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ZOID BATTLE 2

2003, 2005 Trevor Lemon

INTRODUCTION
Welcome to the second edition of Zoid Battle. This game is
a simple and fast-paced table-top wargame based on the Zoids
toys from TOMY (and more recently, Hasbro). The main
purpose of this second edition is to clarify some of the rules
from the previous edition, enhance a few of the zoid design
rules, give some examples of the design and combat systems,
and to fix a few errors. To play this game, you will need;
- at least ten six-sided dice per player (more if you got 'em)
- a hexmap with 1" or larger hexes
- counters or marker chits to represent your zoids on the map
- copies of the Zoid Control Sheet (on the last page of the rules)
- pencils and some scratch paper
Since this game uses a hex-based system for movement and
combat, you do not actually need any zoids toys to play this
game (although you will need counters or marker chits of some
kind to represent your zoids' position on the hexmap).
However, to keep within the spirit of the game, it is
recommended that you keep a model (or at least a sketch) of
the zoid that you are using next to the Zoid Control Sheet for
that particular zoid.

Initial Toughness
1
2
3
4
5
6

SIZ 2 Zoids (Small Zoids)


Z-002 Gaisack
Z-003 Barigator
Z-006 Molga
Z-010 Pteras
Z-013 Cannon Tortoise
Z-014 Godos
Z-017 Iguan
Z-018 Saicurtis
Z-019 Double Sworder
Z-020 Stealth Viper

Z-022 Gator
Z-023 Helcat
Z-027 Rev Raptor
Z-030 Gunsniper
Z-032 Sinker
Z-043 Spinosapper
Z-056 Hammer Rock
Z-057 Snipe Master
Z-061 Killer Dome
Z-068 Storch

SIZ 4 Zoids (Large Zoids)


Z-004 Red Horn
Z-007 Shield Liger
Z-016 Saber Tiger
Z-026 Geno Saurer
Z-028 Blade Liger
Z-029 Storm Sworder
Z-031 Dibison
Z-034 Geno Breaker

Size (SIZ)
A zoid's size (SIZ) will determine several things, the first of
which is the base cost of the zoid and the zoid's initial
toughness (toughness will be explained later in the rules).
Originally, the SIZ stat was based on the zoid's powersource
(small wind-up, large wind-up, small battery motor, etc.), but
since not all zoids actually have a powersource (like the
smaller Diloforce and Demantis sized zoids, or any of the Blox
type zoids), this had to be changed. The table below lists a
zoid's size, its size as a numeric value (SIZ), its initial TN, and
the base cost for a zoid of that size.
SIZ
1
2
3
4
5
6

Z-058 Megaleon
Z-059 Glaive Quama
Z-062 Saber Lion
Z-063 Guntiger

SIZ 3 Zoids (Medium Zoids)


Z-005 Redler
Z-039 Raynos
Z-009 Command Wolf
Z-044 Zabat
Z-011 Heldigunner
Z-046 Shadow Fox
Z-012 Brachios
Z-066 Gorhecks
Z-033 Hammer Head
Z-067 Arosaurer

DESIGNING A ZOID
The following sections will show you step-by-step how to
design the stats for your own custom zoid using these rules.

Zoid Size
Mini
Small
Medium
Large
Huge
Mega

SIZ 1 Zoids (Mini Zoids)


Z-047 Maccurtis
Z-048 Demantis
Z-050 Diloforce
Z-051 Grounchar

Z-035 Lightning Saix


Z-038 Elephander
Z-041 Liger Zero
Z-049 Berserk Fuhrer
Z-052 Gunblaster
Z-053 Koenig Wolf
Z-060 Dark Spiner
Z-065 Dimetrodon

SIZ 5 Zoids (Huge Zoids)


Z-001 Gojulas
Z-045 Salamander
Z-008 Gordos
Z-064 Gojulas Giga
Z-015 Iron Kong
Z-069 Seismosaurus
Z-036 Death Stinger
SIZ 6 Zoids (Mega Zoids)
Z-021 Deathsaurer
Z-055 Mad Thunder
Z-037 Ultrasaurus

Base Cost
10pts
20pts
30pts
40pts
50pts
60pts

Blox Zoids
...if the zoid uses 1-3 blox in its design, it is SIZ 1
...if the zoid uses 4-9 blox in its design, it is SIZ 2
...if the zoid uses 10 or more blox in its design, it is SIZ 3
Blox Zoids cannot be larger than SIZ 3, and some
exceptions should be made to the above rule if any actual blox
are replaced by special body components in the zoid's design
(i.e. parts that may add additional strength and/or structure).

The following is a list of zoids and their SIZ. If you are


using a zoid that is not on this list, or are using a totally
customized zoid, you can use the list as a guide to determine
your zoid's SIZ.

Toughness (TN)
A zoid's toughness (TN) is what it uses to resist any damage
that manages to get through its defenses (how this actually
works is explained in the section on Damage Saves later in the
rules). Although TN is initially determined by the zoid's SIZ,
you may increase its TN for an additional cost. The cost
formula for TN is:

Armor (AR)
A zoid's armor (AR) is one of its primary def
enses against
damage (aside from avoiding the damage in the first place). In
this game, armor has a single defensive value; it protects the
zoid all the time and from all angles, and it is never reduced
because of damage. The amount of armor a zoid has is up to
the player, but there is only a limited amount of armor that can
be purchased. The following table shows the different levels
of armor, their AR, and the cost for that level of armor. Also,
the listed cost for each level of armor is the same regardless of
the size of the zoid it being used for.

(8 - SIZ) x 3 per additional point of TN


As you can see, toughness is much more expensive for
smaller zoids, since they have less space for structural
enhancements and must use more advanced (and costly)
materials.

Armor Level
Light
Medium
Heavy
Ultra-Heavy

Movement (MOV)
A zoid's movement value (MOV) represents how fast and
how far the zoid can move (i.e. how many points of Speed the
zoid can spend on movement in a single turn - Speed is
explained later in the rules). The amount of movement a zoid
has is entirely up to the player; the more movement the zoid
has, the faster it will be able to move in a single turn (and
subsequently, the better its initiative score will be and the
better the zoid will be at avoiding damage - more on that
later). Movement is purchased in "points", and the cost for
one point of movement depends on the zoid's size.
SIZ
1
2
3
4
5
6

AR
1
2
3
4

Cost
5pts
10pts
15pts
20pts

As mentioned previously, a zoid's movement is reduced by


the amount of armor it has (the specifics of which will be
explained later in the rules in the section on Speed), so you
may have to go back and purchase more movement.
A note on armor cost: there are two schools of thought
regarding the cost and weight of armor. School One thinks
that armor is just metal (or some other material), and that the
cost and weight of armor for a smaller zoid should be less than
the same level of protection for a larger zoid (i.e. smaller
zoid = less material; larger zoid = more material).
School Two thinks that armor in general is designed for
larger zoids, and is meant to stop large amounts of damage
(i.e. most armor is "tank armor", and not "body armor"), and
that putting that same level of protection on a smaller zoid
would cost a tremendous amount, utilizing advanced
composites and such to offset the massive amount of weight
that such a level of protection would incur for a smaller zoid.
Because these are both valid points, this game assumes that
the material cost (both the quantity and the quality) is covered
in a single armor cost for any sized zoid, as the designers of
that zoid would almost certainly use the most cost effective
material available to meet the defensive requirements for that
design.

