MIS Project

The Reporting tools, Decision Support Software tools and different types of Dashboards

MIS Project

Contents DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM (DSS) ......................................................................... 3
Introduction ................................................................................................................................. 5 Theory Development ................................................................................................................... 6 THE STRUCTURE OF DSS ...................................................................................................... 7 KEY DSS FUNCTIONS ............................................................................................................. 9 Types of DSS ............................................................................................................................ 10 DSS UNCERTAINTIES AND LIMITATIONS....................................................................... 12

DASHBOARDS ...................................................................................................................... 14
Types of dashboards .................................................................................................................. 14 Interface design styles ............................................................................................................... 14 History ....................................................................................................................................... 15 Benefits of digital dashboards ................................................................................................... 15 Corporate dashboards ................................................................................................................ 16 Dashboard for CEO's ............................................................................................................. 16 Dashboard for CFO's ............................................................................................................. 17 Dashboard for IT ................................................................................................................... 17 Dashboard for sales and marketing ....................................................................................... 18

Reporting tools ........................................................................................................................ 19
Query plus Data Mining and Reporting .................................................................................... 19 LogiXML by LogiXML ............................................................................................................ 19 Custom CRM Reporting ........................................................................................................... 20 Benefits of custom CRM reporting: ...................................................................................... 20 CONTROL by KCI Computing ................................................................................................ 20 Discover Analytics by On Demand Analysis ............................................................................ 21

Bibliography ............................................................................................................................ 22

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Declaration

We here declaring that report on ―The Reporting tools, Decision Support Software tools and different types of Dashboards‖ are original work done by us, submitted in partial fulfillment of our academic project in Management Information System of 3rd Term. This report is correct to the best of our knowledge and it has not been published anywhere else.

Group num 9 Place: Bangalore Ram Mohan Shubha M.G Sourav Pramanik Monika Manish

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Acknowledgement

We acknowledge that we are thankful to our respected professor Prof. Anupama for guiding us to complete the project with honest attention. Without her kind help, the project completion would not have been possible. Her presence had a great significance in encouraging us, our warm gratitude to her....

We are thankful to our team members who gave their support and commitment to make this project successful. As a team, we had a pleasure to work together and share our ideas and efforts to make the project a remembrance.

We are thankful to the other staff members to provide us the right direction to proceed.

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DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM (DSS)
Decision support systems are a set of manual or computer-based tools that assist in some decision-making activity. In today's business environment, however, decision support systems (DSS) are commonly understood to be computerized management information systems designed to help business owners, executives, and managers resolve complicated business problems and/or questions. Good decision support systems can help business people perform a wide variety of functions, including cash flow analysis, concept ranking, multistage fore-casting, product performance improvement, and resource allocation analysis. Previously regarded as primarily a tool for big companies, DSS has in recent years come to be recognized as a potentially valuable tool for small business enterprises as well.

Introduction
Computerized decision support systems became practical with the development of minicomputers, timeshare operating systems and distributed computing. The history of the implementation of such systems begins in the mid-1960s. In a technology field as diverse as DSS, chronicling history is neither neat nor linear. Different people perceive the field of Decision Support Systems from various vantage points and report different accounts of what happened and what was important. As technology evolved new computerized decision support applications were developed and studied. Researchers used multiple frameworks to help build and understand these systems. Today one can organize the history of DSS into the five broad DSS categories explained in Power (2001; 2002; 2004b), including: communications-driven, data-driven, document driven, knowledge-driven and model-driven decision support systems. This hypertext document is a starting point in explaining the origins of the various technology threads that are converging to provide integrated support for managers working alone, in teams and in organization hierarchies to manage organizations and make more rational decisions. History is both a guide to future activity in this field and a record of the ideas and actions of those who have helped advance our thinking and practice. Historical facts can be sorted out and better understood, but more information gathering is necessary. This web page is a starting point in collecting more firsthand accounts and in building a more complete mosaic of what was occurring in universities, software companies and in organizations to build and use DSS. This document traces decision support applications and research studies related to model and data-oriented systems, management expert systems, multidimensional data analysis, query and reporting tools, online analytical processing (OLAP), Business Intelligence, group DSS, conferencing and groupware, document management, spatial DSS and Executive Information Systems as the technologies emerge, converge and diverge. All of these technologies have been used to support decision making. The study of decision support systems is an applied discipline

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that uses knowledge and especially theory from other disciplines. For this reason, many DSS research questions have been examined because they were of concern to people who were building and using specific DSS. Hence much of the broad DSS knowledge base provides generalizations and directions for building more effective DSS (cf., Baskerville & Myers, 2002; Keen, 1980). The next section describes the origins of the field of decision support systems. Section 3 discusses the decision support systems theory development that occurred in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Section 4 discusses important developments to communications-driven, data-driven, document driven, knowledge-driven and model-driven DSS (cf., Power, 2002). The final section briefly discusses how DSS practice, research and technology is continuing to evolve.

