International Society of Political Psychology Spring 2006 Vol.

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The purpose of the International Society of Political Psychology (ISPP) is to facilitate communication across disciplinary, geographic and political boundaries, among scholars and concerned individuals in government and public posts, the communications media and elsewhere, who have a scientific interest in the relationship between politics and psychological processes. In so doing, ISPP aims to continue to advance scholarship in political psychology, and to contribute to the usefulness of work in political psychology.

ISPP News
useful automated and reporting functions. In addition to renewing your membership or joining ISPP via the web, you can now access the system at any time to check your membership information, find your member ID#, and update your mailing address. Above all, the system offers a secure way for people to join or renew their memberships on-line without worrying about sending their personal information through the mail. Check out the membership link at http://ispp.org/join. html. Please remember to use the same email address we have on record, or you will create a duplicate ac(continued on next page)

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR'S CORNER

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’m hoping to see many of you at the upcoming annual meeting in Barcelona this July 12 to 15. Information about Barcelona, the preliminary program, and hotel information is now available at the ISPP website: http://ispp.org/meet.html. Barcelona promises to be one of the larger ISPP meetings in several years with participants from all over the world representing the very best of political psychology.

I’d like to express my appreciation to Conference Chair Lupicinio Iniguez Rueda; Program Co-Chairs Yael Aronoff and Félix Vázquez; and all of those that have volunteered to serve as section chairs for the program (see the preliminary program for a complete listing) for their hard work in organizing the conference. Thanks also to ISPP President Maritza Montero, ISPP Conference Planner Linda Patten, and our own Radell Roberts here at the Central Office. The number of details that go into putting an ISPP conference together is almost overwhelming and the rewards are too few. Yearafter-year, however, our many volunteers manage to assemble thought provoking and memorable meetings. Barcelona will surely continue in this tradition. Here at the Central Office we have continued to work to improve our ability to meet the needs of our members, expand the ISPP website, and enhance the visibility of the Society. Most of you have probably noticed by now that the Central Office has established a new membership renewal system. This system, operated by the same company that provides on-line registration for the ISPP annual meeting, is available 24/7 and provides some 1

C•O•N•T•E•N•T•S
I. II. EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR'S CORNER MESSAGE FROM PRESIDENT ...... 2

III. JSC NEWS ........................................... 3 III. ISPP ANNOUNCEMENTS 2006 Election Results ............................ 3 ISPP 2006: Barcelona ........................... 4 ISPP 2007: Portland .............................. 4 Call for Journal Submissions ................ 4 Latin American Summer Institute ......... 5 IV. PROFESSIONAL ANNOUNCEMENTS Calls for Papers ..................................... 6 Listserv Invitation ................................. 6 V. PUBLICATIONS................................. 7 VI. KUDOS............................................... 10 VII. PERSPECTIVES: POLAND ............11

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Spring 2006

count. (Contact us to change your email address or if you need help using this system.) Hard-copy renewal forms can also be printed out from our website and then mailed in with a check or money order, for those preferring that option. After a year in the job I’ve become aware of a number of special projects that would strengthen the overall health of the Society. Among the projects I’ve prioritized for the coming year are: to work with the organizers of the Summer Institute for Political Psychology to better integrate ISPP and SIPP, to explore whether changing the ISPP constitution away from contested elections makes sense for an organization of ISPP size and nature, and to improve the visibility of ISPP in policy circles. As always, Radell and I look forward to hearing from you at any time.