Cost per Point of MOV


3pts
6pts
9pts
12pts
15pts
18pts

Please be aware that a zoid's overall movement will be


reduced by the amount of armor it has, and possibly by the
amount of weaponry it carries, so you may have to come back
to this step and purchase more movement to offset these
reductions after you purchase the zoid's armor and weapons.
A few notes on purchasing movement: it is not impossible to
think that something as large as a Gojulas might have the same
movement value as something as small as a Gunsniper. While
the Gunsniper would be able to move its body faster than the
Gojulas, its stride is shorter. Conversely, while the Gojulas
does have a larger stride, its overall body movement would be
slow due to its immense size. This may not be the case in
every instance, and of course you could always design the
Hyper Gojulas with magnetic coating on its joints ( la
Gundam), but size doesn't always determine speed.
Also, if you aren't sure how much movement your zoid
should start out with, you can use the "km/h" stat listed on the
box of most zoids along with the following formula to
determine a base MOV value:

Energy Shields (SH)


Energy shields (also called "barriers", or just "shields") are
another form of protection that a zoid can have, but unlike
armor, they cover only a limited area depending on how many
shield arcs are purchased. Also, shields can be lowered if the
shield generator itself is destroyed (for damage purposes, the
shield generator is treated as if it were a ranged weapon - more
on that later). Shields do not count against the zoid's
movement in the same way that armor does - instead, they are
treated as if they were a weapon system, and they count against
the zoid's Load Allowance (explained later).
Shields costs ten (10) points per level of protection, with a
maximum shield level of six (6), and you must also separately
purchase the defensive arcs that the shield covers. Each 60
arc to be covered adds another five (5) points to the shield's
cost, and every arc must be paid for - there are no "free" arcs
covered by the shielding.

km/h x 0.0277777 = base MOV


(round decimals of .6 down, and round decimals of .7 up)

From the following diagram, select the numbered arc (or


arcs) that the shield will cover. If the shield covers more than
a single arc, the arcs must be adjacent to each other (i.e. a
shield may cover arcs 1 and 2, arcs 1 and 3, or arcs 1, 2 and 3,
but not just arcs 2 and 3). If so desired, the shield may cover
the entire zoid - there is no restriction as to how many shield
arcs may be purchased.

If the Gunsniper had a FC level of 3, it would be able to fire


all of its forward facing weapons in the same turn (again, at the
same or at different targets), but it would not be able to attack
with its tail gun (this is also because the tail gun faces another
direction - more on that later).
DESIGNING ZOID WEAPONS
The next step is to design some weapons for your zoid.
Range
Like movement, weapon range is measured in hexes, and
each level of range adds two (2) points to the weapon's cost.
Short range is ten (10) hexes (and costs 2pts), medium range is
twenty (20) hexes (and costs 4pts), and long range is thirty
(30) hexes (and costs 6pts).

1
2

5
6

Damage
The weapon's damage is how many dice it rolls when an
attack is made with it. Each die of damage adds two (2) points
to the cost of the weapon.

Close Combat (CC)


A zoid's close combat value (CC) represents how well it can
fight with its close combat weapons and "natural" fighting
abilities (biting, kicking, clawing, etc.). A zoid's base CC is
equal to its SIZ, but it can be raised for an additional five (5)
points per level to represent better melee weapons or more
ferocious fighting tactics (for example, a standard Rev Raptor
would have a higher CC stat than a standard Gunsniper,
because it has better close combat weapons than the
Gunsniper). Any points spent on raising a zoid's CC are
considered points spent on a weapon system, and will count
against the zoid's Load Allowance (explained later).

A note on weapon damage: the maximum suggested


damaged that a single barreled weapon should be able to cause
is nine (9) dice of damage per shot. The maximum damage
per shot for a multi-barreled weapon is six (6) dice of damage
per barrel (but this does not apply to weapons like rotary
cannons or gatling guns, as only one barrel is actually being
fired at any given time, so they count as single barreled
weapons).
In the case of rocket or missile launchers, no single rocket or
missile should cause more than six (6) dice of damage - unless
you are considering that the weapon is firing multiple rounds
at the same time, in which case the maximum damage can be
increased to nine (9) dice of damage per volley. Also, if the
weapon only has one or two rockets or missiles, the maximum
damage can be increased to nine (9) dice of damage per shot.
If the players agree beforehand, the maximum damage limit
of nine (9) dice can be increased to fifteen (15) dice, and the
maximum damage limit of six (6) dice can be increased to ten
(10) dice (but this will lead to very lethal games, and you will
need a lot of dice).

Fire Control (FC)


A zoid's fire control (FC)stat represents how many "fire
control" or "targeting" computers the zoid has, and determines
how many different ranged weapons (or sets of linked
weapons) the zoid can attack with in a single turn (each
weapon or set of linked weapons to be fired in the same turn
needs to have its own targeting computer). Fire control also
indicates how many different targets the zoid may attack in a
single turn (provided it has enough ranged weapons to do so,
since each weapon can only be used to attack once in a single
turn - more on that later). The cost for each level of fire
control is five (5) points, and a zoid can have as many levels of
FC as it can afford. Also, FC and its cost do not count against
a zoid's Load Allowance in any way.
Now for an example of the fire control stat: the Gunsniper
has a gun on each arm, a pair of missile launchers on its back
(assumedly linked), and a gun in its tail. If it had a FC level of
2, it could fire both of its arm guns at the same or separate
targets, or just one of its arm guns and the pair of linked
missile launchers at the same or at separate targets (but in this
case, both missile launchers would have to attack the same
target, since they are sharing a targeting computer). If the
Gunsniper were to fire only the missile launchers, it could
attack two separate targets (since each missile launcher would
be able to use a separate targeting computer, even though they
would be fired at the same time).

Scatter Weapon Effects


A scatter weapon fires several shots instead of a single shot
like most weapons, and includes weapons like machineguns
and shotguns. In game terms, this means that each point of
damage that exceeds the target's defense roll must roll
separately for system damage (explained later). Adding the
scatter effect to a weapon adds four (4) points to the weapon's
overall cost.
For example: a normal weapon causing 6 dice of damage
will inflict all of that damage to a single randomly determined
system on the target, but a scatter weapon causing 6 dice of
damage will spread that damage to several randomly
determined systems (again, each point of damage that exceeds
the target's defense roll must roll separately for system
damage). However, the damage is initially applied as a single
attack for the purposes of beating the target's defense roll.

Concussion Weapons Effects


Any weapon that has a powerful explosive effect or has a
high "stopping power" is considered to be a concussion
weapon. In game terms, a concussion weapon increases the
chances of causing Knockback by lowering the required
damage multiplier from x3 to x2 (explained later in the rules in
the section on Knockback). Adding concussion effects to a
weapon increases its cost by six (6) points.

1
2

5
6

Barrage Weapon Effects


A barrage weapon is able to fire any or all of the shots in the
weapon in a single attack (the exact number of shots fired is up
to the controlling player), but they must all be fired at the same
target. Each shot makes its attack roll separately, but the target
only gets its full DEF against the first shot - for all subsequent
shots from the same attack, the target must subtract its EV
from its DEF (EV and DEF are explained later in the rules).
In other words, the target cannot "dodge" the subsequent shots,
it may only use its armor and any shields for its defense against
them. Adding barrage effects to a weapon increases its cost by
ten (10) points.

Weapon Link
A weapon link allows two or more weapons to share a single
fire control computer so they can fire together at the same
target in the same turn. Any number of weapons may be
linked - as long as they all cover at least one common firing
arc (i.e. at least by 60). It costs two (2) points to link two
weapons together, and another two (2) points for every
additional weapon linked in the "chain" of weapons.
Linked weapons that are fired together using a single
targeting computer must fire at the same target - but it is not
necessary for all linked weapons to fire together. The zoid
may fire just one weapon in the "chain" if so desired (either to
conserve ammo or in case the target is only within the firing
arc of one of the weapons, etc.). Also, if the zoid has more
than one fire control computer, it may fire the linked weapons
at separate targets using the normal rules for targeting (again,
just because the weapons are linked doesn't mean they have to
be fired in linked mode).

Ammo
The next step in weapon design is deciding how many shots
the weapon has and its basic cost. Add up the cost of the
weapon so far (range, damage, and weapon effects) and use the
following formula:
(# of shots x .1) x current total = weapon cost (do not round)
A note on weapon ammo: the easiest way to decide how
many shots a weapon has it to just give it ten (10) shots. This
will give it a cost multiplier of only x1. In the case of missile
or rocket launchers that have multiple barrels (or where you
can see that there are multiple shots in the launcher), there are
a few different ways you can handle it. One way is to have as
many shots as there are barrels, but another way is to divide
the barrels or shots up into "volleys".
For example: a 24 shot missile pod could have 24 individual
shots (possibly causing 1 die of damage each), or it could have
8 "volleys" of 3 missiles each (counting the three missiles as a
single shot but possibly doing 2 dice of damage per volley).
You could also have the weapon doing even more damage
with even fewer volleys. As you can see, there are many
possibilities.

