Gods and Goddesses of Vedic literature are often looked upon as external deities, when in fact they are

symbolic and specific expressions of higher archetypal states of consciousness. When that archetypal state of consciousness is expressed or incarnates through us, we become capable of grand and extraordinary accomplishments.

Lord Ganesha is one of the most popular archetypal expressions. Every aspect of his appearance expresses a faculty of higher consciousness. He has an enormous head because he's a deep thinker, and, having mastered the ability to go inward beyond his internal dialogue, he eavesdrops on the mind of the cosmos. He knoW$ that the ground of. being beyond his mental activity is

the gro nd of existence be d all the intelligent activity of the

Univers1il, Hr§ large flappin kate that he 1S a deep listener.

He" fftifHtS wlVft the inst~ f the Flesh, tJ1.e mind, and the

g ul: ~" ele])Ptant's ~~ well as di ent. It

cj. ~rdO..t a tree ~n l. Ht'

l1a'S.JJo..tufak 4~~Q

c~~

Each and every God in the pantheon, like Ganesha, represents various forces and elements that lay in embryo in each of us. Look at Ganesha. Emulate him. Cultivate the qualities of consciousness that he represents in your awareness and you too can become the remover of obstacles, the Lord of knowledge, with two beautiful goddesses Siddhi and Riddhi as your allies. Now that's a real superhero.

Deepak Chopra

IN THe eND, THI~ I~ A~~ THeRe I~. THe ~UM TOTA~ OF A~~ THIN,* I~ eUT A HANDFU~ OF MOMeNT~, ~Me THAT we CHeRI~H. OTHel('; wH~e P~ING we ~AMeNT··A ~eGACY OF DRIFTING I~TANC~, ~IKe GI<AIN~

OF ~AND IN ONe'~ FI~T.

CVI166P ARe TH~e THAT FORGeT THeiR MeMORI~, FOR IN DOING ~, THey FORGer PART~ OF THeM~e~v~, ~ITT~e sv ~ITT~e, MOMeNT ey MOMeNT.

eUT WHAT OF TH~e THAT NeveR FORGeT? FOR eveRY ~MI~e ONe ReMeMeel(';, THeRe I~ A TORReNT OF TeAI('; THAT HAUNT~ THe HeART.

WHAT I~ IT ~LY THAT e~N,* AN INANIMATE:

F00ITOUF6?

IT TAK~ TIME FO~ A 'SON TO COM~HEND THAT HI'S MOTHE~ HA'S OTHE~ ~OL~. THAT OTHEI<oS HAVS CLAIM ON HS~ A'S DO HI'S 'SIeLING'S. A'S DO~ HI'S 'SI~.

... TO oeSy R611Y WO~ OF THS MOTHS~ •

... AND IF HS MAK~ APIIOMtgI.

w.; THS CHI~D WATCHSD THS A~~-MOTHS~ SNTS~ THS ~AKS OF STS~ITY ~ HS~ COSMIC COMMUNION, ~ITT~S DID HS KNOW THAT THS DIS OF FATS HAD A~~ADY eSSN Cw.;T. HS KNSW NOT OF HS~ CO~I<T, tOIlP 6/(NA WHO Ww.; ~TU~ING F~OM A ~NG ~JOU~ IN THS oSO~ITUDS OF TN; NIMAtAYII6.

w.; HS TOOK HloS PLACS ON HloS ICY TH~ONS AND oSUMMONSD HArP!, THS FS~OCIOUoS MINATOU~ HloS MIGHTY MAr-AT-AIIM6 ...

... SVSNToS WSRS !JSING <SST INTO MOTION WHICH WOU~D CHANGS THS eov'oS DSoSTINY FORSVSR. ..

NANDI '?AW THe eov eUARDING THe TH~HOLD AND THoueHT NOTHINe OF HIM. "'" PIIIINK ON

HI'? OWN PROWe% Af? A WMIII£..I1 WAf? He.

HI: WP06 oSl:l:THING WITH III1G1 FOR HAVING ElI:I:N ElSoSTI:D ElV A CII//.P ...

... AND THUoS. HI:

CIIAllsaJ. HUFFING AND PUFFING LIKI: A MAD ElULL.

,

-_

~ .

. .

I'eI<HA~ IT WPI:. NOT HI~ FAULT THAT He SORe THe HeAD OF A BVIJ..

...NANDI'~ FOLLY WPI:. SelNG BVIJ.~'AP"'.

THev ATTACKeD IN A !<ASID FReNZY. ..

,

. /

91TTeN 9Y THe FANC* OF THe WILD ge~T.

THe CHILD FeLL TO THe GI<OUND ...

~ HE: RSACHE:D THE: <$OU~CE: OF THE:

COMMOTION. A ~TRANGE: ~IGHT GRSSTE:D THE:

LO~OF~.

... THI6 TIME. A FATEFU~ ONE •

... YET, HE~ N6AIIT' 6Et«>ED THE ~DICAMENT OF HE~6ON.

ITWA6 A SLOW F~OM THe rlllPlNr THAT FINALLY S~TeD THe SOY.

THe TRIDeNT H~ FeLLeD P6MON6.

GOP6 AND MIN ALIKe. AND THe CHILD W~ NO MO~ MATCH TO IT<; MIGHT THAN THe FLAMe OF

A LAMP TO A HU~ICANe.

... AND VII:;HNU CONoSO~eD THeM.

yeAi<'S HAve PA%eD ~INce THe DAY I W~ CHQI~reNeD IillNIIPIIT'I. THe COMMIINP611 OF 6IIIY1I'6 POliCH ...

TWo~eeCAMe ONI AND A GOP W~ 90RN THAT DAY.

MANY HAve ~INce AD~DMeWITH DIFFeReNT NAM~ ...

N£:W D£:L.HI WAK£:G UP FROM A DR£:AM IN WHICH, AL.L.I:G£:DL.Y, TH£: £:L.£:PHANT H£:AD£:D GOD GAN£:GHA IG CRAVING MIL.K. H£:

HUGTL.£:G lP TH£: N£:AR£:GT T£:MPL.£: AT TWIL.IGHT AND OFF£:RG "f'loI£: GAN£:GHA

GTATU1G M£: Mr~ Ito! ~IN'" AND G£:I:G

IT DIGA R IN FRO.NT ~!~ }Y£:G!

Wi~i ~~w ire~ t il :llews

spr ~ !~. ·r r ~~e

In-dHLlf su-~O ~~~ tJk

b-ustle of Delhi in & nor ~tc;l t:&e

pOlin c\ti~$ in the :}na . ;fr.QII). tne- hubbub of Benga ..jll""the ealst tot):1f: outer deserts of Rajasthan in the west: Ganesha. and. his family, ghiVtl.. Uma and Karthikeya are acaepttng milk of~rings. Tens of m-~lions of people of all ages flock to the nati'on's temples. The bizarre incident brings the nation's capital to a standstill, and its vast stocks of milk-more than a million liters-are sold out within hours.

By noon, the news has spread beyoi India, and Hindu temples in Brita· Canada, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Du and Nepal among other countries

report identical phenomena. Many stores in areas with significant Indian communities see a massive jump in the sales of milk, with one grocery store in England selling over 25,000 pints of milk in a single day. People throng and queue in the streets, long gridlocks form in front of temples, and when the media arrives, even the most skeptical journalists are humbled when they hold therr milkfilled spoons to the "&o~ the milk disappear-s