OVERCOMING OPPOSITION

OBAMA WELCOMES BUDGET, DEBT DEAL TO KEEP GOVERNMENT OPEN

KNIGHTS FIGHT
INTO 1ST PLACE
SPORTS PAGE 11

NATION PAGE 7

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula

www.smdailyjournal.com

Weekend • Oct. 31-Nov.1, 2015 • Vol XVI, Edition 65

Rodeo in her heart
Emilie Montoya, from Pacifica, named 2016 Miss Grand National Rodeo
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

At the age of 4, Pacifica resident Emilie
Montoya hopped on an Appaloosa gelding
for the first time. Now, at the age of 22, she
owns one.
She started competing in rodeos at the age
of 13 and this past weekend at the Cow
Palace in Daly City, Montoya was named
2016 Miss Grand National Rodeo, one of

the most prestigious crowns in all of the
sport.
It’s more than a title, however, as
Montoya will be the Grand National
Rodeo’s ambassador for the next year, promoting the Western lifestyle.
To earn the crown, Montoya showed she
has a broad knowledge of all things rodeo
including livestock, agriculture and science.
She currently studies animal science at

Cal Poly San Luis Obispo after attending
College of San Mateo. Graduating next
spring, Montoya plans to pursue a master’s
degree in reproduction.
For more than 70 years, the Grand
National Livestock Exposition, Horse
Show and Rodeo held at the Cow Palace has
been the West’s most prestigious Westernlifestyle event.

Pacifica resident Emilie Montoya was crowned
See RODEO, Page 24 Miss Grand National Rodeo.

Transit-based
development
under review

HALLOWEEN PARADE

Millbrae planning officials to discuss
massive housing, office developments
By Austin Walsh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

AUSTIN WALSH/DAILY JOURNAL

Students at Washington Elementary School in Burlingame showed off their costumes in the annual Halloween
parade on the school’s playground Friday, Oct. 30. Some students, accompanied by members of the Burlingame
High School band, paraded on to visit residents at Atria, the nearby senior assisted living facility.

Two large housing and office
developments proposed to be built
near the Millbrae train station are
primed to take a significant step
forward, as city officials may
begin to lay the groundwork for
formal approval.
The
Millbrae
Planning
Commission will examine the
environmental impact report, general plan revisions and Millbrae
Station Area Specific Plan during a
meeting Monday, Nov. 2, which
will establish guidelines for two
projects that aim to add new

homes, businesses and office
space to a 116-acre site next to the
Caltrain and Bay Area Rapid
Transit station near Millbrae
Avenue.
Should the commission approve
the findings of the reports, the
developments would move to the
City Council for a final OK of constructing 400,000 square feet of
office space, about 79,000 square
feet of retail space and more than
800 residential units split between
two projects.
City staff is recommending the
Planning Commission certify the
environmental impact report,

See REVIEW, Page 24

Blue Star Moms, scouts team up for troops
By Janet McGovern
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT

Three weeks ago, Mitchell Chang’s
scout troop blanketed a Burlingame
neighborhood with fliers asking for
donations for military care packages.
The next week, the Boy Scouts
returned, collecting paperbacks, toiletries, snacks, socks and more.
And on the morning of Saturday,
Oct. 24, joined by the Blue Star Moms
of San Mateo County, the Boy Scouts
reported for duty in Redwood City,
packing 133 boxes with goodies head-

“This is like a big accomplishment
for me. ... gives me a good feeling.”
— Mitchell Chang

ed for Afghanistan.
For Chang, the care package campaign he organized and supervised for
his Eagle Scout project was the most
complex — and rewarding — task he
had ever undertaken.
“This is like a big accomplishment
for me,” said Chang, 19. Thinking
about the reaction of the troops who

will be getting the care packages, he
added, “gives me a good feeling.”
Saturday morning’s packing day at
American Legion Post 105 in Redwood
City brought together mothers of veterans and of active-duty service men
and women and other volunteers

JANET MCGOVERN/DAILY JOURNAL

Mitchell Chang of San Mateo and Helen Deitschman make
See TROOPS, Page 24 care packages in Redwood City Oct. 24.

2

FOR THE RECORD

Weekend • Oct. 31-Nov.1, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day
“Success is a public affair.
Failure is a private funeral.”
— Rosalind Russell, American actress

This Day in History
Martin Luther posted his 95 Theses
on the door of the Wittenberg Palace
church, marking the start of the
Protestant Reformation in Germany.
In 1 7 9 5 , English poet John Keats was born in London.
In 1 8 6 4 , Nevada became the 36th state as President
Abraham Lincoln signed a proclamation.
In 1 8 8 7 , Nationalist Chinese leader Chiang Kai-shek was
born in Zhejiang Province.
In 1 9 2 6 , magician Harry Houdini died in Detroit of gangrene and peritonitis resulting from a ruptured appendix.
In 1 9 4 1 , the Navy destroyer USS Reuben James was torpedoed by a German U-boat off Iceland with the loss of some
100 lives, even though the United States had not yet entered
World War II. Work was completed on the Mount Rushmore
National Memorial in South Dakota, begun in 1927.
In 1 9 5 5 , Britain’s Princess Margaret ended weeks of speculation by announcing she would not marry Royal Air Force
Group Captain Peter Townsend.
In 1 9 6 1 , the body of Josef Stalin was removed from
Lenin’s Tomb as part of the Soviet Union’s “deStalinization” drive.
In 1 9 6 4 , Theodore C. Freeman, 34, became the first member of NASA’s astronaut corps to die when his T-38 jet
crashed while approaching Ellington Air Force Base in
Houston.
In 1 9 6 8 , President Lyndon B. Johnson ordered a halt to all
U.S. bombing of North Vietnam, saying he hoped for fruitful peace negotiations.
In 1 9 8 4 , Indian Prime Minister Indira Gandhi was assassinated by two Sikh security guards.
In 1 9 9 4 , a Chicago-bound American Eagle ATR-72 crashed
in northern Indiana, killing all 68 people aboard.
In 1 9 9 9 , EgyptAir Flight 990, bound from New York to
Cairo, crashed off the Massachusetts coast, killing all 217
people aboard.
Ten y ears ag o : President George W. Bush nominated Judge
Samuel Alito to the Supreme Court.

1517

Birthdays

Actress-singer
Former CBS
Actor Rob
Willow Smith is 15.
anchorman Dan
Schneider is 51.
Rather is 84.
Actress Lee Grant is 90. Former astronaut Michael Collins
is 85. Folk singer Tom Paxton is 78. Actor Ron Rifkin is 77.
Actress Sally Kirkland is 74. Actor David Ogden Stiers is 73.
Actor Brian Doyle-Murray is 70. Actor Stephen Rea is 69.
Olympic gold medal long-distance runner Frank Shorter is 68.
Actress Deidre Hall is 68. Talk show host Jane Pauley is 65.
Actor Brian Stokes Mitchell is 58. Movie director Peter
Jackson is 54. Rock musician Larry Mullen is 54. Actor
Dermot Mulroney is 52. Rock musician Mikkey Dee
(Motorhead) is 52. Rock singer-musician Johnny Marr is 52.

REUTERS

A boy jumps into the sea from a roof in the bay of Rio Caribe at the state of Sucre, Venezuela.

A

lpha and Beta are the first two
symbols of the Greek alphabet.
That is the origin of the word
alphabet.
***
Bacchus is the Roman God of wine. In
Greek mythology, he is known as
Dionysus, and is the son of Zeus and
Semele. Bacchus is a handsome youth
with black eyes and flowing locks. He
wears a crown with vine and ivy.
***
Cheerioats cereal was introduced by
General Mills in 1941. In 1945, the
name was changed to Cheerios. The
new slogan was “the first ready-to-eat
oat cereal.”
***
Dionne Quintuplet mania occurred in
the 1930s. The famous quintuplets,
born in 1934, were the first quintuplets to survive infancy. Can you
name them?
***
E is the most frequently used letter in
the English alphabet. Q, X and Z are
the least frequently used letters.

Lotto

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Oct. 28 Powerball

Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

©2015 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.

TIWYT

WOLLYS

4

54

56

62

63

10

Oct. 30 Mega Millions
17

41

51

53

56

15
Mega number

Oct. 28 Super Lotto Plus
7

9

12

20

34

8

13

26

27

34

4

0

7

Daily Four
9

Daily three midday
4

5

national language of the Vatican. The
closest common language to Latin is
Italian.
***
Monday is the only day of the week
that has an anagram; dynamo.
***
Nike’s logo, the “swoosh,” was created in 1971 by graphic design student
Carolyn Davidson. At the time, Nike
owner Phil Knight paid Davidson $35
for the logo. In 1983, Knight surprised Davidson with a gift of Nike
stock.
***
A n s w e r: The Dionne Quintuplets
were named Annette, Cecile, Emilie
(1934-1954), Marie (1934-1970) and
Yv onne (1934-2001), The fiv e identical sisters, born in Canada, were raised
by Dr. Allen Roy Dafoe (1883-1943),
the obstetrician who deliv ered the
babies and became their guardian. The
media widely publicized news about
the quints; some happy news in the
time of the Depression. The babies
were used in ads for many products.
Tourists v isited Quintland, a theme
park in the quints hometown, where
they watched the babies play behind a
one-way screen.

Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend edition of the Daily Journal.
Questions?
Comments?
Email
knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or call 3445200 ext. 114.

Local Weather Forecast

Fantasy Five
Powerball

Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app

RAPOE

***
FedEx was founded by Frederick Smith
in 1971. Federal Express started with
14 small planes flying deliveries out
of Memphis, Tennessee. FedEx
Express is now the largest cargo airline in the world.
***
“Gunsmoke” is the longest running
western series of all time. James
Arness (born 1923) starred as
Marshall Matt Dillon during the 20
years the show was on television; a
total of 633 episodes.
***
Hawaiian is the ancestral language of
the Polynesians in the Hawaiian
Islands. The Hawaiian alphabet has 12
letters: five vowels (a, e, i, o, u) and
seven consonants (h, k, l, m, n, p, w).
***
Ike was the nickname of President
Dwight D. Eisenhower (1890-1969).
Eisenhower used a campaign song
called “I Like Ike.” Some of the lyrics
were “I Like Ike! I’ll shout it over a
mike, Or a phone, Or from the highest
steeple. I Like Ike! And Ike is easy to
like, Stand’s alone, The choice of we
the people.”
***
J does not appear anywhere within the
periodic table of the elements.
***
Kindergarten is called Reception in
England. In Australia, it is called the
Preparatory Grade.
***
Latin is the formal language of the
Roman Catholic Church, and the

8

6

Daily three evening

Mega number

8

7

5

The Daily Derby race winners are Hot Shot, No.
3, in first place; Gorgeous George, No. 8, in second
place; and Solid Gold, No. 10, in third place. The
race time was clocked at 1:46.25.

Saturday : Sunny. Highs in the upper
60s. Northwest winds 5 to 10 mph.
Saturday ni g ht: Partly cloudy in the
evening then becoming mostly cloudy.
Lows in the mid 50s. West winds 5 to 15
mph.
Sunday : Rain likely. Highs in the mid
60s. West winds 5 to 10 mph. Chance of
rain 70 percent.
Sunday ni g ht: Showers. Lows in the 50s. West winds 5 to
10 mph.
Mo nday : Mostly cloudy. A chance of showers. Highs in
the lower 60s.
Mo nday ni g ht: Partly cloudy. A slight chance of showers. Lows in the lower to mid 50s.
Tues day thro ug h Thurs day : Mostly clear.

GEDDER
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer
here:
Yesterday’s

(Answers Monday)
Jumbles: USURP
ELOPE
DONKEY
UTOPIA
Answer: The harbormaster was a little overweight, but
his wife liked him on the — PORTLY SIDE

The San Mateo Daily Journal
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information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com. Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once, longer than 200 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.

LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Speaking up for a good cause
Hillsborough students contribute to synthetic voice project
By Austin Walsh

Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Students in Hillsborough are doing their
part to make life better for those less fortunate by contributing to a project that gives a
voice to the voiceless.
Crocker Middle School students collectively donated hundreds of hours of vocal
recordings which will be technologically
transformed into a unique voice for those
diagnosed with illnesses such as cerebral
palsy which require them to use an automated
device for speaking.
VocalID, a company headquartered in
Boston, analyzes the recording samples and
matches those with people of a similar age,
gender and other factors to create a mechanized voice which identifies with the user.
Engineers at the company will record samples of the sounds the recipients are capable
of making, then virtually analyze the defining characteristics such as depth and tone to
help find a proper match from the voice sample database.
Once a match is found, technicians are able
to blend the two sound samples together to
create a new, unique, customized voice which
will be transmitted when the recipient communicates through the speech program on
their computer.
To build a strong database of vocal samples
which align with the variety of different people who may be interested in the technology,
VocalID is looking to collect as many voice
recordings as possible, which inspired one
local mother to get Hillsborough students
involved.
Laurel Miranda, a special education parent
mentor in the Crocker school community,
said she was inspired to bring the vocal
recording program to the school through the
experience of a child of a family friend who
uses an electronic device to communicate.
She said the standard digitized voice is that

of an adult male, referred to as some by the
“Stephen Hawking voice,” which does not
accurately reflect all people who use the technology.
“These are children, but they sound like
adults,” she said. “We would expect a prosthetic leg to be customized to a person’s
body, but we don’t do that with voices.”
Offering a unique, customized voice to a
child who cannot speak without assistance
grants the recipient a sense of empowerment
and greater self-worth, said Miranda.
Inspired by the opportunity to help those
in need, Miranda said she suggested the program to educators at Crocker school who
jumped at the opportunity to get students
engaged in the process of contributing to the
bank of voice recordings.
“The parents were really supportive and so
were their children,” she said.
Roughly 25 students participated in recording vocal samples this summer, said
Miranda, and the program was so popular it is
expected to return again this fall.
“This is a great opportunity for the kids to
get community service hours in a way that is
hopefully meaningful to them,” she said.
VocalID Communications and Project
Manager Adam Nilsson said the company is
thrilled with the amount of recordings they
received since incorporating in 2014.
“There are so many amazing responses,”
he said. “It takes some commitment, but if
you are motivated and want to help someone,
it is a worthy cause.”
He approximated 10,000 people had
donated vocal recordings, each comprised of
nearly 3,500 sentences which donors are
required to read to construct a complete sub-

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mission. Each submission takes between six
to seven hours to complete, said Nilsson,
and donors are asked to do the recordings in
small, manageable segments so as to be able
to communicate clearly and strongly and create a high-quality recording.
The means necessary to create a recording
are relatively simple, said Nilsson, requiring
only a computer, headset, quiet room to
record in and a desire to help those in need.
He said the company is interested in
receiving as many vocal submissions as possible, from a variety of people with different
demographics, to create a comprehensive
and thorough voice bank.
“We don’t want all our voices to come from
one place,” he said.
Miranda said she was thrilled to see how
the voice recording project resonated with
local students.
“It was just very heartwarming,” she said.
Students are familiar with a variety of community service efforts, said Miranda, but the
vocal project was something they could do
which offered a great benefit in relatively
short order.
“We have kids who grow their hair out for
cancer survivors,” she said. “But this is an
opportunity for kids to do something more
active, to really help people more quickly.”
Miranda, who has seen the benefits of the
creation of a unique voice firsthand, said she
believes the donation will go on to help
many families and children in need.
“The kids who are participating are really
helping kids in San Mateo County,” she said.
“This will be a library accessed by a wide
variety of people.”

Weekend • Oct. 31-Nov.1, 2015

3

Police reports
Was is foul play?
A dead duck was seen on the sidewalk on
Halsey Boulevard in Foster City before
7:37 a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 28.

SAN MATEO
Theft. A black Chevrolet Tahoe was stolen
on 36th Avenue before 9:46 p.m. Saturday,
Oct. 25.
Van dal i s m. The front windows of a
woman’s house were broken by eggs on
Eaton Road before 7:09 p.m. Saturday, Oct.
25.
Theft. A man left cash in his friend’s car
while he was test driving a vehicle and discovered the money was gone when he
returned on North Kingston Street before
9:10 a.m. Sunday, Oct. 25.
Vandal i s m. A man broke a restroom stall
door at Bel Mateo Bowl on Olympic Avenue
before 1:14 a.m. Sunday, Oct. 25.
Acci dent. A silver BMW struck a pedestrian
on South El Camino Real before 10:26 p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 24.

MILLBRAE
Ars o n. An unknown person started a fire in
a plastic recycling bin on the 500 block of
Broadway before 9:40 p.m. Wednesday, Oct.
28.
Burg l ary . A tool bag valued at approximately $300 was stolen from a vehicle
through a broken window on the 500 block
of Park Boulevard before 8:45 p.m. Tuesday,
Oct. 27.
Theft. A motorcycle was stolen on the 900
block of Crestview Drive before 7:40 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 27.

4

LOCAL

Weekend • Oct. 31-Nov.1, 2015

Robert Hedenberg Beggs
Robert Hedenberg Beggs, born Aug. 31,
1924, died peacefully in his home Aug. 13,
2015.
A native of California, Robert was born
in Los Angeles and resided in Redwood
City since 1933. He is proceeded in death
by his mother Anne Corinne Beggs and his
father Watson Gailey Beggs. He is survived by his cousin Margaret Fisher of
Sacramento.
Robert graduated from Sequoia High in
Redwood City. He received a bachelor’s
and a master’s degree in engineering from
Stanford University in 1949 and 1952
respectively. In 1958, he graduated from
San Francisco Law School. He was a naval
reserve officer and aviator. He was a member of St. Peter Episcopal Church in
Redwood City.

Obituaries
Condolences may be offered to the family through their guestbook at www.crippenflynn.com.

Douglas Robertson
Douglas Robertson, born April 18,
1953, died Oct. 26,
2015.
Douglas is survived by
his wife Mary Elise
Robertson and their
three children Elisa
Giannini,
Stacey
Robertson and Sean
Robertson. 
A memorial service
will be 10 a.m. Monday, Nov. 2, at St.
Gregory Catholic Church in San Mateo,
California.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Traffic stop leads to drug arrest

Local briefs

A Redwood City man was arrested in San
Bruno Wednesday after police said a traffic
stop led officers to the discovery of
methamphetamine.
Joseph Gipson, 42, was arrested on suspicion of evading a peace officer, possession
of a controlled substance for the purpose of
sale, transporting a controlled substance
and possession of an illegal expandable
baton.
Officers at 10:58 p.m. conducted a traffic
violation stop on a pickup truck in the 1700
block of El Camino Real.
Police said the Gipson initially failed to
yield, and officers saw him throw two suspicious packages out the window before he
pulled the truck over.
Officers retrieved the discarded packages
and determined they contained suspected
methamphetamine, and Gipson was taken

into custody, police said.

Police investigate
residential burglary
Police are investigating a Wednesday residential burglary in San Bruno.
Officers responded at 9:30 p.m. to the
3800 block of Adriatic Way on a report of a
residential burglary.
Police said the homeowner arrived home
and noticed several items in different rooms
in the residence were in disarray.
The homeowner also noticed a rear sliding
glass door had been shattered.
Nothing was stolen from the residence.
Officers searched the home and the surrounding area, but they did not locate a suspect.

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STATE/NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Oct. 31-Nov.1, 2015

5

News briefs
Colorado asks voters to
reshuffle spending of new pot taxes

Beverly Hills, with its huge mansions, including many fronted by sprawling, emerald-green lawns, has drawn the ire of Los Angeles
residents who have complained of excessive water use by their wealthy neighborhood.

State fines water suppliers
for failing to meet reductions
By Kristen J. Bender
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — State officials
for the first time are fining California
water suppliers for failing to meet a
mandated 25 percent reduction in water
use in the battle against a widespread
drought.
The $61, 000 fines are being
imposed on Beverly Hills, Indio,
Redlands and the Coachella Valley
Water District.
Beverly Hills officials said in a
statement they may impose additional
fines and hire extra staff to meet its
savings goals. Officials with the
Coachella Valley Water District said
they, too, will develop new ways to

encourage greater water savings.
Redlands spokesman Carl Baker said
the city learned of the fine late
Thursday and said officials will seek
direction on how to respond from the
City Council on Tuesday. He declined
to elaborate.
Indio said it has been working hard
to meet state water conservation
goals, including adopting a drought
penalty surcharge and offering rebates
for water customers who get rid of their
grass.
The Indio Water Authority said the
utility will explore additional programs.
“We are committed to conserve,”
General Manager Brian Macy said in a
statement.

For a fourth straight month,
Californians as a whole have cut back
water consumption by more than 25
percent since Gov. Jerry Brown put
that mandate into effect last June.
“Millions of Californians have
saved water during the summer
months, which are the four most critical months to save water,” said State
Water Resources Control Board
Chairwoman Felicia Marcus.
“This is important and wonderful,
and we are thankful for all of the effort
by individuals and agencies. Now, we
need to keep it up as best we can, even
as we hope for as much rain and snow
as we can safely handle.”
In September, Californians reduced
water use by more than 26 percent.

DENVER — The only statewide ballot question in
Colorado next week seems like a no-brainer: Should the
state keep $66 million in marijuana taxes it has already collected to spend on schools and drug-abuse prevention?
The measure arose from an accounting error two years
ago, when the taxes were first approved. And it has broad
support, from Democrats, Republicans, the marijuana
industry and nearly every newspaper in the state.
But the fine print of Proposition BB goes beyond allowing the government to keep the money it already collected.
It rearranges the spending plan to give money to some new
recipients, including the 4-H Club and Future Farmers of
America — youth groups that never sought the handout and
aren’t keen on being associated with pot.
Lawmakers insist the marijuana money will be spent as
voters generally intended when they approved a 10 percent
sales tax and 15 percent excise tax on recreational pot in
2013. For example, the measure sends $40 million to a
school construction fund.

DAs, police, family of slain
push for death penalty changes
LOS ANGELES — California prosecutors, police officers
and family members of the slain launched a campaign
Friday to speed up executions for murderers sentenced to
death.
Sacramento district attorney Anne Marie Schubert said
the effort follows through on a promise that law enforcement made when fighting a 2012 ballot initiative that
aimed to abolish the death penalty. Rather than get rid of
the ultimate punishment, they vowed to fix it.
Schubert said the penalty is reserved for the “worst of the
worst:” mass killers, serial killers, cop killers and those
who rape and murder children.
The proposed initiative would change the lengthy
appeals process by expanding the pool of appellate attorneys and appointing lawyers to the cases at time of sentencing. Currently there’s about a five year wait to be
assigned a lawyer.

Obituary

JIRO MUKAI

August 4, 1925 – October 20, 2015
Resident of Foster City, CA
Jiro Mukai passed away peacefully on Oct. 20, 2015 at the age of 90 at a memory care facility in
Burlingame, CA due to Parkinson’s related illness. He was the son of Jisaku & Riyo (Sakai)
Mukai. He is survived by his loving wife of 56 years, Michi Mukai; sons Kevin Mukai of
Campbell, and Wesley (Jessica) Mukai of Foster City; sister, Irene (Larry) Katayama. He was
predeceased by brothers Goro (Susie) Mukai, Hachiro Mukai, Taro (Rose) Mukai, and sisters
Asako and Chiyoko (George) Hosaka. He is also survived by grandchildren Katie, Matthew
and Calvin Mukai and many nephews and nieces.
He was born in Redwood City, CA and attended schools in San Jose. During WWII, he and
his family were interned to Poston III, AZ. After the war, his family moved to Seabrook, NJ
where he and his family worked for Seabrook Farms. He also worked as an auto mechanic in
Bridgeton, NJ. In 1955, he was employed by United Airlines maintenance base in San Bruno,
CA. He retired in 1989 after 34 years as an aircraft inspector. He was a long-time member of
the San Mateo Buddhist Temple and enjoyed traveling, spending time at the library reading
financial papers, news and National Geographic magazines, and was a “master handyman”
tackling many projects.
A memorial service will be held on Friday, November 6, 2015, 2:00 PM at the San Mateo
Buddhist Temple, 2 S. Claremont St., San Mateo, CA, 94401.

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6

NATION

Weekend • Oct. 31-Nov.1, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Rising Rubio seeks to
separate from GOP’s
presidential hopefuls
By Steve Peoples
and Julie Bykowicz
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHICAGO — Marco Rubio’s
“lean” presidential campaign is
putting on weight.
By every measure, the Florida
senator’s bid for the Republican
nomination has grown more
robust in October, boosted again
by a strong showing in
Wednesday night’s debate. In preference polls and money flowing
in, he’s ticking upward.
The campaign’s fundraising,
which lagged that of several competitors over the summer and early
fall, just finished its best month
yet. In the hours around the debate
Rubio raised $750,000 online —
more than on any previous occasion.
The next day, Rubio was cheered
at two fundraisers in Chicago,

each of which had more attendees
than organizers had planned. At a
“young professionals” happy
hour at a downtown sports bar, the
44-year-old Rubio told a rowdy
group that he woke up that morning “still kind of wired” from the
debate.
“It’s becoming easier to get
people to say yes,” said Chris
Grozev, who said he sold a couple
hundred $100 tickets to the happy
hour.
Phil Rosen, a New York real
estate lawyer who hosted one of
the most lucrative fundraisers for
the campaign a few weeks ago,
said he’s since had “people come
out of the woodwork and call me
directly, asking for another event
so that they can meet him.”
And billionaire investor Paul
Singer on Friday announced his
support for Rubio in a letter to his
extensive network of Republican

REUTERS

Republican presidential candidate Marco Rubio speaks at an event in Sioux City, Iowa.
fundraisers, encouraging them to
follow his lead.
Donor enthusiasm has given
campaign leaders who have prided
themselves on a slim and sleek
operation — partly out of necessity because of low cash flow — the
confidence to increase hiring.
Rubio’s staff grew by about onethird in October, making for
crowded conditions in the
Washington row house that serves
as headquarters. Rubio is steadily
adding resources in each of the

first four voting states, and the
campaign just signed an office
lease in South Carolina, the third
state voting in the primaries early
next year. Volunteers there had
been working out of a garage.
“We’re definitely building,” said
Terry Sullivan, Rubio’s campaign
manager. “But we’re scaling at the
right time.”
With growth comes the potential for growing pains.
Rub i o ’s
co mp et i t o rs
are
sharpening their criticism of the

freshman senator.
In Wednesday’s debate, mentorturned-rival Jeb Bush went after
him for missing Senate votes
while he campaigned for president.
The former Florida governor
came to the debate after briefing
his top fundraisers on a strategy
that hinges on overpowering
Rubio, whom his campaign sees
as his most dangerous competitor
for the voters and donors who
want to see a traditional nominee.