Final Weapon Cost & Weapon Weight


After you have calculated the cost of the weapon based on
its ammo, and added in the cost of any additional firing arcs,
you have the final cost of that weapon. To determine the total
weight of a zoid's weapon systems, add together the final cost
of all of its weapons (including the cost of any weapon links),
the cost of any increases to its CC stat (but not the base CC
value), and the cost of the zoid's energy shields (if it has any).
This new total is the total weapon system cost. Now apply the
following formula:
total weapon system cost 10 = weapon weight (round down)
Please be aware that there are a few pieces of Advanced
Optional Equipment that are described later in the rules that
are considered to be weapon systems for the purposes of
weapon weight and Load Allowance.

Firing Arcs
Now that you have the weapon designed, it's time to "place"
it on your zoid and determine which direction it shoots and
how much of an area it will cover. All weapons automatically
cover a single 60 firing arc (this is included in the weapon's
cost and must be specified when the weapon is designed).
costs an
Increasing a weapon's firing arc by another 60
additional two (2) points. From the following diagram, select
the numbered arc(s) that the weapon will cover. If a weapon
covers more than a single arc, the arcs must be adjacent to
each other (i.e. a single weapon may cover arcs 1 and 2, arcs 1
and 3, or arcs 1, 2 and 3, but not just arcs 2 and 3).

Load Allowance
The load allowance of a zoid is how much weapon weight it
can carry before its movement is reduced by the weight of its
armaments. A zoid's load allowance is equal to its SIZ (i.e. 16), so a SIZ 2 zoid could carry two points of weapon weight
without any penalty to its movement. Each point of weapon
weight that exceeds the zoid's load allowance is called "excess
weapon weight", and the zoid's movement will be lowered
based on this excess weight (this will be explained in more
detail in the following section on Speed).

CALCULATED STATISTICS

The first step is to determine its size. Based on the list from
the SIZ section, it appears to be a Small zoid (SIZ 2), so its
base cost is 20pts, and it has an initial toughness (TN) of 2.
Since we're not making a customGunsniper, we'll leave its TN
at 2, so there is no additional cost there.
Next, we'll determine its movement value. According to the
back of the Gunsniper's box, it travels at 200km/h. Using the
conversion formula, we see it should have a base MOV of 5,
and for a SIZ 2 zoid, that will cost 30pts. Now let's give it
some armor. Since it's a relatively small zoid, it probably
doesn't have much in the way of protection, so we'll just give it
some Light armor (AR 1) for 5pts.
Since a basic Gunsniper doesn't have any energy shields, we
can skip that step. Even though the Gunsniper is primarily
used for ranged combat, it is still a velociraptor, so we'll
increase its basic close combat value by one level for 5pts (it's
a SIZ 2 zoid, so it has a basic CC value of 2, which has now
been increased to 3). Because the Gunsniper is so suited to
ranged combat, we will give it a fire control level of 3 (FC 3)
for 15pts. So far, we've spent 75pts.
Now let's design theGunsniper's weapons. Again, according
to the box, it has a machinegun on each arm, a beam gun on its
torso, two 8-shot missile pods on its back, and a sniper rifle in
its tail.
First, the machineguns (we'll focus on just one of them for
the remainder of this example). The weapon seems relatively
small, so let's make it short ranged (2pts), but since it's an
automatic weapon, we'll have it cause 2 dice of damage (4pts),
and we'll also make it a scatter weapon (4pts). For ammo, let's
keep it simple and give it just 10 shots. So for just one
machinegun we have:
(2 + 4 + 4 = 10) x (10 x .1 = 1) = 10pts
The cost for both of them together is 20pts. Due to their
positioning on the Gunsniper's arms, we won't give them any
additional firing arcs (and we'll assign the free firing arc to
firing arc 1 to the unit's front). Also, let's link them both
together for an additional 2pts. So the total for both
machineguns is 22pts.
Now for the beam gun. It also looks like a short ranged
weapon (2pts), that causes about 2 dice of damage (4pts), but
we'll have it put all of that damage in one place, so there are no
additional costs for special effects. We'll also give it just 10
shots, so for the beam gun we have:
(2 + 4 = 6) x (10 x .1 = 1) = 6pts
Because it swivels left and right, we'll also give it two
additional firing arcs (arcs 2 and 3) for 4pts, so the total comes
out to be 10pts.
Next are the missile pods (again, we're going to focus on just
one of them for this example). First off, let's make the missile
pod a medium ranged weapon (4pts). Since the missiles
themselves seem to be fairly small, they probably don't cause
too much damage individually, so we'll say that it takes two of
them to cause 1 die of damage (2pts). This effectively makes
the weapon a 4-shot missile pod (firing volleys of two missiles
at a time). We'll also add the barrage weapon special effect
(10pts), so one missile pod is:
(4 + 2 + 10 = 16) x (4 x .1 = .4) = 6.4pts

Speed (SPD)
Speed (SPD) is a calculated statistic, and it is the actual
number used in the game to represent how many hexes the
zoid can move on the hexmap. A zoid's SPD is also used to
determine its initiative each round (explained later). As
mentioned previously, a zoid's movement is reduced by the
amount or armor and weapons it carries. A zoid's SPDstat is
calculated by taking the zoid's original movement value, and
lowering it by the zoid's armor level and by the excess weight
of its weapon systems. Here is the formula used to determine a
zoid's Speed:
MOV- (AR + excess weapon weight) = SPD
At this point, you may want to go back and purchase a few
more points of MOV to bring the zoid's SPD back up to the
desired level.
Evasion (EV)
A zoid's Evasion value (EV) is also a calculated statistic,
and it represents how well the zoid can dodge incoming
attacks. A zoid's EV is calculated with the following formula:
SPD 2 = EV (round down)
Defense (DEF)
Defense (DEF) is probably one of the most important
calculated statistics; it is a combination of the zoid's armor
level (AR) and its evasion value (EV), with its shield level
(SH) added in when appropriate (how this is used will be
explained later). Here is the formula for calculating a zoid's
defense value:
AR + EV (+ SH) = DEF
Design Points & Cost
Throughout this section, the words "points" and "cost" have
been tossed around quite a bit. The main reason for a point
system is to encourage some kind of balance in your games.
When designing a zoid for any kind of competitive game (one
where the opposing sides should be roughly equal), it is
usually a good idea to set a limit on how many points can be
spent on each zoid. Or, if playing a game where each side has
a team of zoids, you could set a limit as to how many total
points can be spent on the entire team (although it's also a
good idea to limit the number of zoids on each team).
You can set any limit you like for the number of points used
in a battle (as long as your opponent is aware of the limit
beforehand), but the recommended point limit is 200pts per
zoid, or 600pts per team with a 3 zoid limit per team.
Design Example No.1: Gunsniper
Now as an example of the design system, we will design our
trusty old Gunsniper and go through it step-by-step.

Now let's add one additional firing arc for 2pts (firing arc 2
for the pod on the left and firing arc 3 for the pod on the right).
The final cost for one missile pod is now 8.4pts. For the pair
of them the total is 16.8pts, and if we link them both together,
it raises the total to 18.8pts.
The final weapon in the Gunsniper's arsenal is its sniper
rifle. This will obviously be a long ranged weapon (6pts).
Let's assume that it has some kind of armor-piercing ammo, so
we'll give it 3 dice of damage (6pts), no special effects, and
just 10 shots (we'll also assign its free firing arc to arc 6 to the
unit's rear). The cost for the sniper rifle is:
(6 + 6 = 12) x (10 x .1 = 1) = 12pts
So, the final total for all of the Gunsniper's weapons comes
out to be:
22 + 10 + 18.8 + 12 = 62.8pts
Now let's determine theotal
t weapon weight:
62.8 10 = 6.28 (rounded down to 6)
We know that the Gunsniper's load allowance is only 2, so
its excess weapon weight is 4. We now need to determine its
SPD, so if we apply the formula from the section on Speed, we
get:
MOV 5 - (AR 1 + excess weapon weight 4 = 5) = SPD 0
Since we've overloaded theGunsniper to the point of not
being able to move any more, we need to go back and buy
some more movement. If we purchase another 5pts of MOV,
it will cost another 30pts, but that will bring its speed back up
to 5 (SPD 5), and its evasion value will be 2 (EV 2). So the
grand total for the Gunsniper, including weapons and the
increased movement, comes out to be 167.8pts.