Theory Development
In the mid- to late 1970s, both practice and theory issues related to DSS were discussed at academic conferences including the American Institute for Decision Sciences meetings and the ACM SIGBDP Conference on Decision Support Systems in San Jose, CA in January 1977 (the proceeding were included in the journal Database). The first International Conference on Decision Support Systems was held in Atlanta, Georgia in 1981. Academic conferences provided forums for idea sharing, theory discussions and information exchange. At about this same time, Keen and Scott Morton‘s DSS textbook (1978) provided the first broad behavioral orientation to decision support system analysis, design, implementation, evaluation and development. This influential text provided a framework for teaching DSS in business schools. McCosh and Scott-Morton‘s (1978) DSS book was more influential in Europe. In 1980, Steven Alter published his MIT doctoral dissertation results in an influential book. Alters‘ research and papers (1975; 1977) expanded the framework for thinking about business and management DSS. Also, his case studies provided a firm descriptive foundation of decision support system examples. A number of other MIT dissertations completed in the late 1970s also dealt with issues related to using models for decision support. Alter concluded from his research (1980) that decision support systems could be categorized in terms of the generic operations that can be performed by such systems. These generic operations extend along a single dimension, ranging from extremely data-oriented to extremely modeloriented. Alter conducted a field study of 56 DSS that he categorized into seven distinct types of DSS. His seven types include: 1. File drawer systems that provide access to data items. 2. Data analysis systems that support the manipulation of data by computerized tools tailored to a specific task and setting or by more general tools and operators.

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3. Analysis information systems that provide access to a series of decision-oriented databases and small models. 4. Accounting and financial models that calculate the consequences of possible actions. 5. Representational models that estimate the consequences of actions on the basis of simulation models. 6. Optimization models that provide guidelines for action by generating an optimal solution consistent with a series of constraints. 7. Suggestion models that perform the logical processing leading to a specific suggested decision for a fairly structured or well-understood task.

THE STRUCTURE OF DSS
In order to discuss the support of decisions and what DSS tools can or should do, it is necessary to have a perspective on the nature of the decision process and the various requirements of supporting it. One way of looking at a decision is in terms of its key components. The first component is the data collected by a decision maker to be used in making the decision. The second component is the process selected by the decision maker to combine this data. Finally, there is an evaluation or learning component that compares decisions and examines them to see if there is a need to change either the data being used or the process that combines the data. These components of a decision interact with the characteristics of the decision that is being made.

STRUCTURED DECISIONS: Many analysts categorize decisions according to the
degree of structure involved in the decision-making activity. Business analysts describe a structured decision as one in which all three components of a decision—the data, process, and evaluation—are determined. Since structured decisions are made on a regular basis in business environments, it makes sense to place a comparatively rigid framework around the decision and the people making it. Structured decision support systems may simply use a checklist or form to ensure that all necessary data is collected and that the decision making process is not skewed by the absence of necessary data. If the choice is also to support the procedural or process component of the decision, then it is quite possible to develop a program either as part of the checklist or form. In fact, it is also possible and desirable to develop computer programs that collect and combine the data, thus giving the process a high degree of consistency or structure. When there is a desire to make a decision more structured, the support system for that decision is designed to ensure consistency. Many firms that hire individuals without a great deal of experience provide them

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with detailed guidelines on their decision making activities and support them by giving them little flexibility. One interesting consequence of making a decision more structured is that the liability for inappropriate decisions is shifted from individual decision makers to the larger company or organization.