Immigrants caught at border believe families can stay in U.S.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Nearly a year
after the Obama administration
launched a massive public relations campaign to dispel rumors
of a free pass for immigrant families crossing the border illegally,
internal intelligence files from
the
Homeland
Security

public benefits.
The interviews with immigrants
by federal agents were intended to
help the Obama administration
understand what might be driving
a puzzling surge in the numbers of
border crossings that started over
the summer.
Administration efforts to stop
the flow of immigrant families,

Department suggest that effort is
failing.
Hundreds of immigrant families caught illegally crossing the
Mexican border between July and
September told U.S. immigration
agents they made the dangerous
trip in part because they believed
they would be permitted to stay
in the United States and collect

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primarily from Central America,
have included public service campaigns in Honduras, El Salvador
and Guatemala to highlight the
dangers and consequences of making the trek.
The Associated Press obtained
copies of the interview summaries, which were compiled in
reports by the U.S. Customs and

Border Protection’s Office of
Intelligence. They said hundreds
of people traveling as part of families consistently cited opportunities to obtain permission to stay
in the U. S. , claim asylum and
receive unspecified benefits.
Immigrants spoke of “permisos,”
or a pass to come into the United
States.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

NATION/WORLD

Weekend • Oct. 31-Nov.1, 2015

7

Around the world
Rome’s mayor forced out
a day after reclaiming seat

REUTERS

Barack Obama greets people as he arrives at O’Hare International Airport in Chicago.

Obama welcomes budget, debt
deal to keep government open
By Andrew Taylor
and Mary Clare Jalonick
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — President Barack
Obama said he’s eager to sign the twoyear budget deal passed by the Senate
in the pre-dawn hours Friday in hopes
of breaking a “cycle of shutdowns and
manufactured crises” that have hurt the
U.S. economy.
Senators voted 64-35 for the measure that will spare the nation the
specter of a catastrophic default and a
partial
government
shutdown.
Democrats teamed with Republican
defense hawks to overcome opposition from conservatives who included
two GOP senators running for president — Rand Paul of Kentucky and Ted
Cruz of Texas.
Obama had negotiated the accord,
passed by the House earlier this week,

with congressional
leaders who were
intent on avoiding
the brinkmanship
and
shutdown
threats that have
haunted the institution for the past
several
years.
Departing
Rep.
Paul Ryan
John Boehner of
Ohio made it his top priority in his
final days as speaker before making
way for Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., who
took over the leadership Thursday.
The White House said Obama would
sign the bill on Monday.
In a statement issued early Friday,
Obama said the deal shows Congress
can “help, not hinder” the nation’s
progress. He urged lawmakers to work
on other needed spending measures in
the future “without getting sidetracked

by ideological provisions that have
no place in America’s budget process.”
The deal allows members of both
parties to look ahead toward next
year’s presidential and congressional
elections. Republican leaders were particularly concerned that failure to
resolve this vexing issue could reflect
poorly on their ability to govern.
There was significant opposition in
the Senate, nevertheless, as Paul and
Cruz made it a point to be on the floor
to register their concerns.
In an hour-long speech that delayed
the final vote to around 3 a.m., Paul
said Congress is “bad with money.” He
railed against increases in defense dollars supported by Republicans and
domestic programs supported by
Democrats.
“These are the two parties getting
together in an unholy alliance and
spending us into oblivion,” he said.

MILAN — Just a day after rescinding his resignation,
Rome’s embattled mayor was forced out of office Friday
after the city council yanked its support.
Ignazio Marino acknowledged the end
of his turbulent administration in a news
conference Friday evening, complaining
of backroom politics that hurt transparency after a quorum of 26 council
members resigned.
Marino, a transplant surgeon elected in
2013, announced Oct. 12 he was stepping down following reports that he used
Ignazio Marino public funds for private dinners. He
always denied wrongdoing, and rescinded
the resignation Thursday without explanation, and after
getting public shows of support from citizens.
Earlier Friday, he acknowledged that prosecutors were
investigating him for the misuse of public funds, but played
it down as a pro forma action. Marino was never implicated
in the wide-ranging corruption probes of public works contracts involving projects that started before his election.
The political gamesmanship even drew the critical notice
of the Roma Catholic Church Rome prepares to host millions of pilgrims for the Holy Year that begins Dec. 8 and
runs through late November 2016.

Iranian-American reportedly
etained in Iran; fourth in custody
DUBAI, United Arab Emirates — An Iranian-American
businessman who advocated better ties between Iran and the
U.S. reportedly has been arrested and imprisoned in Tehran,
becoming the fourth U.S. citizen known to be held there at
a time when hard-liners are pushing back against the country’s nuclear deal with world powers.
The reasons why Siamak Namazi would be detained were
not immediately known.
Namazi, the son of a politician from the era of the shah,
had been specifically criticized in hard-line commentary
this year as Iranian conservatives warned against easing
hostilities with the U.S.
On Friday, Iran and the U.S. sat down together in new multilateral talks trying to end Syria’s civil war.
Reports of Namazi’s imprisonment follow the conviction
of other Iranian-Americans, notably Washington Post journalist Jason Rezaian. Meanwhile, an Internet freedom
group said a Washington-based Lebanese citizen recently
disappeared while on a trip to Tehran.
Namazi was arrested earlier this month while visiting
Tehran, according to the Wall Street Journal, The New York
Times and The Washington Post, all of which relied on
anonymous sources. Attempts by the Associated Press to
reach relatives of Namazi, who has a home in Washington,
weren’t immediately successful.

8

LOCAL/WORLD

Weekend • Oct. 31-Nov.1, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Nations agree on new Syria talks,
but say little about Bashar Assad
By Bradley Klapper
and George Jahn
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

REUTERS

Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov, left, and Secretary of
State John Kerry, right, listen while U.N. Special Envoy for Syria
Staffan de Mistura speaks during a news conference at the
Grand Hotel in Vienna, Austria.

U.S. escalates fight in Syria
amid talks on Assad future
By Bradley Klapper and Lolita C. Baldor
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The United States escalated its fight
against the Islamic State in Syria on Friday, pledging the
first open deployment of military boots on the ground, even
as U.S., Russian and other diplomats pressed a new peace
effort that America hopes will hasten the departure of Bashar
Assad.
Up to 50 special operations troops will be sent to assist
Kurdish and Arab forces in northern Syria, American officials
said. The move marks a significant departure for President
Barack Obama, who for years has resisted putting ground
forces in Syria even as he has gradually intensified the U.S.
military response to what counterterrorism officials worry is
a growing Islamic State threat in Syria and Iraq.
The troop announcement came as diplomats in Vienna representing 17 countries and the European Union agreed to
launch a broad new peace attempt to gradually end Syria’s
long civil war — a declaration that avoided any determination on when President Assad might leave. It is not clear how
many rebel groups would agree to a plan that doesn’t result in
Assad’s immediate departure.
Any cease-fire agreement that may come as a result of the
peace effort would not include the Islamic State, which controls large parts of northern Syria and has its capital there.
But the participation by Russia and Iran in the attempt
could mark a new and promising phase in the diplomacy
since those countries have staunchly backed Assad.
The White House has long said that Assad’s ouster is essential to its ultimate goal of defeating the Islamic State because
the Syrian president’s brutal tactics against Sunni rebels
have drawn Sunni radicals from all over the world into the
militant group’s ranks.
The Syrian civil war has killed more than 250,000 people
and uprooted more than 11 million, sparking a refugee crisis
throughout Europe.
Despite killing as many as 12,000 militants, the U.S.
bombing campaign has not significantly weakened the
Islamic State’s capacity to hold territory, and the group’s
ranks have been replenished by foreign fighters and others.
Military experts say ground troops are essential for the
fight. A U.S. program to train Syrians was abandoned as a
failure, and the new deployment essentially would replace
that program.
Speaking to reporters flying with him on an overseas trip,
Defense Secretary Ash Carter said this would probably not be
the last significant adjustment to the anti-IS military campaign in Syria and Iraq.

CITY GOVERNMENT
•  Fo s t e r Ci t y officials will
hold a community workshop
Tuesday, Nov. 17, on its Lo cal
Haz ard Mi t i g at i o n Pl an ,
which can be submitted to the
Fe de ral
Eme rg e n c y
Manag ement Admi ni s trati o n
to qualify for grant funding for projects. The LHMP is a
written plan, updated every five years, that identifies
potential risks and strategies for reducing potential
harm of natural disasters throughout the community. 
The community workshop will be 6:30 p.m.-8:30
p.m. in the Vi be Teen Center, 670 Shell Blvd.
Attendees can register and reserve their space at fchazardmitigation. eventbrite. com. Community members
can also provide their input by responding to the local
hazard mitigation survey (there is a link to the survey on
the city’s website www.fostercity.org). Those including
their contact information in their survey response will
be kept informed of future ways to participate and will be
automatically entered to win a Pers o nal Emerg ency
Preparednes s Ki t valued at over $40.
More information about the Local Hazard Mitigation
Plan is available at www.fostercity.org or email Jenel l e
Mas ters o n, emergency preparedness coordinator at
jmasterson@fostercity.org with questions or comments.

VIENNA — The United States,
Russia, Iran and more than a dozen
other nations agreed Friday to launch a
new peace effort involving Syria’s
government and opposition groups,
but carefully avoided any determination on when President Bashar Assad
might leave power — perhaps the
most intractable dispute of the conflict.
There was no guarantee that either
Assad or the vast array of rebel groups
fighting against him would join the
push for peace.
The plan was hashed out after two
days of discussions in Austria’s capital among some of the fiercest

geopolitical foes
on the planet,
including governments
fighting
directly or by
proxy on opposing sides in a civil
war that has killed
more than 250,000
Bashar Assad people, uprooted
11 million from
their homes, led to the emergence of
the Islamic State and sparked a
refugee crisis throughout Europe
since beginning in 2011.
Although details were vague, the
approach has clear differences with
previous such efforts. Chief among
them: The U.S. and allies including
Saudi Arabia softened calls for Assad’s
quick removal from power. Russia and

Iran didn’t rule out his eventual departure.
“Four-and-a-half years of war, we all
believe, has been far too long,” U.S.
Secretary of State John Kerry told
reporters.
“I did not say that Assad has to go or
that Assad has to stay, ” Russian
Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said
at the news conference with Kerry and
the U. N. special envoy to Syria,
Staffan de Mistura.
The new diplomatic push coincided
with a U.S. announcement that a small
number of American special operations forces will be sent to northern
Syria to work with local ground forces
in the fight against Islamic State militants. It would mark the first time
American troops would be deployed
openly on the ground in the country.

OPINION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Saturday • Oct. 31-Nov.1, 2015

9

Letters to the editor
Eirene Chen for
San Carlos Elementary
School District trustee
Editor,
I am endorsing Eirene Chen for
San Carlos School District
Trustee. Of all the candidates she
has the most direct knowledge of,
and lengthy experience in, the
district. Her years as PTA president and member of PTA
Coordinating Council gives her a
broad district perspective, along
with her site level (middle and
elementary school) volunteer
activities. Coupled with her educational and work background
she is well positioned to lead the
district forward. I believe the
Daily Journal to be remiss in not
recognizing her potential. 

Jean Dehner
San Carlos
The letter writer is a retired
administrator, counselor and
teacher for the San Carlos
Elementary School District. 

Vote for Freschet
Editor,
San Mateo is fortunate to have
a responsive mayor with the
experience, education and knowhow of Maureen Freschet. If
there’s any hope of solving our
regional problems, including
traffic and housing, it will be
because we are represented by
qualified people like Maureen
who are respected and supported
by our community leaders and
county and state legislators. Let’s
keep our best shot at dealing with
the issues facing our city and our
neighborhoods.

Denise Young
San Mateo

Yes on Measure W
Editor,
Measure W in South San
Francisco will support public
safety, street infrastructure and
quality of life services for families, senior and the disabled for
years to come. Like home mortgages, 30 years is the right
amount of time to plan for the
future and plan/replace essential
public buildings that are neither
seismically safe nor able to handle the data and needs of the 21st
century. Please join me in voting
yes on Measure W for upgraded,
police, fire and community serv-

ices that will serve our community for generations to come.

Diane Huddleston
South San Francisco

Vote no on Measure V
Editor,
After reading Measure V, I had
to laugh, especially at the way
Councilman Mark Olbert is promoting it. Nowhere has it been
established what the final cost of
everything involved in that piece
of property will be. I have personally walked that entire property while working for the city of
San Carlos, and I know what
would have to be done to make
that property a viable park for
this city, but I have yet to hear
how the city plans to come up
with the money to clear the area,
implement infrastructure and
maintain the park. Do I have to
remind the citizens of this city
that not too many years ago the
city dissolved the parks department and decided to contract the
maintenance to a private contractor?
Now, they want to add more
taxes to support this project.
When are they planning on
exposing all the hidden costs of
implementing this park? I would
like to see Mr. Olbert disclose all
of these issues, before asking for
us to sign a blank check. I am
urging my fellow citizens to vote
no on Measure V.  

Joseph Caprioni
San Carlos

Don’t ‘x-out’ Measure X
Editor,
We strongly disagree with Mr.
Milano’s letter to the editor
regarding Measure X published
on Monday, Oct, 26.
The overcrowding in our
schools is critical. How exactly
does Mr. Milano propose this
problem be addressed?
Our classrooms are currently
jam-packed and require serious
improvements to dated structures.
We are fortunate enough to live
in an area which is very much in
demand by young families thus
the increase in our elementary
school population (and our property values). The turnover in
established residences, the major
contributor to this student explosion, will bring 1,000 students
in the next five years. We must
start building classrooms for our

Jerry Lee, Publisher
Jon Mays, Editor in Chief
Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor
Erik Oeverndiek, Copy Editor/Page Designer
Nicola Zeuzem, Production Manager
Kerry McArdle, Marketing & Events
REPORTERS:
Terry Bernal, Bill Silverfarb, Austin Walsh, Samantha Weigel
Susan E. Cohn, Senior Correspondent: Events
Ricci Lam, Production Assistant
Letters to the Editor
Should be no longer than 250 words.
Perspective Columns
Should be no longer than 600 words.
• Illegibly handwritten letters and anonymous letters will not be

BUSINESS STAFF:
Charlotte Andersen
Charles Gould
Kathleen Magana
Joe Rudino

students now.
The San Mateo-Foster City
Elementary School District has
prided itself on providing a quality education for all its students.
Measure X will assure that all students and families will continue
to have equal access to our exceptional, award-winning schools.

Brenda and Jim Sell
San Mateo

Caring for our children
– time to be an X-Man
Editor,
There is little more important
duty in life than caring for and
educating our children. While no
one likes to pay more taxes, the
fact remains that our state does
not provide sufficient funds to
educate our children in reasonable
facilities and with reasonable and
modern equipment, so that job,
my friends, is left to us.
Our school district is one of the
best in the state. Great schools
are no small part of what makes
Foster City and San Mateo great
places to live and, I believe, keep
property values high. 
Measure X is a compromise put
together by representatives from
both cities after months of discussion and public outreach. Our
families and our children deserve
nothing less than the best education we can give them. The desperately needed new and refurbished facilities funded by
Measure X will allow just that.
I have been working on this
issue with officials at the school
district for many years now and
am convinced the solutions
reached with great community
input are the best solutions for
San Mateo and Foster City. I also
pledge that I will continue to
work with the school district to
ensure the funds are spent in a
way that will significantly
address both today’s and our
future’s school capacity problems.
Please vote yes on Measure X
in November. It is your chance to
help make a difference in our
future. Be an X-Man (or XWoman) for your community.

Charlie Bronitsky
Foster City
The letter writer is a member
of the Foster City Council. 

Support of Measure X
Editor,

Irving Chen
Karin Litcher
Paul Moisio

INTERNS, CORRESPONDENTS, CONTRACTORS:
Robert Armstrong
Jim Clifford
Caroline Denney
William Epstein
Tom Jung
Jeanita Lyman
Jhoeanna Mariano
Karan Nevatia
Jeff Palter
Nick Rose
Jordan Ross
Andrew Scheiner
Emily Shen
Kelly Song
Gary Whitman
Cindy Zhang

accepted.
• Please include a city of residence and phone number where we
can reach you.
• Emailed documents are preferred: letters@smdailyjournal.com
• Letter writers are limited to two submissions a month.
Opinions expressed in letters, columns and perspectives are those

I am voting yes on Measure X.
Our San Mateo and Foster City
schools are overflowing with students. At my children’s school
(Foster City Elementary), there
are six kindergarten classes this
year plus two transitional kindergarten classes, and they’re all
full. That’s almost 200 5-yearolds sharing the small primary
playground at once. I was at the
school recently and the fifthgraders were having PE and using
the blacktop at the same time
that 400 first- through thirdgraders were having recess. That
is a lot of chaos on the playground. Unfortunately, there
aren’t enough hours in the school
day to accommodate three recess
periods, three lunch periods, and
separate PE times for each grade.
We have to have three assembly
periods for all 900 students to be
able to enjoy an assembly in our
MPR. In five years, we will need
classrooms for an additional
1,000 students in our district.
Where will they fit? Our schools
are already over capacity.
Measure X will relieve overcrowding by adding classrooms
and expanding school sites.
Please support our
excellent schools by voting yes
on Measure X.

Anne Larsson
Foster City
The letter writer
is the PTA president for
Foster City Elementary School.

Yes on W
Editor,
The South San Francisco Police
Officers Association supports
Measure W on the Nov. 3 ballot.
We urge all residents to vote yes
on Measure W to provide critical
funds to enhance our ability to
keep South San Francisco families and businesses even safer.

Ken Hancock
President, South San Francisco Police
Officers Association

Editor’s note:
The deadline for election-related letters to the editor has passed.
The Daily Journal will no longer
be accepting letters related to the
Nov. 3 local election.

OUR MISSION:
It is the mission of the Daily Journal to be the most
accurate, fair and relevant local news source for those who
live, work or play on the MidPeninsula.
By combining local news and sports coverage, analysis and
insight with the latest business, lifestyle, state, national and
world news, we seek to provide our readers with the
highest quality information resource in San Mateo County.
Our pages belong to you, our readers, and we choose to
reflect the diverse character of this dynamic and everchanging community.

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the editor at news@smdailyjournal.com or by phone at:
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CITY COUNCILS
San Bruno City Council: Irene
O’Connell, Michael Salazar
San Mateo City Council:
Maureen Freschet, Diane Papan
Redwood City Council: Alicia
Aguirre, Ian Bain, Rosanne
Foust, Shelly Masur
Belmont City Council: Davina
Hurt, Doug Kim
Millbrae City Council: Wayne
Lee, Gina Papan, Ann Schneider
Foster City Council: Sam
Hindi, Catherine Mahanpour,
Herb Perez
Burlingame City Council:
Emily Beach, Donna Colson

SCHOOL BOARDS
San Mateo County
Community College District
Board of Trustees: Dave
Mandelkern, Karen Schwarz,
Alan Talansky
San Mateo Union High
School District Board of
Trustees: Marc Friedman, Greg
Land
San Mateo-Foster City
Elementary School District
Board of Trustees: Nancy
Kohn Hsieh, Audrey Ng
Sequoia Union High School
District Board of Trustees:
Carrie Du Bois, Georgia Jack,
Allen Weiner
San Bruno Park Elementary
School District Board of
Trustees: Jennifer Blanco,
Kevin Martinez
Redwood City Elementary
School District Board of
Trustees: Alisa MacAvoy,
Dennis McBride, Yolanda Padilla
Belmont-Redwood Shores
Elementary School District
Board of Trustees: Huan Phan,
Robert Tashjian
Hillsborough City Elementary
School District Board of
Trustees: Greg Dannis, Margi
Power, Gilbert Wai
San Carlos Elementary
School District Board of
Trustees: Neil Layton, Michelle
Nayfack

LOCAL MEASURES
Measure S: Extension of
quarter-cent sales tax in San
Mateo for city services — YES
Measure X: $148 million bond
request for the San MateoFoster City Elementary School
District — YES
Measure W: Half-cent sales tax
increase in South San Francisco
for city services and capital
improvements — YES
Measure V: $45 million bond
measure for acquisition of up
to 23.5 acres of open space in
San Carlos — YES
Measure T: $193 million bond
for Redwood City Elementary
School District facilities — YES
For links to previous
Daily Journal endorsements go to
smdailyjournal.com/opinions.html

10

BUSINESS

Weekend • Oct. 31-Nov.1, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

U.S. stocks slip but finish month
with biggest gain in four years
By Marley Jay
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Dow
17,663.54
Nasdaq 5,053.75
S&P 500 2,079.36

-92.26
-20.53
-10.05

10-Yr Bond 2.15 -0.02
Oil (per barrel) 46.43
Gold
1,141.80

Big movers
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Friday on the New York
Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Valeant Pharmaceuticals International Inc., down $17.73 to $93.77
The company is cutting ties with Philidor, which is shutting down
following accusations that it was a “phantom pharmacy” used solely to
artificially boost sales.
AbbVie Inc., up $5.45 to $59.55
The drugmaker reported better-than-expected third-quarter results on
a boost in sales of the anti-inflammatory Humira.
CVS Health Corp., down $5.02 to $98.78
The drugstore chain reported a worse-than-expected third-quarter profit
and narrowed its outlook.
Anheuser-Busch InBev, up $1.59 to $119.33
The world’s largest brewer reported a 9.6 percent boost in third-quarter
profit, driven by Budweiser, Stella and Corona brands.
LinkedIn Corp., up $23.87 to $240.87
The professional networking service reported better-than-expected
third-quarter profit and revenue and a boost in accountholders.
Nasdaq
First Niagara Financial Group Inc., down 3 cents to $10.35
KeyCorp is buying the regional bank in a $4.1 billion deal that will create
the 13th largest commercial bank in the U.S.
Expedia Inc., up $9.24 to $136.30
The online travel company reported better-than-expected third-quarter
profit.
SolarCity Corp., down $8.42 to $29.65
The installer of solar panels reported worse-than-expected third-quarter
earnings.

The stock market drifted lower
Friday but finished October with its
biggest monthly gain in four years.
U. S. government economic data
released Friday and earlier this week
suggests the economy is still sluggish, stuck in a pattern of gradual but
uneven growth it has followed since
the Great Recession. But the outlook
for future growth improved and fears
waned that a slowing Chinese economy would send the U.S. economy into
a tailspin.
Strong corporate earnings in some
sectors, like health care and telecommunications, also helped propel the
market all the way back to positive
for the year after a swoon in August
and a rocky September.
Paul Christopher, global market
strategist for Wells Fargo, said
investors are now gaining confidence
in the U.S. economy and are more
hopeful that China won’t suffer an
abrupt downturn.
“We could see investors finally put
that correction in August and those
fears permanently behind them,” he
said.
The Standard & Poor’s 500 index
has risen for five consecutive weeks
and it ended October up 8.3 percent,
its best month since October 2011.

The index’s increase of 159 points
was the biggest in its 77-year history. The next-best month was March
2000, the height of the dot-com bubble, when it rose 132 points.
Sam Stovall, U.S. equity strategist
at S&P Capital IQ, said a very strong
October usually means the market
won’t make big gains in November
and December, muting the so-called
Santa Claus rally. He does expect
stocks to keep rising for the rest of
this year, though, and make gains in
2016, lifted by overall economic
growth and improving corporate
earnings.
He said 2016 “has a chance of
being a good year but not a great
year” for equities. “Investors will
continue to buy the dips until the
prospect of either a U.S. or global
recession spooks investors again.”
On Friday, stocks were largely flat
through much of the day, venturing
into positive territory in the early
afternoon before ending lower. The
S&P 500 lost 10.05 points, or 0.5
percent, to 2,079.36. The Dow Jones
industrial average dipped 92. 26
points, or 0.5 percent, to 17,663.54.
The Nasdaq composite index slid
20. 53 points, or 0. 4 percent, to
5,053.75.
The Commerce Department said
Friday that consumer spending
inched up just 0. 1 percent in

Hewlett-Packard, Silicon Valley
icon, is ready for its break-up
By Brandon Bailey
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — One of the nation’s
most storied tech companies will split in
two this weekend, another casualty of seismic shifts in the way people use technology
— and big-company sluggishness in
responding.
Hewlett-Packard was an early pioneer of
what became the model for Silicon Valley
startups: Founded in 1939 by two Stanford
graduates in a Palo Alto garage, HP was long
celebrated for its engineering know-how
and laid-back corporate culture. It made
hefty profits as it grew into a multinational
giant that sold a wide range of computer gear
and commercial tech services.