Now for the high density beam gun. It looks to be a medium


ranged weapon (4pts), that causes about 3 dice of damage
(6pts), with no additional effects. We'll also give it just 10
shots, so we have:
(4 + 6 = 10) x (10 x .1 = 1) = 10pts
Because it's mounted on theLiger's tail (we'll assign the free
firing arc to firing arc 6), and we know how flexible a cat's tail
is, we'll give it five additional firing arcs (arcs 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5)
for 10pts, so the total comes out to be 20pts.
So, the final total for all of the Liger Zero's weapons comes
out to be:
16 + 20 = 36pts
Now let's determine the total weapon weight:
36 10 = 3.6 (rounded down to 3)
Since the Liger Zero's load allowance is 4, there is no excess
weapon weight. We now need to determine its SPD, so if we
apply the formula from the section on Speed, we get:
MOV 8 - (AR 2 + excess weapon weight 0 = 2) = SPD 6
Since we've only slightly overloaded theLiger, we only need
to go back and purchase another 2pts of MOV (for 24pts), and
that will bring its speed back up to 8 (SPD 8), and its evasion
value will now be 4 (EV 4). So the grand total for the Liger
Zero, including its weapons and the increase in movement,
comes out to be 226pts.
Now that you know how to design a zoid, it's time to learn
the actual rules of the game and how it is played so you can
put that design knowledge to good use. Read on...

Design Example No.2: Liger Zero


As our next example of the design system, we will design
the Liger Zero. According to the list, it's a Large zoid (SIZ 4),
so its base cost is 40pts, and it has an initial toughness of 4
(TN 4). According to the back of the Liger Zero's box, it
travels at 307km/h, so its MOV should be 8 (96pts for a SIZ 4
zoid). Lets also give it some Medium armor (AR 2) for 10pts,
and skip any energy shields.
Since we know the Liger Zero is good at close combat, and
is armed with laser fangs and strike laser claws (again,
according to the box), we'll raise its basic CC value by three
levels (from 4 to 7) for 15pts (one level for its fighting
abilities, and two additional levels for its close combat
weapons). Because the Liger Zero has a couple of ranged
weapons as well, we'll give it a fire control level of 1 (FC 1)
for 5pts. So far we've spent 166pts.
Now let's design theLiger Zero's weapons. According to the
box, it has a dual barrel shock cannon on its chest, and a high
density beam gun on its tail.
First, the shock cannon.
It's fairly small, so let's make it short ranged (2pts), but give it
4 dice of damage (8pts), and let's also make it a concussion
weapon (6pts). For ammo, we'll give it just 10 shots. So for
the shock cannon we have:
(2 + 8 + 6 = 16) x (10 x .1 = 1) = 16pts
Due to the weapon's positioning on theLiger Zero's chest,
we won't give it any additional firing arcs (and we'll assign the
free firing arc to firing arc 1 to the Liger's front).

PLAYING THE GAME

INITIATIVE
All units should roll for initiative at the beginning of each
round. Each unit should roll as many d6 as its Speed (SPD)
stat; the total resulting number is that unit's initiative score for
the current round. All units act and take their turns in order of
their initiative, with the highest initiative score acting first.
Units with tied initiative scores should have a tie-breaking roll
among themselves using 2d6.

THE DICE
This game uses only regular six-sided dice (d6), but some of
the die rolls in this game are read differently than rolls for
many other games. If the rules call for a roll of "nd6" ("n"
being the number of dice to be rolled), the dice are rolled and
the results of all dice rolled are added together. Any modifiers
to the roll are then added to the total score rolled on all of the
dice (so if the rules called for a roll of 2d6+2, the player would
roll two dice, add the two scores together, and add a +2 bonus
to the total score).
However, if the rules call for an "attack" roll (also called a
"damage" roll), a "defense" roll, or any roll of "nd" (again, "n"
being the number of dice to be rolled; note that this is not the
same as "nd6"), each die is rolled and the results are read
separately in the following way; a roll of "1-2" equals a
"miss", a roll of "3-5" equals a "hit", and a roll of "6" equals a
"critical hit" (and counts as two "hits"). The total of all "hits"
rolled then determines how successful the overall roll was.
Any modifiers to rolls like this are applied to the actual
number of dice to be rolled; so a positive modifier of "+1d" in
this game adds an additional die to the total number of dice to
be rolled, and a negative modifier of "-1d" subtracts one die
from the total to be rolled. Also, all modifiers to this kind of
roll are applied before any dice are actually rolled.

MOVEMENT
When it is a unit's turn to act, it may move on the hexmap
using its Speed (SPD) stat. Moving forward costs one point of
SPD per hex, but moving backward costs two points of SPD
per hex - a unit may not move sideways into the hexes to the
unit's sides. A unit may change its facing by one hex side
(60) for free, but there must be at least one hex of forward or
backward movement between each free facing change
(although a single 60 facing change by itself is also
acceptable, as long as the free facing change is the only
movement that the unit performs). Changing facing by more
than one hex side at a time (either 120 or 180) costs one
point of SPD. Also, a unit must always face toward a hex side
- never towards one of the hex's corners.
A unit can move into a hex with rough or difficult terrain in
it, but at double the SPD cost for that hex. Examples of
difficult terrain would be mud, rubble, heavy foliage, streams,
loose sand, rocky hills, etc. Movement may be performed
before or after the unit makes its attacks, but not both. The
player may interrupt the acting unit's movement at any time to
make an attack (since a unit doesn't have to useall of its
movement when it moves), but doing so ends that unit's
movement for the remainder of the current round.

TIME & SCALE


This game is played in a series of rounds, each being equal
to about 3-5 seconds of real time. This game also uses a
hexmap for all movement and combat, so all distances are
measured in "hexes", and one hex is equal to about fifty meters
(50m). Because of the ground scale used, it would be
impractical to use actual zoid toys as gaming pieces (since one
hex at the same scale as the actual zoid toys would be about
24" across), so counters or marker chits should be used instead
to indicate a zoid's position on the hexmap.

HEX CAPACITY
More than one unit can occupy a single hex; up to eighteen
(18) points of SIZ worth in units can be in the same hex at any
given time (i.e. three SIZ 6 units, six SIZ 3 units, two SIZ 5
units and two SIZ 4, etc.). As long as the total SIZ for all units
in the hex does not exceed 18pts, any number of units may
occupy the same hex.
Entering an occupied hex incurs the normal SPD cost for
that hex, but moving through an occupied hex costs an
additional point of SPD for each separate unit already in the
hex (this refers to the actual number of units in the hex, and
not to the total number of SIZ points in the hex). Remember, a
hex can only hold eighteen points of SIZ, so a unit may not
pass through a hex if doing so exceeds that hex's size capacity.
Also, any individual piece of terrain in the hex (like a boulder
or a small building) should have a SIZ value assigned to it by
the players and/or the referee.

Note: the ranges and movement values from the design section
are by no means "realistic" for the kinds of weapons zoids
have and the speeds at which they travel when you compare
them to the time and scale being used, but they are more than
adequate for a simple table-top game like this.
SEQUENCE OF PLAY (Turns & Rounds)
When a player performs actions with one of his zoids
(hereafter referred to as a "unit" throughout these rules), he is
taking that unit's "turn". When all of the units on the map have
taken a turn, that "round" of combat is over and another round
begins. A player must declare that he is finished with his unit's
turn before any other unit can take its turn. The following is
an example of the sequence of play;

FIRING ARCS & FOCUS


Although each unit has its own firing arcs based on the
individual weapons that it has equipped (see the Designing
Zoid Weapons section previously in the rules for details on
weapon firing arcs), a unit may only attack targets that are in a
single 180 arc in any given round; this is referred to as that
unit's "focus".

All units roll for initiative.


The unit with the highest initiative roll acts first.
(the initiative winner resolves all movement and combat)
The unit with the second highest initiative roll acts.
The unit with the third highest initiative roll acts.
Etc. (this continues until all units have acted)
A new round begins.

The attacker can only "focus" on one area at a time, so if he


chooses to attack a target to the front this round, he may not
attack any targets to the rear in the same round (and this rule
applies to attacks made in any direction). Close combat
attacks (explained later) do not have firing arcs or "focus".

