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2nd Edition

Plan or review
administrative systems
BSBADM504B

Student Workbook

 

Student Workbook

BSBADM504B Plan or review
administrative systems
2nd Edition 2010

Part of a suite of support materials for the

BSB07 Business Services Training Package

Acknowledgment
Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council (IBSA) would like to acknowledge
HASCOM Pty Ltd for their assistance with the development of this resource.
Writer: Kensington Budgewater
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Published by: Innovation and Business
Industry Skills Council Ltd
Level 11
176 Wellington Parade
East Melbourne VIC 3002
Phone: +61 3 9815 7000
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ISBN: 978-1-921788-38-3
Stock code: BSBADM504B2CL

Originally published: November 2009
2nd edition version: 1.0
Release date: June 2010
Printed by: Fineline Printing
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.......................................................................... 3  Some background .............................................................................................. 30  What skills will you need?......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 12  Obtaining quotations....................... 1  Recommended reading ........................................................... 55  Section summary .................................................................. 5  Causes of change ....................................Table of Contents Getting Started .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 31  Obtaining staff participation .................................................................................................................................................................................... 46  Continually improving the system ................................................................ 45  Section 3 – Monitor Systems .................................... 27  Section summary ..................... 10  Section 1 – Plan or Review Systems ............................................... 12  Identifying requirements........................................................... 66  ............................................................................................................................................................... 33  Defining and communicating procedures ........................................................................................ 63  Appendix 1: Implementation plan template ........... 46  Monitoring the system ......... 49  Monitoring and addressing training needs ............................................................................................................................ 39  Dealing with contingencies....................................... 61  Appendices ................................ 2  Introduction to Administrative Systems........................................... 64  Appendix 2: Standard operating procedure (SOP) template ..................................................... 9  A final word of caution ................. 12  What skills will you need?........................ 1  Structure of the training program ..... 42  Section summary .............................................................................................................. 7  What is your role as manager? ........... 60  Glossary .................................................................................................................................... 24  Selecting suppliers or developers ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 30  Developing implementation strategies ........................ 3  What are administrative systems? ...... 37  Providing training and support ............................................................................ 29  Section 2 – Implement Systems ..................... 65  Appendix 3: Specification template .................................................................................................................. 46  What skills will you need?........ 1  Features of the training program .................

..................... 73  ...............................................................................................................................................................................................Appendix 4: Case study .. 69  Appendix 7: Purchasing policy.................................. 68  Appendix 6: Skills matrix template ............................................................... 72  Appendix 9: Answers to selected learning activities ..... 67  Appendix 5: Stakeholder mapping template ...................... 70  Appendix 8: Reframing matrix template .......................

in some cases. this Training Program may be delivered in 2 or 3 sessions. The videos have been carefully selected and embedded into relevant learning and assessment resources in order to assist education providers and students in the learning process. Videos can be found on IBSA’s YouTube channel at <http://www. Each video is accompanied by a learning activity. The Student Workbook is broken down into several sections. or in others.  Assessment tasks – Summative assessments where you can apply your new skills and knowledge to solve authentic workplace tasks and problems. For example. Innovation & Business Skills Australia has licensed the use of over 200 video vignettes from the Channel 9 television program. Structure of the training program This training program introduces you to current practices in business administration.com/ibsachannel>. BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd Page 1 of 74 . Monitoring administrative systems Note: the Student Workbook sections and Session numbers are listed next to the topics above.  Facilitator-led sessions (FLS) – Challenging and interesting learning activities that can be completed in the classroom or by distance learning that will help you consolidate and apply what you have learned in the Student Workbook.Student Workbook Getting Started Getting Started Features of the training program The key features of this program are:  Student Workbook (SW) – Self paced learning activities to help you to understand key concepts and terms. Specifically. Planning /reviewing administrative systems 2.youtube. you will develop the skills and knowledge in the following three topic areas: 1. Your Business Success. Implementing administrative systems 3. You facilitator may choose to combine or split sessions. as many as 8 sessions.

2010. 2010. M. <http://learnsigma. and Champy.org.. 4th edn. M. HarperCollins. 2008. viewed June 2010. 2008.  Learn Sigma. <http://www.org>.asq.Getting Started Student Workbook Recommended reading Some recommended reading for this unit includes:  Hammer. Lean Enterprise Australia.au>.. ASQ. Page 2 of 74 BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd . <http://www. New York.  American Society for Quality. viewed June 2010. 2003. A guide to the project management body of knowledge: (PMBOK™ guide).  Lean Enterprise Australia. Project Management Institute. 2010. Excel 2007 Dashboards and Report for Dummies. viewed June 2010. Reengineering the corporation: a manifesto for business revolution.com>.  Alexander.lean. J.  Project Management Institute Inc. Lean. Wiley Publishing . Newtown. Indianapolis. quality and six sigma..

for example:  physical systems such as the solar system  biological systems such as the circulatory system  ecosystems such as the Great Barrier reef. The system concept has been applied to a number of areas of human endeavour. for example:  engineering  computer science  business. Search for: Systems definitions To further develop your understanding of systems. planning /reviewing administrative systems 2. However. before you begin. Systems occur naturally.Student Workbook Introduction to Administrative Systems Introduction to Administrative Systems The goal of this unit is for you to be able to effectively plan and review administrative systems. search the internet for definitions of:  system  Business Process Management  brocess. implementing administrative systems 3. You will learn about: 1. Some background What are systems? The word system comes from the Greek word systēma (σύστημα) which means a set of interacting or interdependent entities that make up a structure. The word ‘system’ can also refer to the set of rules that explain how the structure operates. you may want to take some time to reacquaint yourself to some of the details of administrative systems. ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd Page 3 of 74 . monitoring administrative systems.

‘System’. viewed June 2010 <http://en. which involves inputs.org/wiki/System>.wikipedia. reporting)  behaviours (inputs. defined by parts and their composition.1 Systems have processes. energy or information. processes. Page 4 of 74 BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd . systems have a number of features in common. How well do you think the system works? Consider its:  structure (its parts)  relationships between parts (internal communication.  Systems have interconnectivity. outputs). the various parts of a system have functional as well as structural relationships between each other. inputs and outputs Example: Consider your place of study Your place of study is a system. These are:  Systems have structure.Introduction to Administrative Systems Student Workbook Features of systems Whether man-made or natural. ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ 1 Wikipedia. and outputs of material. processing.  Systems have behaviour. 2010.

g. a payroll system in MYOB or Quicken  paper based systems.g. regardless of whether they are big or small. those governing use of vehicles  physical systems. 2Investor words. a computer network  electronic systems.g.html> BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd Page 5 of 74 . search the internet for definitions of administrative systems.Student Workbook Introduction to Administrative Systems What are administrative systems? Administrative systems can be defined as ‘internal office and accounting functions. e.com/117/administrative_systems. e. Search for: Administrative systems To further develop your understanding of systems. a document filing system.’2 When you reflect on this definition and on the definition of ‘systems’ provided above.g. ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ Elements of administrative systems Administrative systems. e. an administrative system could include such varied systems as:  operational rules. Administrative Systems. You may want to try searching for:  office systems  administrative systems  financial systems  operational systems  IT systems. Try to find 5 or 6 examples that you can use for a group discussion with your peers. all have these common elements:  people  processes (activities or tasks)  equipment  rules. electronic or paper based. viewed November 2009 <http://www. e. simple or complex.investorwords.

From the IT department’s perspective. if people didn’t use the computers. if the system isn’t managed properly.Introduction to Administrative Systems Student Workbook Example: Student records system At your place of study. The human element Administrative systems require a degree of human intervention to work properly. there is a student records system that has all of the elements outlined above:  People – there is a Student Administration Officer (or similar role). and so on. everything would work just fine! Consider the things that need to be done to ensure that a computer network works properly. Some of these rules come from standards (AQTF or ISO) or from industry best practice.  Processes – There are also processes for carrying out key tasks and activities such as entering grades and producing certificates. timeframes to complete processes and so on. Try to name at least 6. Just to name a few.  Equipment – There are computers and software for recording student details such as grades. Intervention in systems can take many forms such as following:  management procedures  operational procedures  system maintenance procedures  data recording procedures. it breaks down.  Rules – Finally. If you are like most of us. Some require quite a bit of intervention to work properly. Learning activity: Computer systems A common workplace complaint is that the computer network doesn’t function the way it should. In brief. there are rules that govern the system. you shouldn’t find it too difficult! ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ Page 6 of 74 BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd . Rules govern things like backing up data. personal details. releasing information to 3rd parties.

BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd Page 7 of 74 . Virgil is surprised by how many systems are needed. administrative systems:  organisational change  system is outmoded/outdated/not working  ongoing commitment to quality  continuous improvement  to meet customer expectations  to comply with standards. evaluate quotes and so forth. He has also communicated with his contacts and networks to find out what systems they use and to get some feedback and advice. The firm is launching a new division and Virgil has the job of planning and implementing the administrative systems for the new division including:  Accounting System  Customer Relation Management System  Student Administration System  Document Management System. or review existing. He has done some internet searches for different systems. There can be many reasons to implement new. New systems An organisation will require a new administrative system when it is starting up or establishing a new office. develop specifications. Case Study: Setting up a training company Virgil is working as a project manager in a small firm. get quotes. source suppliers.Student Workbook Introduction to Administrative Systems Causes of change The need for new or improved administrative systems can occur at any time in an organisation’s lifecycle. He has found implementing the administrative systems to be quite a challenge since he has had to scope and plan the systems.

it would be submitted to Olivia to place in the centralised filing system.Introduction to Administrative Systems Student Workbook Modified systems On the other hand. ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ Page 8 of 74 BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd . an administrative system may be outmoded or outdated requiring a review. Olivia would often have to spend time searching for files only to find them sitting on an agent’s desk. so they were keeping their active files on their desk because they had nowhere else to store them. Learning activity: Filing system modification – Part 1 Olivia works in an administrative role in a real estate agency. Finally. It seemed that the agents felt that walking back and forth to the centralised filing system several times a day was a waste of time. The outcomes of this could range from a modification/upgrade to complete replacement of the system. she held a review of the filing system with the agents. A common occurrence was that the agents would remove files and leave them piled up on their desks rather than return them to the centralised filing system.  When the account was closed or no longer active. As a result. The outcomes were:  Agents were given filing cabinets next to their desks for active clients. Olivia was responsible for the filing system but these sloppy housekeeping behaviours meant that she was doing a lot of unnecessary cleaning up.  Agents would keep their active files in their cabinets. She was becoming frustrated with the sales agents’ lack of housekeeping.

___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd Page 9 of 74 . Review the project management life cycle below and record some the tasks that you would be carrying out at each stage of this project. For example:  managing change  communicating  providing leadership  budgeting  project managing  evaluating options  training and coaching  promoting team involvement. Imagine that you are responsible for upgrading the reception procedures in a workplace. you will have roles and responsibilities that you will need to fulfil. Compare and contrast your thoughts with your fellow learners.Student Workbook Introduction to Administrative Systems What is your role as manager? As a manager or as a person responsible for planning or reviewing an administrative system. This includes phone answering procedures as well as receiving visiting customers. Learning activity: Project management Project management skills are essential for planning or reviewing administrative systems.

 Risk identification and management.  Time and cost estimates (usually under-estimated). ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ Page 10 of 74 BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd . funding. or lack thereof. when planning for new administrative systems in particular. it is human nature to overlook or disregard problems with projects that you are leading. equipment. – Douglas Hofstadter Remember. even when you take into account Hofstadter's Law. Namely:  Communication. you will have heard from friends or colleagues of projects that haven’t succeeded. or lack thereof. or lack thereof. so you need to be aware of some cognitive biases:  optimism bias  benefit shortfall  planning fallacy. you should be aware of some of the common pitfalls of project management. or lack thereof. office space.  Resources – people.  Skill/experience of the project manager and team.Introduction to Administrative Systems Student Workbook A final word of caution Hofstadter's Law: It always takes longer than you expect. Remember. Further reading: Cognitive biases No doubt.  Scope creep – define the scope – agree and record changes.  Monitoring performance and meeting milestones. Do some online research about these topics and make notes on the meanings and implications of each.

Student Workbook Introduction to Administrative Systems ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd Page 11 of 74 .

sales.Section 1 – Plan or Review Systems Student Workbook Section 1 – Plan or Review Systems This section deals with the knowledge and skills that you will need to plan or review administrative systems in your workplace. This includes updating the operating systems and desktop applications to the same standard desktop which includes Windows 7 and Office 2007. Page 12 of 74 BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd . This is a big task.  Reviewing organisational goals and objectives.  Preparing the project plans. the organisation uses a number of different operating systems and applications which will need to run on the same standard desktop. Identifying requirements Effective planning and reviewing allows you to identify what has to be done. you must be able to:  identify requirements  obtain quotations  select suppliers or developers. This involves:  Complying with organisational systems. To make things more complicated. not to mention resistance to change from some of the employees. given the range of software and hardware that is used in the organisation. The firm employs approximately 25 office staff in roles such as administration. at what cost and when. production and engineering. by whom. What skills will you need? In order to plan or review administrative systems. marketing.  Stakeholder analysis and involvement. accounting.  Financial analysis of costs and benefits.  Defining the problems. standards and processes. purchasing. Sally is the administration manager and has recently been asked to manage the update of the computer systems for all employees. including a budget. Scenario: Where to begin? Sally works in a small firm that makes and sells camping equipment in Australia and abroad. It is going to be difficult.

Student Workbook Section 1 – Plan or Review Systems Some of the biggest problems encountered with new and modified administrative systems derive from inadequate definition and poor planning.youtube. Complying with organisational systems. and Australian Standards  legal requirements. How have Jeff and Alana managed continuous improvement within their Platinum Electrics business? ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ 2. identify the relevant systems and processes for planning and reviewing that your organisation currently has in place. What has been Alana’s role in the business? ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd Page 13 of 74 .com/ibsachannel>. Learning activity: Managing continuous improvement Watch the video ‘BSBADM504B: ‘Managing continuous improvement’ on IBSA’s YouTube channel at <http://www. Standards can include:  internal standards such as using Office 2007  external standards such as ISO. standards and processes Before you do anything. 1. Systems and processes can include:  project management  change management  continuous improvement  professional development  human resources  quality  occupational health and safety.

What might be the consequences if some of these were not complied with in the project? ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ Policy and procedures ensure that the organisation can meet legislative. or other requirements that relate to the operations of the company. They can be used by people or electronic systems alike to aid in decision making. Tip: Business rules When working with administrative systems. Business rules create an unambiguous statement of what a business does with information. What might be some of the systems standards and processes that need to be considered by Sally? List as many as you can think of below.Section 1 – Plan or Review Systems Student Workbook Learning activity: IT Scenario Consider the IT scenario above. These can often been found in a manual or on a corporate intranet. you may encounter the term ‘business rules’. For example:  when to reorder inventory  what events require disciplinary action  terms of payment for accounts. These are the rules that explain how processes operate. quality. Page 14 of 74 BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd .

Strategic goals and objectives are set at the top management level of the organisation and are implemented at the departmental level. In other words. towards which effort is directed. or end. 1998. Macquarie Concise Dictionary. Learning activity: Where do goals and objectives come from? Familiarise yourself with some of these strategic management terms on the internet to gain a better understanding of how goal and objectives set at the management level impact on operational levels. BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd Page 15 of 74 .Student Workbook Section 1 – Plan or Review Systems Review organisational goals and objectives A goal or objective is the aim. improving efficiency or improving customer satisfaction. the goal of the improvement may be part of a larger organisational goal. The Macquarie Library.3 An objective is a level of performance or achievement and can be monitored and graphed. ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ 3 Macquarie. 3rd edn. Macquarie. Look for:  quality function deployment  strategic planning  strategic management  Hoshin Kanri. A review of an administrative system may be triggered by a strategic goal of the organisation. such as lowering costs.g. e. “We will increase sales by 10% by the EOY 2009”.

