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CRETASUS ADVENTURE GUIDE By Fred Bush, Joseph Goodman, and Mike Roberts

CRETASUS ADVENTURE GUIDE

By Fred Bush, Joseph Goodman, and Mike Roberts

CRETASUS ADVENTURE GUIDE By Fred Bush, Joseph Goodman, and Mike Roberts
Welcome to the world of Broncosaurus Rex! Be sure to look for these products at your

Welcome to the world of Broncosaurus Rex! Be sure to look for these products at your local game store:

Core Rulebook, available now Dino Hunter’s Guide to Velociraptors, July 2002 Dino Hunter’s Guide to Tyrannosaurus Rex, Fall 2002

For more information, or to join our mailing list, contact us.

www.broncosaurusrex.com

goodmangames@mindspring.com

The following legal text is required by the Open Game License. For more information on open gaming, see www.opengamingfoundation.org.

OPEN GAME LICENSE Version 1.0a The following text is the property of Wizards of the Coast, Inc. and is Copyright 2000 Wizards of the Coast, Inc (“Wizards”). All Rights Reserved. 1. Definitions: (a)”Contributors” means the copyright and/or trademark owners who have contributed Open Game Content; (b)”Derivative Material” means copyrighted material including derivative works and translations (including into other computer languages), potation, modification, correction, addi- tion, extension, upgrade, improvement, compilation, abridgment or other form in which an existing work may be recast, trans- formed or adapted; (c) “Distribute” means to reproduce, license, rent, lease, sell, broadcast, publicly display, transmit or other- wise distribute; (d)”Open Game Content” means the game mechanic and includes the methods, procedures, processes and routines to the extent such content does not embody the Product Identity and is an enhancement over the prior art and any addi- tional content clearly identified as Open Game Content by the Contributor, and means any work covered by this License, including translations and derivative works under copyright law, but specifically excludes Product Identity. (e) “Product Identity” means product and product line names, logos and identifying marks including trade dress; artifacts; creatures characters; sto- ries, storylines, plots, thematic elements, dialogue, incidents, language, artwork, symbols, designs, depictions, likenesses, for- mats, poses, concepts, themes and graphic, photographic and other visual or audio representations; names and descriptions of characters, spells, enchantments, personalities, teams, personas, likenesses and special abilities; places, locations, environments, creatures, equipment, magical or supernatural abilities or effects, logos, symbols, or graphic designs; and any other trademark or registered trademark clearly identified as Product identity by the owner of the Product Identity, and which specifically excludes the Open Game Content; (f) “Trademark” means the logos, names, mark, sign, motto, designs that are used by a Contributor to identify itself or its products or the associated products con- tributed to the Open Game License by the Contributor (g) “Use”, “Used” or “Using” means to use, Distribute, copy, edit, format, modify, translate and otherwise create Derivative Material of Open Game Content. (h) “You” or “Your” means the licensee in terms of this agreement.

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  • 15 COPYRIGHT NOTICE

Open Game License v 1.0 Copyright 2000, Wizards

of the Coast, Inc. System Rules Document Copyright 2000 Wizards of the Coast, Inc.; Authors Jonathan Tweet, Monte Cook, Skip Williams, based on original material by E. Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson.

Dinosaur Planet: Broncosaurus Rex Core

Rulebook Copyright 2001 Joseph Goodman DBA Goodman Games (contact goodmangames@mindspring.com, or see www.broncosaurusrex.com) Dinosaur Planet: Broncosaurus Rex Cretasus Adventure Guide Copyright 2002 Joseph Goodman DBA Goodman Games (contact goodmangames@mind-

spring.com, or see www.broncosaurusrex.com)

This printing of Dinosaur Planet: Broncosaurus Rex Cretasus Adventure Guide is done under version 1.0 of the Open Gaming License and the draft versions of the D20 System Trademark License, D20 System Trademark Logo Guide and System Reference Document by permission from Wizards of the Coast, Inc. Subsequent printings will incorpo- rate final versions of the license, guide and document. Designation of Product Identity: The following items are hereby designated as Product Identity in accordance with Section 1(e) of the Open Game License, version 1.0: Any and all Dinosaur Planet: Broncosaurus Rex logos and identifying marks and trade dress, including but not limited to the terms Dinosaur Planet: Broncosaurus Rex, Cretasus, Bronco Rider, Wild One, Dino Warrior, Federal Marshal, Ironclad; any ele- ments of the Broncosaurus Rex setting, including but not lim- ited to names of characters, areas, factions, and creatures, including nicknames for dinosaurs; and all artwork, stories, storylines, plots, thematic elements, symbols, depictions, and

illustrations, except such elements that already appear in the System Reference Document. Designation of Open Content: Subject to the Product Identity designation above, the following portions of Dinosaur Planet: Broncosaurus Rex Cretasus Adventure Guide are designated as Open Gaming Content: all creature statistic templates from Size/Type (e.g., “Medium Animal”) to Advancement, all text under the “Combat” header of each creature’s section (except the creature’s name or proper names specific to the Broncosaurus Rex setting), and the sec- tions “New Weapons,” “New Equipment and Devices,” and “Vehicle Rules” (including tables) on pages 77-78 and 89- 92, except for such place names and terminology which relates to the Broncosaurus Rex setting. Some of the portions of this book which are delineated OGC originate from the System Reference Document and are copyright © 1999, 2000 Wizards of the Coast, Inc. The remainder of these OGC portions of these book are hereby

added to Open Game Content and, if so used, should bear the COPYRIGHT NOTICE “Dinosaur Planet: Broncosaurus Rex Cretasus Adventure Guide Copyright 2002 Joseph Goodman DBA Goodman Games (contact goodmangames@ mindspring.com, or see www.broncosaurusrex.com)” Dinosaur Planet: Broncosaurus Rex Cretasus Adventure Guide is copyright © 2002 Joseph Goodman DBA Goodman Games. Illustrations are copyright © their respec- tive creators, as indicated. Dungeons & Dragons ® and Wizards of the Coast ® are Registered Trademarks of Wizards of the Coast, and are used with Permission. ‘d20 System’and the ‘d20 System’logo are Trademarks owned by Wizards of the Coast and are used according to the terms of the d20 System License version 1.0. A copy of this license can be found at www.wizards.com. Open game content may only be used under and in the terms of the Open Game License.