But after struggling to keep pace with
recent trends like the rise of smartphones
and cloud computing. HP’s board decided
last year to create two smaller companies,
each with a narrower focus.
HP Inc. will sell personal computers and
printers; Hewlett Packard Enterprise will
sell commercial computer systems, software and tech services. Starting Monday,
each will trade separately on the New York
Stock Exchange.
The old HP “missed the emergence of the
Web,” said tech analyst Peter Burris at
Forrester Research. “They missed the emergence of mobile.”
HP’s current chief executive, who pushed
for the split, says the new spinoffs will be
more nimble. CEO Meg Whitman will run
HP Enterprise, while PC industry veteran

Dion Weisler will lead HP Inc. Each will be
independent, with “flexibility to respond to
a constantly evolving market,” Whitman
told an investor conference last month.
“With less to focus on,” she added, “each
company will do core things better.”
By dividing HP into roughly equal halves,
analysts estimate, each spinoff should produce more than $50 billion in sales next
year. But skeptics say neither will have the
clout of the old HP, which became a leading
consumer brand while using its vast size to
negotiate volume discounts with suppliers
and big contracts with business customers.
“They won’t have the impact that HP once
had, now that they don’t have the depth of
portfolio they once had,” predicted Rob
Enderle, a longtime industry analyst. “It’s
not clear what HP is anymore.”

Chevron cutting up to 7,000 jobs as oil profits shrink
By David Koenig
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DALLAS — Chevron is cutting up to
7,000 jobs, or 11 percent of its workforce,
the latest indication of the toll that low oil
prices are taking on the industry.
The two biggest U. S. oil companies
reported huge profits for the third quarter.
Chevron Corp. said Friday that it earned $2
billion, and Exxon Mobil Corp. earned
more than $4.2 billion.
But those profits are down sharply from a

year ago. Chevron’s profit was 64 percent
lower than last year’s third quarter; Exxon’s
profit fell 47 percent, its worst third quarter
since 2003. Both companies are slashing
costs to boost profits. Chevron plans to cut
capital and exploratory spending next year
by one-fourth, with further cuts in 2017 and
2018 depending on the oil industry’s condition then.
That will include cutting the workforce by
6,000 to 7,000 jobs and shedding a similar
number of contract workers, said Chairman
and CEO John Watson. Many of the layoffs

will be in Australia, he said, and an unspecified number will be in the U.S. Chevron has
64,700 employees.
Exxon doesn’t announce job cuts, and a
spokesman declined to say whether the
company had reduced its headcount in
response to low oil prices. Vice president of
investor relations Jeffrey Woodbury told
analysts that Exxon has “continuously ...
right-sized our global function organization” and has the same number of employees today that it had in 1999, before its
merger with Mobil.

EPA may ban common pesticide used on fruit and vegetables
By Matthew Daly
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — A common pesticide
used on citrus fruit, almonds and other crops
would be banned under a proposal
announced Friday by the Environmental
Protection Agency.
The proposal would prohibit use of chlor-

pyrifos, a widely used insecticide that is
sprayed on a variety of crops including
oranges, apples, cherries, grapes, broccoli
and asparagus.
The pesticide, in use since 1965, has
sickened dozens of farmworkers in recent
years. Traces have been found in waterways, threatening fish, and regulators
say overuse could make targeted insects

immune to the pesticide.
U. S. farms use more than 6 million
pounds of the chemical each year — about
25 percent of it in California.
The EPA said it will take public comments
on the proposal for at least two months,
with a final rule expected in December
2016. The rule would not take effect until
2017 at the earliest.

September, partly because consumers
were spending less on gasoline as
energy prices fell. The gain was the
smallest in eight months. The department said Thursday that economic
growth slowed sharply in the summer, although most economists
think the economy has improved this
month.
Wells Fargo’s Christopher said the
November and December U.S. unemployment reports will help set the
course of the markets for the rest of
this year, along with the Federal
Reserve’s interest rate policies.
The busiest week of third-quarter
earnings wrapped up Friday with big
moves for a slew of companies. The
professional networking service
LinkedIn surpassed analyst estimates
and its stock gained $23.87, or 11
percent, to $240. 87. Drugmaker
AbbVie surged as sales of its antiinflammatory Humira, the biggestselling drug in the world, continued
to rise. AbbVie rose $5.45, or 10.1
percent, to $59.55.
Chevron, the second-largest U.S.
oil company, said its profit fell
almost two-thirds. The company said
it will eliminate around 10 percent of
its jobs, or up to 7,000 positions,
and will also slash capital and exploration spending as it deals with lower
oil prices that are cutting deeply into
profit.

Business briefs
Valeant cutting ties with Philidor
NEW YORK — Valeant Pharmaceuticals, a
company that has come under intense
scrutiny for its drug prices, has cut ties with
Philidor following accusations that it was a
“phantom pharmacy” used solely to artificially boost sales.
Valeant said Friday that the mail-order
pharmacy has informed the company that it
will shut down as soon as possible.
The imminent end of Philidor comes just
hours after the nation’s two largest pharmacy benefit providers, CVS Health and
Express Scripts, said that they had ended all
interactions with the company citing its
business practices. UnitedHealth Group
conducted an audit of Philidor in late 2014
and began cutting ties with the company
“in the interests of our customers.”
Valeant Pharmaceuticals International
Inc. is under fire for its practice of buying
smaller drug developers and then hiking
prices on the medicines developed by that
company. At the same time, the company’s
profits have skyrocketed as it slashed
spending on research into new drugs.
Valeant had become a Wall Street favorite
and its shares hit an all-time high as recently as August, but it has been hammered
relentlessly since coming under a national
spotlight.

Couple sues Six Flags, says
animals kept in bad conditions
SAN JOSE — Two former employees have
sued Northern California’s Six Flags
Discovery Kingdom, saying they were fired
in retaliation for raising animal welfare
concerns.
KNTV-TV in San Jose reports that
Michael and Holley Muraco’s wrongful termination lawsuit against the Vallejo park
says Michael Muraco told the U. S.
Department of Agriculture about poor water
quality in the dolphin pools.
A USDA inspection report from 2014
supported Muraco’s fear that the poor water
quality was related to the deaths of two
infant dolphins and chronic health problems in adult dolphins.
Six Flags did not return calls seeking
comment. The park told a court publication
conditions are safe for animals and that the
lawsuit has no merit.

PAC-12 FOOTBALL: NO. 8 STANFORD GEARS UP FOR WASHINGTON ST.; CAL AIMS TO FINALLY TAKE DOWN USC >> PAGE 13

<<< Page 12, Raiders’ Hudson
proving he’s worth the gamble
Weekend • Oct. 31-Nov. 1, 2015

Knights run table for WBAL girls’ tennis crown
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

The Menlo girls’ tennis team has made
quite a racket since Bill Shine took over as
head coach in 1995.
Now in his 20th year at the helm, Shine
celebrated his anniversary in style as the
Knights won outright the West Bay Athletic
League Foothill Division title Thursday.
With a 5-2 win over Harker at the Santa Clara
Tennis Center, Menlo (10-0 in WBAL, 19-1
overall) completed an undefeated run through
WBAL play, making Shine 20 for 20 in winning league titles throughout his tenure.

Menlo has played in
three different leagues during that span. When
Shine took over 20 years
ago, the Knights were in
the now defunct Girls
Private School League. In
2002, they moved to the
Peninsula
Athletic
League, where they won
Schuyler
six straight league titles.
Tilney-Volk
Since moving to the
WBAL Foothill Division in 2008, the team
has run the table with seven straight league
championships.

“It’s just a number,”
Shine said. “It means I’ve
been around awhile.”
Not that Thursday’s win
over second-place Harker
(8-2 in WBAL Foothill)
was a cakewalk. The
Knights entered already
one player short, with
Kathryn Wilson No. 2 doubles player
Vivian
Liu
having
sprained an ankle earlier this season. Then,
to go with Menlo’s restructured doubles lineup, Shine found out Thursday that No. 2 single Alice Yao couldn’t play due to illness.

Menlo’s doubles held down the fort
though. The doubles were the team’s strength
last year, when the Knights advanced to a
Northern California championship. They
continued the trend Thursday sweeping all
three matches. No. 1 doubles Mia
McConnell and Melissa Tran won 6-2, 6-3;
No. 2 doubles Schuyler Tilney-Volk and
Kathryn Wilson won 6-2, 6-3; and No. 3 doubles Hao and Gornick won 6-2, 4-6, 6-2.
With Liu injured, Wilson moved up to pair
with Tilney-Volk. The two have won all four
of their matches since pairing up Oct. 13

See MENLO, Page 15

Curry, Dubs
rout Rockets
By Jordan Godwin
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

TERRY BERNAL/DAILY JOURNAL

Hillsdale running back Cameron Taylor fights his way to the end zone in the Knights’ thrilling 37-34 win Friday night at Half Moon Bay.

Fighting for first
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

It was last year when the Hillsdale Knights
started sporting the ‘Fighting Knights’
across their football jerseys. Friday night,
they earned that title.
Despite falling behind by two touchdowns
at the start of the fourth quarter at raucous Half
Moon Bay, the Fighting Knights stormed
back to win the battle for first place in the
Peninsula Athletic League Ocean Division
with a 37-34 victory over the Cougars.
Amid a 34-34 tie, Hillsdale place kicker
Josh Janakes drilled a 35-yard field goal with

one second remaining in regulation to win it.
With the victory, the Fighting Knights (4-0
in PAL Ocean, 7-1 overall) remain unbeaten
in league play and take over sole possession
of the PAL Ocean Division.
“That’s who we are,” Hillsdale head coach
Mike Parodi said of the team’s moniker.
“That’s who we need to be.”
The game seemed destined to go down to
the wire after Hillsdale took a slight 13-12
lead into halftime. But Hillsdale quarterback
Brett Wetteland was grace under fire down the
stretch. The senior was 18-of-28 passing for
315 yards and three touchdown strikes, all to
junior wide receiver Isaiah Cozzolino.

Half Moon Bay quarterback Gavin
Tomberlin put on a passing clinic of his own.
The left-handed sophomore threw for 207
yards and five TDs, all to senior wide receiver
Pablo Gutierrez. In fact, Tomberlin had four
straight completions spanning from the second quarter to the fourth, all for touchdown
strikes to Gutierrez of 18, 10, 50 and 26 yards.
Tomberlin’s 26-yard strike on a timing
pattern up the sideline gave Half Moon Bay
a 34-20 lead with 10:26 remaining in the
game. But the savvy Wetteland answered the
call, leading three straight scoring drives,

See KNIGHTS, Page 15

HOUSTON — Stephen Curry showed
Houston fans that he’s the real NBA MVP.
Curry scored 25 points and the Golden
State Warriors beat the Rockets 112-92 on
Friday night in a rematch of the Western
Conference finals.
Curry listened to the crowd frequently rain
down “MVP! MVP!”
chants on Rockets guard
James Harden. But Curry
outscored him 25-16 and
got the win again, just as
he did in the real MVP vote
and in the Warriors’ fivegame victory that sent
them to the NBA Finals.
“The best players in
Steph Curry
this league learn every
year how to get a little bit better, a little bit
more efficient,” Curry said. “I’m just trying
to follow suit.”
The reigning champions improved to 2-0
while the Rockets fell to 0-2.
Harden struggled with his shot for a second
straight game. The MVP runner-up finished 4
of 18, including 1 of 10 from 3-point range,
but added seven rebounds and five assists.
“He’s not comfortable, but then, who is?”
Rockets coach Kevin McHale said. “I mean, I
don’t see anybody who looks comfortable
out there. We’re funky.”
Dwight Howard had nine points and seven
rebounds for Houston in his first game after
serving a one-game suspension for getting a
fourth flagrant foul in the postseason.
Emotions ran high in a game that felt more
like a playoff game than the second one of
the season. The frustrated Rockets were called
for two technical fouls, while the calm and
collected Warriors cruised to their second
straight victory under interim coach Luke
Walton, who is filling in for Steve Kerr as he
recovers from back surgery.
Curry added seven rebounds and six assists.
Marreese Speights had 14 points, Andre
Iguodala and Harrison Barnes both had 12,
and Klay Thompson had 11.

Mets, Syndergaard bounce back with Game 3 victory
By Mike Fitzpatrick
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Two balls launched over the
wall, one fired over an opponent’s head and
just like that, David Wright and the New York
Mets are right back in this World Series.
Wright homered and drove in four runs,
Curtis Granderson also connected and rookie
Noah Syndergaard set a nasty tone at the start
of a 9-3 victory against the Kansas City
Royals that trimmed New York’s deficit to 2-1

Noah
Syndergaard

Friday night.
Syndergaard’s
first
pitch was a 97 mph fastball just off the inside corner and way over Alcides
Escobar’s head, eliciting
a huge cheer from fans.
The skinny shortstop
went down to the dirt on
his rear end and stayed
there, legs splayed,
catching his breath for

several seconds.
“I feel like it really made a statement to
start the game off, that you guys can’t dig in
and get too aggressive because I’ll come in
there,” said Syndergaard, who alluded
Thursday to having “a few tricks” up his
sleeve for the leadoff man.
“My intent on that pitch was to make them
uncomfortable, and I feel like I did just that. I
know that for the past, I think every postseason game that Escobar has played in, he’s
swung at the first-pitch fastball, and I didn’t

think he would want to swing at that one.”
Escobar, having a huge postseason,
acknowledged he was caught off guard.
“I didn’t like it one bit. He was saying yesterday that he had a plan against my aggressiveness. If that’s the plan, I think that’s a
stupid plan,” Escobar said. “I cannot fathom a
pitcher would throw to the head a 98 mph
pitch on the first pitch of the game.”
Kansas City players spent the next few

See GAME 3, Page 14

12

SPORTS

Weekend • Oct. 31-Nov.1, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Hudson paying dividends for Raiders Patriots taking out
Deflategate wrath
on rest of the NFL

By Michael Wagaman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ALAMEDA — Oakland Raiders general
manager Reggie McKenzie has taken his
fair share of criticism for some of the free
agent moves he’s made over the past few
years.
One signing that no one disputes was the
$44.5 million, five-year contract given to
center Rodney Hudson in March.
The deal made the 26-year-old Hudson the
highest-paid player on the Raiders’ roster.
With an average salary of $8.9 million,
Hudson is the second highest-paid center in
the NFL behind Miami’s Mike Pouncey,
who earns $8.95 million annually.
Hudson has certainly proven to be worth
the investment.
Through six games, he has allowed one
sack while dominating both as a pass
blocker and a run blocker. Hudson also made
the pivotal block on San Diego free safety
Jimmy Wilson that helped spring wide
receiver Amari Cooper for a 52-yard touchdown in last week’s win over the Chargers.
It was a play that made several national
highlight shows and one that still had
Hudson’s teammates buzzing this week
when the team gathered to watch film.
“Everybody was going crazy for him
because you just see someone that big running that fast,” Raiders quarterback Derek
Carr said. “I’m happy I don’t play defense.
I’d rather be on this side of him than having
to try and take that block on.”
A second-round pick by Kansas City in
2011, Hudson had already carved a reputation for being one of the most physical centers in the league when the Raiders reached
out to him this offseason after Hudson
became a free agent.
Hudson was at the top of Oakland’s priority list and the two sides quickly reached an
agreement. Now the Raiders front office is
enjoying watching the payoff.

Sports brief
American Pharoah bids farewell
at Breeders’ Cup Classic in Kentucky
LEXINGTON, Ky. — Triple Crown winner
American Pharoah will look to deliver a final
dynamic performance in the $5 million
Breeders’ Cup Classic on Saturday at Keeneland.
The colt who ended the 37-year Triple
Crown drought is heading to stud duty at a
nearby farm after the Classic.
American Pharoah looks like the probable
pacesetter in the 1 1/4-mile race largely
devoid of speed horses.

T

JAKE ROTH/USA TODAY SPORTS

Raiders center Rodney Hudson, left, signed a five-year, $44.5 million contract prior to the
season, making him the highest paid player on the roster.
“Money aside, at the end of the day, do
you like the player?” McKenzie said. “We
like the player. The market dictates everything else. We just penciled him as a guy we
really liked and we wanted. Once we found
he was interested, we just went after it.”
Hudson wasn’t the only Oakland offensive lineman making a big block downfield
on Cooper’s touchdown. Left tackle Donald
Penn sealed off San Diego cornerback
Brandon Flowers five yards beyond where
Hudson leveled Wilson.
“Donald made a great block on that play,
too,” Hudson said Friday. “It was a collective effort. A lot of people did good things.
It just comes with it. I got out in space, and
Amari made a great cut, too. He did a great
job of setting my block up.”
The Raiders have definitely made significant strides offensively with Hudson at center. They’re 18th overall and 23rd in rushing
offense after finishing last in both categories a year ago.
Hudson grades out as the best pass-blocking center in the NFL, according to

ProFootballFocus. com. That’s helped
Oakland make a smooth transition to the
new schemes of offensive coordinator Bill
Musgrave despite using three new starters
on the offensive line.
“It’s always important to take it one game
at a time and not lose sight on what’s now
by looking in the past or the future, ”
Hudson said. “It’s the players and coaches
as a whole reminding each other and focusing on the game plan, the opponent and
what they’re trying to do.”
No tes : Safety Charles Woodson (shoulder/knee) is probable. . DL Denico Autry
(concussion), defensive back TJ Carrie
(shoulder), DT Justin Ellis (ankle) and CB
Keith McGill (foot) are also probable. . LB
Neiron Ball (knee) is out. . Chase DeLisle, a
7-year-old boy from Canada, served as
coach for the day as part of a Make-A-Wish
Foundation wish. DeLisle attended practice
then broke the team huddle at the end of the
workout before holding his own press conference with the media after coach Jack Del
Rio had done the same.

Montana, Marino to host
fantasy football weekend
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN DIEGO — Dan Marino and Joe
Montana will be going long on a fantasy
football weekend.
The Hall of Fame quarterbacks will host the
World Fantasy Football Championship on
Dec. 12-13 in San Diego for 120 players
vying for the first-place prize of $3 million.
FanDuel and DraftKings have come under

increased legal scrutiny by regulators after
employees played on competing sites.
Marino says he’s “excited to team up with
Joe Montana and get back out on the gridiron
to see if these fantasy players can translate
their skills to the field.”
CEO Nigel Eccles says the finalists will test
their skills with “two of the greatest quarterbacks to ever play” and compete the next day
for FanDuel’s largest payout.

he New England Patriots are still
ticked off. They’re taking it out on
the rest of the NFL.
Instead of being the scandal that brought
down Belichick, Brady & Co., Deflategate
turned out to be the fuel that might just propel the Patriots to their greatest season yet.
New England (7-0) has been utterly dominant through the first half of the season,
doling out its latest shellacking on the
Miami Dolphins, who never had a chance
in a 36-7 rout Thursday night.
Like all great champions, from Ali to
Bird to Jordan, the
Patriots feed off every
perceived slight — or,
in this case, a major
scandal in which they
were charged with
intentionally deflating
footballs used in last
season’s AFC championship game.
The NFL attempted
to drop the hammer on
the Patriots, doling
out a four-game suspension to quarterback
Tom Brady. He went to
court and beat the rap. Now, at age 38, he’s
putting together a remarkable season (69
percent completions, 20 touchdowns, just
one interception, on pace to throw for
more than 5,500 yards, which would be an
NFL record) and boasting that he wouldn’t
mind playing for another decade.
Seriously, Tom, quit rubbing it in.
Aren’t four Super Bowl rings enough
for you?
Nope.
Nothing’s ever enough for the Patriots,
especially when they’ve got a convenient
target for channeling their anger. Coach
Bill Belichick has never been shy about
immersing his team in an us-against-theworld mindset, going all the way back to
Spygate and carried along by a persistent
belief that he’s always looking for ways to
skirt the rules.
After the brouhaha over deflated footballs, Belichick channeled his disdain for
Roger Goodell onto the other 31 teams,
who have the misfortune of standing in as
the commissioner’s proxies each week.
The coach almost sounded satisfied after
the beat-down of the Jets, though it won’t

PAUL
NEWBERRY

See PATS, Page 16

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Oct. 31-Nov.1, 2015

13

Cal looks to beat USC No. 8 Stanford vs. Washington St.
for 1st time since ’03 might be surprisingly significant
By Josh Dubow

By Nicholas K. Geranios

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BERKELEY — The fortunes for Southern California and
California have undergone quite the change the past two
weeks.
Back-to-back losses by the Golden Bears (5-2, 2-2 Pac-12)
have erased the good feeling from a 5-0 start and have raised
questions about whether Cal is in for
another late-season flop.
USC (4-3, 2-2) rebounded from the firing of coach Steve Sarkisian and three
losses in a four-game span to hand Utah
its first loss last week in a performance
that validated the preseason hype around
the Trojans.
If a topsy-turvy season in the Pac-12
has
proved anything so far, it’s that perJared Goff
ceptions can change quickly. The Trojans
will look to avoid that roller-coaster when they visit the
Bears on Saturday.
USC has dominating this in-state rivalry with Cal for more
than a decade. The Trojans have won 11 straight meetings
against the Bears since a triple-overtime loss in 2003.
Most of those haven’t even been close with the average
margin of victory being nearly 19 points. Last year’s 38-30
USC win was the closest since 2007 but only got that way
when Cal scored two late touchdowns long after the game had
been decided.
This marks the second straight season that Cal got off to a
fast start against the easy part of its schedule only to fall flat
when the games got tougher in the conference season. The
Bears started 4-1 a year ago, only to lose six of their final
seven games to fall one win shy of a bowl bid.
“When you play against good teams, your level of execution has to go up,” coach Sonny Dykes said. “We probably
haven’t raised our level of execution as much as we need to.”

This didn’t have the look of a particularly significant game
a few weeks ago.
Three straight wins by Washington State have left Saturday
night’s game against No. 8 Stanford as arguably the Cougars’
biggest home game in more than a decade.
Stanford (6-1, 5-0 Pac-12) is the only undefeated team in
league play, but it’s Washington State (5-2, 3-1) that’s right
on the heels of the Cardinal. Not Oregon. Not California. It’s
Washington State that could take control of its destiny in the
Pac-12 North race should it manage to knock off the Cardinal.
The last time Washington State was in contention for the
conference lead this late in the season was 2003. Aside from
rivalry games against Washington, it could be considered the
Cougars’ most significant home game since 2002 when
Washington State went to the Rose Bowl.
The last time the Cougars beat a Top 10 team was No. 5
Texas in the 2003 Holiday Bowl.
Stanford coach David Shaw said he has been impressed by
how Washington State rebounded from a season-opening loss
to FCS Portland State to win five of six games.
“These guys have bounced back from that and become a real,
real good football team,” Shaw said. “Offensively, their quarterback is playing at a high level. He’s got weapons around
him. They are protecting him better.”
Washington State quarterback Luke Falk has thrown for
2,885 yards, with 26 touchdowns and four interceptions this
season. The Cougars have scored more than 40 points in each
of their past three games, including last week’s 45-42 win at
Arizona.
Coach Mike Leach said Falk, a sophomore, is ahead of other
quarterbacks he has coached at this stage.
“He’s a very composed guy,” Leach said. “He’s very focused,
very coachable. ... He has a clear mind.”
He also has a slew of targets. Seven different receivers have
at least 20 receptions for the Cougars this season in the passhappy Air Raid offense. They are led by Gabe Marks, who
leads the Pac-12 with 57 catches, good for 717 yards and 10
touchdowns. Marks caught a school-record four touchdown
passes last weekend against Arizona.
“Week after week, he makes big play after big play,” Shaw
said.

Top flight QBs
With Cal’s Jared Goff and USC senior Cody Kessler, this
game features two of the top passers in the country. Kessler is
completing more than 69 percent of his passes with 18 TDs
and five interceptions. Goff has completed 65.5 percent of
his passes with 20 TDs and nine interceptions but is coming
off his two worst games of the year, including a five-interception performance against Utah three weeks ago.
“We have to be able to run the ball better,” Dykes said. “That
will take a little pressure off of him. We just have to execute
better as a group. It’s not just Jared. It’s really our offense.”

Center of attention
The Trojans are on their third starting center after losing
Max Tuerk and Toa Lobendahn to season-ending injuries.
Khaliel Rodgers stepped in last week against Utah after
Lobendahn left in the first quarter and fared well. Now he gets
the start.
“I was ready last week, and I’m ready for this week,”
Rodgers said. “An opponent is an opponent. I don’t look at
it as any different. You just have to wait until your time
comes, and now it’s time to go out there and perform.”

Stanford has won six straight games since
an opening loss to Northwestern, scoring
more than 40 points in four of them. The
Cardinal have won seven straight over the
Cougars and may unleash even more of
Christian McCaffrey on a defense that
remains Washington State’s weakness.
McCaffrey is leading the nation with
259.7 all-purpose yards per game, more
than 40 yards per game over the next playChristian
er. McCaffrey needs just 57 yards rushing
McCaffrey
to reach 1,000 for the season.
McCaffrey is the first Stanford player since 1991 to post
100 yards receiving and rushing in the same game, which happened last week in a win over Washington.

Ground game
Washington State has discovered a ground attack this year
behind running backs Jamal Morrow, Gerard Wicks and
Keith Harrington, who are known collectively as Earth,
Wind and Fire. The Cougars have already rushed for 638
yards this season, compared to 478 yards all of last year.

See PAC-12, Page 16

NASCAR brief
Logano wins pole at Martinsville Speedway
MARTINSVILLE, Va. — Joey Logano won the pole at
Martinsville Speedway on Friday to set
up a shot at his fourth consecutive win
and a quick berth into NASCAR’s championship race.
Logano turned a lap at 98. 548 in
Friday qualifying to earn the top starting
spot. He heads into Sunday’s race coming off three consecutive wins — a
sweep of the second round of the Chase
Joey Logano for the Sprint Cup championship.