Taking time to define the problem will. Example: IT Scenario Prior to the commencement of the new IT project. For example. in most cases. what kind of goals might the administration team need to consider? How might this goal impact on:  communication procedures (phone and email)  processing complaints  record keeping? ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ Define and analyse the problem Once you have established the goals for the administrative system. Page 16 of 74 BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd . then it is out of step with the organisation’s strategic goals and should be reconsidered. flush out whether we are concentrating on symptoms or problems.Section 1 – Plan or Review Systems Student Workbook Any improvement to administrative systems needs to be explained in terms of the organisation’s strategic goals. These were initially identified as training or motivational issues. Learning activity: IT Scenario Consider the IT scenario from the beginning of this section. This ensures that that the improvement can be justified to managers and operators alike. If the organisation had a goal of improving customer service. if the organisation has set a goal of reducing operational costs and your administrative improvement increases these costs. Information was being lost. you need to conduct a review of current operations to scope out and define the problem and requirements. ignored or misplaced. There were complaints about:  sending incompatible files  keeping critical information in spreadsheets on their own machines  not being able to access some company information from certain machines. there was some discussion in Sally’s department about problems with IT. Some of the supervisors thought that some of the employees just needed to ‘step it up’.

How are people affected by the problem? a. Ask questions about the problem to identify key behaviours and the people involved and their consequences: 1. How many people are affected? 3. Which specific behaviours need to change to address the problem? c. It was outmoded and not integrated. What types of people are affected? b. How significant is the effect? d. consider these questions:  Is it my problem?  Can I solve it? Is it worth solving?  Is this the real problem. How often does the problem occur? b. Who is affected by the problem? a. they pointed out that Sally’s company was looking at the problem in the wrong way. For what amount of time are people affected? c. they were only treating the symptom. By telling employees to ‘step it up’. or merely a symptom of a larger one?  If this is an old problem. The problem wasn’t with the people. not the problem. How important is the problem perceived to be? 2. How does this identification of target behaviours influence how we would address the problem? At this stage you may find that you do not have enough information to define the problem. Whose behaviour needs to change? b. it was with the system. what's wrong with the previous solution?  Does it need an immediate solution. Tip: Problem definition To further define the problem and decide whether to continue the process. after a consultant was brought in to advise on the problem. or can it wait?  Is it likely to go away by itself?  Can I risk ignoring it?  Does the problem have ethical dimensions?  What conditions must the solution satisfy?  Will the solution affect something that must remain unchanged? BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd Page 17 of 74 .Student Workbook Section 1 – Plan or Review Systems However. What behaviours (of whom) contribute to the problem? a.

around the office.Section 1 – Plan or Review Systems Student Workbook Problem solving tools Now that you have a better idea of what the problem is. When these were then submitted to Olivia for review. Some techniques for defining and analysing the problem and identifying requirements include:  brainstorming  Seven Wastes/waste walks  current state/future state  process mapping  workflow diagrams  value stream mapping  SIPOC – Suppliers. Customers  cause and effect diagrams  5 whys  spaghetti charts (as in the case study above)  analysing usage statistics  analysing procedures  work shadowing. you need the tools and techniques for coming up with a solution. Case Study: Filing system modification – Part 2 Do you remember the example from the introduction where the filing system was modified? In that example. Inputs. Process. Outputs. it was easy to determine how much unnecessary movement was occurring. This information made it easy to see that there was unnecessary and wasteful transport of files around the office. Page 18 of 74 BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd . they drew a line on the floor plan. or should move files. and led to the solution of providing the agents with their own filing cabinets. a simple floor plan was used by the agents to record how often they currently moved files. It is imperative that you collect data on how processes are currently done. Each time they moved a file. not on gut feelings. The most movement was happening where the lines were thickest on the floor plans. The decisions on the best solutions should be made on facts.

BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd Page 19 of 74 . there are inputs. It is standard practice to consult with people involved with the system at all of these stages. processes and outputs. Research some of these tools and consider how you could use them in analysing workplace processes and systems. ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ Involve the key stakeholders Stakeholders are people with a vested interest in the outcome of the project. contractors.  People who are affected by outputs – customers.Student Workbook Section 1 – Plan or Review Systems Learning activity: Problem solving tools The problem solving tools listed above are very simple and effective tools for measuring and analysing problems. managers. project activities. or may be affected by. Individuals and organisations that are involved in. Remember that with administrative systems. namely:  People involved with system processes – users. as with any system. This can include:  users  decision makers  customers  suppliers.  People influencing inputs – suppliers. decision makers.

but it won’t tell you what people want. Tip: Questioning techniques When interviewing stakeholders. Page 20 of 74 BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd . we looked at how to collect data to define the problem. ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ Determining requirements with stakeholders In the previous section.  Determine who to communicate what to and how often as part of implementing continuous improvement.Section 1 – Plan or Review Systems Student Workbook Search for: Stakeholder mapping Mapping of stakeholders is a tool to:  Understand the support and opposition to a planned change such as implementing a continuous improvement program. Open questions start with:  What?  Who?  Where?  How?  When?  Why? Open questions encourage people to talk more and open up. For that. Search the internet for examples of stakeholder mapping from different projects. Communication strategies include:  holding meetings  interviewing  surveying. you’ll need to talk to them. The stakeholder map is a simple table consisting of a rating of the level of support or opposition of identified stakeholder groups and individuals ranked by their level of power and influence over the project method or outcome. use open questions to encourage exploration of ideas and feelings about a proposed change. In contrast.  Determine the composition of a continuous improvement project team or a steering committee. you can use closed questions (questions that elicit a yes/no response) to clarify and verify what you think. Record them to review and discuss with fellow learners. This may tell you how things are currently done and where the problems are.

Aseervatham and Reid 2004. you may want to ask people:  How frequently do they use the system?  What do they use it for?  What features do they use?  What features do they like/dislike?  What features would they want in a new photocopier?  What problems do they experience?  What general comments would they like to make? (Note the use of open questioning techniques in this sample) Review plans and budgets You are probably familiar with plans.e. In the questionnaire. we need a response by the end of the week so we can review and place an order by Tuesday of the following week). In a business environment. Tell them why you are asking (i. Managing finance: prepare & manage budgets & financial plans. Sydney p. Pearson. 4 BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd Page 21 of 74 .e. We make plans all of the time for a range of purposes. All plans should contain information about:  goals  responsibilities  tasks  timelines. You plan holidays. Every plan has a budget Anandarajah. Budgets are the quantification of plans into monetary terms4. and family events. home renovations. you have been given the task of reviewing usage) and when you need a response by (i. 68.Student Workbook Section 1 – Plan or Review Systems Learning activity: Create a survey Create a simple questionnaire (five to ten questions) that can be given to employees to find out about their usage of a workplace system. every project must have a budget.

Pearson.000 $4. Some key features of budgets are:  they are related to the organisation’s plans  they refer to a future period  they have a defined period  they have a scope or area of responsibility.000 Backup system $3. Without budgets. Budget. Aseervatham and Reid 2004. 69-70 Page 22 of 74 BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd .500 6 $9.Section 1 – Plan or Review Systems Student Workbook Another definition of a budget is an “estimate of costs.000 1 $3. Prepare Managing finance: prepare & manage budgets & financial plans.com/> 6 Anandarajah.businessdictionary. and resources over a specified period.000 Review the budget shown above and consider: 5  When would this budget need to be reviewed?  Who would need to be involved in the review of this budget?  What you would do if the 6 desktop computers cost $1700 each Business Dictionary. a business’s costs could not be controlled and this could result in you and your colleagues being out of a job. A3 Mid-range desktop computers  17” monitors  3 year warranty Servers Network equipment $10. 5 Businesses need budgets Budgets are essential for the planning and control of business operations.6 Learning activity: IT budget Capital Budget for IT (Current financial year) Product (including specifications) Unit price Units Value ($) Printer $15. viewed August 2009.000 $1. Sydney pp. <http://www.000  Black and white only  40 pages per minute (minimum)  A4.500 2 $9. reflecting a management's reading of future financial conditions. revenues.000 1 $15.

and then  monitor the budgets Learning activity: How would you monitor your budget? Budgets are a key method of control in the workplace and ensuring that a new or modified system falls within budget is critical. Businesses:  set goals  create plans  budget for the plans. including. The reasons for this can be numerous. BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd Page 23 of 74 .Student Workbook Section 1 – Plan or Review Systems Budgets are a key method of control in a business. you will always encounter some resistance. ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ Some common problems When planning and reviewing administration systems.  fear of change  lack of capability  poor management support  resistance to change. For a new or modified administrative system. consider:  How you would review the budget?  How often would you review?  Who would need to be involved? Make notes in the space provided.