CRETASUS ADVENTURE GUIDE

Table of Contents

Introduction

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Machinists

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Chapter I: The Main Valley

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Skill Evolution

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New Savannah & Environs

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New Feats

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New Savannah

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New Equipment

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Mount Crowe

. The Dukes and Butlers

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Chapter IV: Gamemaster Reference

 

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The McQuarry Brothers

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The Great Library of Logos

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Generating Settlements

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The Hideout Hills

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Typical NPCs

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Getting Around Cretasus

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The Crystal Desert

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Common Mounts

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The Tecumseh Trail Fort Tecumseh

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Vehicle Rules

. Typical Vehicle Stats

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The Dino Warriors

Fort Lincoln

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.39

Buying a Mount

Treasure Tables

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Federal Marshals

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Encounter Tables

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Ironclads

. The Southwestern Plains

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Chapter V: Creature Statistics

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The Black Jungle

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Coloration

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The Bayou The Bay Trail

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Subspecies and Mutations

Albertosaurus

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The Inland Sea

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Ceratopsians

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The Bay Side Company

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Cheirolepis

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Underglen

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Dryosaurus

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Fort Apache

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Dunkleosteus

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Plesiosaur Bay

. The Northwestern Plains

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Eurypterid

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Hadrosaurs

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Barrister House

. The Warp Pirates

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Kronosaurus

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.114

 

Plesiosaurus

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Chapter II: Dinosaurs

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Quetzalcoatlus

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Dinosaur Intelligence

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Scray

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.117

Cultural Habits

Dinosaurs in the Wild

Dinosaurs in the Economy

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Small Game

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Stenonychosaurus

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Dinosaurs as Weapons

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Tanystropheus

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.123

Dinosaur Combat Rules

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Therizinosaurus

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Trilobite

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Chapter III: Player Reference

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Vulcanodon

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Character Classes

. Prestige Class: Dino Warrior

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. Prestige Class: Federal Marshal

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.76

Template: Ironclad

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Index

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Credits

Writers: Fred Bush, Joseph Goodman, Mike Roberts Copy Editor: Derek Schubert Cover Artist: Walter Stuart Logo Designer: Derek Schubert

Interior Artists: Tim Burgard, Brianna Garcia, Dan Morton, Derek Schubert, V. Shane (vshane.com), Walter Stuart Concept Artist: Andrew Farago Graphic Designer: Joseph Goodman

Dinosaur Planet: Broncosaurus Rex created by Joseph Goodman Dedicated to my brother Mike. Thanks for all the good games.

Introduction

Welcome to the world of Cretasus! Cretasus is the setting for Dinosaur Planet: Broncosaurus Rex, a game world where cow- boys use laser rifles to hunt dinosaurs. If you haven’t read the Dinosaur Planet: Broncosaurus Rex Core Rulebook, you might want to do so before continuing in the Cretasus Adventure Guide. You could use this book in any d20 setting, but it is best suited to Dinosaur Planet: Broncosaurus Rex. We have divided the Cretasus world into several volumes. This first, the Adventure Guide, will give you all the information you need to start adventuring in the planet’s Main Valley, the most settled area of Cretasus. Future works will cover new dinosaur species and specific regions in greater detail, as well as some of the other great valleys of Cretasus. For those of you unfamiliar with Dinosaur Planet:

Broncosaurus Rex, it is set in the year 2202. Dinosaurs have been discovered on the planet Cretasus. The two main factions in human politics – the Union and the Confederacy – rush to estab- lish a military presence, even as pioneers from across the galaxy come to farm, hunt, and domesticate the dinos. Settlers on Cretasus have identified hundreds of varieties of dinosaurs virtually identical to those once found on Earth. Prehistoric mammals have been sighted in neighboring regions, engendering theories that the planet’s massive surface area has created numerous micro-climates separated by mountains or other impassable terrain. Some micro-climates have remained “frozen” in evolutionary time or have evolved along unusual lines, while

others have evolved more normally. The result is widely different ecological results in close proximity to each other. Some of the dinosaurs are the classic dumb brutes we all know so well. But most are not. Velociraptors have near-human intelligence. They live in organized tribes which loosely connect into larger nations. Tyrannosaurus rex live in widely dispersed family groups whose members remember genealogies for hun- dreds of years. Triceratops travel in large herds with rigorous social organization. Almost every species has its own language, and the more intelligent ones have dialects specific to each region. Even though Cretasus is far outside established political bor- ders, it has been brought to the forefront of galactic politics by its Earth-like environment and abundance of dinosaurs. The dinosaurs have great potential as weapons and beasts of burden, a point not lost on either the Confederacy or Union generals. Although the Union and Confederacy long ago ceased open war- fare, they have never ended hostilities. Now the battle for Cretasus threatens to re-open a centuries-old conflict. Characters can choose from six new character classes pre- sented in the Broncosaurus Rex Core Rulebook: Bronco Rider, Machinist, Soldier, Spy, Two-Fister, and Wild One. They can be Union or Confederate, staunch loyalists or complete impartials, or they may hail from one of several independent factions. Adventures abound on the newly settled planet, with aliens, warp pirates, the dinosaur nations, intergalactic trade, and rustlers, ranchers, robbers, and wranglers to round out the universe.

Introduction Welcome to the world of Cretasus! Cretasus is the setting for Dinosaur Planet: Broncosaurus Rex

Chapter I: The Main Valley

The Main Valley is ringed by steep mountains which isolate it from the rest of Cretasus. The only break in the mountain perimeter is the Fur River, which flows directly into Mammoth Valley to the west. One can travel to Mammoth Valley on the river itself or along the treacherous bluffs beside it. The Fur River earned its name from the occasional migrants who follow it out of Mammoth Valley – in the dinosaur-laden Main Valley, these mam- malians are the only creatures to sport fur of any kind. The center of human civilization on Cretasus is New Savannah, the planet’s only city to speak of. Staunchly Confederate, it sits between Fort Tecumseh to the west and Fort Apache to the east. New Savannah houses the planet’s only civil- ian spaceport, although ships with wilderness landing capabilities can (and do) land in the wilderness. In contrast to the relative sophistication of New Savannah, the territories around it are the “wild west” of Cretasus. Stretching from Fort Tecumseh in the west to Fort Apache in the east, you will find the large farms and ranches, the watering holes and saloons, the small towns, the big herds of domesticated broncos, the rustlers, and the stables and mills and tanneries. This area is still quite wild, but human occupation is extensive enough that towns are relatively safe from wild dinosaurs (with the occasion- al dramatic exception). By now, most hunters and trappers have moved further into the frontier where the wild dinosaurs are still plentiful.

To the west of Fort Tecumseh, and to the east of Fort Apache, are the true frontiers. At any time of day, there is at least one wagon train leaving New Savannah for these frontiers, carrying pioneers lured by the promises of free land, undiscovered gold, and simple freedom. The passage west is called the Tecumseh Trail. As it heads into the great southwestern plains, it splits. Most settlers end their journey near the fork, setting up a farm somewhere on the plains. Some continue along the southern route, which leads to the forests, Lake Hope, and the frontier town of Garsville. A very few make the dangerous journey north along the edge of the swamp known as the Bayou: a route that ultimately crosses the Fur River and leads to the fertile northwestern plains. The passage east from New Savannah is called the Bay Trail. It soon turns north as it winds along the banks of the inland sea. Most settlers along this route make their living by fishing, but some have headed east into the deep valley forest. The forest is thick with dangerous dinosaurs, but lush and ideal for logging and raising a variety of crops on cleared land. The Bay Trail ends at Plesiosaur Bay, a lawless settlement on the very northern tip of the inland sea. These general regions – New Savannah, the Tecumseh Trail, and the Bay Trail – provide the structure for our description of the Main Valley. Together with the vast Northwestern Plains, they make up the valley’s four quadrants.