Vice-Presidencies, Executive Committee; special committees to attend a variety of tasks, are the initial steps for the year in waiting, the year executing, the year going out. Being part of the clockwork, then, begins silently, slowly, but firmly, proving that participation and commitment go together, one nourishing the other. Preparing the Annual Conference illustrates this point. The selection of the site is the object of observation, information, and discussion by the governing bodies of the Society, and also by members invited to join the committee selecting the site, or being consulted in specific matters. The presidential standpoint allows a general perspective of the many hands and many minds collaborating to achieve that annual intellectual feast. This year I have had the intelligent and accurate help of Yael Aronoff and Félix Vázquez, Scientific Program Co-Chairs, who in spite of distance (one in Columbia University, New York; the other at Universitat Autónoma de Barcelona, in Catalunya, Spain) are putting a very busy program with, as I write this, some 140 sessions. Professor Lupicinio Iñiguez, Conference Chair, also in Catalunya, has been busily preparing a warm reception for the participants, as well as being responsible for having disseminated the news about the Conference throughout Europe, attracting many submissions. And as happens every year, ISPP members have contributed with their submissions, giving the planning its concrete materialization. At the same time, other projects have begun, other projects are already giving fruit; others are being evaluated or closed. The Third Decade Plan proposed by Daniel Bar Tal and supported by Helen Haste in their respective presidencies has reached the stage where every program begins to be evaluated according to its capacity to respond to the proof of facts, and it seems to be demonstrating its strength, and also the inevitable frictions. The Society’s journal had a transition deftly managed by both editorial teams. And all these facts are the demonstration that ISPP is in good health. During my membership in ISPP I have had the privilege of meeting and working with many interesting people. During my presidency I have had the privilege to closely work besides them. Thanks to all. And let us meet in July, at Barcelona. —Maritza Montero

—Bruce Dayton

MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT
year runs so fast. Some months before I was writing my message to the members of ISPP, to be included in the 2005 Fall issue. And now I am writing this farewell message. Yet looking back, these past months have been full. Discussions, committees preparing, and producing the many tasks that keep the Society going; a Winter meeting of planning and decision-making; 11 months to prepare and accomplish the annual challenge of the International Scientific Conference. ISPP, as those towers in ancient churches that have a clockwork with figures coming out at certain hours, produces at fixed intervals the appearance of a figure, the President, that during a minute (make it a year) is visible. In this metaphor the main piece is the clockwork. Figures, bells tolling, and the clock needles running exactly on time depend on the mechanism. From the Central Office the Executive Director keeps that mechanism running, so it can accomplish its mission, by the employment of so many devices united in the creation of a complex product. The president’s work begins some years in advance, not just the year she or he is elected. Governing Councils,

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NEWS FROM JSC
ROBERTA SIGEL AWARD WINNERS The Roberta Sigel Award Committee has reached its decision about the award winners for papers presented at the 2005 Annual Meeting by junior scholars. The award for Category I (papers authored only by junior scholar(s) goes to Daphna Canetti-Nisim for her paper, “The Effect of Religiosity on Endorsement of Democratic Values: The Mediating Influence of Authoritarianism.” The award for Category II (for which the first author is a junior scholar) goes to Rajiv Jhangian & Peter Suedfeld for their paper, “Integrative Complexity and Emotional Positivity during a Terrorist Attack.” These awards will be announced and presented by the Sigel Award chair Melinda Jackson at the 2006 Annual Meeting in Barcelona. CALLING ALL SYLLABI & BIBLIORAPHIES SPECIAL JSC EVENTS AT THE BARCELONA MEETING Be sure to check out all of the Junior Scholars events, programs, and workshops at the Barcelona meeting (July 12-15), including: the junior scholars social hour, mentoring program, mentoring coffee hour, mentoring roundtable, publishing workshop, professional issues roundtable, and the presentation of the Roberta Sigel Award. We are also working on a roommate matching service BLOG that will be available soon to help those who want to share rooms and costs. For more information, see the Junior Scholars web page, http://ispp.org/jsc/junior_ scholars.html, and watch for the spring issue of the junior scholars newsletter due out later this spring.

ISPP ANNOUNCEMENTS
The ISPP Junior Scholar Committee is in the process of updating our resources links on the ISPP website and we’d like your input. If you have taught a political psychology course, send us your syllabus for the online syllabus library. Perhaps you have a political psychology research topic that would be of interest to others, we’ll gladly post your bibliography to our online archive. If you haven’t noticed these valuable resources before, take a look. Syllabi are located at http://ispp.org/ppsyl. html; bibliographies at http://ispp.org/ppbib.html. To submit either your syllabus or bibliography (or both!), please send an electronic version by 17 April 2006 to janice.adelman@cgu.edu with the subject line “ISPP syllabi/bibliographies”. Thanks for your help! Keep your eye on the website for the new updates in the coming months. -Janice Adelman, MSc ISPP Junior Scholar Committee Doctoral Student School of Behavioral & Organizational Sciences Claremont Graduate University 2006 ELECTION RESULTS The following members have been elected to serve the Society beginning in July 2006: President Elect: Kristen Monroe Vice President: Rose McDermott Governing Council Members: Molly Andrews Allyson Holbrook Angela Kindervater Steve Reicher Klaus Wasmund For more information on the newly-elected officers, see http://ispp.org/ELECTIONS2006/ELECTIONS06.html For a list of current officers, including continuing vice presidents and Governing Council members, see http://issp.org/officers.html 3