Ranged attacks are considered to be made from a distance of


one hex or more - any closer than one hex and the targeting
sensors can't get a proper lock-on. However, at such close
range, it's pretty hard to miss a target as large as a zoid.
Because these two factors cancel each other out, there are no
modifiers for range applied to ranged attacks that are made
against targets that are in the same hex as the attacker (i.e. at a
range of zero hexes). Also, each ranged weapon may only be
used to attack once per round (i.e. the same weapon cannot be
fired more than once per round).

LINE OF SIGHT (LOS)


The line of sight (LOS) is an imaginary line drawn between
the attacker and the target. A unit should have a clear LOS to
the target in order to attack it (i.e. free of obstructions). If the
target is obscured by some form of cover (if the LOS intersects
a hex containing some type of cover), it can usually still be
attacked, but there will be a modifier applied to the target
unit's defense roll based on the specific type of cover.
If the target is obscured by another unit (if the LOS intersects
a hex containing another unit - either friend or foe), the LOS is only
blocked if the intervening unit is larger than the target unit by
two points of SIZ or more (in which case the original target
unit may not be attacked, as the intervening unit is too large
and will be hit by the attack instead).
However, this does not apply to multiple units that are in the
same hex, as it may be too difficult to determine which unit is
actually in the line of fire. Instead, any ranged attack made
into a hex containing multiple units has a random chance of
hitting the various units based on their SIZ. Have each unit in
the hex roll 1d6 and add that unit's SIZ to the roll; the unit with
the highest total roll is the one that gets hit by the attack. As
with initiative rolls, any units with tied rolls should have a tiebreaking roll among themselves using 2d6.

CLOSE COMBAT (Melee Attacks)


Close combat or melee attacks (biting, clawing, kicking, tail
bashing, using blades, etc.) can only be made when the target
is in the same hex as the attacker (i.e. at a range of zero hexes).
Unlike ranged attacks, firing arcs and focus are not used for
close combat, as it is assumed that a unit will be able to fight
(or fight back) regardless of which direction it is facing. In
game terms, this means that a unit does not have to change its
facing to make a melee attack, nor are there any modifiers to
the attack roll based on the facing of the attacking unit.
However, facing does affect a unit's ability to use any shields
that it may have for its defense. A unit may only make one
close combat attack per round, as it is assumed that the
attacking unit will be using all of its fighting abilities every
time it makes a melee attack.
ATTACK ROLLS
To make a ranged attack, roll the damage dice for the
weapon being used, and apply any appropriate situational
modifiers (explained below). To make a close combat attack,
roll as many dice as the attacking unit's CC value (again,
adding in any appropriate situational modifiers). In either
case, the total number of "hits" rolled is how much damage is
inflicted by the attack. As stated before, each roll of "1-2"
counts as a "miss", each roll of "3-5" counts as a "hit", and
each roll of "6" counts as two "hits".

COVER
There are two types of cover; soft and hard. Soft cover is
any cover that would only visually obscure an attack (like
foliage and smoke), while hard cover is any cover that would
actually stop an attack (like rocks or buildings). Soft cover
adds a modifier of +1d to the target's DEF (i.e. the target gets
to roll one additional die for its defense roll), while hard cover
adds a +2d modifier to the target's DEF (so the target gets to
roll two additional dice for its defense roll).
As mentioned previously, when the LOS intersects a hex
that contains a specific type of cover, the target unit receives
protection from that cover. This also applies if the target unit
is actually within a hex containing some form of cover.
However, if the attacker is also in the same hex as the target,
the target receives no protection from any cover in that hex (at
that close range, there really is nowhere to hide).
Also, while a unit does receive protection from any cover
that is in the same hex as that unit, it may also make ranged
attacks from that hex without any penalties due to that cover.
In some cases, it will be up to the players and/or the referee to
determine if a unit is "in cover" - just use your best judgment
(and if all else fails, just roll a die).

DEFENSE ROLLS
Every time a unit is attacked, it gets to make a defense roll.
A defense roll consists of rolling as many dice as the unit's
current DEF stat, and adding any appropriate situational
modifiers to the roll (remember - if a unit has shields, but the
attack is coming from a direction that is not covered by the
shields, the unit does not get the DEF for its shields against
that attack). The total number of "hits" rolled is how much
damage from the attack is nullified (either stopped by armor
and shields, or evaded by dodging - or a combination of both).
SITUATIONAL MODIFIERS
As mentioned previously, positive modifiers for attack and
defense rolls add additional dice to the total number of dice to
be rolled, and negative modifiers subtract dice from the total
number of dice to be rolled. Also, all modifiers are applied
before any dice are actually rolled. The following is a short
list of the most common situational modifiers that you will
encounter during the game. Please note that these modifiers
only apply to ranged combat attacks.

RANGED COMBAT (Shooting Attacks)


All ranged weapons can be used to attack a target up to their
maximum range without any penalties based on range. A
weapon can attack a target that is beyond its maximum range,
but there is a -1d attack modifier for each hex beyond the
weapon's maximum range.

Attack Roll Modifiers


extended range (beyond the weapon's max) -1d/hex
Defense Roll Modifiers
the unit is in soft cover
the unit is in hard cover
the unit is in flight*

DAMAGE & DAMAGE EFFECTS


After the system hit location has been determined, apply the
appropriate damage (explained below) to the specified system.
Also please remember that "scatter" weapons spread the
damage around to several systems, so each point of damage
inflicted by a scatter weapon is counted as a separate hit, and
should roll for system damage separately.

+1d
+2d
+1d

* flying units are explained later in the rules

Toughness (TN) Damage: each time a unit's Toughness


system is hit due to system damage, its TN stat is reduced by
one point (reducing the number of dice that are rolled for a
damage save by one die). Please note that this only applies to
each time the unit's TN system is hit by an attack, andnot for
each point of damage that exceeded the target's defense roll (so
regardless of the amount of damage inflicted by an attack, the
unit's TNstat will still only be lowered by one point each time
this system is hit). If a unit's TN is reduced to zero, the next
time it takes any damage (i.e. the next time any "hits" exceed the
target's defense roll
), it automatically has a command system
freeze and shuts down (explained previously).

ATTACKING WITH LINKED WEAPONS


When attacking a single target with linked weapons, the
damage for all of the linked weapons in the "chain" is rolled
together as a single powerful attack, and the target only gets to
make a single defense roll against this attack. In the event that
there are barrage weapons in the chain, only the first shot from
each barrage weapon is added to the damage of this massive
attack - any subsequent shots from a barrage weapon should
follow the normal rules for barrage weapons.
DAMAGE SAVES
After the attack and defense rolls have been made, total the
number of "hits" that exceeded the target's defense roll - this is
the amount of actual damage that was inflicted by the attack.
The target must now make a damage save. Roll as many d6 as
the target unit's TNstat and add all the rolls together; if the
total rolled is equal to or less than the amount of actual
damage, the unit has a "command system freeze" and
completely shuts down. The unit then collapses to the ground
and is out of commission for the remainder of the game. For
example, if the total amount of damage inflicted by an attack is
3 "hits", and the target unit has a TN of 2, the unit will have to
roll 2d6, and if the total roll is "3" or less, the unit will have a
command system freeze.
If the total rolled on the dice is greater than the amount of
actual damage, the unit suffers only minor system damage and
must now roll on the System Hit Location Table (explained
below) to determine what that damage is.

Movement (MOV) Damage: each time a unit's Movement


system is hit due to system damage, its MOV stat is reduced by
one point for each point of damage that exceeded the target's
defense roll. Each time a unit's MOVstat is lowered, its Speed
(SPD), Evasion (EV), and Defense (DEF) must all be
recalculated to reflect the unit's current mobility status. If this
causes the unit's SPD to be reduced to zero, it may no longer
move (although it may still make a single facing change of one
hex side per round - essentially by crawling and squirming its
way into the new position).
Fire Control (FC) Damage: each time a unit's Fire Control
system is hit due to system damage, its FC stat is reduced by
one point (knocking out one targeting computer). Please note
that this only applies to each time the unit's FC system is hit by
an attack, and not for each point of damage that exceeded the
target's defense roll (so regardless of the amount of damage
inflicted by an attack, the unit's FCstat will still only be
lowered by one point each time this system is hit). If a unit's
FC is reduced to zero, it may no longer make any attacks with
its ranged weapons (but it can still make close combat attacks
provided its CC stat is above zero).