New Savannah & Environs

New Savannah

New Savannah is the first great city on Cretasus to have developed through the natural processes of settlement. Situated on the shore of a great land-locked ocean, it provides a focal point for the vast number of smaller habitations and farms that extend across the plains towards the distant frontiers and beyond. Ranchers and farmers come to New Savannah to sell their live- stock and crops, making the city’s market place a hive of activity. Soldiers and Dino Warriors come to enjoy the loquacious atmos-

phere of New Savannah’s many watering holes and other distrac- tions that help mentally postpone the next tour of duty. Trades of every kind are plied within its tall stone walls, some less salubri- ous than others, but all intrinsic to New Savannah’s rich and var- ied tapestry. Inside its granite boundaries, you’ll find people look- ing for a good time, others seeking a respite from the bitter con- ditions of frontier life, and still others hunting the rewards that such endeavors bring. If you want to make your mark on Cretasus, New Savannah is your best bet for a solid starting point, for with- out the security provided by its civilized community, your plans have foundations of sand.

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The History of New Savannah

Early Developments

New Savannah developed as the largest community on Cretasus soon after people discovered the great land-locked ocean. Finding food on Cretasus was always a major concern for the settlers, and a source of fresh water, untouched by man, would always guarantee food. Fishing expeditions quickly proved that New Savannah would have the bare necessities to sustain a popu- lation far larger than any other prospective site had yet offered, and the plains surrounding it were suitable for both pastoral and arable agriculture, due doubtless to the presence of the ocean. Quarries of stone, mines for fuel, forests for wood: all lay within relatively easy reach of the site chosen to establish the first settle- ment, and it soon became the center for the whole of the region’s activity. If farmers found their crops destroyed by the untamed dinosaurs wandering from the eastern forests, they knew they could find food at New Savannah. Many of the early victims of stampeding herbivores relinquished their land in return for a fish- ing vessel and a rudimentary wooden dwelling. These men and their families were the founders of “modern” New Savannah. Few families left after stopping on the shores of the picturesque ocean, so abundant were the fish and helpful neighbors. Those with an eye for commerce quickly purchased the land off disenchanted farmers, knowing that others would follow eager to try their hand at taming the land, and it was not long before much of the land surrounding New Savannah was in the hands of the Porter family and its patriarch, Hepsediah Porter.

The Porter Family

A wealthy industrialist and philanthropist descended from Atlanta, Hepsediah Porter was committed to establishing a model community on Cretasus. Having successfully combined business interests with an often-contradictory devout belief in fair play, Porter had left for Cretasus in search of a fresh start after the heart-breaking death of his beloved wife Marie. His sons and daughters asked to travel with him, and the whole family left on a ship with little of the pomp and circumstance that their wealth had accustomed them to. Porter’s arrival on Cretasus was not auspicious. As the ship descended to the verdant plains he had identified for settlement, the crew saw an eighteen foot tall metal man below them. They had stumbled onto secret testing grounds for the Union’s iron- clads, the powerful walking tanks that the Union hoped to some- day deploy against the Confederacy. Porter retreated, but not before the ironclad’s warning shots breached the hull. After a wild descent, the damaged craft finally came to rest. Porter and his shipmates found that they were in the middle of a desert. They were way off course. Taking what supplies that they could carry, the party left the ship and struck out in search of the plains. Some stayed with the

stricken craft, insisting that they would be rescued when they were reported as missing, but most left, with Porter at their head. His strong personal charm, wise yet swift mind and keen skills of negotiation had made him a popular man on board ship: despite his age, it was only natural that he should lead the expedition into the distant depths of this unfamiliar planet. Several settlers wanted to set up a more permanent camp after only three days of travelling, but Porter persuaded them to con- tinue. He spoke as if certain of brighter prospects ahead, and there were very few dissenting voices as he laid out his plans for a longer trek into the interior. They had plentiful supplies, well- serviced transports, and fuel supplies to see them right for several weeks’ touring. He sent motorcycle riders and horsemen out ahead of the main group to warn of obstacles and relay any good news, such as the discovery of a source of fresh water and food. For eight days and nights, each rider brought back the same story: that there was nothing but desert surrounding them, and that they had made their initial landing way off target. With the exception of unusual crystal formations and the occasional small dinosaur, there was nothing to be seen but sand and shale. Hepsediah realized that those who’d refused to come with him would be calling for help that would never come; they were nowhere near their intended destination, and there was no guaran- tee that the radios on the ship would be able to contact those who could save them. Porter’s eldest son, Daniel, volunteered to go back for the settlers that had stayed with the ship. Despite his gut feeling, Hepsediah allowed Daniel to do so. Several members of the party objected, because if Daniel were to make the return jour- ney and catch up with the main contingent he would need a great deal of the remaining fuel and food. Others opined that the people at the ship would have already been rescued by now. Some fami- lies wanted to travel with Daniel, as they believed that Hepsediah was mistakenly leading them to starvation in a barren desert. At this point, the first cracks appeared in the settlers’ previous solidarity. Most were ignorant of Hepsediah’s concern for his son and the well-being of those who traveled with him; it would indeed be a great feat for anyone to make a return journey and sur- vive. Critics showed more interest in the fact that they had been travelling for over a week, and yet had found nowhere to set up camp. Now that the convoy was going to be split, they would have fewer vehicles – none to spare if any broke down – and they would also have fewer supplies. They estimated that they could go on for only one more week without finding a supply of food; then, they would starve. Porter restricted rations to half their current level, which was unpopular, but the settlers stuck with the man who had brought them here so far unscathed by the hostile wilder- ness through which they drifted.