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ISPP ANNOUNCEMENTS
CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS Special Issue of Political Psychology: Emotion in Politics The last several years have witnessed a burst of interest among psychologists in the topic of emotion. No longer thought to wreak havoc on human rationality, emotions are increasingly recognized as making a positive contribution to the human condition. Psychological research indicates that emotions are implicated in all aspects of cognition and behavior, including attention, perception, and memory, as well as attitude change, reasoning, and decision-making, and interpersonal and intergroup relations.

Join us in Barcelona, Spain July 12-15, 2006
International Society of Political Psychology's Twenty-Ninth Annual Scientific Meeting: "The Political Psychology of Liberation, the Political Psychology of Oppression"
For more information on the meeting, hotel options, and to register, visit: http://ispp.org/meet.html

Emotions have also been studied as physicological processes, and have contributed to elucidating the brain mechanisms that underlie cognition and behavior. Scholars have recently begun to explore the role of emotion in political life, including its impact on the nature of the candidate appraisal process, the strategic use of emotions by campaigns, and the role of discrete emotions in the formation of policy attitudes. The goal of this special issue is to further explore the causes and consequences of emotional processes in the political realm, and to provide a selective integration of work on the topic. Political Psychology is therefore inviting and soliciting manuscripts for a special issue on Emotion in Politics. Submissions, irrespective of subfield, should adopt a political psychological approach. All manuscripts will be peer reviewed by a minimum of three experts in the field. Acceptance of all papers is conditional on satisfactory reviews. All manuscripts should be submitted to the editors following the submission instructions for regular manuscripts. (See http://www.sunysb.edu/polsci/polpsych/ Guidelines.html.) Authors should note that the submission is intended for consideration in the special issue. The deadline for submission is October 31, 2006. A panel at the 2007 meeting of the ISPP in Portland will be based on the forthcoming special issue.

And mark your calendars now to join us for ISPP's thirtieth annual scientific meeting

July 4-7 July 2007 in Portland, Oregon, USA “Political Psychology: Then, Now, and Hereafter”
Preliminary information available at: http://ispp.org/meet.html "We warmly welcome ideas and proposals, so if you have any suggestion please let us know." —Martin Rosema and Jamie Druckman, Program Chairs

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ISPP ANNOUNCEMENTS
THE LATIN-AMERICAN SUMMER INSTITUTE IN POLITICAL PSYCHOLOGY (LASIPP) The Latin-American Summer Institute in Political Psychology will start in the beginning of 2007 at the Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG) which is one of the best public universities of Brazil with several internationally recognized graduate programs. The first step towards the creation of the LASIPP was taken by Dr. Maritza Montero, the present president of ISPP, on the occasion of her visit to the Centre of Political Psychology of the UFMG in April 2006. The now outgoing president of the university, Dra. Ana Lúcia Almeida Gazzola, has strongly supported the initiative. This past July, in Toronto, the Governing Council of the ISPP approved the creation of the LASSIP and will co-sponsor its functioning, extending an annual scholarship of five hundred US dollars and a student membership to each successful participant and facilitating liaisons with the Summer Institutes in Europe and the United States. The Academic Coordination for Higher Education (CAPES) of the Ministry of Education and the Minas Gerais Foundation for Research Support (FAPEMIG) have been contacted to obtain additional funds. In all probability the LASIPP will also be underwritten by the National Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq) and other sponsors of research and higher education. The LASIPP meets the strong need for graduate training in political psychology in Latin America, up till now difficult to accomplish since a small group of core practioners and academics is scattered across Latin America and few students have opportunity to attend Summer Institutes in North America or Europe. The Institute will provide an intensive three-week training program focused on core theoretical and methodological topics in the field as well as on issues of special relevance for Latin America. In doing so, it intends to become a new space for developing insights and emancipatory ideas for politics in the region. At the same time, the LASIPP recognizes that while dealing with Latin-American issues, it will be necessary to grasp the world’s complexity. For this, it 5 will foster a dialogue with the international audience, inviting researchers and lecturers from North America and Europe. In the beginning of 2007, the LASSIP hopes to welcome about 40 participants, both graduate students interested in political psychology and practioners in the field. The program will be organized through modules. Modules consist of lectures, discussions groups, and research groups. The sessions of the LASIPP will be held by the Faculty of Philosophy and Human Sciences and the participants will be accommodated in student flats close to the UFMG campus. At the conclusion of the program, the participants will receive a certificate indicating that they have completed coursework in Political Psychology on the graduate level. The LASIPP will be directed by Dr. Cornelis Johannes van Stralen, professor of Social Psychology at the UFMG, director of the Graduate Program in Psychology of the UFMG, and present president of the Brazilian Association of Political Psychology, and by Dr. Marco Aurelio Prado, professor of Social Psychology at the UFMG, director of the Department of Psychology of the UFMG, present director of the Centre of Political Psychology, and one of the editors of the Revista de Psicologia Política. Dr. Leonardo Avritzer, professor of the Political Science Department and member of the CAPES Committee of Political Science, is also collaborating with the project. Updated information and announcements will be distributed by May 2006. Visit the ISPP website (http://ispp.org/sipp. html) for updates. Provisional contact: colpospsi@ fafich.ufmg.br