UNSTRUCTURED DECISIONS: At the other end of the continuum are unstructured
decisions. While these decisions have the same components as structured ones—data, process, and evaluation—there is little agreement on their nature. With unstructured decisions, for example, each decision maker may use different data and processes to reach a conclusion. In addition, because of the nature of the decision there may only a limited number of people within the organization that are even qualified to evaluate the decision. Generally, unstructured decisions are made in instances in which all elements of the business environment—customer expectations, competitor response, cost of securing raw materials, etc.— are not completely understood (new product and marketing strategy decisions commonly fit into this category). Unstructured decision systems typically focus on the individual or team that will make the decision. These decision makers are usually entrusted with decisions that are unstructured because of their experience or expertise, and therefore it is their individual ability that is of value. One approach to support systems in this area is to construct a program that simulates the process used by a particular individual. In essence, these systems—commonly referred to as "expert systems"—prompt the user with a series of questions regarding a decision situation. "Once the expert system has sufficient information about the decision scenario, it uses an inference engine which draws upon a data base of expertise in this decision area to provide the manager with the best possible alternative for the problem," explained Jatinder N.D. Gupta and Thomas M. Harris in the Journal of Systems Management. "The purported advantage of this decision aid is that it allows the manager the use of the collective knowledge of experts in this decision realm. Some of the current DSS applications have included long-range and strategic planning policy setting, new product planning, market planning, cash flow management, operational planning and budgeting, and portfolio management." Another approach is to monitor and document the process that was used so that the decision maker(s) can readily review what has already been examined and concluded. An even more novel approach used to support these decisions is to provide environments that are specially designed to give these decision makers an atmosphere that is conducive to their particular tastes. The key to support of unstructured decisions is to understand the role that individuals experience or expertise plays in the decision and to allow for individual approaches.

SEMI-STRUCTURED DECISIONS: In the middle of the continuum are semistructured decisions, and this is where most of what are considered to be true decision support systems are focused. Decisions of this type are characterized as having some agreement on the

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data, process, and/or evaluation to be used, but are also typified by efforts to retain some level of human judgment in the decision making process. An initial step in analyzing which support system is required is to understand where the limitations of the decision maker may be manifested (i.e., the data acquisition portion, the process component, or the evaluation of outcomes). Grappling with the latter two types of decisions—unstructured and semi-structured—can be particularly problematic for small businesses, which often have limited technological or work force resources. As Gupta and Harris indicated, "many decision situations faced by executives in small business are one-of-a-kind, one-shot occurrences requiring specifically tailored solution approaches without the benefit of any previously available rules or procedures. This unstructured or semi-structured nature of these decisions situations aggravates the problem of limited resources and staff expertise available to a small business executive to analyze important decisions appropriately. Faced with this difficulty, an executive in a small business must seek tools and techniques that do not demand too much of his time and resources and are useful to make his life easier." Subsequently, small businesses have increasingly turned to DSS to provide them with assistance in business guidance and management.

KEY DSS FUNCTIONS
Gupta and Harris observed that DSS is predicated on the effective performance of three functions: information management, data quantification, and model manipulation: "Information management refers to the storage, retrieval, and reporting of information in a structured format convenient to the user. Data quantification is the process by which large amounts of information are condensed and analytically manipulated into a few core indicators that extract the essence of data. Model manipulation refers to the construction and resolution of various scenarios to answer 'what if' questions. It includes the processes of model formulation, alternatives generation and solution of the proposed models, often through the use of several operations research/management science approaches." Entrepreneurs and owners of established enterprises are urged to make certain that their business needs a DSS before buying the various computer systems and software necessary to create one. Some small businesses, of course, have no need of a DSS. The owner of a car washing establishment, for instance, would be highly unlikely to make such an investment. But for those business owners who are guiding a complex operation, a decision support system can be a valuable tool. Another key consideration is whether the business's key personnel will ensure that the necessary time and effort is spent to incorporate DSS into the establishment's operations. After all, even the best decision support system is of little use if the business does not possess the training and knowledge necessary to use it effectively. If, after careful study of questions of DSS utility, the small business owner decides that DSS can help his or her company, the necessary

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investment can be made, and the key managers of the business can begin the process of developing their own DSS applications using available spreadsheet software.

Types of DSS

Since the definition of Decision Support Systems can be stretched to include almost any application that processes data there is some confusion as to exactly what constitutes a DSS. In an effort to clarify the term, DS systems can be separated into seven broad categories, each aiding decision making by different methods.

* Communications Driven DSS A C-D DSS is a type of DSS that enhances decision-making by enabling communication and sharing of information between groups of people. At its most basic level a C-D DSS could be a simple threaded e-mail. At its most complexes it could be a web-conferencing application or interactive video. Communication-Driven DSS will exhibit at least one of the following characteristics: 1. Supports coordination and collaboration between two or more people; 2. Facilitates information sharing; Enables communication between groups of people; 3. Supports group decisions.