Parting of the Company

The convoy split on September 12th, Hepsediah fighting back the tears as his son climbed into the cabin of the lead truck. The Porter family had always been renowned for their wanderlust;

Hepsediah’s distant relatives had been at the frontiers of American settlement many generations ago, and it was evident that both Daniel and his father had inherited the trailblazing spirit. Neither had experienced such a split first-hand, however; they had always operated as a family, and found the parting difficult, especially before the eyes of those who had followed them into the desert. A few words of encouragement were exchanged, as were proud boasts of a speedy return. Their smiles that followed were forced through overwhelming sensations of loss for both father and son, the like of which they had not experienced since the death of Marie, wife and mother respectively to those facing this difficult separation. Both parted into a future of dire uncertainty. The mood in both camps hung heavy that night. Hepsediah’s expedition left the next morning, moving further into the interior and communicating with Daniel’s convoy through radio. After four days of travel, Hepsediah’s group found themselves on an incline. They were heading towards mountains, and all quickly realized that it would be almost impossible to get the trucks over them except by a pass. Motorcyclists were sent out once again, and after a day, the first returned with news that there was a gorge running through the mountains. The gorge was clearly hazardous, but the party could only continue onwards. They had seen large dust clouds behind them, and once it was clear that Daniel’s convoy was not respon- sible, the settlers became quite keen to delay any meeting with the cause of the disturbances. The storm or stampede behind them could damage their vehicles, but the way forward also seemed distinct- ly unforgiving. Choosing the lesser of the two perceived evils, the company set off toward the mountain pass. They were not long into the second day’s travel when an avalanche of rocks hurtled down the mountainside toward the lead vehicle. Other vehicles were knocked over as the rocks crashed into the gorge, killing several of the settlers and blocking the path forwards. It was far too hot to begin clearing the debris; after an initial search for survivors, it was decided to clear the way during the night. Those unharmed by the incident set up camp, whispering to their neighbors that they should have traveled with Daniel’s con- voy. The party worked hard through the night to remove fallen rocks and crushed vehicles, but more remained. As they awoke the second night, many in the party

echoed another’s dissatisfaction at Porter’s leadership. Hepsediah was despondent. He knew that if there was nothing beyond this mountain pass, they were doomed. The louder the murmurs of mistrust, the more he doubted his decision to lead them here. However, they now had little option but to continue onwards. That night, they cleared the gorge with superhuman effort. After trav- elling through the night, the party soon came to the other side of the range and gazed on a world wholly different from the desert dunes they had left days before.

Beyond the Mountains

As the light of a new day suffused their senses, the settlers looked in awe at the plains that stretched before them. Desert quickly gave way to grasses, trees, and other plants: the first signs

Hepsediah’s distant relatives had been at the frontiers of American settlement many generations ago, and it

of life they had seen for an age, a wild array disappearing into the horizon as far as the eye could see. Small herds of grazing dinosaurs could be seen in the distance, slowly making their way across the landscape that seemed an herbivorous utopia. To Hepsediah Porter, such lushness spoke of one thing: water. He would soon find water. His group would survive. Previous doubts gave way to jubilation, and Porter was hailed as a genius. Despite the excitement, Porter himself was less than gleeful, as the mountain range had severed the radio link with his son’s party. While the travelers celebrated, Hepsediah worked without rest on the radio, trying to catch a frequency through which he could hail his son. His labors went unrewarded, and while his company exulted, something inside him seemed to die. Instinctively, he knew that Daniel had perished.

The Inland Sea

Now determined that the planet not take any more lives, Hepsediah sent motorcyclists to search for a river. There had be a river flowing from the mountains into this plain to give it such vibrant life. After a day’s searching, the scouts returned, two of them having found rivers that flowed from the mountains. Several members of the company asked why no such rivers had flowed into the other side, but their questions were quickly drowned in the excitement that followed the announcement that the nearest river would be followed to its destination. If it followed the same pattern as rivers on Earth, it would flow to the sea, where the trav- elers knew they would find a place to rest. As the river grew greater, so did the hopes of the settlers. After two more weeks of travel beside its lush green bank, they reached their destination. The river’s mouth opened into a vast lake, the likes of which the travelers had never seen. Lazy hadrosaurs splashed in the shallows, a huge herd of triceratops grazed the lush green shoots along the shore, and low-flying pterosaurs plucked fish from the gentle waves. The water was a deep blue, untarnished by man and primordially pure. Building small fishing vessels, the intrepid settlers soon dis- covered the vast array of aquatic life that proved not only easy to catch in their nets but eminently suitable for their cooking pots. Their first week passed with disarming swiftness, and the travel- ers knew that they had arrived.

The Birth of New Savannah

It wasn’t long before the inhabitants of the planet began to show an interest in these new arrivals. The settlers’ first encoun- ters with the dinosaurs did nothing to engender an open-minded attitude towards the creatures that were now their co-habitants, but Porter knew that if they were to survive, the settlers would have to somehow live with these giants. Some advocated shooting the dinosaurs if they came too close; however, the settlers’ weapons would merely irritate one of the creatures, perhaps enough to enrage it and cause the whole herd to stampede in

response. Preventive measures were needed, foundations on which could be built a permanent future for the settlement, and the ocean would be their ally. Porter proposed the construction of a deep, wide moat around the settlement, with a wooden palisade atop the earth thrown up by the digging of the channel. The deep water should discourage the casual visitor, and the palisade would protect the settlement from the more determinedly inquisitive while providing an excel- lent vantage point from which to espy the surrounding plain. Some parts of the plan would prove difficult to achieve; the con- struction of a lock to stop the water flowing away from the chan- nel when the tide retreated seemed the most challenging mechan- ical problem. Some of the settlers balked at the sheer toil of that the scheme. Adapting well to the task ahead of them, the settlers modified some of their vehicles using the tools and equipment they had brought from Earth. The work took weeks, but fortunately the herds of herbivores kept their distance, possibly because they saw the trucks and diggers as a new kind of predator. Whatever the reason, it was a welcome piece of good fortune, for the small set- tlement could not have withstood the charge of a terrified herd. However, while all eyes were on the vast numbers of herbivores that moved along the coast, others slipped through the forest glades unseen. The settlers would soon discover that they were not the only ones capable of alarming the destructive mass of the triceratops.

Taming the Wild

As night fell one balmy June evening, the lookouts reported swift creatures approaching from the edges of the forest towards the foremost members of the vast herd, which was now drinking at the ocean’s edge. It was clear the herd was unaware, as they remained fixed on quenching their thirst. With the benefit of their night-vision goggles, the lookouts saw that a pack of albertosaurs was on the move, intent on sating their hunger at the expense of the herd. Porter was alarmed. Much of the herd was now within a kilo- meter of the settlement, and should they stampede to escape the predators, there was a distinct possibility that they would charge the settlement. However, the albertosaurs had some considerable distance to travel over sparsely covered ground, and they too were in no hurry to panic their quarry. They began to move slowly as they came out of the forest, making the best use of the cover around them to hide from the herd. Porter knew it was now or never. Asking for volunteers from the unmarried men, he proposed that the settlers venture out and take the fight to the albertosaurs. Their vehicles could cover the ground in a few minutes, and if they could drive off the albertosaurs, they would be unlikely to return. One group was to drive the herd away from the village, while another group on the faster vehicles would take what fight they had in them to the hunters.