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PROFESSIONAL ANNOUNCEMENTS
CALL FOR PAPERS AND PARTICIPATION Catastrophe, Fear and Fascination: On the Political Psychology of Emotions 25th Workshop-Conference Political Psychology University of Crete, Rethymno/Crete May 18th to 21st, 2006 Submission Deadline Extended to March 30, 2006 The conference follows last year’s 24th Workshop-Conference on “Myth-History-Media: Historical, Political and Mental Fomations” that marked the beginning of a Greek-German cooperation in political psychology. Organizers: • • • • • University of Crete, Department of Psychology Greek Association of Political Psychology Association of German Professional Psychologists (BDP), Division of Political Psychology Editorial Board Political Psychology, University of Hamburg Walter-Jacobsen-Society for Political Education and Political Psychology, Hamburg well as quantitative). Topics include: the psychological functions of catastrophe and its imagination • the subjective consequences and impact of the cultural imagery of catastrophe, • the ambivalence of knowledge as a strategy of coping and as a ource of fear, • downfall and purification/lustration, for instance in religious narrative, • the political functions of catastrophe and its societal construction, • the longing for catastrophe in entertainment, the role of catastrophe in the cultural fabrication of every-day consciousness, • catastrophe as justification for scientific designs of institutional and social prevention and control. Proceedings may be lectures, presentations and discussions in Greek, German, French, and English. Proposals for panels or intercultural study groups are welcome. It will be possible, for example, to have parallel media analyses in German and Greek (or other) groups, with subsequent joint discussion and interpretation in English. Please submit proposals for individual presentations, panels or study groups by March 30, 2006 (including an abstract, approx. 150 words). Please send German and English texts to Liselotte Hermes da Fonseca M.A. (da_fonseca@uni-hamburg.de), Greek and French texts to Prof. Dr. Georgios Galanis (confpo2@psy.soc.uoc.gr) For more information see: •

Conference Fee: 80 Euro Students: 40 Euro “Catastrophe” indicates a decisive turn, a violent cut, a collapse. Nevertheless, contemporary theories on genesis of life, culture, or systems embrace catastrophe as an explanatory design. Movies and other cultural products redefine catastrophe as a medium of purification and renewal. From their perspective, the surviving or renewed life appears as a purified, more truthful, more valuable form of existence. Thus, catastrophe opens ambivalent concepts of condensed fear and their reinterpretation. This holds true not only for historical models like evolution theories, but as well for fantasies of impending doom—planetary impacts, aliens, pandemic outbreaks of diseases. The conference intends to analyze the social organization of anxiety and fear rooted in the media’s imagery of catastrophe. Invited are theoretical accounts, intercultural and historical comparative studies, media analyses and research on media effects (qualitative as 6