* Data-Driven DSS Data-driven DSS are a form of support system that focuses on the provision of internal (and sometimes external) data to aid decision making. Most often this will come in the form of a data warehouse – a database designed to store data in such a way as to allow for its querying and analysis by users. Another example of a data-driven DSS would be a Geographic Information System (GIS), which can be used to visually represent geographically dependant data using maps. * Document-Driven DSS

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Document-driven DSS are support systems designed to convert documents into valuable business data. While data-driven DSS rely on data that is already in a standardized format that lends it to database storage and analysis, document-driven DSS makes use of data that cannot easily be standardized and stored. The three primary forms of data used in document driven DSS are:

1. Oral (i.e. transcribed conversations); 2. Written (i.e. reports, memos, e-mail and other correspondence); 3. Video (i.e. TV commercials and news reports).

None of these formats lend themselves easily to standardized database storage and analysis, so managers require DSS tools to convert them into data that can be valuable in the decision making process. Document-driven DSS is the newest field of study in Decision Support Systems. Examples of document-driven tools can be found in Internet search engines, designed to sift through vast volumes of unsorted data through the use of keyword searches.  Knowledge-Driven DSS Knowledge-driven DSS are systems designed to recommend actions to users. Typically, knowledge-driven systems are designed to sift through large volumes of data, identify hidden patterns in that data and present recommendations based on those patterns. Model-Driven DSS Model-driven support systems incorporate the ability to manipulate data to generate statistical and financial reports, as well as simulation models, to aid decision-makers. Model-based decision support systems can be extremely useful in forecasting the effects of changes in business processes, as they can use past data to answer complex ‗what-if‘ questions for decision makers. In addition to these basic types of DSS there are also two additional factors: whether the DSS is spreadsheet-based, web-based or something else entirely.  Spreadsheet-based DSS

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Model- and Data-driven DS systems can be built using spreadsheets. Spreadsheets offer decision-makers easy to understand representations of large amounts of data. Additionally, spreadsheet data is arranged in such a way as to make it easy to convert the data into visualizations to further aid decision-makers.  Web-based DSS Any type of DSS can be web-based. The term simply describes any decision support system that is operated through the interface of a web browser, even if the data used for decision support remains confined to a legacy system such as a data warehouse.In addition to these basic types of Decision Support System there are also two separate categories used to define systems.  Enterprise-wide DSS Enterprise-wide DS systems are systems that are linked into large data warehouses, and offer decision support to managers at all levels of an enterprise. Enterprise-wide systems will typically be basic, general use systems that can perform a wide variety of functions.  Desktop DSS Desktop DS systems are much smaller applications designed to be run from a desktop PC. While these systems may well be linked into a data warehouse or other large volume of data, they will typically be more limited in scope. An example of a desktop DSS is Microsoft Excel, the desktop spreadsheet application.

DSS UNCERTAINTIES AND LIMITATIONS
While decision support systems have been embraced by small business operators in a wide range of industries in recent years, entrepreneurs, programmers, and business consultants all agree that such systems are not perfect.

LEVEL OF "USER-FRIENDLINESS": Some observers contend that although
decision support systems have become much more user-friendly in recent years, it remains an issue, especially for small business operations that do not have significant resources in terms of technological knowledge.

HARD-TO-QUANTIFY FACTORS: Another limitation that decision makers confront
has to do with combining or processing the information that they obtain. In many cases these limitations are due to the number of mathematical calculations required. For instance, a manufacturer pondering the introduction of a new product cannot do so without first deciding on a price for the product. In order to make this decision, the effect of different variables (including

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price) on demand for the product and the subsequent profit must be evaluated. The manufacturer's perceptions of the demand for the product can be captured in a mathematical formula that portrays the relationship between profit, price, and other variables considered important. Once the relationships have been expressed, the decision maker may now want to change the values for different variables and see what the effect on profits would be. The ability to save mathematical relationships and then obtain results for different values is a feature of many decision support systems. This is called "what-if" analysis, and today's spreadsheet software packages are fully equipped to support this decision-making activity. Of course, additional factors must be taken into consideration as well when making business decisions. Hard-to-quantify factors such as future interest rates, new legislation, and hunches about product shelf life may all be considered. So even though the calculations may indicate that a certain demand for the product will be achieved at a certain price, the decision maker must use his or her judgment in making the final decision. If the decision maker simply follows the output of a process model, then the decision is being moved toward the structured end of the continuum. In certain corporate environments, it may be easier for the decision maker to follow the prescriptions of the DSS; users of support systems are usually aware of the risks associated with certain choices. If decision makers feel that there is more risk associated with exercising judgment and opposing the suggestion of the DSS than there is in simply supporting the process, the DSS is moving the decision more toward the structured end of the spectrum. Therefore, the way in which a DSS will be used must be considered within the decision-making environment.