Most of the young men volunteered. Taking the deadliest weapons in the settlement’s well-kept arsenal, they set out on the fastest motorcycles in teams of two: one to concentrate on driving, the other riding pillion to fire the guns. Their small size should not alarm the herbivores, whose attention was to be demanded by the pick-up trucks and massive engineering vehicles that seemed to have stayed the herd during the construction of the palisade and moat. The bikers took absurd risks in driving away the albertosaurs. Believing that a head shot was the only way to make the bullets count, they had to get in close. Young Abraham Jackson was the first to feel the powerful teeth of an enraged albertosaur close around his body, damning both him and his pillion passenger to a terrifying death and sending Abraham to rest with his family. Zeke Wylde, a seventeen-year-old dead-eye shot from Hazzard County, Mars, settled the debt, sending several hollow-point rounds through the hateful staring orb of the largest albertosaur, which had been watching Zeke and his driver as if sizing up its next meal. Another albertosaur fell as three gunmen riddled its face with bullet-holes, forever closing its mandibles of death. Whether it was the roar of the bikes’ engines or the simple fact that they were now on the receiving end of the kind of brutal aggression they usually handed out, the albertosaurs began to run towards the forest glade. Zeke downed another two as they fled, and other teams wounded several more. Though the albertosaurs were much hardier than the humans they’d fought, the horrific wounds inflicted by the hollow-point rounds ensured that at least a few escapees would die in the very near future. Here was the first sign that man had established himself on Cretasus. The natural order of the dinosaur planet was to be changed forever by mankind’s intervention; he was to play the role of a brutal shepherd, protecting the flock from all harm so that he could slaughter them himself. The first albertosaur pack that the settlers had encountered would soon starve to death, deprived of the food source that had always been available to them. Although they had only been here for weeks, all Cretasus now knew that the humans had arrived.

The Second Wave

After the albertosaur incident, many settlers who had previ- ously been ranchers suggested dividing the herd. This would reduce the threat it posed and let it be used as a source of food. To do this, they would need more hands. Since the settlement had survived the initial threats posed to it by the planet’s environment, Hepsediah decided it was time to call for more settlers. News of the travelers’ success in establishing the community sparked a great deal of interest in the Confederacy. Drawing together an armada of ships for the journey to the fledgling settle- ment, Confederacy officials informed Porter that many new set- tlers would be heading for the inland ocean, with masses of machinery and materials so that they could take full advantage of the prime land he’d discovered. Scientific, industrial and military

advisers were also to travel to the area, to survey it and measure its potential for expansion. Realizing that this would soon be the largest settlement on Cretasus, Porter decided that it needed a name. The community was unanimous in its opinion that Porter should choose the name for their piece of Cretasus, and it wasn’t difficult for him to make up his mind. Thinking of his beloved wife Marie and the splendor of the city of his ancestors, he proclaimed to rapturous applause that the settlement would be known as New Savannah. The first ships landed fourteen weeks after the albertosaur attack, by which time the inhabitants had prepared temporary accommodation for the new arrivals. Masses of machinery and supplies were unloaded, including fuel, mining tools, felling equipment, engineering vehicles, and temporary structures. Many of the settlers were specialists: miners, quarrymen, lumberjacks and machinists from all over the galaxy had come to New Savannah to aid in its development. Each had brought their fami- lies; Porter had requested that most of the new settlers be family men in order to avoid the problems that plagued developing com- munities in the old west, where the drinking and gambling of sin- gle men bored with the monotony of their solitary lives had stressed the mining towns to breaking point. The advisors sent to New Savannah were a great surprise to Porter. He had known all three of the senior post-holders from his earlier days, and they were delighted to see him. Edgar Winthorpe, his old business partner who had left to manage oper- ations elsewhere, joined him as the industrial advisor; Jonas Crowe, an old university friend, had been appointed scientific advisor to the community; and finally, his old fishing friend Nathanial P. Hood, a descendant of the famous Civil War general, accompanied the new wave of settlers as military advisor. Other officials and specialists had been sent to help build a lasting com- munity, including doctors, fire chiefs, and planning architects. With them at his disposal, Porter knew that New Savannah was ready to take its first major leap towards its destiny as the greatest example of human endeavor on all of Cretasus.

Building New Savannah

With the new machinery and skilled workers to use it, work started on the construction of a whole new city by the ocean. Builders worked night and day to erect permanent dwellings, fol- lowing architects’ plans for town blocks based on the distinct squares in the original pattern of Savannah, Georgia. Heavily armed teams ventured into the mountains to assess their mineral value and begin mining ore, while workers prepared the founda- tions for the new factories that would process them. Ranchers got to work driving a portion of the vast triceratops herd away from the sea and into the plains, where they were watered and managed by the humans. Most of the ranches were founded along the river, extending the community onto the plains. It was then that the predators reared their ugly heads and caught the settlers unaware. A lack of security and a dearth of easy prey

saw the destruction of both the Jones’ ranch and the Caddocks’ before armed patrols could drive the predators away. Some of the ranchers figured that they had overstepped the boundary of safe- ty. The older hands pulled back into the town until they could ade- quately protect themselves and their families out on the plain. Some families, determined to make the most of the land and the opportunities that it offered, stayed outside what the others con- sidered a safe distance, but many paid a terrible price for doing so. With new buildings erected every day, the pace of New Savannah’s development had fooled these younger ranchers into believing the predatory dinosaurs were no longer a threat, and that the humans had scared them off for good. However, the original settlers’ determined resistance had forced the predators to take more risks and attack whenever hunger forced an opportunity. The ranchers living on the very edge of the community proved to be perfect targets. Most realized that New Savannah itself could not protect all who decided to live out on the plains. Nathanial P. Hood, New Savannah’s military advisor, suggested the construction of small outposts from which patrols could be launched against threatening predators. These would also act as an early warning system against other threats; Hood was all too aware that the Union would be equally interested in the rich land surrounding New Savannah, and he was determined not to give any ground to the enemies of his country. Four small wooden forts were erected along the bank of the river, each six kilometers apart: close enough to support each other but far enough apart to actually play a useful role in supporting the outlying ranches. Union spies and potential interlopers could be apprehended at one of these forts, and the forts’ very presence would increase the range that patrols could cover. They would also provide convenient resting places for the workers that traveled to and from the mountains, for rich deposits of ore had been discovered and work had begun in earnest to retrieve it. And all the time, the building of permanent structures continued in New Savannah. As the years progressed, more and more settlers came to New Savannah, until the town was forced to spread over the plains towards the forests and the mountains. Each influx brought more machinery, equipment and resources to develop the town. Soon, over two hundred thousand souls lived in New Savannah and its environs. The town had expanded out in a checkerboard fashion, copying the squares of old-time Savannah, and there were all the offices, facilities, and amenities that humans elsewhere would have expected to find. Farmers started to farm the vast plains, and ranchers herded the triceratops further and further from the new city. Ruthless purges against dinosaur predators were carried out to clear the way for further human development and for the secu- rity of the herds, but predators would always reappear just when the people thought them destroyed. As Hepsediah Porter and his family grew in years, so the city of New Savannah grew in size and maturity, until it was a self-sufficient and thriving communi- ty. Whether you come here for commerce or adventure or just to bask in its splendor, New Savannah is a must-see spot for anyone on Cretasus.