SYSTEM HIT LOCATION


When an attack is successful (when at least one "hit"
exceeds the defense roll), the attacker should roll one six-sided
die (1d6) and consult the System Hit Location Table to
determine which part of the target was struck by the attack.

Close Combat (CC) Damage: each time a unit's Close


Combat system is hit due to system damage, its CC stat is
reduced by one point (either due to destroying or disabling
some of its melee weapons or from weakening the areas on the
unit that power those weapons). Please note that this only
applies to each time the unit's CC system is hit by an attack,
and not for each point of damage that exceeded the target's
defense roll (so regardless of the amount of damage inflicted
by an attack, the unit's CCstat will still only be lowered by one
point each time this system is hit). If a unit's CC is reduced to
zero, it may no longer make any close combat attacks (but it
can still make shooting attacks with its ranged weapons
provided its FC stat is above zero and it still has any
functioning ranged weapons).

System Hit Location Table (1d6)


Roll
1
2-3
4
5
6

Damaged System
Toughness (TN)
Movement (MOV)
Fire Control (FC)
Close Combat (CC)
Ranged Weapons *

* (1d6) 1 = target chooses weapon, 2-5 = nearest weapon (relative to


the weapon making the attack), 6 = attacker chooses weapon

Note: any system hit location roll of a system that can no


longer take any damage will automatically default to the target
unit's Toughness (TN).

Ranged Weapon Damage: when a unit takes a system


damage hit to one of its ranged weapons, that weapon is
automatically disabled and/or destroyed. Please note that only
one ranged weapon is disabled or destroyed each time the
ranged weapon system is rolled on the system hit location
table, and not one weapon for each point of damage that
exceeded the target's defense roll. Also please note that
certain special systems (including energy shields) are treated
as if they were a ranged weapon for damage purposes. So in
the case of a unit's energy shields, if the shield generator is
disabled or destroyed, the unit's shieldstat (SH) is instantly
reduced to zero.

Optional Rules: Ramming Attacks & Collisions


If a unit wants to ram into another unit, the attacker must
first move into the same hex as the target of the ram and then
make a close combat attack roll; the target may then make a
defense roll as normal. The base damage for a ram is the
attacking unit's normal close combat damage (CC) plus an
additional +1d of damage for each hex traveled in the current
round (note that this is the actual distance traveled, and not
from the amount of SPD spent on that movement). Damage
from a ram affects many of the target unit's systems, so the
attack should be treated just like a hit from a scatter weapon.
The unit performing the ram also takes damage from the
attack (again, as if it were from a scatter weapon), but the
damage is only that of the actual distance traveled (i.e. one die
of damage per hex traveled). The unit's own CC damage is not
added in, as it can't actually hurt itself with its own weapons.
The attacking unit also gets to make a defense roll against this
self-inflicted damage, but it may not use its evasion (EV) for
the defense roll - however, it does get to use its armor (AR)
and shields (SH) if it has any. This is also the exact same
method used to determine the damage from a collision
(explained below).
If the ramming unit misses the target altogether (if all of the
damage dice roll a "miss"), the attacker overshoots the target
of the distance that it previously moved (round down), and
in a straight line based on its current facing. This may cause
the unit to collide with something else, but the additional
movement for overshooting the target should not be used in
determining the damage for the collision (as it is assumed that
the unit will be trying to slow down at this point after missing
the initial target of the ram).

KNOCKBACK
If a unit takes enough damage from a single attack, it may
take "knockback". In this case, a single attack refers to the
damage coming from a single weapon (including all of the
damage from a scatter or barrage weapon) or from a group of
linked weapons. Knockback is what we call the effect of
receiving so much damage that it causes a unit to be knocked
off balance and placed in a vulnerable position - and
knockback effects only occur after all other normal damage
effects have been applied (so if a unit has a command system
freeze, there really is no point in applying any knockback
effects, as that unit is already out of the game).
To determine if the unit takes any knockback, you must first
determine the actual amount of damage that was inflicted by
the attack (the total number of "hits" that exceeded the target's
defense roll); if the total damage is three times (3x) or more
than the target unit's current TN stat, that unit takes
knockback. If the weapon used to make the attack was a
"concussion" weapon, knockback is caused if the total damage
inflicted is only two times (2x) or more than the target unit's
current TN. If the concussion weapon is part of a group of
linked weapons, the entire attack benefit's from the concussion
weapon's effects.
For example, if a unit with a TN of 2 took 6 points of
damage or more from a single attack, that unit takes
knockback, and if the weapon was a concussion weapon,
knockback would be caused if the total damage inflicted was
only 4 points or more.
When a unit takes knockback, it is considered to be toppled
over or knocked off balance. The unit must then spend all of
its available movement to get back up or to re-orient itself assuming that it hasn't already moved in the same round that it
took the knockback. If it has already moved, it must wait until
its next turn to be able to shake off the knockback effect
(again, at the cost of all of its available movement).
While under the effects of knockback, a unit may not make
any attacks (either ranged or melee). After the unit uses all of
its available movement to remove the knockback effects, it
may then make attacks normally during that same round. A
unit under the effects of knockback also has less DEF to
protect itself, and it may only use its armor (AR) and shields
(SH) for any defense rolls - but it may not use its evasion
(EV), since an immobile unit cannot dodge (but its other
defenses like armor and shields will still work normally).

Advanced Optional Equipment: Smoke Dischargers


When a unit uses a smoke discharger (also called a smoke
generator), the hex it occupies immediately fills with thick
opaque smoke, blocking the LOS into and through that hex. If
the unit moves, every hex that the unit moves into or moves
through is also filled with smoke (when a smoke discharger is
activated, it must be "on" until the end of the current round, so
the unit cannot choose which hexes are filled with smoke and
which hexes are not; they are all filled with smoke).
If more than one smoke discharger is used at the same time,
or if a smoke discharger is used in a hex that is already filled
with smoke, the six adjacent hexes are also filled with smoke.
However, no more than seven hexes total can be filled with
smoke from a single central hex, regardless of the number
smoke dischargers in use or how long they are used.
Smoke lasts for the remainder of the current round (the
round in which it was generated) and all of the following
round, but at the end of the following round it dissipates
(unless more smoke is generated in that hex). A unit may
attempt to see through the smoke by making a "scanning" roll,
but the result of the scan is only good for the remainder of the
current round, and only for the scanning unit.
Roll 1d6 for the scanning unit; on a roll of "1-3" the LOS is
completely obscured and no attacks can be made, on a "4-5"
the LOS is partially obscured and any attacks will have a -1d
modifier, and on a roll of "6" the LOS is completely clear.

10

A smoke discharger costs ten (10) points, has a weapon


weight of one (1) point, counts as a ranged weapon for system
damage purposes, and can be used only six (6) times (either
for six rounds individually, or for six consecutive rounds).
Using a smoke discharger counts as an action, so a unit must
sacrifice either its movement or its attacks for the current
round. However, multiple smoke dischargers may be used for
this one action, as they are automatically considered to be
linked.