www.politische-psychologie.de or http://www. soc.uoc.gr/psycho/English/conference.
NEUROPOLITICS LISTSERVE ISPP Member Darren Schreiber, J.D. (Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of California at San Diego), invites Society members to join the neuropolitics listserve. This is a moderated listserve focusing on issues broadly related to the intersection of neuroscience and political science. It will contain regular updates about new research and publications, with links to articles and webpages. In addition to new material, the listserve will contain occassional lists of
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PUBLICATION ANNOUNCEMENTS
Political Psychology: Key Readings By John T. Jost and Jim Sidanius, Editors Taylor and Francis, 2004 Table of Contents: Part I: Historical Introduction. Reading 1. W.J. McGuire, The Poly-Psy Relationship: Three Phases of a Long Affair

research articles and reviews relevant to a particular substantive and/or methodological topic (e.g. fMRI studies of emotion). The moderators also encourage questions and discussions about topics of theory, modeling, methodology, measurement, interpretations, and future directions. If Aristotle is right that humans are by nature political animals, then neuroscience stands to gain substantially through the study of human decision making in political contexts. And, political science should do well to leverage the methods and insights into cognition and affect that are emerging in neuroscience. Schreiber’s hope is that together these fields can provide richer understandings of humans in the political context. The home page for the listserve: http:// dss.ucsd.edu/ mailman/listinfo/neuropolitics. This is a low bandwidth list, but the frequency of updates will be improved this year. You can see the archive of previous posts at: http://dss.ucsd.edu/pipermail/neuropolitics.

PUBLICATION ANNOUNCEMENTS
“Historical and Legal Remarks on Cultural Diversity and Higher Education in Brazil in the Context of the School System,” By Roseli Fischmann Higher Education Policy (2005) 18, 375-395 The debate about intercultural dialogue and intercultural learning in Brazil must first consider the excluded ‘Brazils’. Indeed Brazil has been labeled a ‘racial democracy’, although the inequality is at one of the highest levels in the world. This article proposes the analysis of the role of education, particularly higher education, in the process of social construction of inequality, and its relations with cultural diversity. To that aim one must reflect on at least four different sources of cultural diversity: the situation of indigenous peoples; the situation of African descendents; the particularities of immigration to Brazil; and the singularities of the religious situation in Brazil.

Part II: Personality and Politics. A. Authoritarianism and Mass Psychology. Reading 2. R. Brown. The Authoritarian Personality and the Organization of Attitudes. Reading 3. R.M. Doty, B.E. Peterson, and D.G. Winter, Threat and Authoritarianism in the United States: 1978-1987. Reading 4. B. Altemeyer. The Other “Authoritarian Personality.” B. Political Elites and Leadership. Reading 5:Greenstein, Can Personality and Politics be Studied Systematically? Reading 6: D.G. Winter, Leader Appeal, Leader Performance, and the Motive Profiles of Leaders and Followers: A Study of American Presidents and Elections. Part III: Mass Media and Candidate Perception. Reading 7. S. Iyengar, M.D. Peters, D.R. Kinder. Experimental Demonstrations of the “Not-So-Minimal” Consequences of Television News Programs. Reading 8. J.A. Krosnick, D.R. Kinder. Altering the Foundations of support for the president through priming. Reading 9. G.E. Marcus and M.B. MacKuen. Anxiety, Enthusiasm, and the Vote: The Emotional Underpinnings of Learning and Involvement During Presidential Campaigns. Part IV: Ideology and Public Opinion. A. Does Ideology Exist? Reading 10. P.E. Converse. The Nature of
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Belief Systems in Mass Publics. Reading 11. P. Johnston Conover and S. Feldman. The Origins and Meaning of Liberal-Conservative Self-Identification. B. Cognitive Style and Ideological Functioning. Reading 12. R.E. Lane, The Fear of Equality. Reading 13. P.E. Tetlock, Cognitive Style and Political Belief Systems in the British House of Commons. Part V. Challenges of Decision-Making. Reading 14. G.A. Quattrone, A. Tversky. Contrasting Rational and Psychological Analyses of Political Choice. Reading 15. R. Jervis. The Drunkard’s Search.