The City Today

Governing the Wilderness

If it were not for the presence of dinosaurs among them, the citizens of New Savannah could be forgiven for thinking that they’d never left Earth. All the raw materials valued on Earth can be found somewhere near the city, whether it be in the ocean, the earth or the mountains. In fact, the land is so fertile, so inviting to humanity, that some have even entertained thoughts that they’ve discovered Eden, while others (mostly conspiracy theorists) believe that it is some grand alien plan to lure humans to a single location, in order to make it easy for aliens to harvest them for their own sinister reasons. While the debate continues amongst those with very little to do, the majority of New Savannah’s peo- ple get on with the job of making Cretasus their home. A self-supporting community, New Savannah benefits from a sound organizational structure conceived by Porter and his advi- sors. As the city grew in size, so did the need for a system of law enforcement and social services to provide the infrastructure for the thriving community. All these services were provided by the Confederacy. They include a fire service, free public heath sys- tem, sanitation department, police department, and all the other public utilities and structures of government one would expect to find in a major city. Acting as head of the New Savannah community is Hepsediah Porter, now in his early fifties. He and his close advi- sors form what government there is; there are none to rival him, although there are sometimes voices of dissent, which usually manifest themselves in protest or pressure groups. There is very little in the way of political debate in the homesteads of the city, and it is unlikely that there will be a place for it in the near future. All of those who come to New Savannah do so out of choice; if they are unwilling to live by its laws or pay its taxes, they simply leave for the frontier. All who travel through space to New Savannah are fully aware what is expected of them, and those who refuse to comply are typically asked to leave.

Settling in New Savannah & Acquiring Land

There are two ways one can come to live in New Savannah. The most common is through an employment contract, which guarantees the successful applicant a house and some land. The second way is through land purchase. The Confederacy has enough troops in the area to forcefully lay claim to the plains of New Savannah, and it can sell land to those who wish to live there. A nominal rent is paid to the Confederacy to help finance the army and forts in the area. Only a handful of the citizens resent paying the taxes and rent, as they’re all too well aware of what might happen if the patrols stop and the predators return in num- bers. Those less well-off are also eligible for land purchase by mortgage, for which they purchase the land for a nominal fee, and

then are expected to pay a greater sum of rent to the Confederacy to pay for the land. Failure to pay means eviction; New Savannah isn’t a socialist utopia, and life there can be as harsh for those who fail as it is back on Earth. Once the land has been purchased, the owner is free to do with it as he or she sees fit (providing the Confederacy gets its rent, of course). There are strict regulations preventing the mass purchase of land or monopolies of ownership, as Porter and the Confederacy are wary about potential land barons buying up all the land and then selling to Union settlers. This is one conceptual Mason-Dixon line that they’re determined to preserve. Of course, many visitors to New Savannah choose neither of the above options, opting instead to stay only long enough to gath- er supplies for passage to the frontier.

Industry

All conceivable types of industry occur in or around New Savannah. All kinds of ore are mined, mostly around the moun- tains that separate the New Savannah plain from the desert that Porter’s initial expedition had to cross. Many of these industries are in the hands of the Confederacy, as they supply vital raw mate- rials critical to any nation at times of war. The processing facto- ries are kept close to their sources of supply, which means that New Savannah’s greatest industrial center is in fact many miles away from the city. Life for the families of the miners and other workers is harder than for those fortunate enough to live within New Savannah’s walls, but they have their own communities and small towns that support them. The largest town is called Mount Crowe, after Porter’s scien- tific advisor who discovered the main seams of ore in and around the mountains. It is probably the last major stopover point for any- one wishing to head off into the mountains or beyond into the desert, though very few come there for such a purpose. Most work for the mining companies, and there’s always work available for deadeye shots to guard the ponderous travelling freight wagons. Work is also underway on a railway between New Savannah and the factories to reduce the risk of dinosaur attack; none of the huge haulage wagons can travel very fast across the plain of New Savannah, and while the trucks are pretty indestructible, their crews aren’t. Pteranadons and pteradactyls from the mountains have been known to attack resting convoys, and there is always the threat of bandits. Drivers and outriders are always in demand too; if one is looking for passage between New Savannah and the mountains with food and pay, then the freight convoys are the best option.

Places of Note

There are several places of particular importance in New Savannah:

City Hall, where all the Offices are located; The Docks, where most commercial and military boats moor;

The Grand Market, where most trade is done in New Savannah; Chatham Theatre, the largest and most popular theatre in New Savannah; and The Spaceport, the only one on Cretasus under civilian con-

trol.

City Government

Hepsediah Porter is the man responsible for the development of what is essentially his city. As the population began to grow, he studied the design Robert Castell had developed and that James Oglethorpe used to create their magnificent Georgian city, the Earthly Savannah that Porter loved so much. Drafting plans for New Savannah, Porter and his team adopted the system of broad, straight streets interspersed with grassy squares and parks. Lining these streets were buildings of all kinds: houses and apartment buildings, food stores, neighborhood shops, etc. The prototype allowed for great flexibility and a pleasant human scale. Thirty such squares formed the basis of the early city, and as more peo- ple arrived, more squares were added. The moat and palisade sys- tem were replaced by stone walls, which soon had to be ringed by a second perimeter of massive wire fences as the city continued to grow. While not as secure as the palisade, the fences are strong enough to provide protection from the smaller dinosaurs now that the ranchers had reduced the threat of mass stampedes. Porter’s initial desire had been to re-create the eighteenth and nineteenth century architecture that Savannah was famed for, but simple economics and building pressures ruled out such ambitions in the short term. However, as more settlers arrived and the machinery to develop more impressive structures came available, some of his dreams became reality. New Savannah has a burgeoning business community, spec- tacular docks, the only civilian spaceport on Cretasus and much more to interest the adventurer. It is the epitome of sophistication and Southern gentility, and is even more outstanding given the harsh environment in which it thrives. Like a fragrant orchid of culture surrounded by an arid desert of plebieanism, the city is a marked contrast to the hardships that surround its strong stone walls. While ranchers and farmers fend off the natural world they so carefully tend, the inhabitants of New Savannah relish the new life they have made for themselves on Cretasus. For the majority, it has been a struggle, but some arrive with the money and back- ground of privilege. However, most of New Savannah’s good cit- izens have endured their own hardships to get this far, and none intend to return to the trials of the life they’ve striven to escape. New Savannah is one of the few centers of habitation that has a formal government. Few of those that decide the city’s future are not “first generation,” and real authority lies with the Porter fam- ily and their close friends. Hepsediah Porter is still the overall “ruler” of New Savannah, acting as the head of the community as something crossed between a president and a mayor. There is no serious political opposition to the Porter patriarch, and it almost

seems that he is without critics, but this is not the case. Taxation is always a sore point, but most arguments are nipped in the bud by admitting only those willing to pay such taxes to live in New Savannah. The taxes pay for the infrastructure needed to keep New Savannah working: roads, street lighting, the fire service, hospitals, waterworks, militia guard, and other public utilities controlled by Porter’s government. Each department of the local government is responsible for keeping its part of the city in work- ing order, and the Porter family oversees this conglomeration, meshing it into one unified whole. Individuals are elected by the citizens of New Savannah to run these utilities for terms of four years. The role of public servant is not a light one; the grave responsibility that comes with the office is not often reflected in the pay, and one needs a certain philanthropic bent to stand for one term, never mind run for a second. There is a great sense of achievement amongst those who have held office, as each and every one of the holders recognizes the significance of what they are building on Cretasus. Being part of the New Savannah success story is a great honor. There are six main offices: the Sheriff’s Office, the Office of Public Works, the Office of Agriculture, the Office of Civil Defense, the Office of Trade and Industry, and the Office of Public Welfare.