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14

SPORTS

Weekend • Oct. 31-Nov.1, 2015

Pirates’ Andrew McCutchen
brings home Clemente Award
NEW YORK — Andrew
McCutchen cut off his signature
dreadlocks during spring training
to benefit Pirates Charities.
McCutchen was honored Friday
with Major League Baseball’s
Roberto Clemente Award, given
annually to a player for positive
contributions on and off the field,

MLB brief
including sportsmanship and community involvement.
McCutchen founded “Cutch’s
Crew” in 2010 to assist inner-city
youth baseball players and at-risk
children in Pittsburgh. Among the
charities he supports are the MakeA-Wish Foundation, the Children’s
Hospital of Pittsburgh Foundation,
the Homeless Children’s Education

Fund, the Light of Life Rescue
Mission and Habitat for Humanity.
Pittsburgh’s only previous winner was Willie Stargell in 1974.
A Hall of Famer for the Pirates
from 1955-72, Clemente died in a
plane crash on New Year’s Eve in
1972 while on a humanitarian mission to assist earthquake victims
in Nicaragua.
McCutchen, a 29-year-old outfielder, is a five-time All-Star and
the 2013 NL MVP.

GAME 3
Continued from page 11
innings shouting at Syndergaard from the dugout.
“I think the whole team was pretty upset. The
first pitch of the game goes whizzing by our leadoff man’s head,” Mike Moustakas said. “I think all
25 guys in that dugout were pretty fired up.”
Shut down at the plate in Kansas City, the Mets
broke loose and chased Yordano Ventura early during the first Series game at Citi Field. Aided by
more unsteady fielding from a Royals team known
for tight defense, New York got 12 hits from nine
different players.
Pitching on Halloween eve, Syndergaard recovered from a scary start and went six innings, giving the Mets the winning performance they didn’t
get from fellow studs Matt Harvey and Jacob
deGrom at Kauffman Stadium.
“He delivered,” manager Terry Collins said. “He
came through exactly as we expected.”
Another rookie, hometown kid Steven Matz,
tries to pull New York even Saturday night in
Game 4 when he faces 36-year-old Chris Young
and the Royals.
After the Mets fell behind in the first inning,
Granderson started the bottom half with a single
and Wright hit his first World Series home run,
recharging a packed crowd of 44,781.
The captain, who entered batting .182 without
an RBI in his first World Series, added a two-run
single on Kelvin Herrera’s first pitch during a
four-run sixth that broke it open.
Pinch-hitter Juan Uribe, just back from a chest
injury, had an RBI single in his first plate appearance since Sept. 25. Slumping slugger Yoenis
Cespedes added a sacrifice fly.
In a matchup between two of the hardest throwers in the game, Syndergaard turned up the heat on
a brisk night (52 degrees and windy) while Ventura
lost some steam.
Syndergaard struggled early against a Royals
lineup minus slugging designated hitter Kendrys
Morales and was only a couple of batters from
coming out of the game, Collins said.
But Syndergaard set down 12 in a row, five on
strikeouts, before loading the bases with two outs
in the sixth. He retired Alex Rios on his 104th and
final pitch.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Baseball blues in Venezuela as
economic chaos hits stadiums
By Hannah Dreier
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CARACAS,
Venezuela

Venezuela’s raucous, boozy and
affordable baseball games have
long provided respite from the
growing gloom in the economically struggling country.
Now, a more than quadrupling of
ticket prices is putting a damper on
the national pastime, with the season kicking off this month to
sometimes half-empty stadiums and
featuring players who say their per
diems don’t go far enough to buy
lunch.
On a recent game night, hardcore
baseball lovers celebrating what
fans call Venezuela’s national religion filled about a third of the sooty
stadium in central Caracas. The
plaza of vendors outside had the
ghost-town feel that has come to
mark so much of Venezuelan life as
the socialist country grapples with
the world’s highest inflation and a
severe shortage of imported goods.
Average attendance at the 25,000seat arena is down 25 percent for the
first month of the season.
“It’s not just the ticket price; it’s
the cost of everything you have to
buy your family during the game,”
said Luis Rojas, director of Caracas’
Estadio Universitario.
While most South Americans
prefer soccer, Venezuela is crazy
for baseball. It’s exported more
players to Major League Baseball
than any country aside from the
Dominican Republic, including
several who are playing for the
Kansas City Royals in the World
Series this week. During the offseason, major and minor league
players often come to play in the
oil-producing nation.
The fact that thousands of
Venezuelans so far have been willing to pay the stadium’s new ticket
prices of up to 2,000 bolivars — a
fifth of the monthly minimum wage
— is a testament to their love for
the game.
A beer vendor drew jeers as he
worked the stands after giving fans
the unhappy news that the price of a
300-milliliter (10-ounce) bottle had
jumped from 30 to 120 bolivars
since the season ended last year, and

the most popular brands had gone
missing altogether.
“Last year my shoes cost 2,000
bolivars and this year they cost
18,000,” he shouted back at outraged customers.
Even beer fans with money are
cutting back.
Radio DJ Daniel La Cruz has been
limiting himself to two bottles of
light beers per inning, instead of
ordering a case of 36 for himself and
his wife to share like usual.
“I couldn’t afford to buy a new
jersey this year either,” he said.
“Still, you can’t just watch the
game on TV. Baseball is life for
Venezuelans.”
Below him, a couple sat together
in an empty row, having decided to
save money by leaving their kids
at home for what used to be a family activity.
Outside, T-shirt vendor Alexander
Morales eyed the empty walkways.
He skirts Venezuela’s rigid currency
controls by buying dollars on the
black market to import his merchandise. Like the beer vendor,
Morales took his share of abuse
from fans objecting to his price,
which are up 500 percent from last
year. That’s about the inflation seen
for other imported goods like specialty foods and electronics, but far
ahead of the rates seen in taxis and
street food stands.
“I put my faith in God, but these
are apocalyptic times,” he said.
Oscar Prieto Parraga, president of
the Venezuelan
Professional
Baseball League, believes people
are overestimating the drop in
attendance, and says he and other
officials are doing all they can to
maintain a sense of normalcy for
fans in the face of raging inflation.
For many years, the country’s
runaway inflation seemed to hardly
touch baseball. Last year, attendance was up 5 percent for major
stadiums around the country, and
ticket sales for the Caracas team
jumped about 3 percent.
Now, it’s not just the fans and
vendors who are being hit. Team
managers say they are struggling to
rent buses, pay for hotel rooms and
provide basics like cups and toilet
paper, which can sometimes only
be found on the black market.

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

MENLO
Continued from page 11
against Pinewood.
“It just turned out to be great,”
Shine said. “They complement
each other well.”
Yao’s absence forced sophomore
Elika Eshghi to move into the No.
4 singles spot, with Georgia
Anderson moving up to No. 3 and
Taylor Gould to No. 2. While
Anderson and Gould were each
defeated, Eshghi held on to win the
day’s longest individual match 6-2,
3-6 (4). Menlo won two other individual matches — No. 1 single
Ashley Vielma and No. 3 doubles
Kaitlin Hao and Lila Gornick — in
three sets.
“I just was so proud of [the team]
because we learned just before the
match Alice wasn’t going to play,”
Shine said. “So we knew everybody
was going to have to move up.”
It could have been worse though,
had Shine not readjusted the top of
his singles’ lineup Tuesday against
Sacred Heart Prep. Yao, a junior,

KNIGHTS
Continued from page 11
going 8 for 10 in the fourth quarter.
“We were down two (touchdowns),” Cozzolino said. “You
think he’d break, but no way. He
brought us back— him and [senior
guard Michael Mounga].”
Mounga was a blocking force to
opened rushing lanes for senior
tailback Cameron Taylor and sophomore Nick Hulman, who were
essential to balancing the attack.
Taylor had a typical night by his
standards, rushing 18 times for 129
yards and two touchdowns. But he
also had a 23-yard reception to

had played No. 1 for most of the
season.
“Now it’s clear that Ashley is
playing better right now than
Alice,” Shine said.
Two factors caused Shine to flipflop Yao and Vielma though.
During the second half of the
WBAL schedule, Vielma moved up
to No. 1 against Crystal Springs
Uplands and Pinewood due to
injuries to Yao. Then, Tuesday
against Sacred Heart Prep, Shine
kept Vielma in the top spot with
Yao at No. 2 for the first time this
season. It was a tall order for
Vielma, having to contend with the
WBAL’s top singles player in SHP
sophomore No. 1 Sara Choy.
Vielma, a freshman, put up quite a
fight against Choy, extending the
second set in a 6-1, 7-5 loss. Still,
Vielma — who won in comeback
fashion Thursday 3-6, 6-4, 6-2 —
has the best individual singles
record for Menlo at 14-3 overall.
“She was really consistent and has
a little bit more power,” Shine said.
With the WBAL individual playoff tournament starting Monday,
Shine said he expects Yao to return
to the court. He certainly would
like to see Yao at her best in two
open Hillsdale’s initial fourth quarter drive before Hulman reeled off
runs of 9, 2 and 5 yards.
Then Wetteland connected with
Cozzolino on a fly pattern over the
middle for a 26-yard touchdown;
and Janakes hammered the extra
point home to make it 34-27.
Half Moon Bay (3-1, 7-1) didn’t
go quietly on the following possession, driving to the Hillsdale 23yard line and looking to put the
game away. But on second-and-9,
senior linebacker Siua Etu got into
the backfield to stuff a sweep play
for a 5-yard loss. Then back-toback incompletions turned the ball
over on downs, giving the Knights
possession at the own 28-yard line
with 3:27 remaining.
Taylor sparked the game-tying
drive with a 6-yard run, then he

weeks for the Central Coast
Section playoffs, as Menlo
attempts to win its second straight
title.
“Hopefully over the weekend
she’ll be back,” Shine said. “She’s
had some ailments. It was tight
without her (Thursday) so hopefully she’ll be back.”

Weekend • Oct. 31-Nov.1, 2015

15

Japan’s Kohei Uchimura soars
to 6th world gymnastics title
By Will Graves

“I expect us to be No. 1 seeded,”
Shine said. “But having said that,
if Alice is sick and with Vivian out,
it’s going to be a dogfight.”

GLASGOW, Scotland — Japan’s
Kohei Uchimura breezed to his record
sixth world gymnastics championship title Friday, putting together
a series of nearly flawless routines to
continue his long run of dominance.
Uchimura posted a total of
92.332, more than 1.6 points better
than Cuban teenager Manrique
Larduet and Deng Shudi of China.
The triumph came two days after
Uchimura helped Japan to its first
gold medal in the world championships in nearly 40 years.
The 26-year-old Uchimura’s combination of elegance and athleticism makes him a heavy favorite to
repeat at the 2016 Olympics.
American Donnell Whittenburg finished eighth after being added to the
field when Belarus’ Dzmitry Barkalau
withdrew. American teammate Danell
Leyva struggled on pommel horse and
high bar, fading to 17th.

The usually
r e s e r v e d
Uchimura

who said he was
di s a p p o i n t e d
after a high bar
flub during team
finals made the
margin over seco n d-p l ace
Kohei
Britain a little
Uchimura
slimmer than
anticipated — let loose after his
final score was unveiled. He made
the “6” sign with his fingers and
pointed to the crowd that included
his mother, who is still a competitive gymnast back home.
His biggest competition came from
the surprising Larduet. He appeared
right at home in his debut at a major
international event. His powerful
tumbling runs made the floor creak
underneath him and his aggressive
parallel bars display had a youthful
enthusiasm that will certainly make
him a factor in Rio next summer.

caught a 7-yard pass from
Wetteland to gain a first down. The
Knights’ next first down would be
much more dramatic, however.
Faced with a fourth-and-2 from the
Cougars’ 49, Wetteland shuffled
right and used an option pitch to
Taylor for a 10-yard gain. Two
plays later, Cozzolino sprinted up
the right sideline to catch a perfect
spiral from Wettleland in stride.
With 1:23 remaining, Hillsdale
initially lined up to attempt a twopoint conversion. But when a false
start penalty marched the Knights
back five yards, they turned to
Janakes to tie it with an extra point
at 34-34.
Hillsdale’s defense then expedited a quick change of possession,
allowing the Cougars to run just a
minute off the clock on a three-

and-out. Taylor had a big defensive
play as Half Moon Bay took a
shot at Gutierrez downfield on first
down, but Taylor caught up with
the speedy senior to break up the
pass. Etu then dropped Tomberlin
for a sack on second down. Two
plays later, Half Moon Bay punted
and the Knights took over at the
Cougars’ 44.
Parodi said, with :21.4 seconds
remaining, his strategy from the
drive’s opening play was to get
into field goal range.
“With no timeouts, it’s how close
can we get,” Parodi said. “Time was
more important than yards. You’ve
just got to make common sense
plays and it works out.”
Wettleland opened with a creative
5-yard pass underneath to Nate
Shani. Then he hit Cozzolino for a

14-yard gain. With :10 seconds
remaining, Wettleland found sophomore Joey Sabel at the 18-yard line.
That set up Janakes’ game-winner.
“I’m tore up,” Tomberlin said.
“I’m mad. But I’m trying to keep my
teams’ heads high and move on. ...
Every team losses.”
For the Knights — who trailed 60 at the end of the first quarter — it
was a matter of steady momentum
towards a spectacular finish.
“We didn’t start too well as a
team,” Parodi said. “Half Moon
Bay — hats off to them — they
played a great game. We came out
a little excited, a little overamped, and were trying to get our
bearing straight. … They got us a
couple times in that third quarter,
and then we got it going in the
fourth quarter.”

Otherwise, Menlo may find itself
in the opposite situation from last
year’s CCS bracket. The Knights
entered as the No. 5 seed in 2014,
only to pull off three straight
upsets en route to the title by
defeating No. 4 Mitty, No. 1
Saratoga and No. 3 St. Francis.
This year — with Menlo having a
19-1 overall team record, its only
loss coming to Punahou School of
Honolulu — Shine said the Knights
figure to enter the CCS bracket as
the top seed.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

16

SPORTS

Weekend • Oct. 31-Nov.1, 2015

NBA GLANCE

NFL GLANCE
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T
New England 7 0 0
N.Y. Jets
4 2 0
Buffalo
3 4 0
Miami
3 4 0
South
Indianapolis 3 4 0
Houston
2 5 0
Jacksonville 2 5 0
Tennessee
1 5 0
North
Cincinnati
6 0 0
Pittsburgh
4 3 0
Cleveland
2 5 0
Baltimore
1 6 0
West
Denver
6 0 0
Raiders
3 3 0
Kansas City 2 5 0
San Diego
2 5 0
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T
N.Y. Giants
4 3 0
Washington 3 4 0
Philadelphia 3 4 0
Dallas
2 4 0
South
Carolina
6 0 0
Atlanta
6 1 0
New Orleans 3 4 0
Tampa Bay
2 4 0
North
Green Bay
6 0 0
Minnesota
4 2 0
Chicago
2 4 0
Detroit
1 6 0
West
Arizona
5 2 0
St. Louis
3 3 0
Seattle
3 4 0
49ers
2 5 0

Pct PF
1.000 249
.667 152
.429 176
.429 154

PA
133
105
173
173

.429
.286
.286
.167

147
154
147
119

174
199
207
139

1.000 182
.571 158
.286 147
.143 161

122
131
182
188

1.000 139
.500 144
.286 150
.286 165

102
153
172
198

Pct
.571
.429
.429
.333

PF
166
148
160
121

PA
156
168
137
158

1.000 162
.857 193
.429 161
.333 140

110
150
185
179

1.000 164
.667 124
.333 120
.143 139

101
102
179
200

.714
.500
.429
.286

133
119
128
180

229
108
154
103

Thursday, Oct. 29
New England 36, Miami 7
Sunday, Nov. 1
Detroit vs. Kansas City at London, 9:30 a.m.
San Francisco at St. Louis, 1 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at New Orleans, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Chicago, 1 p.m.
Tennessee at Houston, 1 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Atlanta, 1 p.m.
Arizona at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
San Diego at Baltimore, 1 p.m.
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Seattle at Dallas, 4:25 p.m.
Green Bay at Denver, 8:30 p.m.
Open:Buffalo,Jacksonville,Philadelphia,Washington

PAC-12
Continued from page 13
The three backs collectively average 6.1 yards per carry.

Red zone
One knock on Washington
State’s Air Raid offense is that it is

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W
Toronto
2
Boston
1
New York
1
Brooklyn
0
Philadelphia
0
Southeast Division
Washington
2
Atlanta
2
Miami
1
Orlando
0
Charlotte
0
Central Division
Detroit
3
Chicago
2
Cleveland
2
Indiana
0
Milwaukee
0
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
Dallas
1
Memphis
1
San Antonio
1
Houston
0
New Orleans
0
Northwest Division
Minnesota
2
Oklahoma City
2
Portland
1
Utah
1
Denver
1
Pacific Division
Warriors
2
L.A. Clippers
2
Sacramento
1
Phoenix
1
L.A. Lakers
0

THE DAILY JOURNAL

PATS

NHL GLANCE

L
0
1
1
2
2

Pct
1.000
.500
.500
.000
.000

GB

1
1
2
2

0
1
1
2
2

1.000
.667
.500
.000
.000


1/2
1
2
2

0
1
1
2
2

1.000
.667
.667
.000
.000


1
1
2 1/2
2 1/2

1
1
1
2
2

.500
.500
.500
.000
.000




1
1

0
0
1
1
1

1.000
1.000
.500
.500
.500



1
1
1

0
0
1
1
2

1.000
1.000
.500
.500
.000



1
1
2

Friday’s Games
Utah 99, Philadelphia 71
Cleveland 102, Miami 92
Oklahoma City 139, Orlando 136,2OT
Detroit 98, Chicago 94, OT
Toronto 113, Boston 103
Washington 118, Milwaukee 113
Atlanta 97, Charlotte 94
San Antonio 102, Brooklyn 75
Minnesota 95, Denver 78
Golden State 112, Houston 92
Sacramento 132, L.A. Lakers 114
Phoenix 110, Portland 92
Saturday’s Games
Utah at Indiana, 4 p.m.
New York at Washington, 4 p.m.
Golden State at New Orleans, 4:30 p.m.
Brooklyn at Memphis, 5 p.m.
Phoenix at Portland, 7 p.m.
Sacramento at L.A. Clippers, 7:30 p.m.

ineffective in the red zone, where
receivers do not have room to
spread out. But the Cougars are
scoring touchdowns on 73 percent
of their trips into the red zone this
season, and have scored three more
red-zone TDs than opponents.

Aerial duel
It will be strength vs. strength
when it comes to the Cougars’ passing game against the Cardinal’s
passing defense. Stanford has

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W
Montreal
12 10
Ottawa
10 5
Tampa Bay
11 5
Boston
9
5
Florida
10 5
Detroit
10 4
Buffalo
11 4
Toronto
9
1
Metropolitan Division
GP W
N.Y. Rangers
11 7
Washington
9
7
N.Y. Islanders 10 6
Pittsburgh
10 6
New Jersey
10 5
Philadelphia
10 4
Carolina
11 5
Columbus
11 2

L
2
3
4
3
4
5
7
6

OT Pts
0 20
2 12
2 12
1 11
1 11
1 9
0 8
2 4

GF GA
45 23
32 31
28 28
36 30
31 21
23 27
26 34
20 31

L
2
2
2
4
4
4
6
9

OT Pts
2 16
0 14
2 14
0 12
1 11
2 10
0 10
0 4

GF GA
31 21
32 22
33 25
20 20
25 27
21 29
23 30
23 43

0
1
1
1
1
0
1

16
15
15
15
13
12
7

35
27
27
33
32
24
24

4
0
1
0
0
1
2

14
12
11
10
8
5
4

32 25
20 18
30 32
24 20
28 34
22 46
10 27

WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
Dallas
10 8 2
Nashville
9
7 1
St. Louis
10 7 2
Minnesota
10 7 2
Winnipeg
10 6 3
Chicago
11 6 5
Colorado
10 3 6
Pacific Division
Vancouver
11 5 2
Los Angeles
9
6 3
Arizona
11 5 5
Sharks
9
5 4
Edmonton
11 4 7
Calgary
11 2 8
Anaheim
10 1 7

27
17
21
29
26
24
29

Friday’s Games
Buffalo 3, Philadelphia 1
N.Y. Rangers 3, Toronto 1
Washington 2, Columbus 1
Carolina 3, Colorado 2
Ottawa 3, Detroit 1
Boston 3, Florida 1
Minnesota 5, Chicago 4
Montreal 6, Calgary 2
Vancouver 4, Arizona 3
Saturday’s Games
N.Y. Islanders at New Jersey, 10 a.m.
San Jose at Dallas, noon
Nashville at Los Angeles, 1 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Toronto, 4 p.m.
Detroit at Ottawa, 4 p.m.
Boston at Tampa Bay, 4 p.m.
Washington at Florida, 4 p.m.
Winnipeg at Columbus, 4 p.m.
Minnesota at St. Louis, 5 p.m.
Calgary at Edmonton, 7 p.m.

allowed just nine passing touchdowns
this
season,
while
Washington State averages nearly
four per game.

Third act
Stanford outscores opponents
84-31 in the third quarter, which
could be significant Saturday since
Washington State has been
outscored 51-28 in the third.

Continued from page 12
last long. You don’t build perhaps
the greatest dynasty in NFL history, one that hasn’t had a losing
season since 2000, by stopping to
smell the roses.
Not ever.
“I thought there were a lot of
good things out there,” Belichick
said coldly. “Still a lot of things
we need to work on.”
Somewhere under that hoodie,
he’s probably still mad about that
Super Bowl loss almost eight years
ago, when the Patriots won their
first 18 games only to be beaten in
the one that really mattered when
David Tyree somehow caught a ball
off the side of his helmet.
Can this team do what that team
couldn’t? Could this team go 19-0?
Probably not.
The biggest potential stumbling
block is a Nov. 29 trip to Denver
to face the unbeaten Broncos (6-0).
Two road trips to New York, one to
face the Giants on Nov. 15, the
other against the AFC East rival
Jets on Dec. 27, could possibly
trip the Patriots up, too.
Then again, it’s hard to see anyone
stopping Brady and all those
weapons he has around him, from
Rob Gronkowski, the best tight end
on the planet, to receiver Julian
Edelman and running backs LeGarrett
Blount and Dion Lewis. The defense
gets overlooked, but it’s playing
well enough to carry the Patriots to
another Super Bowl championship.
Edelman shrugged off any pressure to stay unbeaten.
“It’s more about just going out
there and hammering the nail away,
all the way in,” he said. “That’s what
coach always says. Just hammer
away, because if you don’t, you’re
going to be stubbing your toe on
the floor with the nail coming out.”
The Dolphins weren’t the first
team to get hammered by the
Patriots.
New England’s average margin of

“It’s more about just
going out there and
hammering the nail
away, all the way in. ...
Just hammer away,
because if you don’t, you’re
going to be stubbing your
toe on the floor with the
nail coming out.”
—Julian Edelman, Patriots receiver

victory is more than 16.5 points
per game, and it’s really not even
that close. Pittsburgh scored a
meaningless touchdown with 2 seconds remaining to lose 28-21 in
Week 1. Buffalo trailed 37-13 entering the fourth quarter in Week 2,
before rallying to a more
respectable 40-32 setback.
Only two games have given the
Patriots a serious challenge. They
trailed the Jets 20-16 in the fourth
quarter, but Brady threw a pair of
touchdown passes to pull out a 3023 victory. Indianapolis led New
England at halftime and may have
pulled off the upset if not for one of
the worst plays in NFL history, a
fake punt that never had a chance,
allowing the Patriots to escape
with a 34-27 triumph.
That said, New England hasn’t
been quite as dominant as that
2007 team, which won by an average of 19.7 points during its perfect regular season.
Of course, that just gives
Belichick something else to hold
over his current group.
He’s already got plenty.
Remember, the NFL is appealing
the ruling that threw out Brady’s
suspension. While it seems unlikely to succeed given the scathing
criticism of the league’s shoddy
investigation by the trial judge,
it’s still hanging out there, still
spurring on the Patriots.
The other 31 teams might want
to advise the commish to quietly
let it go.
No need to make these guys even
madder.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

WORLD

Weekend • Oct. 31-Nov.1, 2015

17

Tragedies in Aegean
highlight EU divisions
By Derek Gatopoulos and Nicholas Paphitis
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LESBOS, Greece — Drowned babies and toddlers washed
onto Greece’s famed Aegean Sea beaches, and a grim-faced
diver pulled a drowned mother and child from a half-sunk
boat that was decrepit long before it sailed. On shore,
bereaved women wailed and stunned-looking fathers cradled
their children.
At least 27 people, more than half of them children, died
in waters off Greece Friday trying to fulfill their dream of a
better life in Europe. The tragedy came two days after a boat
crammed with 300 people sank off Lesbos in one of the
worst accidents of its kind, leaving 29 dead.
It won’t be the last.
As autumn storms threaten to make the crossing from
Turkey even riskier and conditions in Middle Eastern
refugee camps deteriorate, ever more refugees — mostly
Syrians, Afghans and Iraqis — are joining the rush to reach
Europe.
More than 60 people, half of them children, have died in
the past three days alone, compared with just over a hundred
a few weeks earlier.
Highlighting political friction in the 28-nation European
Union, Greece’s left-wing prime minister, Alexis Tsipras,
cited the horror of the new drownings to accuse the block of
ineptitude and hypocrisy in handling the crisis.
Hungary’s right-wing foreign minister, Peter Szijjarto,
used the same word — hypocrisy — about critics of his
country’s fencing off its southern border to keep migrants
out.
Szijjarto described the influx as the biggest challenge the
EU has ever faced. While that may be an over-statement, the
crisis has pitted countries like Greece, with well over
500,000 arrivals so far, against eastern Europeans who are
unwilling to take in refugees — or, like Hungary, insist that
anyone leaving a relatively safe country, such as Turkey or
Greece, for a wealthy one like Germany is by definition an
economic migrant.
Speaking in Athens, Tsipras accused Europe of an “inability to defend its (humanitarian) values” by providing a safe
alternative to the sea journeys.
“The waves of the Aegean are not just washing up dead
refugees, dead children, but (also) the very civilization of
Europe,” he said, dismissing Western shock at the children’s deaths as “crocodile tears.”
“What about the tens of thousands of living children,
who are cramming the roads of migration?” he said. “I feel
ashamed of Europe’s inability to effectively address this
human drama, and of the level of debate ... where everyone
tries to shift responsibility to someone else.”
Tsipras’ government has appealed for more assistance
from its EU partners.

