reflected a unified arrangement for the United Nations operation in Cyprus, including
UNFICYP.

UNFICYP FORCE COMMANDERS


Major General Chao Liu China, 2011 - present
Rear Admiral Mario Sanchez Debernardi
Peru, 2008 - 2010
Major General Rafael Jose Barni Argentina, 2006 - 2008
Major General Hebert Figoli Uruguay, 2004 - 2006
Lieutenant General Jin Ha Hwang
Republic of Korea, 2002 - 2003
Major General Victory Rana Nepal, 1999 - 2001
Major General E. A. de Vergara
Argentina, 1997 - 1999
Brigadier General Ahti Toimi Vartiainen
Finland, 1994 - 1997
Major General Michael F. Minehane Ireland, 1992 - 1994
Major General Clive Milner Canada, 1989 - 1992
Major General Gunther G. Greindl
Austria, 1981 - 1989
Major General J. J. Quinn

Ireland, 1976 - 1981
Lieutenant General Dewan Prem Chand
India, 1969 - 1976
Lieutenant General I. A. E. Martola Finland, 1966 - 1969
Brigadier A. J. Wilson (Acting)


United Kingdom, 1965 - 1966
General K. S. Thimayya India, 1964 - 1965
Lieutenant General P. S. Gyani

India, 1964 - 1964

62

This image: Keeping watch over the Old Town of Nicosia, 1974.
Front cover: UNFICYP peacekeepers from the British, Canadian and Swedish contingents read the first edition of
the Blue Beret magazine, issued 20 April 1964. The United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus came into being
with Security Council Resolution 186 on 4 March 1964.
Back cover: Peacekeepers of todays UNFICYP, from the United Kingdom, Slovakia, Ireland and Argentina, read the
Blue Beret Magazine 50th anniversary souvenir edition, Ledra Street, 2014.

The UNFICYP Public Information Office would like to acknowledge and thank the following individuals and institutions
for their contributions to this publication:
David Lees, for his kind contribution of photographs and text, pages 13 and 14
The Canadian War Museum: photographs pages 28 and 29
The Embassy of Sweden: photographs pages 26 and 34
United Nations Photo: For individual photo credits see www.unmultimedia.org/photo
The remaining images used in this publication are drawn from UNFICYPs photographic archives and from digitized
versions of the Blue Beret magazine.
Published by the Public Information Office of the United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus, May 2014.
For more information about UNFICYP, and access to the Blue Beret Archive:
www.unficyp.org
www.facebook.com/UNFICYP
www.twitter.com/UN_Cyprus

BLUE BERET

50th Anniversary

Souvenir Edition