The Sheriff’s Office

The current holder of the Sheriff’s Office is Nathanial Kelly, a devout Protestant whose Earthly ancestors lived in Virginia. A former Security Officer on one of the Confederacy’s largest space-craft, the CSS Shiloh, he is now in his fiftieth year and has kept crime in New Savannah so low that visitors may be unaware that there are any misdemeanors committed in the city. Every officer in the police force wears his badge of office on the left breast: a circle with the Lone Star in the center. The rest of the uniform resembles the grey worn at West Point before the Civil War, making these guardians of the public good instantly recognizable. They are trained to keep the public peace, but also to shoot; the new challenges that the dinosaur planet brings are also not lost on them. Their special division of Bronco Riders handles any threats posed by the herds, and often patrols outside the city to make sure that there are no external threats passing unnoticed. The police also keep a stable of horses and a crack posse that has been known to pursue criminals deep into the swamps and mountains, usually to return days later with their quarry in hand. Zeke Wylde, now a little older than when he fought the albertosaurs at the settlement’s birth, is the head of these Rough Riders. His knowledge of the mountains is second only to that of the criminals who make it their permanent home, and even they have been caught out several times by his tenacious raids into their territory. The city is split into separate precincts, each answerable to Kelly’s office, and is manned by between twenty to forty officers at one time. The Rough Riders are a city-wide elite, the result of

pooled resources from each precinct. All in all, Kelly does a good job in keeping the citizens safe from the potential dangers that sur- round them and strives to ensure that crime does not pay. The Sheriff’s Office is also responsible for the upkeep of the New Savannah prison, a large concrete structure often mistaken for a fort by those approaching the city from outside. Fifteen inhospitable miles separate the prison from the city, and if gover- nor Jackson Wright has anything to do with it, its inhabitant won’t be making that journey until they’ve paid their debt to society in full – and then some. There is no death penalty on Cretasus, but doubtless your players will give cause for some to call for its introduction! Peterson Precinct: A typical precinct station located in the east of the city, Peterson Precinct is home to sixty officers and support personnel. Run by Evan Peterson (the city’s longest serv- ing precinct officer) it has approximately forty police officers ready for action at any one time. At least half of these will be patrolling the streets, as Kelly strongly believes that a powerful police presence deters criminals. Peterson remains at the precinct throughout the day, meeting with Kelly weekly in the city hall to report on some of the initiatives that affect his precinct. The most serious problem in Peterson Precinct is public disorder, as its hotels and bars are popular with visitors from outside, who often bring their cash with every intention of spending it on either the finest wines available to humanity or cheap rot-gut whisky that still “does the job.” Ranch-hands frequent this part of the city when they are delivering to the market and they always bring drunken violence. The officers give short shrift to aggressive drunks; many ranch hands have awakened to find themselves slightly bruised and sore in the station’s cells. Here are the statistics for the average police officer on the New Savannah force should your players force their intervention at any time. New Savannah Police, Confederate War1: CR 1/2; Medium-size Humanoid (6 ft.); HD 1d8+3 (includes Toughness feat); Init +0; Spd 30 ft.; AC 12 (+2 leather armor); Atk +2 melee (1d4+1/crit 19-20, knife), or +1 ranged (1d10/crit x3, Colt .45); AL LN; SV Fort +2, Ref +0, Will +0; Str 12, Con 11, Dex 10, Int 10, Wis 10, Cha 10. Skills: Intimidate +4 (4), Handle Animal +2 (1), Jump (1), Listen +2 (0), Ride +2 (2), Spot +2 (0). Feats: Toughness, Alertness. Possessions: Knife, Colt .45 with 4d10 bullets, leather armor, flashlight, manacles, cash $1d6. Police may be equipped with Winchester rifles or shotguns for special mis- sions. The Rough Riders: A posse of forty trained horsemen, the Rough Riders are chosen from the elite from each precinct. Led by Zeke Wylde, the Riders often go out into the wilderness to get their man, so all the Riders are expert horsemen and scouts. They wear no uniform as such but all carry photographic identification and a badge of office, though they rarely get called on to serve inside the city. They are a cut above the average officer, and their statistics reflect their specialist training.

Rough Rider, Confederate War1/Bro1: CR 2; Medium-size Humanoid (6 ft.); HD 2d8+3; Init +1 (Dex); Spd 40 ft. (light horse); AC 13 (+1 Dex, +2 leather armor); Atk +1

melee (1d8/crit 19-20, longsword), or +2 ranged (1d10/crit x3, Colt .45)*; AL LN; SV Fort +2, Ref +3, Will +0; Str 11, Con 11, Dex 12, Int 11, Wis 10, Cha 12. * Does not include penalties for firing while riding, which are reduced due to Mounted Archery feat: -2 if mount makes double move, -4 if mount runs. Skills: Animal Empathy +6 (4), Balance +3 (2), Handle Animal +8 (5), Intimidate +5 (4), Intuit Direction +4 (4), Knowledge (nature) +2 (2), Jump +2 (2), Ride +7 (5), Wilderness Lore +4 (4). Feats: Mounted Combat, Mounted Archery, Toughness. Possessions: Light horse, longsword, Colt .45 with 4d10 bullets, Winchester rifle with 3d10 bullets, leather armor, cash $2d6. May be equipped with lances or other weapons for special missions. Scenario Hooks: The most likely point of involvement the characters will have with the police force is if they get a little rowdy or forget that New Savannah is a civilized city, not a place where you can kill without facing the consequences. However, if the characters are responsible citizens, they can volunteer as Special Officers or even be deputized to assist the Rough Riders if their reputation warrants it.

movie Alligator to you, but watch it; now imagine it’s a dinosaur down there.

The Office of Public Welfare

Once again, this Office doesn’t provide a great opportunity for adventure; it handles social security and benefits for the sick, the elderly and the disabled. If you can’t work, then you should be able to find help here. Isaiah Mason heads the Office of Public Welfare and quietly gets on with it. There is an investigation department that deals with fraud, but other than catching cheats, there’s not much in the way of excitement at the Office of Public Welfare. The one source of controversy is usually the immigration sys- tem. The Office has to examine people who have arrived at New Savannah’s massive spaceport for viruses and also has to detain those who are on the planet illegally. The growing population of aliens on Cretasus has raised fears of exotic disease, and with the exception of the well-known Scray, most aliens are temporarily quarantined upon their arrival at the spaceport. Scenario Hooks: Unless you really want to go on a crusade to better the lot of the down at heel, there’s not much room for adventure here.