PROCESSING MODEL LIMITATIONS: Another problem with the use of support
systems that perform calculations is that the user/decision maker may not be fully aware of the limitations or assumptions of the particular processing model. There may be instances in which the decision maker has an idea of the knowledge that is desired, but not necessarily the best way to get that knowledge. This problem may be seen in the use of statistical analysis to support a decision. Most statistical packages provide a variety of tests and will perform them on whatever data is presented, regardless of whether or not it is appropriate. This problem has been recognized by designers of support systems and has resulted in the development of DSS that support the choice of the type of analysis.

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DASHBOARDS

In management information systems, a dashboard is an executive information system user interface that (similar to an automobile's dashboard) is designed to be easy to read. For example, a product might obtain information from the local operating system in a computer, from one or more applications that may be running, and from one or more remote sites on the Web and present it as though it all came from the same source.

Types of dashboards
Dashboard of Sustainability screen shot illustrating example dashboard layout. Digital dashboards may be laid out to track the flows inherent in the business processes that they monitor. Graphically, users may see the high-level processes and then drill down into low level data. This level of detail is often buried deep within the corporate enterprise and otherwise unavailable to the senior executives. Three main types of digital dashboard dominate the market today: stand alone software applications, web-browser based applications, and desktop applications also known as desktop widgets. The last are driven by a widget engine. Specialized dashboards may track all corporate functions. Examples include human resources, recruiting, sales, operations, security, information technology, project management, customer relationship management and many more departmental dashboards. Digital dashboard projects involve business units as the driver and the information technology department as the enabler. The success of digital dashboard projects often depends on the metrics that were chosen for monitoring. Key performance indicators, balanced scorecards, and sales performance figures are some of the content appropriate on business dashboards.

Interface design styles
Like a car's dashboard (or control panel), a software dashboard provides decision makers with the input necessary to "drive" the business. Thus, a graphical user interface may be designed to display summaries, graphics (e.g., bar charts, pie charts, bullet graphs, "spark lines," etc.), and gauges (with colors similar to traffic lights) in a portal-like framework to highlight important information.

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History
The idea of digital dashboards followed the study of decision support systems in the 1970s. With the surge of the web in the late 1990s, digital dashboards as we know them today began appearing. Many systems were developed in-house by organizations to consolidate and display data already being gathered in various information systems throughout the organization. Today, digital dashboard technology is available "out-of-the-box" from many software providers. Some companies however continue to do in-house development and maintenance of dashboard applications. For example, GE Aviation has developed a proprietary software/portal called "Digital Cockpit" to monitor the trends in aircraft spare parts business. In the late 1990s, Microsoft promoted a concept known as the Digital Nervous System and "digital dashboards" were described as being one leg of that concept.

Benefits of digital dashboards
Digital dashboards allow managers to monitor the contribution of the various departments in their organization. To gauge exactly how well an organization is performing overall, digital dashboards allow you to capture and report specific data points from each department within the organization, thus providing a "snapshot" of performance. Benefits of using digital dashboards include:
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Visual presentation of performance measures Ability to identify and correct negative trends Measure efficiencies/inefficiencies Ability to generate detailed reports showing new trends Ability to make more informed decisions based on collected business intelligence Align strategies and organizational goals Save time over running multiple reports Gain total visibility of all systems instantly

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Corporate dashboards
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Dashboard for CEO's Dashboard for CFO's Dashboard for sales and marketing Dashboard for IT Dashboard for retail

Dashboard for CEO's

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MIS Project Dashboard for CFO's

Dashboard for IT

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Dashboard for sales and marketing