of Political Terrorism. B. Protest and Revolution. Reading 23. H. Eckstein. Theoretical Approaches to Explaining Collective Political Violence. Reading 24. B. Simon, B. Klandermans. Politicized Collective Identity. Appendix. C.H. Jordan, M.P. Zanna. How to Read a Journal Article in Social Psychology. Saving the Forsaken: Religious Culture and the Rescue of Jews in Nazi Europe By Pearl Oliner Yale University Press, 2005 Does religion encourage altruism on behalf of outsiders or does it reserve generous behaviors for co-religionists only? Are the very religious more likely to be altruistic toward outsiders than the non-religious? Drawing on interviews with more than 500 respondents, all living in Nazi-occupied Europe. including rescuers and nonrescuers of Jews, and based on qualitative and quantitative analysis, Oliner compares the values and attitudes of the very religious, irreligious and moderately religious, Protestants and Catholics, as they related to decisions regarding rescue and nonrescue. Selected and detailed case studies, although primarily chosen to illustrate significant findings, also provide dramatic insights into character and context. While focusing on a given historical period, the book is intended to address cultural values and attitudes of potential importance in addressing outgroup altruism generally. So as to make the book accessible to all readers interested in the above issues, statistical data are reserved for the Appendix. Encyclopedia of Cold War Espionage, Spies, and Secret Operations By Richard C. S. Trahair Greenwood Press, October 2004 This work is intended to encourage scholars to write reliable histories of a field wrought, necessarily, with
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Part VI. Prejudice, Diversity, and Social Contact. A. Theories of Intergroup Relations in Society. Reading 16. H. Tajfel, J.C. Turner . The Social Identity Theory of Intergroup Behavior. Reading 17. J.T. Jost, M.R. Banaji. The Role of Stereotyping in System-Justification and the Production of False Consciousness. Reading 18. J. Sidanius and F. Pratto. Social Dominance Theory: A New Synthesis. B. The Enduring Problem of Racism. Reading 19. L. Bobo., Group Conflict, Prejudice and the Paradox of Contemporary Racial Attitudes. Reading 20. D.O. Sears, C. van Laar, M. Carrillo, and R. Kosterman. Is it Really Racism? The Origins of White Americans’ Opposition to Race-targeted Policies. Part VII. Conflict, Violence, and Political Transformation. A. The Social Psychology of Wrongdoing and Harm. Reading 21. J. M. Darley, Social Organization for the Production of Evil. Reading 22. M. Crenshaw. The Psychology

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PUBLICATION ANNOUNCEMENTS
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lies, sophisticated deception, censored information, the seamy side of war and diplomacy, and seedy adventurism. Over 300 entries summarize hazards of espionage and secret operations, the double-cross, betrayal, deception and cunning in subterranean events during the Cold War, when every country spied on its enemies and friends in government, the military and industry. Among the dominant themes that were allowed to be made more or less public were affairs, assassinations disasters, defections, hoaxes, honey traps, scandals, and spy exchanges. Most occupations were affected by espionage during the Cold War. Accompanying each entry are sources for further research, and the work classifies the main topics of Cold War espionage, and provides a lengthy glossary of terms, a full index, and a chronology of Cold War espionage relating to the period 1917-2001. The entries were chosen to reflect the broad range of actual spying activities and some in sophisticated British and American literature, to outline the human characteristics of spies from over 35 countries, and to examine the psycho-dynamics of espionage with special emphasis on the biography of spies, secret agents and spymasters, their dissociative tendencies, and their use of defensive norms such as “need to know” and “compartmentalization” to advance and preserve espionage as an individual activity, a special career, and an institution to uphold the national interest. Killing in the Name of Identity: A Study of Bloody Conflicts By Vamik D. Volkan Charlottesville: Pitchstone Publishing, 2006 “Why do they hate us so?” Vamik Volkan has the most compelling, humane, and universal response to the riddle of our time. In this extraordinary and timely book, Volkan explains better than anyone the relationship between large group identities and massive traumas with current events and ongoing conflicts from around the world, including the horrific attacks of 9/11. In his newest book, Killing in the Name of Identity, Volkan has