REUTERS

Medics evacuate an Israeli man injured during a stabbing attack in Jerusalem.

Two Palestinian attacks, Israeli
police say; two stabbers killed
By Mohammed Daraghmeh
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

RAMALLAH, West Bank — A
Palestinian stabbed and wounded an
American man at a station of Jerusalem’s
light rail on Friday before he was shot
dead by police, security guards and civilians, police said. An Israeli man was
wounded in the cross-fire.
In the West Bank, two Palestinians
carrying knives ran toward an Israeli
checkpoint, drawing fire from troops
who killed one and critically wounded
the other, according to police and a
Palestinian medic.
Friday’s incidents were the latest in a

series of Palestinian attacks that
began in mid-September and were
accompanied by widespread unrest,
including clashes between Palestinian
stone-throwers and Israeli troops.
There were no further details on the
identity of the American.
In all, 11 Israelis were killed in
Palestinian
attacks
and
66
Palestinians died by Israeli fire in the
past six weeks. Forty of the
Palestinians killed were said by Israel
to have been involved in attacks or
attempted
attacks.
Nineteen
Palestinians were wounded by Israeli
fire in West Bank clashes Friday, the
Palestinian Health Ministry said.

Israel has blamed Palestinian attacks
on what it says is anti-Israel incitement by Palestinian political and religious leaders. Palestinians say the
violence is largely driven by the hopelessness many Palestinians feel after
nearly half a century of Israeli military
rule, with no end in sight.
Meanwhile, Palestinian President
Mahmoud Abbas, Foreign Minister
Riad Malki and senior Abbas aide Saeb
Erekat were to meet Friday with the
prosecutor of the International
Criminal Court at the court’s headquarters in The Hague, Netherlands, to
hand over documentation on the recent
violence, Erekat’s office said.

18

Weekend • Oct. 31-Nov.1, 2015

WORLD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Interior minister:
27 dead in club
fire in Bucharest
By Alison Mutler
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BUCHAREST, Romania — A
heavy metal band’s pyrotechnical
show sparked a deadly fire at a
Bucharest nightclub, killing 27
people and injuring scores of the
club’s mostly youthful patrons,
officials and witnesses said.
Interior Minister Gabriel Oprea
initially said an explosion
occurred Friday night at Colectiv
club, located in a basement in a
building in downtown Bucharest,
a city of 3 million people. But
authorities heading the rescue
effort later said there had been a
fire and no explosion.
Witnesses told Antena 3 TV that
there were between 300 to 400
mostly young people at the club,
housed in a former factory, and
only one exit door when the metal
band Goodbye to Gravity was performing and a pyrotechnical show
went awry. The station reported
that people panicked and rushed
for the exit.
Digi 24 television station cited
witnesses who said a spark on
stage ignited some polystyrene
decor.
Media reported that clubgoers

initially thought the flames were
part of the show and did not immediately react. Fire regulations can
be lax in Bucharest clubs and
restaurants.
An Associated Press photographer at the scene saw people wandering around outside the club clad
in emergency blankets in an
apparent state of confusion.
Upon hearing the news, people
descended on the club looking for
loved ones. Adding to their anxiety was the fact that many of the
clubgoers were not carrying identity papers so victims could not
immediately be identified.
“She’s not answering the telephone and she’s not saying anything,” said a mother, dressed in a
black leather jacket, crying in
front of television cameras.
“We want information whether
he’s alive,” said a visibly overcome woman, speaking about a
family member.
Media reported that emergency
services arrived 11 minutes after
the first call at 10:32 p.m. (2032
GMT).
Victor Ionescu, who was at the
club with his girlfriend, told
Antena 3 TV that “people were
fainting, they were fainting from
the smoke. It was total chaos,

REUTERS

Paramedics carry an injured person at a hospital in Bucharest, Romania.
people were trampling on each
other.”
A young man filmed by Antena 3
said that flames engulfed clubgoers, burning their skin and hair.
Several major nightclub fires
have been blamed on pyrotechnics igniting foam used for soundproofing, including The Station
nightclub fire in the U.S. that
killed 100 people in West
Warwick, Rhode Island, in 2003
and the Kiss nightclub fire in
Brazil, which killed 242 people in
the university town of Santa Maria
in 2013.
Raed Arafat, a government emer-

gency situation official, said that
people were treated for burns,
smoke inhalation and lesions at
hospitals around the capital.
Twenty-five were reported in serious condition at the Municipal
Hospital.
“It is a tragedy without precedent and it is an intervention without precedent,” he said.
Manager
of
the
Ophthalmological
Hospital,
Monica Pop, said the hospital had
treated teens aged 14 to 16 for
injuries.
Oprea called an emergency government meeting for Saturday

morning to discuss the situation.
According to the Bucharestbased metal band’s Facebook
page, lead singer Andrei Gault was
the 2008 winner of “Megastar,” a
Romanian show similar to
“American Idol.” The band has
five members and has released two
albums since it formed in 2011.
President Klaus Iohannis wrote
on his Facebook page that he was
“shaken and deeply hurt by the
tragic event. ... It is a very sad
moment for us all, for our nation
and for me personally.” He said he
was considering declaring a day of
national mourning.

Roman Polanski ‘very happy’ with Polish court ruling
By Monika Scislowska
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WARSAW, Poland — Roman
Polanski beat a U.S. attempt to
extradite him as a Polish judge
ruled that the nation’s law forbids
sending the filmmaker back to the
United States, where he pleaded
guilty nearly four decades ago to
having sex with a minor.
“I can breathe now with relief,”
the Oscar-winning director told

reporters
in
Krakow, where
the case was
heard.
“I
pleaded
guilty. I went to
prison. I have
done my penalty. The case is
closed, ” said
Roman
the 83-year old
Polanski
director, who
appeared thin and exhausted.

Saving lives, from crisis to independence

Polanski also beat a U. S.
attempt to extradite him from
Switzerland more than a decade
ago.
Friday’s decision could finally
close the case in Polanski’s favor.
The Polish prosecutor who argued
the case for extradition on behalf
of the United States did not immediately say whether there would be
an appeal.
Judge Dariusz Mazur said the
case was very complicated but an

extradition procedure would violate the human rights of the elderly Polanski because he could be
sentenced to confinement.
“I find no rational answer to the
question: what is the real point of
the U.S. extradition request?” said
Mazur, who spent more than two
hours explaining his reasoning to
the court in Krakow.
Mazur said Polanski served his
punishment in confinement in the
U.S., and later for 10 months —

partly under house arrest — in
Switzerland in 2009-2010 when
the U.S. unsuccessfully sought his
extradition there.
U.S. judges and prosecutors in
the case violated legal procedures,
broke the plea bargain in 1977,
denied Polanski the right to proper defense and appeared biased, the
judge found.
Polanski was not in court for the
ruling, but followed live TV coverage of the proceedings.

‘Our Brand
is Crisis’
Bullock entertains
as campaign operative

SEE PAGE 21

The Idaho stop
By Karan Nevatia

I

Near the end of “Halo 5: Guardians” (Microsoft, for
the Xbox One, $59.95), an artificial intelligence
bemoans humanity’s propensity toward solving every
problem with violence.
Which makes one wonder: Have you been paying
attention? The entire “Halo” series is about flying to distant planets and then shooting everything that moves.
That formula has served Microsoft well since the first
“Halo: Combat Evolved” in 2001, selling millions of

n San Francisco, there has been some
turmoil caused by a recent proposal to
allow cyclists to roll through stop
signs — known as the Idaho stop, this rule
would almost be a legal California stop for
cyclists, where they would yield at stop
signs, without having to come to a complete stop.
The Idaho stop is a
common cycling practice
— most cyclists aren’t
even aware that they are
legally required to come
to a full stop at stop
signs. In response to the
proposed ordinance,
local San Francisco
police began to enforce the stop sign violations more closely — according to the
New York Times, they issued over 204 citations in just two days. The violation can
cost cyclists upwards of $200 — a hefty
price for a seemingly minor infraction.
Furthermore, San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee
is against the proposal. Despite support
from most of the members of the Board of
Supervisors, it doesn’t look like it will
pass.
Personally, I bike to school roughly
three times a week. Riding from Foster
City to Aragon High School, the trip is
more than 6 miles, each way. Most of the
trip is done on the Bay Trail, free from any
stop signs or other obstacles save for the
occasional pedestrian. However, my trip
takes me through the neighborhoods below
Aragon, in between El Camino Real and
Alameda de las Pulgas — often hilly, the
narrow lanes serve small, isolated cul-desacs of family homes. The roads, with
speed limits of no more than 25 mph, have
many stop signs — but few cars pass
through the area, especially around 7 a.m.
and 4 p.m. — the times when I bike there.
More often than not — I perform the
Idaho stop — I slow down, taking a quick
glance to make sure no cars are around,
then I keep going. I’ve never felt like I was
doing something dangerous, or illegal,
when I did this — it felt normal — why
would anyone want to stop me?
After learning about the legality of my

See HALO 5, Page 22

See STUDENT, Page 22

‘Halo 5’
multiplayer
shows promise
By Lou Kesten
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

‘Zelda: Tri Force Heroes’
doesn’t try hard enough
By Derrik J. Lang
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Link has gone down a very wrong path in
his latest adventure.
With the addition in recent years of such
supremely enjoyable multiplayer games as
“Mario Kart 8,” ‘’Super Smash Bros.” and
“Splatoon,” Nintendo seemed to have finally figured out fun ways for modern gamers to
play together online. That can’t be said of
the newest entry in the “Legend of Zelda”
series. It’s possibly the worst “Zelda” to
date.
The inane plot of “The Legend of Zelda:

Tri Force Heroes” ($39.99 for the Nintendo
3DS) finds the series’ spikey-eared protagonist is no longer a lone star. As the title
suggests, Link must now be part of a trio of
look-alikes who are tasked with taking
down a witch who’s cursed the kingdom’s
princess with a bad sense of style.
The frivolous focus on fashion extends to
Link’s new ability to commission and wear
custom ensembles that grant him different
powers. Putting on a parka will keep the little guy from sliding around in ice caverns,
while donning a cheerleader outfit will
boost the energy levels of his pals. It’s a

The inane plot of‘The Legend of Zelda:Tri Force Heroes’finds the series’spikey-eared protagonist
See ZELDA, Page 22 is no longer a lone star.

20

Weekend • Oct. 31-Nov.1, 2015

WEEKEND JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

MUSEUM GOTTA SEE ‘UM
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR CORRESPONDENT

CHIHARU SHIOTA’S “TRACE OF
MEMORY”: ART YOU CAN GET
INTO, AT THE MATTRESS FACTORY
IN PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA.
Feelings of loss and questions of memory
are often the subject matter for Japaneseborn, Berlin-based installation artist
Chiharu Shiota. One of her most recent sitespecific works on these themes, “Trace of
Memory” (2013), fills an entire renovated
19th-century row house owned by the
Mattress Factory, a contemporary art museum in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. In room
after room, on floor after floor, webs of
multi-layered, intricately strung black yarn
enclose shoes, pianos, beds, desks, suitcases and other material fragments of day-today life. The partitions of yarn impel the
visitor to look more closely, while at the
same time obscuring the view. Shiota’s
intriguing work, which may be viewed
through May 31, 2016, is the first to be
installed in the row house, which had stood
empty for decades. When the artist first visited, she began to imagine what the lives of
the former occupants had been, and she
decided to assemble used objects to recreate
the stories she developed in her mind.
Shiota believes that both the house and the
objects contain memories, which she traps
by weaving thousands of yards of black
yarn through the rooms and corridors.
Those intangible memories represent existence in the midst of absence — a concept
that fascinates her. Commenting on her
work, Shiota said: “When I weave, I create
patterns that can be seen as a mirror of my
feelings. For example, when my mind is
troubled, the thread entangles easily. On the
other side, when I feel balanced, the weavings I make become very regular. Like in
[‘Trace of Memory’], my personal state of
mind and history is connected to the stories

of the objects I decide to put into my work.”
THE MATTRES S FACTORY AND
SITE-SPECIFIC ART. Site-specific art is
created to exist in a certain place. Typically,
the artist takes the location into account
while planning and creating the artwork.
The work of art is created in the site and can
only exist there — it cannot be moved or
changed. The Mattress Factory, featuring
site-specific installations created by artists
in residence from around the world, was
founded in 1977 by Artist Barbara
Luderowski in a former Stearns & Foster
mattress warehouse in Pittsburgh’s historic
Central Northside. From the beginning, the
Mattress Factory has been run by artists to
support artists working in residence as they
created site-specific installations. To date,
it has presented and commissioned new
installations by more than 650 artists.
Expanding from its original site, the
Mattress Factory has rehabilitated nine
properties to provide additional installation space, including, most recently, the
516 Sampsonia Way row house which houses Chiharu Shiota’s Trace of Memory
(2013). The Mattress Factory is now an
internationally recognized leader in sitespecific, contemporary art and currently has
17 permanent installations on continuous
display, including works by James Turrell,
Bill Woodrow, Allan Wexler, William
Anastasi, Dove Bradshaw, Jene Highstein,
Rolf Julius, Yayoi Kusama, Winifred Lutz,
Greer Lankton, Vanessa Sica & Chris
Kasabach, and Monica M. Bock, Mary
Carlisle, Cathy Lynn Gasser, Melissa
Goldstein, Sandrine Sheon and Catherine
Smith (collaboration).
ART WITHOUT B OUNDARIES .
Mattress Factory Co-Director Michael
Olijnyk said: “What’s great about visiting
an installation at the Mattress Factory is
that there are no boundaries between the
viewer and the artwork — you enter the

See MUSEUM, Page 22

SUSAN COHN/DAILY JOURNAL

Artist Chiharu Shiota’s installation ‘Trace of Memory’ enmeshes everyday objects, such the
bed shown here, in intricate web-cocoons of black yarn.Trace of Memory, which occupies an
entire multi-story row house, may be viewed through May 31, 2016, at the Mattress Factory
in Pittsburgh, Penn.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

WEEKEND JOURNAL

Weekend • Oct. 31-Nov.1, 2015

21

Bullock entertains as
campaign operative
By Jocelyn Noveck
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

They say timing is everything — or at
least a whole lot. And on several fronts, the
George Clooney-produced “Our Brand is
Crisis,” starring Sandra Bullock as a damaged, ruthless political consultant, has
absolutely perfect timing.
First, it’s election season: Enough said!
And second, with all the recent discussion
about the need for more diverse, open-minded casting, here’s a role that was originally
written for a man. And happily, in retrospect, the role seems like it SHOULD have
been written for a woman — for Bullock, in
fact. It’s a thornier, meatier role than she’s
had in a while, one that allows her to use her
well-honed comic chops while also digging
deeper into a complicated, very flawed character.
As for the film itself, directed by David
Gordon Green, it’s undeniably entertaining,
but a conundrum. At times, it seems like a
funny and penetrating political satire along
the lines of “Veep” on HBO. (Check out the
amusing llama scene. Yes, we said llama.) At
others, it’s trying to be a much weightier
morality tale (It’s based on — or rather
“suggested by” Rachel Boynton’s 2005
documentary of the same name). At
moments, these two aims mesh well
enough; at others, the zig-zag effect is jarring.
Bullock is Jane Bodine, otherwise known

as Calamity Jane, famous for winning elections at any cost. “The truth is what I tell
the electorate the truth is,” she likes to say.
When we first meet Jane, she’s retired
from the down-and-dirty world of politics,
having been felled by a scandal involving
the violation of election laws. She’s living
in the boondocks somewhere, making pottery. She doesn’t drink or smoke anymore,
and says she can finally look herself in the
eye.
But, like the proverbial wizened former
cop brought in for one last case, Jane is
convinced to join the campaign of a failing
candidate in Bolivia. It’s good money, but
the real reason she agrees is that an old
nemesis, Pat Candy (Billy Bob Thornton,
channeling James Carville — who actually
did work on the 2002 Bolivian election) is
already down there working for the opposition. These two are warriors to the death.
Arriving in La Paz, Jane confronts a candidate who is standoffish, elitist, and 28
points behind (Portuguese actor Joaquim de
Almeida is perfect for the role, and will be
readily recognized by fans of “24”). After
some initial sluggishness (and slapsticky
altitude sickness) her competitive juices
kick in.
Observers of U.S. politics will recognize
every lesson learned here; When Pat seeks
to exploit Jane’s candidate’s short temper,
resulting in the candidate punching a man,
Jane stops her team from crafting an apology, and frames the punch as a sign of his nocrap approach. It’s classic spin. Jane gets

In ‘Our Brand of Crisis,’ Sandra Bullock plays Jane Bodine, otherwise known as Calamity Jane,
famous for winning elections at any cost.
her guy to doff his suit jacket and roll up his
sleeves. His poll numbers rise. “Our brand,”
Jane tells the team, “is crisis.” Convince
voters they’re in crisis, and tell them how
you’re gonna save them.
The backdrop is the contentious relationship between Jane and Pat. While their
byplay is entertaining, it’s also frustrating.
We don’t learn enough about the background; it would help to know more, and
sooner.
It all ends with the election, of course, but
a subplot involving an idealistic young
volunteer (appealing Bolivian actor
Reynaldo Pacheo) keeps the film honest, as

it were, with an ending aimed at making us
wonder what it all was for in the first place.
An excellent supporting cast includes
Anthony Mackie and the terrific Ann Dowd
as fellow consultants. Yet it all rests on
Bullock. She’s fun to watch. Check out her
priceless final remark in that llama scene.
Her brand is Bullock, and it works pretty
well.
“Our Brand Is Crisis,” a Warner Bros
release, is rated R by the Motion Picture
Association of America for “language
including some sexual references.” Running
time: 107 minutes. Two and a half stars out
of four.

Bullock steps into a man’s role in ‘Our Brand is Crisis’
By Lindsay Bahr
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES — Is she going to be hot?
That’s the question a studio executive
asked Sandra Bullock about the lead character
in a project she was pitching well into her
Hollywood career
“I looked at him and I go, ‘Well, it is me,
so you get what you get. You do realize that
I’m pitching this for me?’” recalled Bullock
in a recent interview. “He goes, ‘Yeah, but I
want to know, like, what is she going to
wear?’”
Things have gotten a little better since
then. In “Our Brand is Crisis,” out Friday,
Bullock plays a role originally written for a
man, and no one checked in to see whether or
not the savvy political consultant character
was going to be a bombshell, too.
But this is the exception. Bullock’s conversation with the studio executive remains
an all too familiar scene for actresses in
Hollywood, where sexist presumptions are
engrained in the culture.
Then there’s the matter of substance with
roles for women. Bullock can’t remember
how many times she’s had to listen to a
writer try to explain how the “the wife” is
really the heart of the movie.
“I know what that means. That means

you’re going to be underwritten and you’re
just going to be the wife waking up in bed
with the husband and making the coffee,” she
said. “If you say that I’m the heart of the
piece, I’m going to (expletive) clock you.”
That’s why Bullock and her agent started
looking at roles for men. After all, male
characters don’t always have to be likable.
Their comedies don’t have to be of the
romantic variety. And the first question from
studio executives probably isn’t going to be
“Is he hot?”
When Bullock read the unproduced screenplay for “Our Brand is Crisis,” she decided to
call longtime friends George Clooney and
producer Grant Heslov to see if there was any
chance they might consider her for the lead
— an amoral, Sun Tzu-quoting political consultant who’s come out of retirement for a
showdown with an old rival. They said yes.
To adapt the part, they changed around
some pronouns, they gave the character a
woman’s name, and they added some sexual
innuendos with her foe (Billy Bob
Thornton). But overall, it remained as originally written.
Part of that is the strength of screenwriter
Peter Straughan’s script, said Thornton. The
transition from male to female was easy
because it was never a type to begin with —
the gender was almost incidental.

“I tend as a writer to not identify characters
unless there’s a reason for it,” said Thornton.
“(Straughan) wrote it as a person.”
From there, director David Gordon Green
and his actors could focus on the big ideas in
this satirical story about a failing Bolivian
presidential candidate and the American lackeys hired to try to manipulate his image and
a country for the win.
As someone whose father worked in the
Pentagon, Bullock understands the allure of
stories about the underbelly of politics. The
do-anything candidates and unscrupulous
mercenaries in “Our Brand is Crisis” are especially resonant now, she notes.
“You watch a debate and you watch these
people doing their thing — even if it’s a can-

didate you like — you watch them just
(expletive) people. You see it so clearly,”
said Thornton. “When Donald Trump says,
‘First of all, I respect women, I love women.’
It’s like, you start with that? That means you
don’t!”
But for Bullock, it wasn’t simply about
politics.
“It’s about selling. It’s about how we as a
culture have become so obsessed about what
the win is for us. It’s about how lost in the
win we may have gotten, even to the detriment of our own soul and to the detriment of,
in this case, an entire body of people. And
who would be willing to step off that

See BULLOCK, Page 22

22

Weekend • Oct. 31-Nov.1, 2015

WEEKEND JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

have gone rogue, and it’s up to a new commando named Locke to hunt him down. And
assorted aliens are getting in everyone’s
way.
The missions in the eight-hour solo campaign fall into an uninspired pattern. You
go to another planet, which conveniently
has an assortment of guns lying around.
You plow your way through increasingly
aggressive waves of alien monsters. There
are occasional respites where you get to
drive a Warthog attack vehicle or fly a
zippy anti-gravity Ghost, but for the most
part you’re on foot.
The major change is that whether you’re
playing as Master Chief or Locke you’re
now leading a four-person squad. This
opens up some limited tactical possibili-

ties — primarily, ordering your team to
gang up on particular enemies — as well as
the ability to tackle each mission with
three online friends.
As with any online relationship, you and
your friends will eventually want to stop
playing nice and start attacking each
other. And here, 343 Industries has built a
beefy collection of multiplayer battlefields.
They’re divided into two sections, Arena
and Warzone. Arena is the traditional fourversus-four competition familiar to “Halo”
fans, with the usual variants like deathmatch and capture-the-flag. Warzone is
more ambitious. It’s a 12-versus-12 affair,
with computer-controlled aliens added to
make the mayhem even more intense.

The sprawling Warzone maps accommodate a variety of gameplay objectives. At
the start of a match, you need to clear all
the AI monsters out of your base. Then you
can focus on taking over various control
points on the map, earning “req points”
you can spend on more effective weapons,
armor and vehicles. If you build up enough
power, the enemy’s base becomes vulnerable and it’s game over.
It remains to be seen how well this works
once millions of “Halo” fans are trying to
compete — last year’s “Halo: The Master
Chief Collection” anthology was dogged
by online issues. But Warzone holds much
promise, and could make up for the pedestrian story in the “Guardians” solo campaign. Two stars out of four.

ZELDA

captivating “A Link Between Worlds,” this
entry feels more like a downloadable extra
than a true stand-alone “Zelda” adventure.

Heroes” just doesn’t make it easy to play
well with others.

Continued from page 19

“Tri Force Heroes” is intended to be
played locally or online with two (but never
one) other players. Several of the game’s
puzzles require the threesome to stand on
each other’s shoulders to reach keys or conquer creatures. Besides a sword, they are
each bestowed with a second tool at the start
of each level, which they must use to overcome obstacles.

are completely in simpatico, they’re
doomed from the outset.
Most maddening of all, if anyone happens to be disconnected in the middle of
battle, the remaining players are booted
bounty-less back to the beginning of the
level.
For the usually flawless “Legend of Zelda”
series, three is not a magic number. Despite
providing Link with a glamorous new
wardrobe, another charming musical score
and a new way to join other adventurers, the
awkward “Tri Force Heroes” doesn’t stack up
when compared with previous “Zelda”
installments. One-and-a-half-stars out of
four.

HALO 5
Continued from page 19
Xboxes and inspiring legions of imitators.
But it’s getting stale, with even triggerhappy games like “Destiny” (by “Halo”
creator Bungie) offering players a little
more to chew on.
“Halo” is now in the hands of
Microsoft’s
in-house
studio
343
Industries, which has streamlined the storytelling while acknowledging the convoluted mythology that has built up over the
last 15 years. In essence: Our recurring
hero, the faceless Master Chief, appears to

cute touch for a game filled with frustrations.
While “Tri Force Heroes” looks like a
“Zelda” game, it certainly doesn’t have the
spirit of one.
Instead of a fantastical world to explore,
this Link is confined to a tiny village and
must choose from a list of monotonous dungeons to tackle. Because the art style of “Tri
Force Heroes” so closely resembles 2013’s

In the vein of past “Zelda” games, there
are several stimulating spatial puzzles to
solve along the way. However, “Tri Force

MUSEUM

the artwork before you even have to think
about it, so you really don’t have to know
anything about the work to enjoy it.”

Continued from page 20

MATTRES S FACTORY PARTICULARS. The Mattress Factory is located at
500 Sampsonia Way in Pittsburgh,
Pennsylvania. Free parking for Mattress
Factory guests is provided in the museum
parking lot, located at 505 Jacksonia St.
The Mattress Factory Shop offers artisan

installation and you are completely surrounded by it. You are often experiencing it
with all of your senses — sometimes you
can smell it, sometimes you can hear it,
obviously you can see it. You experience

BULLOCK
Continued from page 21
carousel and sacrifice your own creature comforts for the greater good?” said Bullock.
“That had been on my mind for a couple of
years and then this story came along. It was

STUDENT
Continued from page 19
practice, I haven’t ceased performing Idaho
stops. I see no reason why the law exists at

There’s an option to singularly play
through levels with a solo Link who can
swap bodies with lifeless clones. It’s colossally clunky. Unfortunately, teaming up
with others isn’t much more satisfying.
Because a group shares resources, the group
can only be as strong as the weakest Link.
As with most multiplayer Nintendo
games, the ability to speak with other players isn’t included. Instead, the only method
of communication is to bizarrely tap on different emoji-like icons on the bottom
screen of the Nintendo 3DS. Unless players
jewelry, handmade greeting cards and unusual décor that mirrors the playful and interactive artwork on display in the galleries. In
addition to the shop inventory, the
Mattress Factory sponsors the Artist
Limited Edition Series to provide artists
with the opportunity to create editions of
small works that are permanent and accessible to the public long after the original temporary installations are dismantled. Artists

work with a variety of professional printmaking studios, foundries and fabrication
workshops to produce the editions. More
information about the Mattress Factory
may be found at www.mattress.org or by
calling (412) 231-3169.