This is usually summarised in a specification or a statement of requirements. such as:  a new photocopier  a change in mail procedure  a change in record keeping procedure  implementation of an electronic CRM (customer relationship management) system. Discuss with your fellow learners:  Were the specifications sufficient?  What other things might you record? Page 24 of 74 BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd . At a minimum.Section 1 – Plan or Review Systems Student Workbook Obtaining quotations Before you begin contacting suppliers for quotes on the new or revised system. Work with your fellow learners to develop a specification for a new administrative system.  Performance standards – what performance are you expecting?  Internal and external standards – what other standards are relevant?  Processes/procedures – which ones will require revision?  Budget – what is your price range? Learning activity: Develop specifications Appendix 3 of this document contains a specification template to assist you in recording specifications.  User requirements/expectations. because the costs involved can vary. you need to ensure that you have a clear definition of what you require.  Proposed solution for new or modified administrative system. Any type of system can be used.  Goals and objectives of the new or modified administrative system. Develop a system specification Administrative system requirements often need to be summarised in a specification. Many administrative systems upgrades or replacements require products/ services that cannot have a standard upfront price. a specification should include:  Problem definition. including features and benefits. The specification should provide enough information about your administrative system requirements so that a supplier or developer can quote for a proposed solution.

you may be seeking out a supplier or a developer. Quotations A quotation is a fixed price for a fixed amount of products/ services carried out to a specification. Tenders The term ‘tender’ can refer to both a document and a process. A tender process is a competitive process where the client advertises/calls for tenders. you can then engage someone to get it done for you! Depending on what you need done.Student Workbook Section 1 – Plan or Review Systems ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ Engaging suppliers or developers Once you have written your requirements into a specification. These can be found in a variety of ways including:  existing suppliers  networks  media  call for tenders.  word of mouth Suppliers or developers can be engaged by:  working at set rate  providing a quotation  responding to a tender. The client may or may not accept the suppliers or developers tender bid. BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd Page 25 of 74 . You may need to consider/request options such as:  maintenance contracts  help desk support  supply contracts for consumables  other specific items related to the administrative system. Interested suppliers or developers then respond to the tender document (formal document which is prepared by a client) and submit a bid (offer) to the client.

___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ Page 26 of 74 BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd . Learning activity: Consumer protection What protection do you have if the contractor doesn’t deliver what you asked for? Identify what organisations can advise you in your state or territory. Search for:  consumer affairs  fair trading  contracts.Section 1 – Plan or Review Systems Student Workbook Tenders are more common in public sector organisations. Discuss your findings with your fellow learners and facilitator.

This may be a written policy or in some organisations. you may need to seek advice from a person responsible for the purchasing function. As a result. Learning activity: Purchasing policy Imagine that you work in a small business and your department needs to purchase a new photocopier that can be assumed to cost approximately $3000.Student Workbook Section 1 – Plan or Review Systems Complying with organisational policy and procedure When obtaining quotes. i. the purchasing officer. It is rare (and dangerous) for the decision on successful quotes to be up to one person. Review the purchasing procedure in Appendix 7and answer the following. BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd Page 27 of 74 .e. you may be required to:  form a selection panel  complete a report  submit findings to a decision maker. be sure to review your organisational purchasing policy. what happens next? ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ Selecting suppliers or developers Your organisation may have policy and procedures that must be followed for selecting suppliers or developers. a) Are you making a material expenditure or a capital expenditure? b) How many separate quotes must be obtained? c) Who must approve the purchase and what information must you provide to them? d) Once the purchase has been approved.

Learning activity: Source policy documents Imagine that you are working for an organisation that has recently had some disputes with contractors. You may also want to search the internet for examples. He asked them to do the job and when he reported this back to his manager. Page 28 of 74 BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd . Wayne had not complied with them. You must develop a policy and procedure for engaging contractors that will reduce the risk of these types of disputes re-occurring. ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ Evaluating suppliers When evaluating quotes. Wayne should have understood and followed these policy and procedures before organising a contract. Use some of the ideas you have been introduced to in this section.Section 1 – Plan or Review Systems Student Workbook Example: Follow workplace policy and procedures! Wayne worked in the IT department of an educational institution. It turned out that his educational institution had policy and procedures for:  engagement of contractors  conflict of interest. The IT department needed to create a new online database and had decided to contract this work out as a project. Wayne was in charge of the budget for the project and he did casual work with a firm (unrelated to his educational work) that he thought could do the job. it is recommended that you:  involve the key stakeholders  use selection criteria  evaluate the supplier as well as the product  use the internet or technical experts as needed. The cause of this has been a poor tendering process. Wayne was asked why he hadn’t followed organisational procedure.

Student Workbook Section 1 – Plan or Review Systems Websites: Whirlpool A number of websites are available to help you evaluate suppliers. the Whirlpool knowledge base is an Australian website <http://whirlpool. BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd Page 29 of 74 . For example. Search the internet for websites that evaluate and compare other administrative systems. Compare your findings with your fellow learners.net. ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ Section summary You should now understand how to plan or review administrative systems including:  identify requirements  obtain quotations  select suppliers or developers.au/wiki/> that is ‘devoted to keeping the public informed about the state of internet access in Australia’.

it was clear to Sally that a number of other things needed to be addressed if the administrative change was going to work smoothly. implementing the changes. Page 30 of 74 BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd . However.Section 2 – Implement Systems Student Workbook Section 2 – Implement Systems This section deals with the next step after planning and reviewing administrative systems. Scenario: IT system A supplier was chosen to provide and install the new computer systems and software. It was a bigger job than she even imagined! What skills will you need? In order to implement new or modified administrative systems. Sally chose to do a number of things to make the process go more ‘smoothly’:  develop an implementation plan  communicate the plan to all stakeholders  pilot new systems with early adopters (enthusiastic people)  obtain their feedback and then implement across the organisation  update procedures  anticipate training needs. you must be able to:  develop implementation strategies  obtain staff participation  define and communicate procedures  provide training and support  deal with contingencies.

Learning activity: Develop an implementation plan Use the template in Appendix 1 to develop an implementation plan for a proposed change. Act  test with early adopters. Do. It differs from a To Do list in that it focuses on the achievement of a single goal. the additional resources required to complete the task. simply list the tasks that you need to carry out to achieve your goal. when you will complete the task. ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd Page 31 of 74 . Some recommendations for implementing new or modified administrative systems include:  develop and communicate a plan  follow a methodology like PDCA –Plan. and only then. Develop and communicate the plan An implementation plan is a list of tasks that you have to carry out in order to achieve an objective. Check. did she implement the changes across the board. Then. Wherever you want to achieve something. To draw up an implementation plan. Consider:  Why would it be important to review plans with key stakeholders?  How would you communicate the final plan? Write your thoughts about these points below. draw up an implementation plan. Compare your plan with your fellow learners. Sally chose to implement the administrative changes on a small scale and evaluate them. This allows you to concentrate on the stages of that achievement. and where necessary.Student Workbook Section 2 – Implement Systems Developing implementation strategies In the scenario above. and monitor your progress towards it.

Section 2 – Implement Systems Student Workbook The implementation plan should be communicated to all stakeholders. Check. The Plan-Do-Check-Act Cycle has specific objectives for each stage of the cycle. Plan. Edwards Deming and is now often referred to as the Deming Cycle. Learning activity: PDCA Consider how you would implement PDCA for:  A change in the filing system in your department.  A change in record keeping for petty cash.  Plan – plan the improvement  Do – on a small scale  Check – evaluate the results  Act – implement the improvement. Act The PDCA cycle provides a simple methodology for continuous improvement. Do. ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ Page 32 of 74 BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd .  The implementing of a new CRM across the entire organisation. PDCA is a continuous cycle The cycle was later popularised by W.

the improvement. Your role is to manage for the large majority. consistently. The subjective norm they experience must be positive towards the improvement. persistently and insistently followed. Understanding what motivates your employees can be determined by observing. it is the working environment that motivates employees.Student Workbook Section 2 – Implement Systems Obtaining staff participation For employees to participate in any workplace improvement there are three imperatives: 1. and encourage their participation in. they must believe that the people who influence them the most in their work environment have respect for. There will always be some cynics and people who believe that their notoriety is more important to them than being a team member. Environmental considerations may include but is not limited to:  mutual respect frontline manager to employee  a clean and tidy workplace  the right tools for the job  future employment security  satisfied customers  mutual respect amongst team members  a clear goal. They must believe that their friends and colleagues who they respect believe that improvement is a good thing to engage in. They must perceive that they have control in execution of the improvement. not the noisy minority. Further. A word of caution Not all employees are affected positively by the working environment you create. Creating the right attitude Creating the right attitude towards a new or modified system requires an understanding of what motivates an employee. authority and data available for them to actually participate in the improvement. Once you have determined what working environment aspects create the right attitude amongst a large majority of employees. They must believe that they have the necessary skills. BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd Page 33 of 74 . Generally. the team they work in. 3. undertaking a quantitative survey. or a combination of all of these. and the organisation as a whole 2. it is your role as frontline manager with support of your one-up manager to create that environment. conducting focus groups. They must have the attitude that the change is good for them as an individual.