taken us further, and deeper, into the dark and vulnerable collective mind of ethnic, religious, cultural and national group conflict. Through his eyes and words, we find ourselves looking into and making contact with the universal elements present in humanity and in ourselves, which converge in producing the conditions for great human tragedies. No one understands nor writes about large group terror and violence in a more compassionate and profoundly instructive way. — as described by Professor Michael A. Diamond, Harry S Truman School of Public Affairs, University of Missouri-Columbia Diversity in the Power Elite: How it Happened, Why it Matters (Second edition) By Richard L. Zweigenhaft and G. William Domhoff, editors Rowman & Littlefield, June 2006 This second edition looks systematically at the extent to which Jews, women, African Americans, Latinos, Asians, gay men, and lesbians have entered the higher circles of power that constituted what sociologist C. Wright Mills called “the power elite.” Using a combination of academic research and telling anecdotes, the book examines the backgrounds and careers of such well-known members of the power elite as Attorney General Alberto Gonzales, Secretary of State Condeleezza Rice, former Secretary of State Colin Powell, and former CEO of Hewlett-Packard Carly Fiorina to explain why and how the power elite has diversified and the effect this diversification has had on the way power works in the United States. In the eight years since the first edition was published, a number of African American men and a number of white women have become CEOs of Fortune-level corporations. George W. Bush has named many women and men of color to his presidential cabinets, and a number of men of color have made it to the highest levels of the military. Every chapter has been updated, with information about these new additions to the power elite and with new findings on issues related to the focus of the chapter. Each chapter includes a section on the Supreme Court, and the concluding analysis in the final chapter has been updated.

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KUDOS TO MEMBERS
GRONICH WINS APSA PAPER AWARD Congratulations to Lori Gronich, whose paper (presented at the 2005 APSA meetings), “The Cognitive Miser Theory of Decision-making and U.S. Responses to Nuclear Threats and Terrorist Attacks,” has been selected for the “Best Faculty Paper Award” by the American Political Science Association’s Foreign Policy Section. The award will be presented at the 2006 APSA meeting in Philadelphia. Gronich is Visiting Research Scholar and Adjunct Professor, Center for Peace and Security Studies at the Edmund Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University. HAVEL PRIZE FOR ZIMBARDO RECOGNITION FOR POLITICAL PSYCHOLOGY Professor Philip G. Zimbardo, Ph.D. (Emeritus, Psychology Department, Stanford University) received the The Dagmar and Václav Havel Foundation Vision 97 Award for the year 2005. He accepted the award in person in Prague, Czech Republic, from the hands of the former president of Czech Republic and his wife in autumn 2005. Vaclav Havel is recognized by many as a “philospher king” of his time and generally known as a political dissident who became a leader of Velvet Revolution and then the democratically-elected president of his country. The prize was awarded for Zimbardo’s “efforts to enhance the human condition by countering evil, ignorance, and shyness through research, teaching, and social action.” Zimbardo served as President of the American Psychological Association (APA) and the Chair of the Council of Scientific Society Presidents (CSSP). The foundation Vision 97, established by Czech expresident Havel and his wife, Dagmar, has been annually awarding the prize since 1999 to “an individual whose work has made a major contribution to broadening human horizons, drawing attention to lesser known phenomena and contexts, integrating science into the general culture and promoting human views of the world.” Past winners include: Austrian-born U.S. neurosurgeon Karl Pribram; Economist and Secretary of Labor under Bill Clinton, Robert Reich; Italian writer Umberto Eco; Czech philosopher; and German-born U.S. computer scientist Joseph Weizenbaum.

BURACK WINS GRADIVA AWARD IN HISTORICAL, CULTURAL AND LITERARY ANALYSIS ISPP member Cynthia Burack received the 2005 Gradiva Award in Historical, Cultural and Literary Analysis from The National Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis for her work, Healing Identities: Black Feminist Thought and the Politics of Groups (Cornell University Press, 2004). Dr. Burack is a professor in the Department of Women’s Studies at the Ohio State University. The following is an abstract of the book: Group identifications famously pose the problem of destructive rhetoric and action against others. The author brings together the theory work of women of color and the tools of psychoanalysis to examine the effects of group collaborations for social justice and progressive politics. What can black feminist thought teach scholars and democratic citizens about groups? This volume shows how the rhetoric of black feminism models reparative, rather than destructive, forms of group dialogue and action. Although it may be impossible to eliminate group identifications that provide much of the impetus for bias and violence, Burack argues that we can encourage more progressive forms of leadership, solidarity, and coalition politics.