“Our Brand is Crisis” is one of those films
that seems perfectly attuned to this moment.
While the producers knew they wanted to

release it during the 2016 U.S. presidential
campaign, they couldn’t have imagined how
prescient the gender swapping choice would
have been to the ongoing conversation
about equal opportunities for women — from
roles to wages.
“Hopefully, while I’m still alive, we get to
see women just treated better. My question is,
wage equality, yes, that should be obvious.
But the bigger picture to me is why are we

thought of as less than in general,” said
Bullock.
“I don’t know where my roads are going,
but all I can say is it’s my responsibility to
make it easier for someone else because so
many women made it easier for me,” said
Bullock, one of the highest-paid actresses in
the industry. “As a group, a unified group, I
hope the change is coming. And it’s not just
Hollywood. It’s everywhere.”

all, and I don’t think the San Mateo police
are heavily enforcing the senseless law.
Some people believe the Idaho stop can
cause more injuries and accidents — if a
bicyclist doesn’t stop, and a car is moving
through an intersection, they run the risk
of getting hit by the car. However, the law
has been abolished in Idaho since 1982

(hence the “Idaho stop” name), and, according to the Times, bicycle-related injuries
have not increased in Idaho since the law
was removed.
Cyclists are always asking for bicycle
laws to give them the same rights as automobiles. In this case, we are asking for the
stop sign law to apply to only cars. And

maybe San Francisco officials should be a
little more lenient with the law when it
comes to biking.

echoing what I was feeling — have we lost
that? We as a people, we’re such a beautiful,
strong, opinionated country. I want to see
people gather together from different,
diverse environments to go ‘this is our job
to help each other. Period.’”

Susan Cohn can be reached at susan@smdailyjournal.com or www.twitter.com/susancityscene.

Karan Nevatia is a junior at Aragon High School in
San Mateo. Student News appears in the weekend
edition. You can email Student News at
news@smdailyjournal.com.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

WEEKEND JOURNAL

Weekend • Oct. 31-Nov.1, 2015

23

Family stress stars in perceptive
new dark comedy ‘The Humans’
By Jennifer Farrar
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

‘Brooklyn,’ based on Colm Tóibín’s 2009 novel, challenges the
viewer to focus on the heart by not having any such dramatic
crutches.

Ronan enchants in warm
immigrant tale ‘Brooklyn’
By Lindsey Bahr
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

“Brooklyn” is a story for anyone who has ever left
home. It’s a story for those who’ve waffled in indecision,
for those forming their identities and forging their own
paths. It’s a story awash in muted pastel nostalgia about
family and love and ambition and heritage and goodbyes.
And it’s one of the loveliest films to grace cinemas this
year.
There’s very little drama in this tale of a young woman,
Eilis Lacey (Saoirse Ronan), who leaves her small Irish
town and her mother and sister in the 1950s to find a life
and career in New York.
That might make it feel to some like it’s not a full movie.
We’ve been trained to expect horrible things to happen to
the people we’re groomed to love and root for, especially
in immigrant tales. Here things are just normal.
Eilis is cripplingly homesick at first, but she’s not mistreated at work. She doesn’t suffer extreme hardships or
experience any prejudice for her background or gender. Her
family doesn’t disown her. Her boyfriend doesn’t harbor
dark secrets and the priest (Jim Broadbent) who gets her a
job, a place to live, and a spot at a night college is actually just there to help and support.
If anything, “Brooklyn,” based on Colm Tóibín’s 2009
novel, challenges the viewer to focus on the heart by not
having any such dramatic crutches. Eilis just has to work
and figure out what she wants.
We meet her first at a dead end job as a shop girl in the
tiny town of Enniscorthy, but she’s already got a way out.
Her sister has made an appeal to an Irish priest living in
New York who’s agreed to sponsor her trip across the
Atlantic and set up a job and housing. Eilis knows it’s the
only way to get her life started even though she’s heartbroken to leave.
Ronan, who has proven herself to be one of our most talented ingénues, makes Eilis a leading lady that we usually
don’t get to see. She’s smart and ambitious, but still quiet
and reflective. She’s polite, but not a pushover. She’s
good, but not prudish. She’s pretty, too, but in an understated way that makes most men overlook her. At a dance
early on, one actually sneers in her direction.
Unlike the girls around her, Eilis is not obsessed or even
the least bit concerned with finding a man. And yet one
finds her — a small, sweet, slightly doltish but well-intentioned Italian-New Yorker plumber Tony (Emory Cohen)
who she slowly and believably falls for. In the midst of
their courtship, though, a tragedy brings her back to
Ireland where she meets and begins a flirtation with the
handsome Jim Farrell (Domhnall Gleeson). He is nice,
intelligent, and also smitten with Eilis.
Ads might have you believe that “Brooklyn,” directed by
John Crowley with a lean, witty script by Nick Hornby, is
entirely about which guy she’ll choose. It is partially that,
sure, but it’s not the full truth.
The conflict emerges not just because there’s suddenly a
romantic prospect in Ireland. A fulfilling adult existence
there seems suddenly possible. She starts helping a local
office with their bookkeeping, she goes to the uncrowded
beaches with her friends, and she finds comfort in being
home.
In this way, each man represents a different life for Eilis.
In Ireland, she has stability, comfort, history and space. In
New York, she has uncharted possibilities and precious
anonymity.
Neither path is wrong. That’s the brilliance of this universal story. Some will surely be disappointed with her
choice, but that’s the thing — it’s her choice. Despite
everyone’s good intentions, advice and expectations, it’s
one that only she can make.
“Brooklyn,” a Fox Searchlight release, is rated PG-13 by
the Motion Picture Association of America for “a scene of
sexuality and brief strong language.” Running time: 111
minutes. Three and a half stars out of four.

NEW YORK — Just in time for the
often-stressful holiday family dinner
season comes “The Humans,” a dark
comedy about one family’s often-fractious Thanksgiving gathering in uncertain times.
The blue-collar, Irish Catholic Blake
family is given a compassionate exploration by Stephen Karam, a 2012
Pulitzer Prize finalist for his drama
“Sons of the Prophet” and an expert at
writing natural-sounding dialogue for
ordinary people.
Karam’s warm look at family dynamics, perceptively directed by Joe
Mantello, opened Sunday night offBroadway at Roundabout’s Laura Pels
Theatre. Over one scene in 90 real-time
minutes, the dollhouse-style presentation takes place in an unusual lowerManhattan basement duplex. The
close-knit family drives one another
crazy in loving ways while trying
unsuccessfully not to share their worries.
Twenty-something struggling musician Brigid Blake, (Sarah Steele, affectionate and spunky), has just rented the
oddly noisy place with her older
boyfriend, Richard (given amiable
charm by Arian Moayed). The spiral
staircase is perfect for eavesdropping,
and Mantello keeps the cast in smooth,
constant motion on both levels until
they finally gather at the dinner table.
Something seems to be brewing
between Brigid’s working-class parents, deftly portrayed by Reed Birney as
nervous, platitude-spouting Erik, and
Janye Houdyshell in wryly humorous
form as superstitious, loving mom
Deirdre. They’ve driven up from

‘The Humans’ is a clever, high-energy thriller.
Pennsylvania with Momo, Erik’s
Alzheimer’s-affected mother. Lauren
Klein is devastatingly accurate in her
portrayal of Momo’s dementia, and the
family’s joy is touching to watch when
Momo briefly comes to life as her old
self.
Karam clearly understands the instability affecting the American middleclass, and provides an especially
unlucky lawyer in the character of
Aimee, Brigid’s older sister (Cassie
Beck, both funny and touching). She’s
recently been knocked out of the partner track at her firm, dumped by her girlfriend and is facing major surgery. The
older generation isn’t faring much better, as Erik plaintively complains about
the ever-rising cost of living, “Dontcha
think it should cost less to be alive?”
Despite their personal problems,
family members rally to participate in
good-humored teasing and their traditions of song and prayer, even as

Baptist

Church of Christ

PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH
Dr. Larry Wayne Ellis, Pastor

CHURCH OF CHRIST
525 South Bayshore Blvd. SM
650-343-4997
Bible School 9:45am
Services 11:00am and
2:00pm
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pm
Minister J.S. Oxendine
www.church-of-christ.org/cocsm

(650) 343-5415

217 North Grant Street, San Mateo
Sunday Worship Services 8 & 11 am
Sunday School 9:30 am
Wednesday Worship 7pm

www.pilgrimbcsm.org
LISTEN TO OUR
RADIO BROADCAST!
(KFAX 1100 on the AM Dial)
4:30 a.m.at 5:30 PM

unpleasant confessions may bubble up.
When Erik reluctantly shares a nightmare he just had about a monster, comic
book-loving Richard quietly makes a
seminal point of the play as he comments, “The horror stories for the monsters are all about humans.”
Mantello expertly stages overlapping conversations in different rooms
on the two-level set where David Zinn
has created an extra-creaky old
Manhattan apartment building. This
basement has eerie overtones, skillfully enhanced by Justin Townsend’s flickering lighting and Fitz Patton’s sound
design. Loud crashing sounds above add
to an increasingly melodramatic
ambiance.
Even if the Blakes can’t quite keep all
the harsh realities of life at bay,
Karam’s empathetic rendering of a family enduring setbacks leaves the audience hopeful that they will find
strength in their love for one another.

Lutheran
GLORIA DEI LUTHERAN
CHURCH AND SCHOOL
(WELS)

Buddhist
SAN MATEO
BUDDHIST TEMPLE
Jodo Shinshu Buddhist
(Pure Land Buddhism)

2600 Ralston Ave., Belmont,
(650) 593-3361
Sunday Schedule: Sunday
School / Adult Bible Class,
9:15am; Worship, 10:30am

2 So. Claremont St.
San Mateo

(650) 342-2541

Sunday English Service &
Dharma School - 9:30 AM
Reverend Henry Adams
www.sanmateobuddhisttemple.org

Non-Denominational
REDWOOD CHURCH
Our mission...

To know Christ and make him known.

901 Madison Ave., Redwood City
(650)366-1223

Sunday services:

9:00AM & 10:45AM
www.redwoodchurch.org

A FAMILY SHARING HOPE IN CHRIST

HOPE EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
600 W. 42nd Ave., San Mateo
Worship Service
Sunday School

10:00 AM
11:00 AM

Hope Lutheran Preschool
admits students of any race, color and national or ethnic origin.
License No. 410500322.

Call (650) 349-0100

HopeLutheranSanMateo.org

Church of the Highlands
“A community of caring Christians”

1900 Monterey Drive (corner Sneath Lane) San Bruno

(650)873-4095

Adult Worship Services:
Friday: 7:30 pm (singles)
Saturday: 7:00 pm
Sun 7, 8:30, 10, & 11:30 am, 5 pm
Youth Worship Service:
For high school & young college
Sunday at 10:00 am
Sunday School:
For adults & children of all ages
Sunday at 10:00 am
Donald Sheley, Founding Pastor
Leighton Sheley, Senior Pastor

24

Weekend • Oct. 31-Nov.1, 2015

REVIEW
Continued from page 1

WEEKEND JOURNAL
Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com

adopt amendments to the city’s general plan as well as the development
plan for the region near the station,
and make a variety of other approvals
which would push the projects before
the City Council.
No members of the city staff were
available to comment on the proposal
going
before
the
Planning
Commission, according to City Clerk
Angela Louis.
Two developers have come forward
with proposals to build projects in the
area near the intersection of Millbrae
Avenue and El Camino Real.
BART has hired Republic Urban
Properties to build a mixed-use development that would include 164,000
square feet of office space, nearly
47,000 square feet for retail, more
than 300 residential units and a hotel
on a plot of land owned by the rail
company east of the transit station
currently occupied by a parking
garage.
A separate proposal nearby at 150

Serra Ave. aims to build 267, 000
square feet of office space, 32,000 feet
of retail space and 500 residential
units.
In all, the two developments are
slated to bring more than 800 new residents and nearly 900 new workers to
the city, which has raised concerns for
some regarding the impact on city
infrastructure.
Millbrae residents in the past have
identified potential issues with the
amount of traffic and parking problems the developments could create,
as well as additional effects on the
local housing market, schools and
other public services.
Residents had an opportunity to formally submit their concerns to the
city regarding the projects during the
public input period of the environmental input review process, and more
than 100 letters were received, according to a city report.
The proposed developments, specifically the BART project, have been

TROOPS

Burlingame conducted the drive to
gather items for care packages as part
of their requirement to perform community service. As an Eagle Scout
candidate, Mitchell Chang, who has
autism, also has to exhibit personal
growth and this project required him
to communicate and work with others.

Continued from page 1
assembling the packages that mean
so much to the recipients.
“I served in Operation Desert Storm
and in 10 months I only got one care
package,” said Art Gonzalez, a former
Marine, now a SamTrans bus supervisor, who was also there Saturday to
pack boxes.
“I know what it’s like,” he said.
“It’s from home. It means that I am
not forgotten.”
Chang’s father, Ron Chang, said 25
scouts from a troop chartered by St.
Paul’s
Episcopal
Church
in

RODEO
Continued from page 1
Montoya edged out two other women
to win the crown including 21-year-old
Nicole Fava, who attends Notre Dame
de Namur University in Belmont. The
other contestant was Truckee resident
Sydney Jai Frank, 19.
“This is a really big deal,” Montoya
said about winning.

Amy O’Campo, president of the
Blue Star Moms of San Mateo County,
said the boxes packed Saturday will
go to Camp Buehrig in Afghanistan
and should arrive by Thanksgiving.
A much bigger challenge comes in
early December when well over 200
boxes need to be packaged for
Christmas. Goodies for the boxes, as
well as volunteers, are very much
needed.
She previously won the title of 2013
Miss Rowell Ranch Rodeo Queen.
She has competed in barrel racing
and has showed pigs and steers as an
independent exhibitor in the San
Mateo County Future Farmers of
America.
The Grand National, however, is the
granddaddy of rodeo events.
The rodeo is also making a comeback as its popularity has waned in
recent years, she said.
“It went down in popularity but
it’s developing into a big thing

especially contentious as the race for
City Council has heated up in recent
months nearing Election Day, Nov. 3.
Republic Urban Properties made a
significant campaign donation, along
with other concerned parties, worth
$26, 000 supporting incumbent
Mayor Robert Gottschalk and candidate Ann Schneider and opposing candidate Gina Papan, who has been a
vocal critic of the BART development.
No final approval will be granted at
the meeting Monday, Nov. 3, but the
Planning Commission’s recommendation would be moved before the City
Council at a yet to be determined date.
The project is part of a vision which
could shape the future of the area in
Millbrae, which is part of an effort to
rejuvenate the economic viability of
the city, according to the report.
There are a variety of other sites
near the area of Millbrae Avenue, El
Camino Real and Rollins Road which
are eligible to be developed under the
guidelines set for approval by the city
government, but projects are yet to be
submitted for those sites.
The Millbrae Planning Commission
meets Monday, Nov. 2, at 7 p.m. in
the Council Chambers, 621 Magnolia
Ave.
The Blue Star Moms will be collecting donations during a Veterans Day
band concert 7 p.m., Wednesday, Nov.
11, at Sequoia High School. Tickets
are $10 in advance and $15 at the
door. For concert information go to
www. westbaycommunityband. org or
call (650) 366-3173.
Although soldiers enjoy the beef
jerky, CDs, candy, chips and other
goodies in the care packages,
O’Campo said the personal messages
on cards, photos and other greetings
are particularly welcome and go into
every box.
Go to sanmateocounty bluestarmoms.org for details about the care
pack age needs or to v olunteer to help
pack box es.
again, ” she said.
Montoya hopes to one day raise her
own cattle. She will spend the next
year promoting the traditional roles of
working cattle ranches.
“It’s a way of life,” she said.
Montoya, however, is the black
sheep of her family.
“My family has nothing to do with
horses or livestock,” she said.
It was her aunt who introduced her to
the rodeo world.
“It just boomed from there,” she said
about the lifestyle.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Calendar
SATURDAY, OCT. 31
San Bruno American Legion Post
No. 409 Community Breakfast.
8:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. 757 San Mateo
Ave., San Bruno. $8 per person, $5 for
each child under 10. There will be an
omelet bar, pancakes, bacon, French
toast, juice, coffee and tea. Bring your
family and support our veterans. For
more information visit post409.org.
2015 Bone and Joint Expo. 9 a.m. to
3 p.m. Crowne Plaza Hotel, 1221
Chess Drive, Foster City. Sutter
Health Mills-Peninsula Health
Services
and
the
Arthritis
Foundation present a one-stop shop
for arthritis education and resources.
Free admission. For more information and to register call (415) 3561243.
Purissima Old Town Site Tours. 9,
10 and 11 a.m. Corner of Highway 1
and Verdi Road (on the road to Elkus
Ranch). A small docent led tour to
learn how one of the oldest coastside towns disappeared. Enjoy a
chance to see lots of native flora and
fauna and learn about the history of
the people who used to live on the
site. Wear sturdy shoes, layers and
sun protection. For more information and to register visit
eventbrite.com/e/purissima-oldtown-site-tour-tickets18419807139?aff=es2.
PV I Rosener House Adult Day
Services Open House. 10 a.m. to 1
p.m. Rosener House, 500 Arbor Road,
Menlo Park. Peninsula Volunteers,
Inc. will be offering a variety of therapeutic activities for those struggling with cognitive challenges such
as Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s. For
more information contact 322-1026.
Day of the Dead Festival. 10:30
a.m. to noon. Skylawn Memorial
Park, intersection of State Route 92
and Skyline Boulevard, San Mateo.
Also taking place on Nov. 1. This
ancient Hispanic grave-decorating
tradition is conducted every fall to
celebrate the deceased. There will be
dance performances, a Catholic service, sugar skulls, a farmers’ market,
Mexican food and more. Free. For
more information contact nick@landispr.com.
Halloween Event. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
King Community Center, 725 Monte
Diablo Ave., San Mateo. Designed for
pre-school and elementary schoolage children. Free. For more information call 522-7470.
Scary Scavenger Hunt. 1 p.m. to 4
p.m. Scandinavian Designs, 317 S. B
St. Discover downtown San Mateo
while trick-or-treating through the
neighborhood. For more information call 342-5520.
‘Dracula.’ 8 p.m. 600 N. Delaware St.,
San Mateo. Bay Pointe Ballet will
bring Bram Stoker’s novel ‘Dracula’
to life through theater. For more
information call (800) 595-4849.
Halloween Spook-tacular. 4 p.m. to
6 p.m. Hillsdale Shopping Center, 60
31st Ave., San Mateo. Kids (appropriate for children under 12 years) are
invited to parade the shopping center in costumes and collect treats
along the way. Activities will include
a unicycling juggling act, balloon
sculpture artist, slime activity, cookie
decorating and more. Trick-or-treating from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. and activities from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Free. For
more information call 571-1029.
SUNDAY, NOV. 1
Day of the Dead Festival. 10:30
a.m. to noon. Skylawn Memorial
Park, intersection of State Route 92
and Skyline Boulevard, San Mateo.
This ancient Hispanic grave-decorating tradition is conducted every fall
to celebrate the deceased. There will
be dance performances, a Catholic
service, sugar skulls, a farmers’ market, Mexican food and more. Free. For
more information contact nick@landispr.com.
Community Worship. 10:30 a.m.
Woodside Road United Methodist
Church, 2000 Woodside Road,
Redwood City. For more information
call 568-6096.
Portola Art Gallery presents Jan
Prisco’s ‘Painting Local Beauty.’ 10:30
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Portola Art Gallery
at Allied Arts Guild, 75 Arbor Road,
Menlo Park. Exhibit runs through
Nov. 30. For more information call
321-0220.
The Bible in Context: What are the
issues it addresses? 11:15 a.m. to
12:15 p.m. Hope Lutheran Church,
600 W. 42nd Ave., San Mateo. Class
focused on an understanding of
what the authors of the biblical
books intended to communicate to
their original readers. For more information
email
intermhelc@pacbell.net.

Dance ballet performed in the classical Indian dance style of Bharatha
Natyam. For more information and
to purchase tickets go to
h t t p s : / / s a m u d r a manthan.eventbrite.com.
Piano Marathon. Noon to 8 p.m.
2575 Flores St., San Mateo. Tickets
are $20 per person and are good the
entire day. For more information call
574-4633.
First Sunday Line Dance. 1 p.m. to 4
p.m. 1555 Crystal Springs Road, San
Bruno. Join Tina Beare and Jeanette
Feinberg at the San Bruno Senior
Center for line dancing. Tickets will
be $5. For more information call 6167150.
‘The Fastest Things on Wings’
Presentation and Book Signing. 2
p.m. Birder’s Garden, 926 El Camino
Real, San Carlos. Author Terry Masear
has been rescuing hummingbirds
since 2005. For more information
and to RSVP call 595-0300.
De Young Museum’s Jewel City. 2
p.m. 610 Elm St., San Carlos. This
docent lecture revisits this vital
moment in the inauguration of San
Francisco as the West Coast’s cultural epicenter. For more information
call 591-0341 ext.237.
Baroque Treasures — Bach and
Handel. 3 p.m. First Congregational
Church of Palo Alto, 1985 Louis Road,
Palo Alto. For more information go
to http://www.fccpa.org/concertseries-2015---2016.html.
Dia de los Muertos. 5 p.m. to 9:30
p.m. Courthouse Square, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. For more
information go to https://www.facebook.com/events/16562517412568
89/.
MONDAY, NOV. 2
Daytime Fiction Book Club. 10 a.m.
to 11 a.m. 610 Elm St., San Carlos.
This month we will be discussing
‘The Children’s Crusade: A Novel’ by
Ann Packer. For information call 5910341 ext. 237.
NaNoWriMo at the Library: Author
Talk. 6 p.m. 840 W. Orange Ave.,
South San Francisco. Author David
Talbot will join us to promote his
new book, ‘The Devil’s Chessboard.’
For more information call 829-3860.
Dance Connection with Live Music
by Nob Hill Sounds. Free dance lessons 6:30 p.m.-7 p.m. with open
dance 7 p.m.-9:30 p.m. Burlingame
Woman’s Club, 241 Park Road,
Burlingame. Halloween costume
night, in costume or as you are.
Members, bring a new first-time
male friend and earn free entry for
yourself (only one free entry per new
dancer). Free entry for new men.
Admission $9 members, $11 guests.
For more information call 342-2221.
TUESDAY, NOV. 3
Computer Coach. 10 a.m. to noon.
610 Elm St., San Carlos. Every
Tuesday morning the San Carlos
Library offers one on one help with
your technical questions. For more
information call 591-0341 ext. 237.
E-Book Coach. 10 a.m. to noon. 610
Elm St., San Carlos. San Carlos Library
offers one on one help to download
e-books from the library to your ereader. For more information call
591-0341 ext. 237.
Start Smart: Four Week Starting a
Business Workshop. 10 a.m. to 1
p.m. Burlingame Public Library. In
this interactive workshop, you will
build your vision, mission, objectives, strategies and plans. Also,
assists you in developing an entrepreneurial mindset. Call 558-7400
ext. 2 for more information.
Simon Winchester: Author of
‘Pacific.’ Noon. 4000 Middlefield
Road, Palo Alto. Winchester offers an
enthralling biography of the Pacific
Ocean. For more information call
(800) 847-7730.
Accelerating Career Transition.
6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. First
Presbyterian Church, 1500 Easton
Drive, Burlingame. Critical guidelines
and resources for moving from one
job to the next will be explored. Free
refreshments will be provided. For
more information call 522-0701.
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 4
Redwood City’s Pride and
Beautification
Committee
Meeting. 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. City Hall
(Conference Room 2B), 1017
Middlefield Road, Redwood City. For
more information call 780-7300.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon
to 1 p.m. Kingfish Restaurant, 201 S. B
St., San Mateo. Free. For more information call 430-6500.

Montessori 40th Anniversary.
Noon to 4 p.m. North Shoreview
Montessori, 1301 Cypress Ave., San
Mateo. Free. For more information
go to www.nsmontessori.org.

‘Autumn Palette’ by Tangerine
Arts. Noon to 4 p.m. Twin Pines Art
Center, 10 Twin Pines Lane, Belmont.
Art exhibit runs Wednesdays to
Sundays through Nov. 29. For more
information go to www.tangerinearts.net.

‘Samudra Manthan.’ Noon and 4
p.m. Woodside High Performing Arts
Center, 199 Churchill Ave., Woodside.

For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.