Insistent about:  employees participation in improvement  errors being reduced  two-way communication  the provision of appropriate tools and availability of data for employees trying to implement improvements. insistent and persistent! Consistent in:  their communication about the goal  their approach to all employees  their application of standards  their reaction to errors as something to be eliminated  the manner in which they reward and recognise employees and the reason for rewarding employees  making sure all voices are heard when discussing the nature of and solutions to problems. What elements of a working environment create a positive attitude from you in relation to your work? What elements do you think would create a positive attitude for others that you work with? ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ Creating the right subjective norm Altering people’s subjective norm to one which supports improvement requires frontline managers to be consistent.Section 2 – Implement Systems Student Workbook Learning activity: What working environment works for me? Reflect on your attitudes to work. Persistent in:  their communications about the benefits of improvements  their encouragement of employees to bring forward ideas to improve processes Page 34 of 74 BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd .

Student Workbook Section 2 – Implement Systems  the need for continuous improvement despite setbacks which occur from time to time  the application of a rewards and recognition scheme for people actively participating in improvement. how persistent.  What is the attitude of those people about the habit?  Of the groups which are against smoking.  Empowerment – Authority to make decisions and make improvements. they require:  Information – the right data available to make effective decisions. persistence and consistence of support amongst those people that influence the individual? ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ Creating the perception of control For employees to perceive they have control over their involvement in and application of continuous improvement. BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd Page 35 of 74 . Learning activity: Subjective norms Think about a bad habit you or a family member or friend has that they want to but do not seem to be able to break.  What would you expect the result of your family member or friend to be when given insistence. insistent and consistent are they about the helping (not nagging) the individual give up the habit.  Who influences them most in respect to the issues surrounding this habit? This may be individuals or groups of people (rank the top three). skills and knowledge to execute continuous improvement processes and use continuous improvement tools. Smoking is a common example.  Training – behaviour.

Contrast the level of data. Jobs I enjoyed Jobs I disliked Data availability Behaviour Skills Knowledge Authority Page 36 of 74 BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd . competence and authority you had between the ones you enjoyed and the ones you did not. Think of ones you really enjoyed and ones you did not.Section 2 – Implement Systems Student Workbook Learning activity: What is your perceived level of control over your key job deliverables? Reflect on your job and jobs you have had. and fill out the following table.

Imagine if they didn’t….Student Workbook Section 2 – Implement Systems Defining and communicating procedures Changes in processes that are a consequence of new or modified administrative systems must be documented in policy and procedures. A procedure is ‘the sequence of actions or instructions to be followed in solving a problem or accomplishing a task’. there is some scope for variation in how this achieved. BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd Page 37 of 74 .you might not get the correct grades! Search the internet for ‘record management policy’. When systems are updated or modified.cfm>.au/policies/az_index. An example is provided below:  <http://policies. While the policy gives an indication of the expected outcome. the related procedures must be updated. Some examples include:  filing procedure  telephone answering procedure  document version control procedure  website updating procedure.curtin.edu. The best procedures:  reflect how people actually work  comply with organisational policies  are simple and effective  are developed in collaboration with the people performing the related task. A policy is a statement about an issue that says what the organisation plans to do about the issue. Some examples include:  privacy policy  record management policy  security policy  purchasing policy. Example: A record management procedure Educational institutions often have well designed record management policies and procedures.

taking out the garbage. Work with the group to develop an standard approach to this task. Information is often circulated by:  presentations  distribution lists  noticeboards  corporate intranets  email  staff meetings. 4. composting. 3. 2. there is a job role such as a Quality Manager that is responsible for communicating procedural changes. In most workplaces there is a procedure for doing this.g. Record it on the template. e. 1.Section 2 – Implement Systems Student Workbook Learning activity: Develop a standard procedure Use the standard operating procedure template in Appendix 2 to develop a procedure. doing the dishes. ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ Communicate procedures Ensure that revised and updated procedures are circulated to all stakeholders. Select a task that everyone does. Page 38 of 74 BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd . Work with a group or team of people (people you live with is fine). Note: In many large organisations.

Student Workbook Section 2 – Implement Systems Learning activity: Communication strategy Consider an organisation that you work for. Imagine that you have introduced a change in the filing system that affects everyone in the organisation. or you may need to use outside contractors. updated and circulated. How would you communicate this? ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ Providing training and support Once procedures are revised. Anticipating training needs Complex and large scale changes may require greater planning and effort. system users must be retrained in the new procedures. you may be able to do the retraining in-house. you may need to:  conduct training needs assessments  conduct skills audits  prepare multi-level training programs. or would like to work for. Start with the procedures Small scale and simple changes in administrative systems can be addressed by some basic coaching techniques that are based around the revised procedures. For example. BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd Page 39 of 74 . Depending on the change.

com/ibsachannel>. What is Alana explaining in the video? ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ Page 40 of 74 BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd . ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ 2.Section 2 – Implement Systems Student Workbook Learning activity: Training staff Watch the video ‘BSBADM504B: ‘Training staff’ on IBSA’s YouTube channel at <http://www.youtube. Explain how Jeff supports his sales staff to be more self reliant in his business. 1.

You need to be able identify. one thing is certain. Settling in period Regardless of the size or complexity of the change. recruiting or outsourcing. who has been retrained in the revised procedures.  Random failures – during the useful life of the product. you need to provide additional support during this period. This information is often presented in a table or matrix.Student Workbook Section 2 – Implement Systems Example: Skills audit It is essential to have a skills matrix for your employees. In the example shown below. Each employee is given a rating for their level of competence in each skill. The stages are characterised by:  Early failures – during the ‘infant mortality’ phase of the product.  Wear out failures – at the end of the useful life of the product. In order to avoid failures during startup.  provide extra training sessions  follow up with users  provide a help desk  actively seek feedback. at a glance. Extra effort is required from the introduction of the change to address both expected and unexpected problems. The skills gaps can be easily identified and then addressed through training. BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd Page 41 of 74 . procedures are listed down the rows and the employees appear across the columns. Tip: The bathtub curve A useful analogy is the ‘bathtub curve’ that states that products tend to fail during the start or end of their life.

Section 2 – Implement Systems Student Workbook Useful life Once the administrative system has entered into this stage. Inductions are a good opportunity to introduce new staff to administrative systems. equipment. Tip: Add training program to induction Your human resource department may have developed an induction program. you need to ensure that training is provided as required. After all. This may include educating colleagues about the system through:  induction training  refresher training. Page 42 of 74 BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd . materials. and so on. and this can affect your business. Dealing with contingencies Taking precautions is an important part of implementation. Reliable systems = happy customers What can go wrong? There are a lot of things that you can do to safeguard against things going wrong. things do go wrong with suppliers. such as:  obtaining insurances and warranties  organising maintenance contracts and supply contracts  sourcing new or alternative suppliers  providing training for employees  staying informed about your industry trends and happenings.

Example: IT problems Reliable on-site technicians are hard to come by… but anyone can sell you a new keyboard. Typically. and at times. Identifying ways to reduce those risks. your organisation should have a plan in place that outlines what to do if you have problems with your key suppliers. Determining the risk/probability of these occurring 4. Assessing the vulnerability of resources to specific threats – how serious is it? 3. As you may guess. and risk management for other areas (supply. five being disastrous) and what you could do to manage the risk. confusing. just the high priority ones that would have serious impacts on your business. Compare and discuss your conclusions with your fellow learners. You should have a basic understanding of risk management from your OHS training. risk management processes involve: 1. you don’t have to control every risk. equipment failure) follows a similar process as assessing health and safety risks. Rate the level of risk of the following on a scale of one to five (one being inconvenient. Rating Risk Management Hard disk failure Keyboard is broken Photocopier breakdown Toner needs changing Running out of printer paper BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd Page 43 of 74 . identifying threats or hazards 2. Prioritising risk management measures 5. Risk management plans can be quite detailed.Student Workbook Section 2 – Implement Systems Have a risk management strategy Your organisation will probably have a method for managing risks to key resources. It may include things as obvious as those listed above. However.