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KUDOS TO MEMBERS
FALK PUBLISHES BOOKS, WINS AWARDS Avner Falk’s book, Fratricide in the Holy Land: A Psychoanalytic View of the Arab-Israeli Conflict (University of Wisconsin Press), has won the Outstanding Academic Title award from the American Library Association’s Choice magazine. His book Napoleon Bonaparte: A Psychobiography will be published by Pitchstone Publishing this year. In addition, Avner’s article on collective psychological processes in antiSemitism will be published in the Spring issue of Jewish Political Science Review. That article is the basis of a book he is currently writing. GREENHILL OP-ED in NEW YORK TIMES On February 17, The New York Times published an op-ed piece by ISPP Member Kelly M. Greenhill. The article, “Don’t Dumb Down the Army,” touched upon several issues, including the psychological damage that prolonged combat can impose on members of the military. Dr. Greenhill is an Assistant Professor of Government at Wesleyan University and Research Fellow at Harvard University’s Department of Government. VOLKAN NOMINATED FOR NOBEL PEACE PRIZE Vamik D. Volkan, M. D., a founder and former president of ISPP, has been nominated for the 2006 Nobel Peace Prize for his work that illuminates the theoretical and applies it on the ground by examining conflicts between opposing groups, carrying out projects in various troubled spots in the world for 27 years, and developing psychopolitical theories arising from his fieldwork and observations. Volkan was previously nominated for the 2005 Prize. In addition, Dr. Volkan will be Fulbright-SigmundFreud-Privatstiftung Visiting Scholar in Vienna, Austria during the “Year of Sigmund Freud.” On May 13, 2006, he will bring together psychoanalysts, diplomats, newspaperpersons, and others at 19 Bergasse, Freud’s home (now a museum), for a discussion of world affairs from a psychopolitical point of view as a part of celebrating Freud’s 150th birthday (May 6). 11

PERSPECTIVES
Note from the Editor: With the following article submitted for this issue, ISPPNews launches a series about Perspectives on Political Psychology. In this column, we seek to publish overviews of political psychology programs and associations around the world. In addition, we are interested in submissions about undergraduate and graduate programs (majors, minors, certificates, etc.) in political psychology in the U.S., Europe, Latin America, Asia, and other areas of the world. Especially if you head one of these programs or are a member of a regional- or country-specific professional association focused on political psychology, please consider sending a submission.

POLITICAL PSYCHOLOGY IN POLAND Polish political psychology is only 20 years old. The first studies in the field emerged around 1980 from several researchers’ interest in political conflicts between communists and democratic oppositionists. A pioneering analysis was conducted by Janusz Reykowski, who also created the first research center of political psychology at The Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw. Political psychology has since become the subject of academic lectures and studies at each Polish university. The main interests of Polish researchers include political conflicts and political transformation, political preferences and their determinants, political communication and marketing, ethnic/national prejudice, and gender in politics. Some academic centers now organize remarkable scientific meetings (including the annual ISPP conference and ISPP summer school). During the last three years, a cycle of yearly conferences was organized by the political department of the Warsaw School of Social Psychology: in 2003, Democracy: Psychosocial Advantages and Disadvantages, in 2004, The Psychosocial Problems of European Integration, and in 2005, Political Conflicts: Sources, Symptoms, Consequences and Solutions. Between 60 and 80 participants from major Polish academic centers took part in these meetings, each of which lasted several days.

—Submitted by Urszula Jakubowska
Warsaw School of Social Psychology Poland

International Society of Political Psychology

Spring 2006

ISPPNEWS PRODUCTION
This newsletter was developed at Westminster College by the editor of ISPPNews and printed and placed on the web at the ISPP Central Office.

Submissions to ISPPNews
Editor Professor Andrea Grove Westminster College Next newsletter: Fall 2006 Deadline: October 1, 2006 We can publish notices of upcoming meetings, calls for papers, op/ed letters, book announcements, and (space permitting) limited-length scholarly articles. For these or publishers’ ads, please submit material to the address below. Especially for longer pieces, it is useful to submit material electronically or on disk. We can accept a variety of formats and attachments, but prefer material in a regular email message. Address submissions to: Andrea Grove Department of Political Science and Sociology Westminster College New Wilmington, PA 16172 email: groveak@westminster.edu fax: 724-946-7256

ISPP CENTRAL OFFICE MAILING ADDRESS
Bruce Dayton, Executive Director ISPP Central Office Moynihan Institute of Global Affairs 346 Eggers Hall Syracuse University Syracuse, NY 13244 USA

ISPP WEBSITE: HTTP://ISPP.ORG
Syracuse University ISPP Central Office Moynihan Institute of Global Affairs 346 Eggers Hall Syracuse, NY 13244