COMICS/GAMES

THE DAILY JOURNAL

DILBERT®

Weekend • Oct. 31- Nov. 1, 2015

25

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

HOLY MOLE®

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®

ACROSS
1 Clothing
5 Vista
9 Pay for
12 Bryce Canyon state
13 Division word
14 Boastful knight
15 Feng —
16 Some have bibs
18 Doghouse
20 Allay, as thirst
21 Country addrs.
22 Aunt or bro.
23 Leeway
26 Stage award
30 Flavor enhancer
33 Auto-parts store
34 Proceed
35 Barbecue favorite
37 Clear a trail
39 Tyson stat
40 Meditation guide
41 Organic compound
43 Future flower
45 Upswept hairdo

GET FUZZY®

48
51
53
56
57
58
59
60
61
62

Works hard
Teen occupation
Luau lure (hyph.)
Kind of insurance
Inquire
Shed, as light
Lace or ribbons
— too late now!
Go wild about
They may be split

DOWN
1 Elephant tooth
2 Last box to check
3 Scrawny
4 Glistens
5 Fat fiddle
6 Mdse. bill
7 Paris season
8 Inferior
9 Kan. neighbor
10 Take a hike
11 Financial page org.
17 Let have
19 Athletics channel

22
24
25
27
28
29
30
31
32
36
38
42
44
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
54
55

Show surprise
Oohed and —
Audit pros
Poker stake
Calligraphy medium
Tokyo, once
EPA stat
Worthless coin
Canine warning
— Khan
French Legion headgear
Take turns
Groom’s attendant
Complete reversal (hyph.)
Malodorous
Far East cuisine
Eject
Sorts
Fill fully
CD- —
Ms. Thurman
54, to Flavius

10-31-15

PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS



SATURDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2015
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Your patience and
trustworthiness will help you take care of problems
concerning an elderly relative. A financial gain through
loan repayment, found money or cutting corners will
give you the means to travel.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — A past business
associate will make you an attractive offer. Updating
your qualifications and resume will allow you to take
advantage of what’s being proposed. Advancement
is within reach.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Be honest when it
comes to your expectations and intentions. You will

KenKen® is a registered trademark of Nextoy, LLC. ©2015 KenKen Puzzle LLC. All rights reserved.
Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS, Inc. www.kenken.com

FRIDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED

Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.
The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.
Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.

give the wrong impression if you just blindly follow the
crowd. Be bold and let your voice be heard.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Keep all matters up
to date with financial, medical or legal institutions.
Penalties will be incurred if your personal documents
are lacking information or have lapsed.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — Careful investing will
lead to financial gains. Your pleasant attitude will
make you an interesting dinner partner or business
associate, so accept any intriguing social invitations. A
travel opportunity is apparent.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — A physical challenge
will help distract you from troubling emotional issues.
Update your residence to increase your comfort and to
put a positive spin on the way you think and feel.

10-31-15
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook

TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Give your spirit a
lift by spending time with close friends or younger
family members and it will counter any depression
you’ve been feeling. Games or contests will
provide a diversion.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — Don’t allow others
to take credit for your hard work. An innovative
idea regarding domestic improvements will be
prosperous. Your unorthodox method of problemsolving will come in handy.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — A romantic relationship
will need some tender, loving care. Compassion and
patience will help to get through a temporary setback.
Don’t let anyone meddle in your private affairs.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — A practical fundraising

idea will bring you recognition. Involve yourself in
community activities where you can highlight your
novel concepts. An unexpected expense will catch
you off guard.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Putting in extra hours
at work will be a viable solution to avoid a personal
situation at home. Your employer will appreciate the
effort, and you can momentarily reduce your stress.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Changes you make today
will have a positive effect on your future. Embrace an
opportunity to travel and you will gain beneficial insight
into other cultures and philosophies.
COPYRIGHT 2015 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.

26

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Oct. 31-Nov. 1, 2015

RETAIL -

RETAIL JEWELRY SALES +
EXP DIAMOND SALES ASSOC

CAREGIVERS NEEDED
No Experience Necessary
Training Provided
FT & PT. Driving required.

Benefits-BonusNo Nights!
650-367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com

Early mornings, six days per week,
Monday through Saturday
Pick up papers between 3:30 a.m.
and 4:30 a.m. 2 to 4 hour routes
available from South SF to Palo Alto and the Coast.
Pay dependent on route size.
Call 650-344-5200.

110 Employment

AUTO -

110 Employment

Crystal Cleaning
Center
San Mateo, CA

Presser

Are you dependable and
looking for full-time employment
with benefits?

Call for an appointment:
650-342-6978

Apply 650-565-9100 Ask for Victor

CAREGIVERS

1660 S. Amphlett Blvd., Suite 115
San Mateo, CA 94402
www.homebridgeca.org

San Mateo Daily Journal
Newspaper Routes

TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classifieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its liability shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be submitted within 30 days. For full advertising conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.

Body shop in Palo Alto seeks Journey
man Body man and Painter's helper.

(650) 458-2202

DRIVERS
WANTED

104 Training

2 years experience
required.

HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273

Immediate placement
on all assignments.

Call
(650)777-9000

GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.

HOUSE CLEANERS NEEDED
$12.25 per hour. Company Car.
Call Molly Maid at (650)837-9788.
1700 S. Amphlett, #218, San Mateo.

The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.

MANUFACTURING -

Jeweler/Setters
Setting + repair
Top Pay + ben + bonus

For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation

Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com

650-367-6500 FX: 367-6400

SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com

jobs@jewelryexchange.com

NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM

The Daily Journal is looking for interns to do entry level reporting, research, updates of our ongoing features and interviews. Photo interns also welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented interns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time reporters.

Director of Maintenance / Environmental Services needed for
busy, upscale Assisted Living Memory Care community. This position
ensures residents and families have a clean, comfortable, positive
overall experience from first visit to move-in to lifelong care.
Candidate TIPVMEIBWF t$BSFGVMBUUFOUJPOUPEFUBJMJOVQTDBMFFOWJSPONFOUTt"CJMJUZUPMFBEBOECVJMETUSPOH XFMMUSBJOFEBOEDPNQFOTBUFE
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building operations including commercial kitchen, laundry, resident
space, offices, and common areas.
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monitoring, electrical, plumbing, and mechanical systems.
Candidate must be able to respond to and resolve emergencies such
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other services as needed.
Must be a friendly, flexible team player, able to learn and teach, and love
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&YDFMMFOUsalary depending on experience plus an exceptional training
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as meals, generous paid time off, medical, dental, vision, disability,
life insurance, and more.
Kensington 1MBDF JT UIF OFXFTU NPTU JOOPWBUJWF "TTJTUFE -JWJOH DPNNVOJUZ
JO UIF #BZ "SFB TQFDJmDBMMZ TFSWJOH UIPTF XJUI "M[IFJNFST BOE PUIFS
UZQFT PG EFNFOUJB &NBJM JobRC@KensingtonSL.com, fax 650-6491726, or visit 2800 El Camino Real, Redwood City for an application.

College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not necessarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you apply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by regular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.

PAINTER STALLINGS PAINTING
IN SAN MATEO
Painter Wanted to start IMMEDIATELY.
SOME experience necessary.
Email: stallingspainting@comcast.net
or call: 650-348-2800.
Leave a detailed message and
a callback number.

127 Elderly Care
FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE

The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.

Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in today’s paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Oct. 31-Nov. 1, 2015

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #266906
The following person is doing business
as: Priority Tow & Transportation, 395
San Bruno Ave., E, SAN BRUNO, CA
94066. Registered Owner(s): Xing C. Lin,
63 Tioga Ave, SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94134. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrant commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/Xing C. Lin/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/06/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/10/15, 10/17/15, 10/24/15, 10/31/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT M-266980
The following person is doing business
as: Pueo, 34 Clifton Dr, DALY CITY, CA
94015 Registered Owner(s): Elsie Shumacher, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/Elsie Schumacher/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/13/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/17/15, 10/24/15, 10/31/15, 11/7/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #266986
The following person is doing business
as: Conversations in English, 720 Highland Ave, #4, SAN MATEO, CA 94401.
Registered Owner(s): Earl Hayes, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrant commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
/s/Earl Hayes/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/14/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/17/15, 10/24/15, 10/31/15, 11/07/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #266735
The following person is doing business
as: Paint Rescue, 121 N. Humboldt St,
#A, SAN MATEO, CA 94401. Registered
Owner(s): 1) Alfredo C. Ubau, same address. 2) David Tzoc, 1101 Tilton Ave,
#1, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 The business is conducted by a General Partnership. The registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on
/s/Alfredo C. Ubau/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 09/18/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/17/15, 10/24/15, 10/31/15, 11/07/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #267008
The following person is doing business
as: Dominic’s Car Appraisal, 1231 California Drive, BURLINGAME, CA 94010.
Registered Owner(s): Dominic Tsang,
1229 California Dr, BURLINGAME, CA
94010. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrant commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/Dominic Tsang/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/16/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/17/15, 10/24/15, 10/31/15, 11/07/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #266997
The following person is doing business
as: Eakin Consulting, 303 Tadley Ct,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94061. Registered
Owner(s): 1) Kaia Eakin 2) Bryan Beck,
same address. The business is conducted by a General Partnership. The registrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/Kaia Eakin/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/14/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/17/15, 10/24/15, 10/31/15, 11/07/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT M-267067
The following person is doing business
as: Bermuda Cafe and Sandwiches, 705
Bermuda Drive, San Mateo CA 94403.
Registered Owner(s): Victoria Co, 693
Applause Pl, San Jose CA 95134. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrant commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 9-10-15
/s/Victoria Co/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/22/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/24/15, 10/31/15, 11/7/15, 11/14/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT M-267015
The following person is doing business
as: Convenient Auto Care, 209 A El Camino Real, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080. Registered Owner(s): Omer
Faruk Gunes, 863 North Humboldt St.,
Apt 3, SAN MATEO, CA 94401. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrant commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A
/s/Omer Faruk Gunes/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/16/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/17/15, 10/24/15, 10/31/15, 11/07/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #266796
The following person is doing business
as: Bonded Maids Cleaning Service, 715
El Camino Real, Suite 20A, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066. Registered Owner(s): Michaella G. Payumo, 4 Morton Dr, DALY
CITY, CA 94015. The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/Michaella G. Payumo/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 09/25/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/24/15, 10/31/15, 11/7/15, 11/14/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #266937
The following person is doing business
as: Prime Building Services, 687 Roble
Ave Apt 1, MENLO PARK, CA 94025.
Registered Owner(s): Brenda L. Rodriguez Silva, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/Brenda Rodriguez Silva/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/07/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/10/15, 10/17/15, 10/24/15, 10/31/15)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT M-266907
The following person is doing business
as: Spinner Properties, 411 Borel Ave,
Suite 602, SAN MATEO, CA 94402.
Registered Owner(s): Gambare II, Inc.,
CA. The business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A
/s/Theodore Yamagishi/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/06/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/10/15, 10/17/15, 10/24/15, 10/31/15)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT M-266939
The following person is doing business
as: Birch Avenue Consulting, 1304 Birch
Avenue, SAN MATEO, CA 94402. Registered Owner(s): Susan Graham, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrant commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
N/A
/s/Susan Graham/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/08/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/10/15, 10/17/15, 10/24/15, 10/31/15)

Exciting Opportunities at
Applicants who are committed to Quality and Excellence welcome to apply.

CANDY MAKER TRAINING PROGRAM – Starting Rate: $15.00/hr
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SEASONAL OPPORTUNITIES
UTILITY – Starting Rate: $12.50/hr
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26"-*5:"4463"/$&*/41&$503o4UBSUJOH3BUFIS
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Tundra

Tundra

Tundra

Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

27

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #267024
The following person is doing business
as: Cuts and Colours by Lennie, 140
Brentwood Drive, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080. Registered Owner(s):
Leonila B. Morano-Mangalonzo, 27490
Coronado Way, HAYWARD, CA 94545.
The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on Dec. 1,
2015
/s/Leonila B. Morano-Mangalonzo/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/19/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/24/15, 10/31/15, 11/07/15, 11/14/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT M-266859
The following person is doing business
as: Menlo Cafe, 620 Santa Cruz Avenue
#A, MENLO PARK, CA 94025. Registered Owner(s): Elvira Franco, 1720
West Bayshore Rd, #7, EAST PALO ALTO, CA 94303. The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/Elvira Franco/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/01/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/31/15, 11/07/15, 11/14/15, 11/21/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #267139
The following person is doing business
as: Simpfy Rewards Consulting, 645
Ventura Ave, SAN MATEO, CA 94403.
Registered Owner(s): Phuong Thai,
same address. The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/Phuong Thai/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/30/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/31/15, 11/07/15, 11/14/15, 11/21/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT M-266987
The following person is doing business
as: The Striped Pig, 917 Main Street,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063. Registered
Owner(s): AV Cleaning & Restoration
Corp., CA. The business is conducted
by a Limited Liability Company. The registrant commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/Malinda Mitchell/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/14/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/31/15, 11/07/15, 11/14/15, 11/21/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT M-267101
The following person is doing business
as: Medina Tax Solutions, 881 Sneath
Lane, Ste 110, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066.
Registered Owner(s): 1) Sergio Medina II
2) Angelica Medina, 3848 Fairfax Way,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080.
The business is conducted by a Married
Couple. The registrant commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/Sergio Medina II/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/26/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/31/15, 11/07/15, 11/14/15, 11/21/15)

LEGAL NOTICES

Fictitious Business Name Statements,
Trustee Sale Notice, Name Change, Probate,
Notice of Adoption, Divorce Summons,
Notice of Public Sales and More.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT M-267005
The following person is doing business
as: 1) PCS Cleaning & Restoration 2)
PCS of Bay Area, 541 Taylor Way Suite
#3, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070. Registered Owner(s): AV Cleaning & Restoration Corp., CA. The business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/Sandaya Dave/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/15/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/31/15, 11/07/15, 11/14/15, 11/21/15)
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF
THE USE OF A FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT #262661
Name of the person abandoning the use
of the Fictitious Business Name: 1) Stevenson Fong 2) Justin Y. Lin. Name of
Business: Priority Tow & Transportation.
Date of original filing: 10/20/2014. Address of Principal Place of Business: 395
San Bruno Ave E, SAN BRUNO, CA
94103. The business was conducted by
a General Partnership.
/s/ Stevenson Fong/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 10/06/15. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 10/10/2015,
10//17/2015, 10/24/2015, 10/31/2015).

Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.

210 Lost & Found

Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com

FOUND: LADIES watch outside Safeway Millbrae 11/10/14 call Matt,
(415)378-3634
FOUND: RING Silver color ring found
on 1/7/2014 in Burlingame. Parking Lot
M (next to Dethrone). Brand inscribed.
Gary @ (650)347-2301
FOUND: WEDDING BAND Tuesday
September 8th Near Whole Foods, Hillsdale. Pls call to identify. 415.860.1940
LOST - MY COLLAPSIBLE music stand,
clip lights, and music in black bags were
taken from my car in Foster City and may
have been thrown out by disappointed
thieves. Please call (650)704-3595

PRODUCTION SPECIALIST – Starting Rate: $13.50/hr
t "TTJTUXJUIDBOEZQSPEVDUJPO

SANITATION – Starting Rate: $13.50/hr
t (FOFSBMDMFBOJOHPGQMBOU PGmDFT XBSFIPVTFCVJMEJOHTBOEHSPVOETUPNBJOUBJO
TBOJUBSZDPOEJUJPOTJOBDDPSEBODFXJUI(PPE'PPE.BOVGBDUVSJOH1SBDUJDFT

MACHINE OPERATOR – Starting Rate: $13.50/hr
t 0QFSBUFBOENBJOUBJOBMMLJUDIFONBDIJOFSZPSXSBQQJOHFRVJQNFOU

SHIPPING – Starting Rate: $14.00/hr
t 'JMMPSEFSTGPSQSPEVDUBOEPSNBUFSJBMTTVQQMJFEUPUIFNBOVGBDUVSJOHEFQUTBOESFUBJM
TIPQT FOTVSJOHPSEFSTBSFQSPQFSMZmMMFE XFJHIFEBOEJEFOUJmFEXJUITIJQQJOH
JOGPSNBUJPO.VTUQBTTBXSJUUFOUFTU

Requirements for all positions include:
t
t
t
t
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"QQMJDBOUTNVTUCFBWBJMBCMFUPXPSLEBZBOEPSOJHIUTIJGUBOEPWFSUJNF
.VTUCFBCMFUPSFBE TQFBLBOEXSJUF&OHMJTI
1PTJUJPOTBWBJMBCMFJO4PVUI4BO'SBODJTDPPS%BMZ$JUZ
1SFWJPVTFYQFSJFODFJONBOVGBDUVSJOHQSFGFSSFE
"CMFUPQFSGPSNUIFFTTFOUJBMGVODUJPOTPGUIFKPC JODMVEJOHMJGUJOHMCT
GSFRVFOUMZ EFQFOEJOHPOQPTJUJPO

Apply at 210 El Camino Real, So. San Francisco, Monday-Friday, 8:30 am – 3:30 pm,
at the Guard Station on Spruce Street, Rear Parking Lot. EOE

LOST - Woman’s diamond ring. Lost
12/18. Broadway, Redwood City.
REWARD! (650)339-2410
LOST CAT Our Felicity, weighs 7 lbs,
she has a white nose, mouth, chin, all
four legs, chest stomach, around her
neck. Black mask/ears, back, tail. Nice
REWARD.
Please
email
us
at
joandbill@msn.com or call 650-5768745. She drinks water out of her paws.
LOST DOG, 14 year old Bichon, white
and Fluffy. Reward $500 cash. Her name
is Pumpkin. Lost in Redwood City.
(650) 281-4331.

Books
16 BOOKS on History of WWII Excellent
condition. $95 all obo, (650)345-5502
BOOK
"LIFETIME"
(408)249-3858

WW1

$12.,

MAGAZINES. SIX “Arizona Highways”
magazines from 1974 and 1975. Very
good condition. $15. 650-794-0839.
NICHOLAS SPARKS Hardback Books
2 @ $3.00 each - (650)341-1861
STEPHEN KING Hardback Books
2 @ $3.00 each - (650)341-1861

294 Baby Stuff
GRACO 3 way pack n play for kid in
good condition $20. Daly City (650) 7569516.
GRACO DOUBLE Stroll $90 My Cell
650-537-1095. Will email pictures upon
request.

28

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Oct. 31-Nov. 1, 2015
294 Baby Stuff

297 Bicycles

299 Computers

303 Electronics

304 Furniture

304 Furniture

SIT AND Stand Stroll $95 My Cell 650537-1095. Will email pictures upon request.

2 BIKES for kids $60.My Cell 650-5371095. Will email pictures upon request.

RECORDABLE CD-R 74, Sealed, Unopened, original packaging, Samsung, 12X,
(650) 578 9208

46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.

DINETTE TABLE with Chrome Legs: 36"
x58" (with one leaf 11 1/2") - $50.
(650)341-5347

TEAK-VENEER COMPUTER desk with
single drawer and stacked shelves. $30
obo. 650-465-2344

DINING ROOM table – Good Condition
$90.00 or best offer ( 650)-780-0193

TV STAND in great condition. 3'x 20"x
18", light grey. $20. (650)366-8168

DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condition, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111

VINTAGE LARGE Marble Coffee Table,
round. $75.(650)458-8280

295 Art
BOB TALBOT Marine Lithograph (Signed Framed 24x31 Like New. $99.
(650)572-8895

LANDRIDER
AUTO-SHIFT.
Never
Used. Paid $320. Asking $75.(650)4588280
MAGNA-GLACIERPOINT 26" 15 speed.
Hardly used . Bluish purple color .$ 59.00
San Mateo 650-255-3514.

296 Appliances

298 Collectibles

AIR CONDITIONER 10000 BTU w/remote. Slider model fits all windows. LG
brand $199 runs like new. (650)2350898

1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048

CHEFMATE TOASTER oven, brand
new, bakes, broils, toasts, adjustable
temperature. $25 OBO. (650)580-4763
CHICKEN ROASTERS (4) vertical, One
pulsing chopper, both unopened, in original packaging, $27.(650) 578 9208
DESIGNER LADIES hand bag, yellow
three zippers. purchase price $150.0 sell
price $45 (650)515-2605
HAMILTONBEACH juicer new still in
original packing. purchase price $59.99
sale price $25. (650)515-2605
ICE MAKER brand new $90. (415)2653395
JACK LALANE juicer $25 or best offer.
650-593-0893.
KIRBY MODEL G7D vacuum with accessories and a supply of HEPA bags.
$150 obo. 650-465-2344
PORTABLE AIR conditioner by windchaser 9000 btu s cools 5,600 ft easily
$90 obo (650)591-6842

1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pockets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BELT BUCKLE-MICKEY Mouse 1937
Marked Sterling. Sun Rubber company.
$300 (650) 355-2167.
CHERISHED TEDDIES Figurines. Over
90 figurines, 1992-1999 (mostly '93-'95).
Mint in Boxes. $99. (408) 506-7691
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated
with
Holder
$15/all,
(408)249-3858
MONOPOLY GAME, 1930's, $35, 650591-9769 San Carlos
NUTCRACKERS 1 large 2 small $10 for
all 3 (650) 692-3260
OLD BLACK Mountain 5 Gallon Glass
Water Jar $39 (650) 692-3260
RENO SILVER LEGACY Casino four
rare memorabilia items, casino key, two
coins, small charm. $95. (650)676-0974
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276

300 Toys
3-STORY BARBIE Dollhouse with spiral
staircase and elevator. $60. (650)5588142
5 RARE purple card Star Wars figures
mint unopened. $75. Steve, 650-5186614.
COMPLETE 1999 UD1&2 set of 525
baseball cards - mint. $50. Steve, 650518-6614.
PLAY KITCHEN Step 2, accessories,
sink, shelves, oven, fridge, extendable,
perfect , $50. 650-878-9511
STAR WARS SDCC Stormtrooper
Commander $29 OBO Dan,
650-303-3568 lv msg

302 Antiques
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002

BEAUTIFUL AND UNIQUE Victorian
Side Sewing Table, All original. Rosewood. Carved. EXCELLENT CONDITION! $350. (650)815-8999.
HAND DRILLS and several bits & old
hand plane. $40. (650)596-0513
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bevelled glass, $700. (650)766-3024

OLD COFFEE grinder with glass jar.
$40. (650)596-0513

TRANSFORMERS SDCC Shockwave
Lab Beast Hunters, $75 OBO Dan 650303-3568 lv msg

OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65
(650)591-3313

SHARK FLOOR steamer,exc condition
$45 (650) 756-9516.

299 Computers

PAIR OF beautiful candalabras . Marble
and brass. $90. (650)697-7862

UPRIGHT VACUUM Cleane, $10. Call
Ed, (415)298-0645 South San Francisco

DELL
LAPTOP
Computer
Bag
Fabric/Nylon great condition $20 (650)
692-3260

RIVAL 11/2 quart ice cream maker
(New) $20.(650)756-9516.

VINTAGE ATWATER Kent Radio. Circa
1929 $100. (650)245-7517

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
ACROSS
1 Reaction to a
piece of cake
10 Ustream offering
15 Hyperlink feature
16 Missouri River city
17 Qatar-based
broadcaster
18 Equate
19 Org. concerned
with pedagogy
20 Parliament :
London ::
Storting : __
21 “As if I care!”
22 Blending aid,
briefly
24 Not high
26 Some univ.
proctors
27 Balances (out)
29 Amazon visitor’s
need
32 Make easier to
eat, as fruit
34 Noted source of
rubies and
sapphires
35 French vineyards
37 Rank quality
38 Like some
courses
42 Cannonball
consequence
46 “Sure, let’s!”
48 Knighted
conductor
49 “‘I __ you liked
your drink,’ sez
Gunga Din”
50 Confines
52 Farm food
53 Ford model
56 Senate minority
leader
58 Otolaryngologists,
e.g.: Abbr.
59 Patronized, in a
way
60 Attempt
62 It’s open at the
end of the fall
63 Cattle site
64 Works with keys
65 Microbrewery
product
DOWN
1 Far from clearcut

2 Like some new
mothers
3 “Death Comes to
Pemberley”
author
4 “In Dreams” actor
5 Ingredient in
some Italian
wedding soup
6 Approve
7 Hide
8 Covers up, in a
way
9 Word of apology
10 __ me tangere
11 Put out
12 Stop for a bit
13 1994 Jim Carrey
film
14 Samuel Barber
opera
21 Intertwines
23 Like some hotel
room
coffeemakers
25 River from
Cantabria to
Catalonia
28 Finishing stroke
30 Old cobblestone
road sounds
31 Mexican novelist
Fuentes

33 Large pigs
36 Shot contents
38 Babysitter’s
reading, at times
39 Therapist’s asset
40 What waiters
often do
41 The “rh” in
“rhapsody,” e.g.
43 Wrapping words?
44 Cloud function
45 Cool cat

47 Tube
51 Italian town with
a biannual horse
race
54 Give stars to, say
55 Salt Lake City
team
57 Dash
60 wiki__: collection
of online
manuals
61 Jaw

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:

BIC TURNTABLE Model 940.
Good Shape $40. (650)245-7517

Very

COMPLETE COLOR photo developer –
Besler Enlarger, Color Head, trays, photo
tools $50/ 650-921-1996
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
MOTOROLA BRAVO MB 520 (android
4.1 upgrade) smart phone 35$ 8GB SD
card Belmont (650)595-8855

ESPRESSO TABLE 30” square, 40” tall,
$95 (650)375-8021
FREE 2 piece china cabinet. Pecan finish. Located in SSF. I'll email picture.
650-243-1461

ONKYO AV Receiver HT-R570 .Digital
Surround, HDMI, Dolby, Sirius Ready,
Cinema Filter.$95/ Offer 650-591-2393

FULL SIZED mattress with metal type
frame $35. (650)580-6324

OPTIMUS H36 ST5800 Tower Speaker
36x10x11 $30. (650)580-6324

FUTON COUCH into double bed, linens
D41"xW60"xH34" 415-509-8000 $99

PIONEER HOUSE Speakers, pair. 15
inch 3-way, black with screens. Work
great. $99.(650)243-8198

GLASS TOP dining table w/ 6 chairs
$75. (415)265-3395

PORTABLE AC/DC Altec Lansing
speaker system for IPods/audio sources.
Great for travel. $15. 650-654-9252
SONY DHG-HDD250 DVR and programable remote.
Record OTA. Clock set issues $99 650595-8855
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with remote good condition $99 (650)345-1111

304 Furniture

INFINITY FLOOR speakers H 38" x W
11 1/2" x D 10" good $50. (650)756-9516
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038

WHITE WICKER Shelf unit, adjustable.
Excellent condition. 5 ft by 2 ft. $50.
(650)315-6184
WOOD - wall Unit - 30" long x 6' tall x
17.5" deep. $90. (650)631-9311
WOOD FURNITURE- one end table and
coffee table. In good condition. $30
OBO. (760)996-0767.
WOODEN MINI bar with 2 bar stools
$75. (415)265-3395

306 Housewares

LOVE SEAT, Upholstered pale yellow
floral $99. (650)574-4021
MAPLE COFFEE table. Excellent Condition $75.00 (650)593-1780

COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037

MAPLE LAMP table with tiffany shade
$95.00 (650)593-1780

PRE-LIT 7 ft Christmas tree. Three sections, easy to assemble. $50. 650 349
2963.