Section 2 – Implement Systems Student Workbook Assessing your resources It is important that your resources and their suppliers are reputable and reliable. ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ Page 44 of 74 BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd . Some factors to assist you in assessing suppliers are:  How long have they been in the industry?  Who are their customers/clients?  Do they comply with industry standards? Further reading: Look for standards It is always a good sign if your supplier can publish that they comply with relevant industry standards. with appropriate and corrective action where necessary  regularly reviewing individual processes and the quality system itself for effectiveness  facilitating continual improvement. Learning activity: Risk management Develop a risk management strategy for the IT equipment of an organisation of your choice. ISO 9001 is part of this family and concentrates on the following in a business:  monitoring processes to ensure they are effective  keeping adequate records  checking output for defects. ISO 9000 is a family of standards for qualtiy management systems. ISO stands for the International Organisation for Standardisation.org/wiki/ISO_9000>. For more information go to <http://en.wikipedia.

Student Workbook Section 2 – Implement Systems Section summary You should now understand how to implement new or modified administrative systems:  develop implementation strategies  obtain staff participation  define and communicate procedures  provide training and support  deal with contingencies. BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd Page 45 of 74 .

Section 3 – Monitor Systems

Student Workbook

Section 3 – Monitor Systems
Finally, once new or revised administrative systems have been implemented, they
need to be monitored and continually improved.
Scenario: IT system
Remember Sally from the earlier scenario? The new administrative system has
been implemented and seems to be working well.
The company are now past the settling in stage and people are using the system
effectively.
However, there are still opportunities to improve the system and it is important
to monitor the system and keep making improvements.
Sally’s role is now more focused on monitoring and making incremental
improvements.

What skills will you need?
In order to monitor administrative systems, you must be able to:
 monitor system
 continually improve
 address training needs.

Monitoring the system
Monitoring administrative systems is not a static process. The purpose is to
continually improve processes and systems.
Monitoring progress
Monitoring of progress is completed to achieve one or more of three aims:
1. To determine the gap between existing and desired performance.
2. To review the progress of implementation and maintenance of a system.
3. To ensure procurement, production, and delivery of your products/
services are not moving outside performance standards.
Performance and progress over time may be monitored by a wide range of
methods including:

paper continuous improvement records, for example, check sheets

templates including excel templates for check sheets, histograms and
process control charts

Page 46 of 74

BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems
© 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd

Student Workbook

Section 3 – Monitor Systems

databases of information cross referenced against people, equipment,
time of day and source of inputs

computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) systems including wireless
remote data collection devices automatically uplinked to the system an
data recorded directly from robotics, scales, process logic controllers etc.

feedback from service users/families

performance indicators
o cascaded down from the organisation goal
o cascaded down from customer requirements
o created from benchmarking against internal or external competition

audits of the continuous improvement process

workplace health and safety audits

incident/accident reports

service user surveys

complaints systems

suggestion boxes

third party quality assessments/audits

staff performance appraisals

evaluations of staff in-service training.

To improve progress in the implementation of a system or in closing gaps in
performance within current system, the factors which inhibit performance must be
identified and addressed.

BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems
© 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd

Page 47 of 74

Section 3 – Monitor Systems

Student Workbook

Tip: Dashboards
Digital dashboards are management tools that provide
constantly updated visual information about the
performance of an organisation.
Benefits of using digital dashboards include:

visual presentation of performance measures

ability to identify and correct negative trends

measure efficiencies/inefficiencies

ability to generate detailed reports showing
new trends

ability to make more informed decisions based on collected business
intelligence

align strategies and organisational goals

save time over running multiple reports

gain total visibility of all systems instantly.

technical monitoring.7

Audits of systems
Audits of implementation of administrative systems require some form of
standard upon which to base the audit.
One of the most commonly used quality management standards is AS/NZS ISO
9001: 2000 Quality management systems – Requirements.
This is an international system for recognising organisations that have appropriate
quality management systems in place.
AS/NZS ISO 9001: 2000 Quality management systems – Requirements -based
management systems focus on putting in place quality controls to ensure
consistency and improvement of key processes, which in turn provide products
and services that better meet customers' requirements.
The specific requirements under ISO 9001 cover:

management system

management responsibility

resource management

product realisation

measurement analysis and improvement.

7 <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dashboards_(management_information_systems)> , viewed November
2009

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Section 3 – Monitor Systems

To audit a continuous improvement system against standards such as ISO 9001
requires audit teams to be assembled.
Internal audit teams should be drawn from a pool of people experienced in quality
systems and continuous improvement systems.
External audit teams can be procured from registered firms who have certified
auditors in the particular continuous improvement systems.
Conducting an audit begins with understanding the goal of the audit and what
specifically is to be assessed. For example, the goal may be to analyse the
effectiveness of monitoring. The specific areas to be assessed may then include
but not be limited to:

training of new staff in monitoring processes

training of existing staff when monitoring processes change

effectiveness and consistency of monitoring

effectiveness of the communication of the results of monitoring

use of appropriate tools to monitor

timeliness of monitoring

appropriateness of monitoring in delivering against customer
requirements.

Internal audits can be conducted on a cyclical basis so that the entire operation
and the entire continuous improvement system are analysed on a regular basis.

Continually improving the system
What is continuous improvement?
Continuous improvement is a systematic approach to making things better. It can
be referred to as process improvement, or Kaizen.
Continuous improvement is the ‘programmed, and an almost unbroken, flow of
improvements realised under a scheme such as Kaizen, lean production, or
total quality management (TQM).’8
Three streams of conceptual thinking and philosophies have emerged which
relate directly to continuous improvement. These are:

Total Quality Management

Lean Manufacturing

Six Sigma.

8Business Dictionary, Continuous Improvement, Viewed November 2009,
<http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/continuous-improvement.html>.

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List at least five similarities below and compare with your fellow learners.Section 3 – Monitor Systems Student Workbook Research: Continuous improvement systems Conduct some internet research on the continuous systems listed above. Page 50 of 74 BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd . Five of the more commonly used techniques are:  value stream mapping  brainstorming  5 whys  cause and effect analysis  force field analysis. Identify some of the common features of all of these systems. ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ There are many methods for analysing the factors which inhibit performance.

to get broad stakeholder input and to be able to build on each others ideas. Brainstorming can be used to both identify and to solve factors which inhibit performance. When you are unsure of what the problem area is or when you want to unearth where issues exist in a set of processes you know is not performing to customer expectations. Consider purchasing value stream mapping pads which come with defined icons you many use to establish a common visual language. however. In negative brainstorming the question to be asked is why we can not improve our performance. A Value stream map Brainstorming Use brainstorming to access the creative sides of employee’s brains. Human nature is such that we find it easier to think of why not. Your organisation may have software which helps in the generation of the value stream.Student Workbook Section 3 – Monitor Systems Value stream mapping Use value stream mapping to get the “big picture” of your end-to-end processes. pencil and paper are just as useful and often more engaging for the team as all team members can be involved. Use a cross-functional team with all stakeholders represented. rather than “How can we? “ Utilising this negative aspect of our nature in brainstorming quickly creates a list of factors inhibiting performance. or against benchmarks. A mode of brainstorming which is particularly good at identifying factors which inhibit performance is negative brainstorming. BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd Page 51 of 74 .