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Reporting tools
Query plus Data Mining and Reporting
Query Plus by QualCorp is a state-of-the-art data extraction tool designed to give you instant access to the critical information you need to make timely business decisions. With Query Plus you are in the driver‘s seat. Designed specifically for insurance agencies and built with the novice user in mind, Query Plus is the key to the information locked away inside your software. Combine fields from any section of your management software to create custom hybrid datasets never before possible and do it on the fly. With Query Plus you have the ability set up your own data filters, define custom data groups, decide the export file format, and much more—all quickly and easily without writing one single line of code. For those agencies with advanced reporting needs, there is a customized report designer shipped along with Query Plus which allows you to create even the most complex reports using your custom dataset. Though the preferred format for data processing may often be that of Excel spreadsheets, Query Plus is also the tool of choice for those who want the most robust reporting features available. By providing a friendly, intuitive, visually-based, wizard-driven report design environment, Query Plus allows for possibilities that will stretch the imagination of even the most advanced report users. Query Plus represents the next generation in data extraction. Taking your input, QueryPlus dynamically writes complex SQL queries behind the scenes and then displays the results in a simple, familiar, and flexible grid format where data can be easily manipulated by simply dragging and dropping. From customer ranking reports to complex accounting reports, Query Plus allows you to get the critical business data you need to make timely decisions.

LogiXML by LogiXML
LogiXML is the smart choice for Business Intelligence, giving you more power and more choice with less effort. It's simple to start, easy to use and our no user fees licensing model enables you to empower your entire organization to get the most value from their data. Our solutions include Logi Info for developers, Logi Ad Hoc for end users, and the Logi 9 Platform which includes both plus data integration

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Custom CRM Reporting
Every business has unique processes, requirements, and information tracking. Configure custom CRM reporting for your business metrics by creating your own reports or extending the pre-built report templates included in Maximizer CRM with industry-leading Crystal Reports® and/or Microsoft SQL Reporting Services (SRS)i.

Benefits of custom CRM reporting:
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Create and edit your own custom CRM reports to gain further insight into customer behaviours, new business opportunities and operational inefficiencies Use the industry-leading Crystal Reports report designer for easy creation of custom reports Quickly and easily produce visual summary and drill-down reports with calculations and conditional formatting Automatically send updated reports directly to decision makers on a regular basisii Uncover potential issues (recurrent service problems or poor sales performance), by setting up automatic alerts when metrics meet certain criteria Compare and analyze with data in other applications, such as accounting systems, to get a complete view of relationship health and customer value

CONTROL by KCI Computing
Unified end-to-end solution for all aspects of performance management - budgeting, modeling, forecasting, OLAP analysis, consolidations & reporting. Excel based front end; industry standard relational database back-end; dynamic read-write to myriad data sources; drill-thru to transaction detail and more

Key reporting features include:
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―On-the-fly‖ multi-dimensional financial and operational report generation User defined report formatting Shareable re-usable formatting templates Embedded hyperlinks in context Granular security: Users only see data and reports they have been granted access to Anyone who can see data can comment on it Prototype Reports Navigable reports Snapshot ―point in time‖ VIEWS Scheduled reports Zero effort web publishing requiring only the user‘s internet browser for access

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Discover Analytics by On Demand Analysis
Discover Analytics is a powerful business intelligence and analytics reporting solution integrated with the Microsoft BI platform. It can deliver your organizations business intelligence data into a custom Microsoft Excel based application. Can connect to any data source or ERP system, including SQL Server, DB2, Oracle, SAP and many others. Regardless of your database structure, this tool can connect to your data. Free Demo with our business intelligence experts.Customers demand reporting flexibility more than ever before. They aren‘t willing to settle for static reports or take the time to learn new tools. Leap ahead of the competition by offering rigorous analytics alongside easy-to-use visibility, data trends, charting, dashboards and key performance indicators. Complement your software with great Business Intelligence and watch new customer sales grow.
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No code integration necessary Requires no additional software (other than Excel) Can be configured locally or in the ―cloud‖ (SaaS) Rapid Implementation at low cost One-stop access to user set up, customer deployment, version control and desktop install

ODA has built multiple, full-platform collaborative solutions to handle all aspects of transactional and reporting systems, from web interfaces to cloud-based SaaS solutions. ODA has delivered solutions to your industry, whether you‘re in oil, hi-tech, lodging, transportation, manufacturing, distribution or retail.
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Automate manual processes Improve business transactional flow Provide rich analytics on your data Streamline workflows to save time and money

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Bibliography

 http://www.business.com/directory/management/operations_management/software/report ing_software/m/mis-reporting/  http://www.kcicorp.com/html/reporting.html  http://www.ondemandanalysis.com/why-choose.html  http://www.logixml.com/products/managed-reporting.html  http://www.maximizer.com/crm/business-intelligence.html

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