MIRROR, SOLID OAK. 30" x 19 1/2",
curved edges; beautiful. $85.00 OBO.
Linda 650 366-2135.

ANTIQUE MAHOGONY double bed with
adjustable steelframe $225.00. OBO.
(650)592-4529

OAK BOOKCASE, 30"x30" x12". $25.
(650)726-6429
OAK SIX SHELF Book Case 6FT 4FT
$55 (650)458-8280

BRASS / METAL ETAGERE 6.5 ft tall.
Rugs, Pictures, Mirrors. Four shelf. $200.
(650) 343-0631

OAK WINE CABINET, beautiful, glass
front, 18” x 25” x 48” 5 shelves, grooved
for bottles. 25-bottle capacity. $299.
(360)624-1898

CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644

OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - new $80
obo Retail $130 (650)873-8167

COFFEE TABLE @ end table Very nice
condition $80. 650 697 7862

PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061

COMPUTER DESK $25 , drawer for keyboard, 40" x 19.5" (619)417-0465

ROCKING CHAIR fine light, oak condition with pads, $85/OBO. 650 369 9762

COMPUTER SWIVEL CHAIR. Padded
Leather. $80. (650) 455-3409

TABLE, HD. 2'x4'. pair of folding legs at
each end. Laminate top. Perfect.
$60.(650)591-4141

CUSTOM MADE wood sewing storage
cabinet perfect condition $75. (650)4831222

WHITE BOOKCASE :H 72" x W 30" x D
12" exc condition $30. (650)756-9516.

BBQ UTENSILS, Stainless steel, Grillmark, flippers tongs, baster, winebarrel,
staves, $25. (650) 578 9208.

ANTIQUE DINING table for six people
with chairs $99. (650)580-6324

ANTIQUE MOHAGANY Bookcase. Four
feet tall. $75. (415) 282-0966.

WALNUT CHEST, small (4 drawer with
upper bookcase $50. (650)726-6429

TEAK CABINET 28"x32", used for stereo equipment $25. (650)726-6429

SHEER DRAPES (White) for two glass
sliding doors great condition $50 (650)
692-3260
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483

307 Jewelry & Clothing
DANISH WATCH, ultra thin elegant, lifetime warranty, $59, 650-595-3933

308 Tools
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CHIPPER/SHREDDER 4.5 horsepower,
Craftsman $150 OBO. (650) 349-2963
CLICKER TORQUE Wrench, 20-150 lbs,
1/2", new, $25, 650-595-3933
COMMERCIAL PADDLE CONCRETE
MIXER, Electric Driven. $875. (650) 3336275.
COMMERCIAL PADDLE CONCRETE
MIXER, Motor Driven. $1,350. (650) 3336275.
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
CRAFTSMAN JIGSAW 3.9 amp. with
variable speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTSMAN RADIAL Arm Saw Stand.
In box. $30. (650)245-7517
DEWALT DRILL/FLASHLIGHT Set $99
My Cell 650-537-1095. Will email pictures upon request.
HEAVY DUTY Mattock/Pick, Less Handle $5. (650)368-0748
PULLEYS- FOUR 2-1/8 to 7 1/4" --all for
$16. 650 341-8342
SHOPSMITH MARK V 50th Anniversary
most
attachments.
$1,500/OBO.
(650)504-0585
SKILL SAW 7/1/4" CRAFTMAN profesional unused $ 45. (650)992-4544
VINTAGE CRAFTSMAN Jig Saw. Circa
1947. $60. (650)245-7517
WILLIAMS #1191 CHROME 2 1/16"
Combination "SuperRrench". Mint. $89.
650-218-7059.
WILLIAMS #40251, 4 PC. Tool Set
(Hose Remover, Cotter Puller, Awl, Scraper). Mint. $29. 650-218-7059.
WIZARD STAINED Glass Grinder, extra
bit, good condition, shield included,
$50. Jack @348-6310

xwordeditor@aol.com

10/31/15

310 Misc. For Sale
"MOTHER-IN-LAW TONGUES" plants,
3 in 5-gal cans. $10.00 each. 650/5937408.
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, perfect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
INCUBATOR, $99, (650)678-5133
LIONEL ENGINE #221 ‘Rio Grande diesel, runs good ex-condition
$90.
(650)867-7433
SAMSONITE 26" tan hard-sided suit
case, lt. wt., wheels, used once/like new.
$60. 650-328-6709
STAR TREK VCR tape Colombia House,
Complete set 79 episodes $50
(650)355-2167
TASCO LUMINOVA Telescope.with tripod stand, And extra Lenses. Good condition.$90. call 650-591-2393
ULTRASONIC JEWELRY Cleaning Machine Cleans jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures, keys. Concentrate included. $30
OBO. (650)580-4763
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$30. (650)873-8167

By Julian Lim
©2015 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

10/31/15

WROUGHT IRON Plant/Curio stand, 5
platforms, 5’ high x 1.5’ wide. Beautiful
designer style, good condition. $25.
(650)588-1946. San Bruno

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Oct. 31-Nov. 1, 2015

311 Musical Instruments

316 Clothes

318 Sports Equipment

ALVAREZ ACOUSTICAL guitar with
tuning device - excellent to learn on, like
new $95. 925-784-1447

SUNGLASSSES UNISEX TOMS Lobamba S007 w/ Tortoise Frames. Polarized lenses 100% UVA/UVB NEW
$65.(650)591-6596

VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167

BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, excellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call
(510)784-2598
HAILUN PIANO for sale, brand new, excellent condition. $6,000. (650)308-5296
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. private owner, (650)349-1172
KIMBALL MAHOGANY Baby Grand
Piano, Bench and Sheet Music. $1,100.
(650)341-2271
MONARCH UPRIGHT player piano $99
(650) 583-4549

VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622
VEST, BROWN Leather , Size 42 Regular, Like New, $25 (650) 875-1708
VINTAGE 1970’S Grecian made dress,
size 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167

317 Building Materials
32 PAVING/EDGING bricks, 12” x 5”x1”
Brown, smooth surface, good clean condition. $32. (650)588-1946 San Bruno
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink, $65. (650)348-6955

UPRIGHT PIANO. In tune. Fair condition. $300 OBO (650) 533-4886.

CULTURED MARBLE 2 tone BR vanity
counter top. New toe skin/ scribe. 29” x
19” $300 (408)744-1041

WURLITZER PIANO, console, 40” high,
light brown, good condition. $490.
(650)593-7001

EXTERIOR BRASS lanterns 20" 2 NEW,
both $30. (650)574-4439

YAMAHA PIANO, Upright, Model M-305,
$750. Call (650)572-2337

312 Pets & Animals

INTERIOR DOORS, 8, free.
call 573-7381.
SHUTTERS 2 wooden shutters 32x72
like new $50.00 ea.call 650 368-7891

BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate design - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402

WHITE DOUBLE pane window for $29
or Best offer. Call Halim @ (650) 6785133.

FRENCH BULLDOG puppies. Many
colors.
AKC Registration. Call
(415)596-0538.

WOODEN SHUTTERS 12x36" Six available. $20. (650)574-4439

ONE KENNEL Cab ll one Pet Taxi animal carriers 26x16. Excellent cond. $60..
650-593-2066
PARROT CAGE, Steel, Large - approx
4 ft by 4 ft, Excellent condition $300 best
offer. (650)245-4084

318 Sports Equipment
ATOMIC SKI bag -- 215 cm. Lightly
used, great condition. $15. (650) 5730556.
BUCK TACTICAL folding knife, Masonic
logo, NEW $19, 650-595-3933

PET CARRIER, brown ,Very good condition, $15.00 medium zize leave txt or call
650 773-7201

DELUXE OVER the door chin up bar; excellent shape; $10; 650-591-9769 San
Carlos

315 Wanted to Buy

G.I. ammo can, medium, good cond.
$10. Call (650) 591-4553, days only.

WE BUY

GOLF BALLS-15 dozen. All Brands: Titeslist, Taylor Made, Callaway. $5 per
dozen. (650)345-3840.

Gold, Silver, Platinum
Always True & Honest values

Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957

400 Broadway - Millbrae

650-697-2685

316 Clothes
BLACK LEATHER belt, wide, non-slip,
43" middle hole, $2, 650-595-3933

GOLF CLUBS, 2 sets of $30 & $60.
(415)265-3395
GOLF CLUBS, 4-9 irons, oversize driver,
metal 3, putter, bag; nice; $25; San Carlos (650)591-9769
IN-GROUND BASKETBALL hoop, fiberglass backboard, adjustable height, $80
obo 650-364-1270
LADIES MCGREGOR Golf Clubs
Right handed with covers and pull cart
$150 o.b.o. (650)344-3104

HAT CLASSIC FEDORA Indiana Jones
large size 7 1/2 in great shape,Brown
$25 510-684-0187

NEW AB Lounger $39 (650) 692-3260

LEATHER JACKET, New Black Italian
style, size M Ladies $45 (650) 875-1708

SOCCER BALLS - $8.00 each (like new)
4 available. (650)341-5347

LEATHER JACKET, New Dark Brown ,
Italian style, Size L $49 (650) 875-1708
PARIS HILTON purse white & silver unused, about 12" long x 9" high $23. 650592-2648

POWER PLUS Exercise Machine
(650)368-3037

TREADMILL BY PRO-FORM. (Hardly
Used). 10% incline, 2.5 HP motor, 300lb
weight capacity. $329 (650)598-9804
TWO SETS of 10lb barbell weights @
$10 each set. (650)593-0893

Concrete

ANGIE’S CLEANING &
POWERWASHING

AAA CONCRETE DESIGN

650.918.0354

www.MyErrandServicesCA.com

WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955

335 Rugs
CARPET RUNNER, new, 30 inches,
bound on both sides, burgundy color, 30
lineal feet, $290. Call (650)579-0933.

340 Camera & Photo Equip.

MOVING
SALE
10/31

310 Tulane Rd
San Mateo 94402
1pm - 4:30pn only

Furniture

BBQ Grill,
misc. household items
and more!

NIKON N80 SLR film camera with 2880mm Nikkor lens, Like new with leather
case. $90. 510-684-0187

345 Medical Equipment
ADULT DIAPERS, disposable, 10 bags,
20 diapers per bag, $10 each. (650)3420935
BATH CHAIR LIFT. Peterman battery
operated bath chair lift. Stainless steel
frame. Accepts up to 350lbs. Easily inserted I/O tub.$250 OBO.
(650) 739-6489.
BATH TRANSFER bench, back rest and
side arm, suction cups for the floor.
$75/obo. (650)757-0149
QUICKIE WHEELCHAIR - Removable
arms for transferring standard size.
$350.00. (650) 345-3017

Garage Sales

FINE ANTIQUES
ESTATE SALE
Beautiful Victorian
Furniture, crystal,
porcelain, silver,
OOP books &
collectibles
Credit Cards Accepted
3005 Monterey St
@ 30th Ave San Mateo
Sat. 10/31 & Sun. 11/1
9:00am - 4:00pm

Construction

380 Real Estate Services

640 Motorcycles/Scooters

FISHING/HUNTING CLUB on Sacramento River. Leave message
(925) 838-2858.

BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003

470 Rooms

DAINESE BOOTS Zipper & Velcro Closure, Cushioned Ankle, Excellent Condition Unisex EU40 $55 (650)357-7484

HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660

DUCATI ‘01 750 Monster, 15K miles,
very clean. ONLY $3,500. (650)342-6342
This is a steal!

620 Automobiles

MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS, with
mounting hardware and other parts $35.
Call (650)670-2888

AA SMOG

Complete Repair& Service
$29.75 plus certificate & fee
869 California Drive .
Burlingame

(650) 340-0492

GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!

List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200

TRAVEL WHEEL chair Light weight travel w/carrying case. $300. (650)596-0513

$99

Cleaning

Move in/out; Post Construction;
Commercial & Residential;
Carpet Cleaning; Powerwashing

VINTAGE GOLF Set for $75 My Cell
650-537-1095. Will email pictures upon
request.

Garage Sales

379 Open Houses

SAN MATEO
OPEN SAT & SUN
1-4pm
2 BR, 2 BA Condo, pool jacuzzi,
hot tub, corner unit, balcony.
$699K. 58 N. El Camino.
Claudia, (650)387-5998

OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200

29

Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $42!
We’ll run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com

CHEVY ‘10 HHR . 68K. EXCELLENT
CONDITION. $8888. (650)274-8284.
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.

670 Auto Service
MENLO ATHERTON
AUTO REPAIR
WE SMOG ALL CARS
1279 El Camino Real

Menlo Park

650 -273-5120

www.MenloAthertonAutoRepair

670 Auto Parts
BRIDGESTONE TURANZA RFT (Run
Flat) 205/55/16 EL42 used 70% left $80.
(650)483-1222
BRIDGESTONE TURANZA RFT (Run
Flat) 205/55/16 EL 42 All Season Like
New $100. (650)483-1222
NEVER
MOUNTED
new Metzeler
120/70ZR-18 tire $50, 650-595-3933
NEW CONTINENTAL Temporary tire
mounted on 5 lug rim Size T125/70/R1798M $100. (650)483-1222
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912

680 Autos Wanted
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483

DODGE
‘99 Van, Good Condition,
$4,200 OBO (650)481-5296
FORD ‘98 Mustang. GT Convertible.
Summer fun car. Green, Tan, Leather interior, Excellent Condition. 128,000
Miles. $3700. (650) 440-4697.
LEXUS 97 ES300 very clean, 175K,
smog and clean title, $3900. (650)3426342
MERCEDES BENZ ‘98 E320 Silver,
black interior, 1 owner, good condition.
Factory chrome wheels, new brakes,
new tires, needs a/c compressor.
195,000 miles. $2,000. (650)867-3399

630 Trucks & SUV’s
DODGE ‘01 DURANGO, V-8 SUV, 1
owner, dark blue, CLEAN! $5,000/obo.
Call (650)492-1298
TOYOTA 97 FOURRUNNER white clean
$4700 obo. (650)342-6342

Construction

Electricians

Flooring

ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE

SPECIALS
AS LOW AS $2.50/sf.

Quality Workmanship,
Free Estimates

650-322-9288

Mention this ad for
Free Delivery

for all your electrical needs

kaprizhardwoodfloors.com

Lic# 947476

ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP

650-560-8119

Gardening

Housecleaning

CALL NOW FOR
FALL LAWN
PREPARATION

CONSUELOS HOUSE
CLEANING

Stamps • Color • Driveways •
Patios • Masonry • Block walls
• Landscaping

(650)533-0187

Drought Tolerant Planting
Drip Systems, Rock Gardens
Pressure Washing,
and lots more!
Call Robert
STERLING GARDENS
650-703-3831
Lic #751832

J.B GARDENING

Decks & Fences
Construction
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
• New Construction
• Remodeling
• Kitchen/Bathrooms
• Decks/Fences
(650)589-0372
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596

MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.

State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500

Maintenance • New Lawns
Clean Ups • Sprinklers
Fences • Tree Trim
Concrete & Brick Work
Driveway Pavers
Retaining Walls

See website for more info.

Bi-Weekly/Once a Month,
Moving In & Out
28 yrs. in Business

Free Estimates, 15% off First Visit

(650)219-4066
Lic#1211534

PENINSULA
CLEANING

RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERICAL

BONDED
FREE ESTIMATES

1-800-344-7771

(650)400-5604
Handy Help
CONTRERAS HANDYMAN
SERVICES
• Fences • Tree Trimming
• Decks • Concrete Work
• Kitchen and Bathroom
remodeling
Free Estimates

(650)288-9225
(650)350-9968

contrerashandy12@yahoo.com

30

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Oct. 31-Nov. 1, 2015

Handy Help

Hauling

Hauling

Painting

JON LA MOTTE

THE VILLAGE
CONTRACTOR

Lic#979435

LOCALLY OWNED

(650)368-8861

(650)701-6072

Family Owned Since 2000

Lic #514269

WESTBAY HANDYMAN
SERVICES

A+ Member BBB • Since 1975

(650) 773-5941

(415)971-8763

• Trimming

Pruning

• Shaping

NICK MEJIA PAINTING

*painting *plumbing *Flooring
*bathroom & kitchen
*remodeling
No job too small

• Large

Removal
Grinding

• Stump

Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Staining, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!

Free
Estimates

Lic. #479564

Mention

Hauling
AAA RATED!

$40 & UP
HAUL

Since 1988/Licensed & Insured
Monthly Specials
Fast, Dependable Service

15 YEARS EXPERIENCE
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR

Call Luis (650) 704-9635

(650) 784-1061
LIC#48219

Roofing

PROFESSIONAL

REED
ROOFERS

Landscaping

NATE LANDSCAPING
* Tree Service * Fence
* Deck * Pavers
* Pruning & Removal
* New Lawn * Irrigation
* All Concrete * Ret. Wall
* Sprinkler System
* Stamp Concrete
* Yard Clean-Up,
Haul & Maintenance

Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating

(650)341-7482
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up

Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo

Starting at $40 & Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592

CHEAP
HAULING!

The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers

PROFESSIONAL
PAINTING

INDEPENDENT
HAULERS

PAINTING

Int./Ext.All prep included
10 years experience
Satisfaction guaranteed
Free Estimates

GREG (510) 706-7914
SUNNY BAY PAINTING CO.

Free Estimate
Lic. #973081

Plumbing

650.353.6554
AUTUMN LAWN

PREPARATION!

Lifelong Learning Never Ends
New Classes Start Monthly
Intermediate Cake Decorating with Fondant and Marzipan
Beginning Microsoft Word
Overcoming ADD/ADHD in the Workplace
Notary Loan Signing and Certification
Money Talk for Couples
Customer Service as a Competitive Advantage
Contemporary Chinese Painting
Climb the Corporate Ladder by Developing Social/Emotional Competencies
Tour of Spain, La Vuelta (wine class)
Fun Cake Pops and Cupcake Decorating
Improve Your Social E.Q.
Home Decorating Detail in Depth

communityed.smccd.edu
For more information call 650.574.6149

Window Washing

Serving the entire Bay Area
Residential & Commercial
License #931457

Call for Free Estimate

Residential Commercial
Interior Exterior
Water Damage, Fences,
Decks, Stain Work
Free Estimates
CA Lic 982576
(415)828-9484

Drought Tolerant Planting
Drip Systems, Rock Gardens
Pressure Washing,
and lots more!

11/02
11/04
11/05
11/07
11/07
11/10
11/10
11/12
11/12
11/17
11/19
11/21

Service

Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates

• Remodels • Carpentry
• Drywall • Tile • Painting

Tree Service

Hillside Tree

PAINTING

Licensed General and
Painting Contractor

Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700

Plumbing

MEYER PLUMBING SUPPLY
Toilets, Sinks, Vanities,
Faucets, Water heaters,
Whirlpools and more!
Wholesale Pricing &
Closeout Specials.
2030 S Delaware St
San Mateo
650-350-1960

(650) 591-8291

Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contractor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their license number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State License Board.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker

BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation

650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Cemetery

LASTING
IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST
PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
Clothing

$5 CHARLEY'S

Sporting apparel from your
49ers, Giants & Warriors,
low prices, large selection.
450 W. San Bruno Ave.
San Bruno

(650)771-6564

Dental Services
Do you want a White,Brighter
Smile?
Safe, Painless, Long Lasting

Maui Whitening
650.508.8669

1217 Laurel St., San Carlos
(Between Greenwood & Howard)
www.mauiwhitening.com

I - SMILE

Implant & Orthodontict Center
1702 Miramonte Ave. Suite B
Mountain View

Exceptional.
Reliable. Inovative
650-282-5555

Weekend • Oct. 31-Nov. 1, 2015

Dental Services

Food

Health & Medical

MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER

THE CAKERY

EYE EXAMINATIONS

Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken

A touch of Europe

15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA

1308 Burlingame Ave
Burlingame
650 344-1006
www.burlingamecakery.com
Find us on Facebook

RUSSO DENTAL CARE

Financial

(650)697-9000

Dental Implants
Free Consultation& Panoramic
Digital Survey
1101 El Camino RL ,San Bruno

(650)583-2273

www.russodentalcare.com

UNITED AMERICAN BANK
San Mateo , Redwood City,
Half Moon Bay

Call (650)579-1500
for simply better banking

579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net

KAY'S HEALTH
& BEAUTY
Facials • Waxing • Fitness
Body Fat Reduction

381 El Camino Real
Millbrae

unitedamericanbank.com

(650)697-6868

BRUNCH EVERY

Fitness

SKIN TASTIC
MEDICAL LASER

Omelette Station, Carving Station
$24.95 / adult $9.95 /Child

LOSE WEIGHT

& Holiday Inn SFO Airport
275 So Airport blvd.
South San Francisco

In Just 10 Weeks !
with the ultimate body shaping course
contact us today.

Food

SUNDAY

Houlihans

CROWNE PLAZA
Foster City-San Mateo
The Clubhouse Bistro
Wedding, Event &
Meeting Facilities

(650) 295-6123

1221 Chess Drive Foster City

(650) 490-4414
www. SanBrunoMartialArts.com

Furniture

Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin

1838 El Camino Rl#130
Burlingame. 650 542-7055
www.skintasticmedicalspa.com

SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening

650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental

GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F

184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com

Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050

Insurance

Health & Medical

www.steelheadbrewery.com

NOTHING BUNDTCAKES
Make Life Sweeter
*864 Laurel Street, San Carlos

650.592.1600

BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?

Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com

*140 So. El Camino Real, Millbrae

650.552.9625

PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA

Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com

DENTAL
IMPLANTS

Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880

Real Estate Loans

GROW

We Fund Bank Turndowns!

YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter

Massage Therapy
BEST ASIAN BODY
MASSAGE

$35/hr First time visitors

AFFORDABLE
LIFE INSURANCE

www.barrettinsuranceservices.net

Eric L. Barrett,

CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226

LIFE INSURANCE
America's Lowest Cost!
(510)282.2466
Larry Hutcherson
Belmont, CA

(650)692-1989

COMFORT PRO
MASSAGE
Foot Massage $24.99

Body Massage $44.99/hr
10 am - 10 pm
1115 California Dr. Burlingame

$48

Belbien Day Spa

IRS TAX
PROBLEM?

Wills & Trusts

Asian Massage
$5 OFF W/THIS AD

(650)349-4492

ESTATE PLANNING

(650)556-9888
633 Veterans Blvd #C
Redwood City

TrustandEstatePlan.com

GRAND
OPENING

Complete Estate Plans
Starting at $399

L & R WELLNESS
CENTER
Relaxing & healing massage
$50 per hour

(650)557-2286

Music

Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract

Music Lessons
Sales • Repairs • Rentals

"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."

AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living Care
located in Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
Burlingame Villa
Short Term Stays
Dementia & Alzheimers Care
Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633

GRAND
OPENING

DOCUMENTS PLUS

legaldocumentsplus.com

Seniors

Call:
Trust The Tax Pros

Legal Services

Registered & Bonded

650-348-7191

Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker
CA Bureau of Real Estate#746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268

1204 West Hillsdale Blvd.
SAN MATEO
(650)403-1400

Open 7 days 10am - 9pm
Free parking behind bldg

(650)574-2087

All Credit Accepted
Purchase / Refinance/
Cash Out
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979

Tax Preparation
FULL BODY MASSAGE

39 N. San Mateo Dr. #1
San Mateo

Jeri Blatt, LDA #11

Equity based direct lender
Homes • Multi-family
Mixed-use • Commercial

Home Care Assistance
Health Care Consultant

Lic #OJ11250

LEGAL

REAL ESTATE LOANS

$39.99/hr Current Clients

(650)389-2468

2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881

Hwy 92 at Foster City Blvd. Exit

Marketing

1838 El Camino #103, Burlingame

Cosmetic Spa Cool Sculpting
Laser&Cosmetic Dermatology

31

Bronstein Music

363 Grand Ave, So. San Francisco

(650)588-2502

bronsteinmusic.com

San Mateo Office
1(844)687-3782

32

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Oct. 31-Nov.1, 2015

It’s The Weekend! Time TO FINALLY
Clean Out The Garage Before The
Holidays Arrive!

Delivering Peninsula Home Owners Superior Effort, Service and Value

Holiday Season Specials
AMERICA’S GREENEST JUNK REMOVAL SERVICE

$50
off any job

1.888.888.5865 (JUNK)

$100
off a full truck

EXCEPT MINIMUM CHARGE
Cannot be combined. Expires 12/31/15
Valid in San Francisco Co. & San MateoCo.

Locally Owned

AMERICA’S GREENEST JUNK REMOVAL SERVICE

Cannot be combined. Expires 12/31/15
Valid in San Francisco Co. & San MateoCo.

155 Reviews on Yelp
www.Junk-King.com/SanCarlos