This is an affinity diagram. Example: Filing system modification – Part 4 Following the brainstorm. Olivia and the participants organised the possible causes under headings.Section 3 – Monitor Systems Student Workbook Example: Filing system modification – Part 3 Do you remember the example from the Introduction where Olivia introduced a new filing system because people weren’t doing their filing? In order to identify possible causes of the problem. Olivia held a brainstorm and the participants came up with a number of issues which were recorded on sticking notes. Sticky notes rearranged into an affinity diagram Page 52 of 74 BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd . Disorganised sticky notes following a brainstorm Brainstorming the elements that may contribute to performance inhibition and creating an affinity diagram can be used as a precursor to building the fishbone (Ishikawa) diagram.

materials. who? Example: Fishbones The fishbone (Ishikawa) diagram does not establish root cause. Five whys may be conducted subjectively using the experience of employees and other stakeholders involved in the process in question. You may want to use some of the often-used categories:  Human resources. workers.  Clients. the 5 whys technique becomes much more powerful. and equipment. However. A cause and effect diagram 5 whys Use the 5 whys alone or in conjunction with a fishbone (Ishikawa) diagram to try to drive to the root cause. when. methods. measurements. where.  What. BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd Page 53 of 74 . if quantitative data is available. how. It creates a visual record of one or more hypotheses about root cause. Each hypothesis still needs to be tested. environment.Student Workbook Section 3 – Monitor Systems Cause and affect analysis Use cause and effect analysis to drill down on particular problems. and procedures. supplies.

You may want to discuss your findings with your facilitator or fellow learners.Section 3 – Monitor Systems Student Workbook Force Field Analysis Use force field analysis to analyse the impact of physical processes. ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ Page 54 of 74 BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd . It is often more instructive in a force-field analysis to think about ways of reducing the forces against performance than redoubling the forces pushing performance. employees’ skills and knowledge. Force field chart Learning activity: Research improvement techniques Research the improvement techniques above and indentify how each could be used to identify administrative system improvements. and the psychological aspects of employees and other stakeholder’s behaviour on performance.

Generally. Who do we coach? Traditionally. between five and ten minutes.  Behaviours – include things like attitude towards workmates. rather than directing them to the solution. however. What do we coach? When we are talking about coaching people’s work performance.Student Workbook Section 3 – Monitor Systems Monitoring and addressing training needs Training needs must constantly be monitored to ensure that skills and abilities are updated with changes in administrative systems. Work coaching Workplace coaching is a collection of methods and techniques used by managers and supervisors to help them to maintain or improve their employees’ work performance. we are usually talking about:  Task goals – include bottom line targets that are measured by KPIs production goals.  Keep coaching conversations brief. It is a simple way to set. managing has involved controlling and directing the work of other people. personal attire. This may involve tasks such as:  induction training  refresher training  performance management  meetings  training matrix/skills matrix.  A coaching meeting should focus on just one or two aspects of performance. BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd Page 55 of 74 . attendance at important meetings. deadlines. Most employees can benefit from coaching in some way. the manager works with the employees to guide them towards solving problems for themselves. Any more than that and employees won’t remember the main impact of your meeting. most performance problems can be resolved through effective communication between managers and employees.  Non-task goals – include targets such as housekeeping. and monitor goals in a collaborative way. How do we coach? Good coaches challenge employees and ask questions that help the employee to discover how to improve. Coaching applies to any skill at any time. and participation in continuous improvement. quality standards. As a coach. discuss.  Coach when you wish to focus attention on any specific aspect of the employee's performance.

Characteristics of good coaches Good coaches:  understand employees’ jobs  make decisions on facts not feelings  are visible  don’t procrastinate  lead by example  listen more than talk.youtube.Section 3 – Monitor Systems Student Workbook  Being an effective coach requires an understanding of what motivates the members of your team.  When things are performing well.  are sincere and honest Learning activity: Benefits of coaching Watch the video ‘BSBADM504B: ‘Benefits of coaching’ on IBSA’s YouTube channel at <http://www. or let employees work through the problems for themselves?  Observe the employee's work and be alert for certain triggers or signs. you may notice an attitude or behaviour creeping in. take the time to understand what is working and why. 1.  Coach when you want to focus attention on any specific aspect of the employee's performance.  Be sure you document any key elements that come out of your coaching sessions and store them in the employee’s file.  practice what they preach  seek assistance when necessary. Be sensitive to the things that drive your people to perform.  Good coaching is guiding.com/ibsachannel>. Ask them: ‘How do you think we should handle this?’ When do we coach? Coaching is different to formal training. not telling or doing.  Allow the employee to own the problem and its solutions.  Don’t hesitate – do it now. Why did Josh Nicholls feel he needed a coach? ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ Page 56 of 74 BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd . or you discover a slump in the weekly KPIs. Coaching is a process that is most effective when it happens daily. But how do you know when you should step in. For example. Remember that people are motivated in different ways.

Steve has gained a valuable asset and is now looking at more training to help Alex develop his career. The first thing Steve asked was for Alex to write a list of the things he was good at and the things he wasn't good at. what was Josh’s next step for the business? ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ Example: The life of a workplace coach Steve is a Department manager with a team of eight employees. He notices that one of his staff members. seems to lack direction. Alex is now the first one at work every day and is being recognised as a motivated team member. Steve approached Alex and asked if he wanted to try coaching. What did the coaching enable Josh to do? ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ 3. but has had little or no success. This gave them both a focus on the areas they could work on to help him improve over the coaching and monitoring period. Instead of potentially losing a staff member. Steve has tried a number of things. After successful coaching. Alex. BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd Page 57 of 74 . and has a number of performance issues – regularly showing up late for work and taking more sick days than the other employees. and having a successful system to manage. displays low selfesteem. Steve spoke to Jill in HR who suggested he might try coaching Alex.Student Workbook Section 3 – Monitor Systems 2. Six months later the improvements were noticeable. They both agreed it was worth trying and they agreed to work together once a week over three months.

The team member should now have a clear idea of how to deal with the situation. Current reality Getting to the root cause of problems means asking the team member about what is happening and how the problem is affecting them. Important information that can help to solve the problem is often missed. Often managers can leap to a conclusion about solving a performance problem. it's time to start exploring the alternatives for solving the problem. It should be a two-way process. GROW is an acronym that stands for: Goal – Current Reality – Options – Will. and the employee’s goals may need to be revisited and reviewed. The final step for you as a coach is to get them to commit to taking action. a number of different workplace coaching models exist. so encourage the team member for their ideas and views about what might be done. GROW is a simple but effective model for running coaching sessions.Section 3 – Monitor Systems Student Workbook The GROW Model In the world of performance management. Ask questions like:  What other options have you considered for how we might handle this?  What are the alternatives?  How else could we approach this? What risks are involved?  What are the possible risks involved in these other options?  What constraints exist? Will By this stage you will have examined the Current Reality and canvassed the options for what could be done.  So how will you take this forward?  How are you going to achieve this?  What obstacles could prevent this happening?  What else will you do? Page 58 of 74 BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd . Some useful coaching questions include:  How is this change affecting your work?  If things changed do we need to revisit how we planned to approach this? Options Once you and your team member have explored the Current Reality. Goal Things can change.

Use the skills matrix in Appendix 6 to list the key procedures/tasks and monitor the team’s level of skills in the procedures/tasks.Student Workbook Section 3 – Monitor Systems Learning activity: Skills audit Consider the skills required in the filing system modification example and create a skills matrix. Compare and contrast your tasks with your fellow learners. ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd Page 59 of 74 .

Section 3 – Monitor Systems Student Workbook Section summary You should now understand how to monitor administrative systems and continually improve them:  monitor system  continually improve  address training needs. Page 60 of 74 BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd .

9Business Dictionary. Coaching Extending traditional training methods to include focus on (1) an individual's needs and accomplishments. organisational structure. Also called business process redesign. (2) close observation. service. BPM can now be effectively managed with software that is customised based on the metrics and policies specified by a company. He or she works in an advisory capacity only and is usually not accountable for the outcome of a consulting exercise. and response time) through the in-depth use of information technology. evaluate. The mentor is responsible for providing support to. or guide to a junior or trainee.businessdictionary. and (3) impartial and non-judgmental feedback on performance. counsellor. which measure a firm's performance in critical areas. KPIs show the progress (or lack of it) toward realising the firm's objectives or strategic plans by monitoring activities which (if not properly performed) would likely cause severe losses or outright failure. Mentoring Employee training system under which a senior or more experienced individual (the mentor) is assigned to act as an advisor. and underlying assumptions and beliefs. BPR's main objective is to break away from old ways of working. cash collection efficiency. and return on investment (ROI). management systems. and feedback on.com/> BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd Page 61 of 74 . Business Process Management Activity undertaken by businesses to identify. Change Management Minimising resistance to organisational change through involvement of key players and stakeholders. and effect radical (not incremental) redesign of processes to achieve dramatic improvements in critical areas (such as cost. the individual in his or her charge. job definitions. quality.Student Workbook Glossary Glossary9 Term Definition Acquisition Taking possession of an asset by purchase. Consultants Experienced professional who provides expert knowledge (often packaged under a catchy name) for a fee. work flow. Business Process Reengineering Thorough rethinking of all business processes. and improve business processes. With the advancement of technology. viewed Novemeber 2009 <http://www. KPI Key business statistics such as number of new orders.

off the shelf. or standard goods or services. energy. Also called vendor. time. at every stage. and routines established or formulated to carry out a specific activity. as opposed to a contractor or subcontractor who commonly adds specialised input to deliverables. System Set of detailed methods. procedures. producer. and facilities for activities where the firm holds competitive advantage. money) to convert inputs (data. perform a duty. or solve a problem. Suppliers External entity that supplies relatively common. machines.) into outputs. parts. material. Training Organised activity aimed at imparting information and/or instructions to improve the recipient's performance or to help him or her attain a required level of knowledge or skill. Page 62 of 74 BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd . Process Sequence of interdependent and linked procedures which. consume one or more resources (employee time. personnel.Glossary Student Workbook Term Definition Outsourcing Contracting. Vendors Manufacturer. etc. sub-contracting. These outputs then serve as inputs for the next stage until a known goal or end result is reached. or 'externalising' non-core activities to free up cash. or seller.