A successful scan lasts until the end of the current round, or


until the scanning unit takes damage from any attack. If a
cloaked unit is successfully spotted, it may be attacked by the
spotting unit, but there will be a -1d modifier applied to the
attack roll; if the scan roll fails, the cloaked unit may not be
attacked by the scanning unit.
The cost of a stealth system is based on the size of the zoid
to be cloaked. The stealth system itself is treated as if it were a
ranged weapon for the purposes of weapon weight and system
damage. Use the following formula to determine the cost of
the stealth system:

Advanced Optional Equipment: Stealth (cloaking) System


A stealth or "cloaking" system allows the equipped unit to
become virtually "invisible" to most scanning equipment
(including visual scanning). Activating or deactivating the
stealth system is free does not count as an action, and it may
only be done at the start of a unit's turn. Any actions that the
cloaked unit takes during its turn will then determine its
"stealth level" for the remainder of the round, which will then
determine the scanning roll needed by other units to spot it.
It is assumed that any unit currently on the map will be able
to determine the general location of a cloaked unit, but they
may not be able to pinpoint it precisely enough to attack it.
Also, because the stealth system is constantly scanning the area
around the cloaked unit when it is active (to try and match the
unit's signature to that of its surroundings
), it ties up one of that
unit's fire control computers - so while the stealth system is
operating, the unit's FCstat is lowered by 1 point.
When a unit activates its stealth system, the unit's base
stealth level is 6. Also, at the beginning of each consecutive
round that the stealth system is still operational, it "refreshes"
or "resets" itself back to a stealth level of 6. If a cloaked unit
moves during its turn (including making a free facing change), or
if it makes a close combat attack, its stealth level is lowered by
1 point for the remainder of the round (and these two modifiers
are cumulative, so a unit that moved and made a melee attack
would have its stealth level lowered by 2 points). If a cloaked
unit makes any kind of ranged attack, its stealth level is
lowered by 2 points for the remainder of the round.
A unit may attempt to scan for cloaked units at the beginning
of its turn, and it may make a single scan roll for each cloaked
unit that is currently on the map at no action cost. To scan for
a cloaked unit, the scanning unit must roll equal to or higher
than the cloaked unit's current stealth level on 1d6 to be able to
spot it. Various situational modifiers can be applied to the
scan roll that will alter the scanning unit's chances of spotting
the cloaked unit.
If the scanning unit is in the same hex as the cloaked unit, a
+2 is added to the scan roll. If the cloaked unit is at short
range (1-10 hexes from the scanning unit), a +1 is added to the
roll, and if the cloaked unit is at long range (21-30 hexes from
the scanning unit), a -1 is applied to the scan roll - there is no
modifier if the cloaked unit is at medium range (11-20 hexes
from the scanning unit).
If the LOS to the cloaked unit is clear, there is no modifier
to the scanning roll, but if the LOS is partially obscured (i.e. if
the cloaked unit is in cover), a -1 is applied to the scan roll,
and if the LOS to the cloaked unit is completely obscured, it
may not be scanned.

SIZ x 10 = stealth system cost


Stealth Level Summary;
When a unit's stealth system is activated or if it is still acti
ve
at the start of a new round, the unit's stealth level is 6.
Stealth Level Modifiers

Stealth Level

Scan Roll Modifiers

Scanning Roll

the cloaked unit has moved this round


the cloaked unit has made a close combat attack this round
the cloaked unit has made a ranged attack this round

the target is in the same hex


the target is at short range (1-10 hexes)
the target is at medium range (11-20 hexes)
the target is at long range (21-30 hexes)
the LOS to the target is clear
the LOS to the target is partially obscured
the LOS to the target is completely obscured

-1
-1
-2

+2
+1
+0
-1
+0
-1
may not scan!

Advanced Optional Equipment: Advanced Scanners


Advanced scanners (infrared, ultraviolet, thermal imaging,
starlight night vision, etc.) allow a unit to "see" through smoke
and most types of cover without having to make a scanning
roll. A unit with advanced scanners can also attack a target
through smoke (either partially or completely obscuring
smoke) with no negative attack modifier due to the smoke. If a
unit with advanced scanners attacks a unit that is behind any
kind of cover (either soft or hard), a +1d modifier is added to
the attack roll to partially offset the target's increase in defense
due to the cover, but this only applies if the target is in cover,
and not to targets in the open.
Advanced scanners also aid in the detection of cloaked
units; a +1 modifier is added to the scan roll when attempting
to spot a cloaked unit, and if the scan is successful, the
scanning unit receives no negative modifier for any attacks
made against the cloaked unit for the remainder of the round.
The cost for adding advanced scanners to a zoid is twenty (20)
points, they also have no weight, and they cannot be destroyed.
Advanced Optional Rules: Flying Zoids
The movement rules for flying units are a bit different than
those for normal ground units. First off, the speed at which
most flying zoids travel is usually listed on the zoid's box as a
"Mach number" - we will have to convert this into hexes.

11

Damage For Flying Zoids


Damage for a flying unit is determined as per the normal
rules for system damage, but the effects of that damage may
differ a bit from those of ground units. If a flying unit has a
command system freeze while in flight, it will immediately
crash to the ground (explained below). When a flying unit's
movement system is damaged, only the type of movement that
is currently in use at the time of the attack is lowered (either
flight or ground movement, but not both).
If a flying unit's MOV is reduced to the point that its SPD
falls below stall speed (as mentioned previously) while it is
still in the air, the unit must "crash land" (this is the same as a
"crash" but without the damage, explained below). If the
flying unit's MOV is reduced to zero, it will automatically
"crash" (again, explained below). If a flying unit takes any
knockback while in flight, it will immediately drop 1d6 hex
levels of altitude, and this may cause the unit to crash into the
ground.
To determine where a crash will take place, first roll 2d6;
this number determines how many hexes along the flying unit's
current facing that the crash will occur (i.e. between 2 and 12
hexes). Now roll 1d6 to determine any possible course
deviation; 1-2 = no deviation, 3 = one hex to the left, 4 = one
hex to the right, 5 = two hexes to the left, 6 = two hexes to the
right). The final result is where the flying unit will crash.
If a flying unit crashes into an occupied hex, any unit
already in the hex must make a dodge roll to avoid a direct
collision with the crashing unit. Roll the dodging unit's EV
dice and get at least one "hit" to make a successful dodge roll.
If the dodge roll fails, the unit on the ground is hit by the
crashing unit and takes damage as if it were a ram (see the
section on Ramming Attacks & Collisions earlier in the rules
for more details). The crashing unit also takes damage exactly
as if it were a collision (which technically it is - a collision
with the ground!). Finally, please remember to add the
distance in hex levels fallen to the distance in hexes traveled
when determining the damage for all units involved in the
crash.

Since Mach 1 is actually a ridiculously high number in the


scale of this game (about 30+ hexes per round or so), we're
going to have to slow it down a bit. Also, since that speed
represents the unit'smaximum speed, it doesn't take into
account things like the time it takes to accelerate to that speed,
the drop in speed from maneuvering and making attacks, etc.,
so a unit usually won't be able to achieve its maximum speed
during the course of a game. For the sake of simplicity, we
shall say that Mach 1 will be equal to a MOV of 10 (so Mach
1.5 is equal to a MOV of 15, and Mach 2 is equal to a MOV of
20, etc.). Please use these numbers when buying the
movement for your flying zoids.
Although the "flight" movement for a flying unit is
purchased normally, all flying units must also have a separate
ground movement stat as well. The base value for this
secondary ground movement is one-sixth (1/6) of the unit's
flight MOV (round down), and it is absolutely free, but any
additional points of this separate ground movement must be
purchased normally.
A flying unit must always move while it is in the air by
spending at least 3 points of SPD on movement each round.
This is so that it will be considered moving fast enough to
remain airborne (i.e. above "stall" speed). The SPD cost for
moving in a forward direction is the same as for any other unit,
but moving in a rearward direction is not allowed - EVER!
(there is no "reverse gear" on an airborne flying unit). Also,
difficult terrain for an airborne unit would be any kind of foul
weather (rain, sleet, etc.).
A flying unit may change its hex facing one hex side for free
as per the normal movement rules, but there must be at least
two hexes of movement between each facing change (i.e. turn
one hex side, move two hexes, turn another hex side, move
another two hexes, etc.). However, a flying unit may not
change its facing more than one hex-side at a time (since a turn
that sharp would conceivably tear the unit apart).
Climbing or descending one hex level of altitude costs 1
point of SPD, and this in addition to the SPD spent on moving
the unit forward. A unit may not fly straight up or straight
down, as it will be too confusing as to which direction the unit
is facing when trying to determine firing arcs and shield arcs.
Also, be sure to keep an accurate record of the unit's current
altitude in case there is a dispute.
When determining the range for an attack involving airborne
units and units on the ground (or even between airborne units
at different altitudes), the linear distance between the
opponents is counted normally, and the difference in altitude is
also added to this distance to yield the overall range for the
attack (this is not the most accurate way to determine the
range, but it's easy to remember).
When a flying unit is attacked, it gets to make a normal
defense roll like any other unit, but with an additional +1d
modifier added to the unit's defense roll due to the flying unit's
high maneuverability (and this only applies when the unit is in
flight - not while it is on the ground). Also, when a flying unit
performs a "take off" or "landing" during its turn, it may not
make any attacks in the same round, and the ceiling (the
maximum height a flying unit is allowed to fly) should be set
at 30 hexes of altitude above ground level.