Student Workbook Appendices Appendices Appendix 1 – Implementation plan template Appendix 2 – Standard operating procedure template Appendix 3 – Specification template Appendix 4 – Case study Appendix 5 – Stakeholder mapping template Appendix 6 – Skills matrix Appendix 7 – Purchasing policy Appendix 8 – Reframing matrix template Appendix 9 – Answers to selected learning activities. BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd Page 63 of 74 .

Appendices Student Workbook Appendix 1: Implementation plan template Goal: Priority Page 64 of 74 Task/Action Who Due Date BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd .

Student Workbook Appendices Appendix 2: Standard operating procedure (SOP) template SOP NAME: TASK DESCRIPTION: DEPARTMENT: SOP#: APPROVED BY: Date: Procedure: # Action Description Standard Required Who If successful. sign and date: Job title Name Signature Date Employee/Candidate Supervisor/Assessor BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd Page 65 of 74 .

Appendices Student Workbook Appendix 3: Specification template Problem definition Proposed solution (for new or modified administrative system) Goals and objectives (of the new or modified administrative system) User requirements/expectations (including features and benefits) Performance standards (what performance are you expecting?) Internal and external standards (what other standards are relevant?) Processes/procedures (which ones will require revision?) Budget (what is your price range?) Page 66 of 74 BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd .

Your business unit is responsible for administrative systems. BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd Page 67 of 74 .Student Workbook Appendices Appendix 4: Case study You are working for a large insurance company with offices located throughout Australia. The strategic plan states that the organisation will reduce carbon emissions by 20% over the next two years. The goal is: To reduce carbon emissions by 20% over the next two years without impacting negatively on sales. The organisation is rather ‘old-fashioned’ in that most business is done by phone or by agents who travel to see customers. Each business unit is required to develop strategies and plans for their unit to meet this goal.

Appendices Student Workbook Appendix 5: Stakeholder mapping template Opposition Active opponents Passive opponents Support Fence-sitters Passive supporters Active supporters Stakeholder power High Medium Low Page 68 of 74 BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd .

Student Workbook Appendices Appendix 6: Skills matrix template Team member Work task Legend: Untrained Team member has no training Learner Team member cannot perform task independently Practitioner Team member can perform task independently with supervision Operator Team member can perform task independently Coach Team member can train others to perform task BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd Page 69 of 74 .

Warehouse Manager.  Capital expenditures – expenditures to new equipment or administrative systems. Procedure Definitions  Material expenditures – expenditures for normal day to day operations.  Purchasing Officer – responsible for documentation and process. Approving Material Expenditure  Material expenditures are the responsibility of the departmental manager. Policy  organisation funds are only used for work-related purposes  purchases are cost effective  purchasing procedures must comply with relevant legislation  failure to comply with this policy and its procedures will result in disciplinary measures. Page 70 of 74 BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd .  Purchasing Committee – is responsible for decisions on capital expenditures. namely: Manufacturing Manager. Office Manager.  All material expenditures must be accounted for within the department’s operational budget.Appendices Student Workbook Appendix 7: Purchasing policy Purpose To establish a process and framework for contracts and purchases of resources that ensures:  our purchases are budgeted for or are subject to financial controls  all purchases are cost effective  purchasing activities complies with legislation.  Any material expenditure that exceeds departmental operational budgets must be raised immediately with the General Manager. Authorities:  General Manager – final decision on purchasing.  Department Managers – are responsible for operational budgets (including supply/purchase of material resources).

 Payment on 30 day terms is customary. Purchase orders must be checked approved by person with budget responsibility (Manufacturing Manager. Accountant and Purchasing Officer. once approved.  Membership includes the General Manager.  Copies of documents relating to purchases must be provided to the committee for review (see table below).  All contracts must be reviewed and signed by the General Manager. Warehouse Manager. Office Manager). BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd Page 71 of 74 . The purchasing officer maintains the list of preferred suppliers on the purchasing committee’s behalf.001–unlimited 3 written quotes Suppliers must present to purchasing committee Purchasing Committee Contract. Order and Payment  Expenditures. Manufacturing Manager.  The purchasing committee must review the proposed expenditure against the relevant budgets. Monetary limit Requirement Documentation Decision Up to $1000 Direct purchase Tax invoice Department Manager $1001–$10000 3 written quotes  Copies of 3 quotes  Comparisons table  Project budget Purchasing Committee $10.  Purchase orders are to be raised electronically through the organisational accounting system. should be forwarded to the purchasing officer for review and finalisation of contract (if applicable).Student Workbook Appendices Approving Capital Expenditure  A purchasing committee has been established and meets monthly to review and approve major purchases (over $1000).  Preferred suppliers are to be asked to quote for relevant contracts. Warehouse Manager. Office Manager.

Appendices Student Workbook Appendix 8: Reframing matrix template Page 72 of 74 BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd .

What has been Alana’s role in the business? Example answer: Alana has taken an active role within the business to the point where she and Jeff run the business as a successful team. he could then employ someone else to go into that role or position. bought a workshop. The coaching goal was to make sure he could work himself out of each area of the business. started turning over a large amount of money and hired 30 staff. He successfully separated work from home.youtube. What did the coaching enable Josh to do? Example answer: The coaching enabled Josh to make sure that once he had built the role up to a certain level and built systems and procedures. Learning activity: Benefits of coaching Watch the video ‘BSBADM504B: ‘Benefits of coaching’ on IBSA’s YouTube channel at <http://www. BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd Page 73 of 74 . Jeff started the business when he was 22 and at the time he had no idea how to run a business. Alana loves working on systems. and having a successful system to manage. 3. what was Josh’s next step for the business? Example answer: Build up franchising opportunities within the business. 1.com/ibsachannel>. After successful coaching.com/ibsachannel>. 2. developing the business and fixing inadequacies within the business. How have Jeff and Alana managed continuous improvement within their Platinum Electrics business? Example answer: Jeff and Alana have managed continuous improvement very well. Why did Josh Nicholls feel he needed a coach? Example answer: Josh felt he needed a coach to regain control of his life and business.Student Workbook Appendices Appendix 9: Answers to selected learning activities Learning activity: Managing continuous improvement Watch the video ‘BSBADM504B: ‘Managing continuous improvement’ on IBSA’s YouTube channel at <http://www. 2. 1.youtube.

What is Alana explaining in the video? Example answer: Alana is asking “how do I train the staff to be good at a role. Then the last two appointments will be done by the sales staff themselves.Appendices Student Workbook Learning activity: Training staff Watch the video ‘BSBADM504B: ‘Training staff’ on IBSA’s YouTube channel at <http://www. Example answer: Jeff goes out on the road with sales staff and does the talking for the first two appointments while his sales staff listen. For the next two appointments. 2. 1. and how can I improve myself as a leader to let go. and let other people move on?" She is talking about effective staff delegation. Explain how Jeff supports his sales staff to be more self reliant in his business.youtube. the staff will listen and speak a little to the customer.com/ibsachannel>. Page 74 of 74 BSBADM504B Plan or review administrative systems © 2010 Innovation and Business Industry Skills Council Ltd . without Jeff’s support or help.