12

CONSTRUCTION TABLES AND FORMULAS

WEAPON STATS

ZOID STATS

Range:

Size (SIZ):
Zoid Size
Mini
Small
Medium
Large
Huge
Mega

SIZ Initial Toughness


1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
6
6

Short (10 hexes) = 2pts


Medium (20 hexes) = 4pts
Long (30 hexes) = 6pts

Base Cost
10pts
20pts
30pts
40pts
50pts
60pts

Damage:

2pts for 1die of damage


maximum of 9 dice for a single barreled weapon
maximum of 6 dice per barrel for a multi-barreled weapon

Weapon Effects:

Toughness (TN):

Scatter = 4pts
Concussion = 6pts
Barrage = 10pts

base TN value = SIZ


(8 - size) x 3 per additional point of TN

Movement (MOV):
Size
1
2
3
4
5
6

Ammo:

Cost per Point of MOV


3pts
6pts
9pts
12pts
15pts
18pts

(# of shots x .1) x current total = weapon cost (do not round)

Firing Arcs:

first 60 arc is free


2pts per additional 60 arc covered (no maximum)

Weapon Link:

2pts to link two weapons together


+2pts to add another weapon to the "chain"

km/h x 0.0277777 = base MOV


(round decimals of .6 down, and round decimals of .7 up)

Smoke Discharger:

for flying units: Mach 1 = MOV 10, Mach 2 = MOV 20, etc.

10pts each (6 uses; counts as a ranged weapon)

a flying unit's base ground MOV is 1/6 of its flying MOV (for free)

Stealth (Cloaking) System:

Armor (AR):

size x 10 = stealth system cost (counts as a ranged weapon)

5pts per level; maximum armor level = 4

Advanced Scanners:

Shields (SH):

20pts (no weapon weight, cannot be destroyed)

10pts per level; maximum shield level = 6


+5pts per 60 arc covered (no maximum)

Weapon Weight:

total weapon system cost 10 = weapon weight (round down)

Speed (SPD):

Shield Arc/Firing Arc Diagram:

MOV- (AR + weapon weight) = SPD

Evasion (EV):

SPD 2 = EV (round down)

Defense (DEF):

AR + EV (+ SH) = DEF

Close Combat Value (CC):

base value = size


+5pts per additional level

5
6

Fire Control (FC):

5pts per level (i.e. per targeting computer)

13

QUICK REFERENCE SECTION

System Damage

Toughness: -1 point of TN per hit to this system


Movement: -1 point of MOV per point of damage to this system
Fire Control: -1 point of FC per hit to this system
Close Combat: -1 point of CC per hit to this system
Ranged Weapons: lose one ranged weapon per hit to this system

Sequence of Play

-all units roll for initiative.


-the unit with the highest initiative roll acts first.
-(the initiative winner resolves all movement and combat)
-the unit with the second highest initiative roll acts.
-the unit with the third highest initiative roll acts.
-etc. (this continues until all units have acted)
-a new round begins.

Knockback

-if the total damage is 3x the unit's current TNstat, it takes knockback
-knockback can only be removed by spending all of that unit's movement
-a unit may not attack until knockback is removed
-a unit may not use its EV until knockback is removed

Initiative

-roll as many dice as the unit's current SPDstat

Ramming & Collisions

-move into the target unit's hex and roll the attacker's CC +1d per hex traveled
-if successful, the attacker also takes damage equal to the distance traveled
-the attacker may not use its EV for its defense roll against this damage
-if all dice "miss", the attacker overshoots the target the distance traveled

Movement

-moving forward costs 1 point of SPD


-moving backward costs 2 points of SPD
-changing facing by one hex side is free
-there must be at least one hex of movement between any free facing changes
-changing facing by two or three hex sides costs 1 point of SPD
-entering a hex with difficult terrain costs double the SPD cost for that hex

Scanning Through Smoke (1d6)

-on a roll of 1-3, the LOS is completely obscured


-on a roll of 4-5, the LOS is partially obscured (-1d for attacks)
-on a roll of 6, the LOS is completely clear

Hex Capacity

-a hex may only hold up to 18 points of SIZ


-moving through an occupied hex costs +1 point of SPD per unit in the hex

Stealth Level Summary;

-when the stealth system is activated (or still active), the stealth level is 6

Focus

Stealth Level Modifiers


Stealth Level
the cloaked unit has moved this round
-1
the cloaked unit has made a close combat attack this round -1
the cloaked unit has made a ranged attack this round
-2

-a unit may only attack targets within a 180 arc in a single round

Line of Sight (LOS)

-LOS is only blocked by another unit if it is larger by 2 points of SIZ or more


-if multiple units are in the same hex, randomly determine which unit is hit
-roll 1d6+SIZ for each unit in the hex; the highest roll is hit by the attack

Scan Roll Modifiers


the target is in the same hex
the target is at short range (1-10 hexes)
the target is at medium range (11-20 hexes)
the target is at long range (21-30 hexes)
the LOS to the target is clear
the LOS to the target is partially obscured
the LOS to the target is completely obscured

Die Rolls (Attack & Defense Rolls)


-a roll of 1-2 = "miss"
-a roll of 3-5 = "hit"
-a roll of 6 = "critical hit" (two hits)

Attack Roll Modifiers

Advanced Scanners

extended range (beyond the weapon'smax) -1d/hex

Defense Roll Modifiers


the unit is in soft cover
the unit is in hard cover
the unit is in flight

-can automatically see through smoke (with no attack modifier)


-add a +1d to attacks against units in any kind of cover
-add a +1 to the scanning roll for cloaked units (with no attack modifier)

+1d
+2d
+1d

Flying Unit Movement

-flying units must always spend at least 3 points of SPD per turn to fly
-flying units may only change facing one hex side at a time (for free)
-flying units must move two hexes between each facing change
-climbing or descending costs +1 point of SPD per hex level of altitude

Damage Saves

-roll as many dice as the unit's current TNstat


-roll higher than the amount of damage that was inflicted by the attack
-if the roll is equal to or less, the unit has a "command system freeze"

Flying Unit Crashes

-if a flying unit takes knockback, it drops 1d6 hex levels in altitude
-roll 2d6 to determine how far along the unit's current facing it will crash
-roll 1d6 for deviation;

System Hit Location Table (1d6)


Roll
1
2-3
4
5
6

Scanning Roll
+2
+1
+0
-1
+0
-1
may not scan!

Damaged System
Toughness (TN)
Movement (MOV)
Fire Control (FC)
Close Combat (CC)
Ranged Weapons *

1-2
3
4
5
6

* (1d6) 1 = target chooses weapon, 2-5 = nearest weapon (relative to the


weapon making the attack), 6 = attacker chooses weapon

= no deviation
= one hex to the left
= one hex to the right
= two hexes to the left
= two hexes to the right

-if the unit crashes into an occupied hex, the units in the hex may dodge
-roll the EV dice for each unit in the hex; if successful, they dodge the crash
-if unsuccessful, determine damage as if for a normal collision
-remember to add in any hex levels fallen to the damage of the crash

Note: any system hit location roll of a system that can no longer take any
damage will automatically default to the target unit's Toughness (TN).

14

ZOID TYPE: _________________________


___ (

TN

___ (

MOV ___ (

SPD ____

AR

___ (

EV

SH

___ (

DEF ____

____

shield arcs: _________ (


___ (

FC

___ (

Weapon

CURRENT
INITIATIVE

Total Cost: _____

SIZ

CC

UNIT ID: __________

1
2

Arcs

Special Equipment & Other Notes:

___ (

TN

___ (

MOV ___ (

SPD ____

AR

___ (

EV

SH

___ (

DEF ____

Range Damage

Effects

Ammo

CC

___ (

FC

___ (

Weapon

UNIT ID: __________


CURRENT
INITIATIVE

Total Cost: _____

SIZ

____

shield arcs: _________ (

Cost

ZOID TYPE: _________________________

1
2

Cost

Arcs

Special Equipment & Other Notes:

Range Damage

Effects

Ammo