The Office of Agriculture

The Office of Public Works

Probably the least glamorous of all the public offices, the Office of Public Works is run by Winston Porter, the second-eld- est son of the city patriarch. He is responsible for the smooth day- to-day running of the Office, which is the largest of the six. His department covers a lot of different ground; the fire service, health care, sewerage and waterworks, fuel supplies, land registration, power, communications, and many other amenities taken for granted by many citizens in New Savannah all fall under his juris- diction. From clearing the sewers of rats and dinosaurs to provid- ing the facilities for delicate surgery, the Office of Public Works is a multi-faceted machine that runs smoothly due only to the dedi- cation of the people who work within it. Private medicine is unheard of, and all doctors must be registered with the Office before they can practice. Of course private doctors do exist, but they tend to serve those who don’t want their medical needs com- ing to the attention of the police. Scenario Hooks: As stated earlier, there usually isn’t much in the way of adventure to be found at the Office of Public Works, but without it and the services it supplies, the characters wouldn’t be able to live in the city or receive medical aid. Union or bandit sabotage of the public works is sometimes an issue, and dinosaurs mucking up the generators has caused problems in the past. There is always work for sewer cleaners; this can be a very dangerous job, and despite the generous pay offered by the Office, very few pursue this as a career. Not many people will recommend the

Porter’s eldest daughter, Catherine, is the head of this Office, which also deals with other sources of food vital to existence in New Savannah. The fishing ships fall under the control of this large department, as do the farms and ranches of the Main Valley. It is only recently that the office has started regulating the fishing ships, not because of fears of over fishing but because many unsuitable boats wound up at the bottom of the inland ocean after attacks by the larger sea dinosaurs. Small rowing boats look like perfect prey to some of the true leviathans that hunt in the same shoals as the fishermen, and more than one family has lost its founder through such misadventure. All land ownership is registered here, as are the individual farms and ranches that lie in the surrounding territory. While the Office covers most of the land within five days’ ride of New Savannah, it doesn’t stretch to the true frontier ranches, as most of those were founded by independent endeavor and don’t come under the jurisdiction of the city. All ranchers register their brand here to help settle cattle disputes, and the Office even has veteri- narians who specialize in the fauna of Cretasus (as much as one can be skilled in something so new) who train some of the less transient ranch hands the skills needed to birth the young of their peculiar herds. The most arduous form of employment offered by the Office is the post of Ranch Inspector, which involves extensive and somewhat dangerous travel through the Main Valley to ensure that ranches are being kept on the land the rancher actually owns and that no one is collecting “stray” beasts from land that isn’t theirs.

This is an unpopular job, as its other responsibilities include col- lecting the taxes due to the Office. If a farmer or rancher has had a bad year or disastrous month, there’s sometimes nothing left for the Inspector to take. Things can turn nasty, especially if the indi- vidual concerned feels that the department is at fault for not sup- porting him during his hour of need. The Inspector usually travels with at least one Rough Rider and several other paid representa- tives to both protect him from angry farmers and enforce his authority when necessary. Scenario Hooks: The Office usually hires outsiders to enforce its dictates, as the potential for corruption is quite high. This somewhat mercenary approach is regulated by a small force of professional officers, all of whom have been extensively vetted before being appointed. They oversee the hirelings and make sure the operation runs smoothly. Characters becoming involved with the Office can usually expect to have at least one NPC accompa- ny them, no matter what task they are paid to undertake. Here are some typical missions:

1. Tax collection: This is a great opportunity to ride with the Rough Riders, but it can also be a harrowing experience for the more sensitive players. Many people struggle in the Main Valley, and a dinosaur attack can wipe out a great deal of hard work. Characters could find themselves in a situation where they support the farmer who can’t pay and refuses to abandon his farm, instead holing up with his rifle and enough ammunition and food to keep the officers off his family’s back. Grudges can develop if the play- ers carry out their duty; if the same farmer, now ruined, catches up with them when the bandit gang he runs ambushes the characters, what will he do? 2. Rustling: Players can find themselves involved in anti- rustling investigations. The Butlers and Dukes, two families that you will meet later, are a common source of friction that the Office has to smooth over and this would be a perfect way to involve the players in their age-old feud. There are also the ban- dits who hide out in the hills, mountains and swamps; they still need to eat, and what easier way than stealing cattle (or other edi- ble life-forms). There’s potential for an awful lot of scenarios here: What if they discover that the rustlers aren’t even human, but aliens or fierce dinosaur predators? 3. Hunting a deadly sea predator. While the Office’s ships are sturdier than most, no one really knows the true size of the mon- sters that dwell within the inland ocean. What terror may come from the deep? Jaws will seem like child’s play compared to some of the specimens chomping their way through the unlucky fisher- men of New Savannah.

The Office of Civil Defense

Under the leadership of Nathanial P. Hood, the Office of Civil Defense covers all military activity in New Savannah, including the patrols that man some of the smaller waypoint forts outside the city walls. Remarkably, there isn’t that much in the way of excite- ment for the military forces and the New Savannah Militia simply

because there’s no one to fight; the regular Confederate Army watches for any Union challenge and the force stationed at New Savannah is more or less a garrison to protect the city from the larger predators and the unlikely but possible prospect of an Union attack. The Militia is purely a Civil Defense Force, but they do train with the military, and could be a useful occupation for player char- acters who want to be soldiers but also to have the freedom with which to adventure on Cretasus.

Militiaman, Confederate Sol1: CR 1; Medium-size Humanoid (6 ft.); HD 1d8+3 (includes Toughness feat); Init +1 (Dex); Spd 30 ft.; AC 16 (+5 flak jacket, +1 Dex); Atk +1 melee (1d4+1/crit 19-20, knife), +2 ranged (1d10/crit x3, automatic pistol), or +2 ranged (1d12/crit x3, Winchester rifle); AL LN; SV Fort +2, Ref +1, Will +0; Str 12, Con 11, Dex 12, Int 12, Wis 10, Cha 10. Skills: Drive +5 (4), Intimidate +4 (4), Knowledge (strat- egy & tactics) +5 (4), Listen +4 (2), Pilot +3 (2), Spot +2 (0), Use Technical Equipment +5 (4). Feat: Toughness, Alertness. Possessions: Knife, automatic pistol with 1d4 cartridges (20 bullets each), Winchester rifle with 1d4 cartridges (20 bullets each), flak jacket, cash $1d4.

The Office of Trade and Industry

Run by Jeremiah Othelthwaite, this Office is responsible for taxation of the local population and New Savannah businesses, as well as ensuring that there is fair play amongst the companies mining the rich ore from the mountains and the surrounding area. It is a very busy office, as new businesses are opening all the time, particularly in New Savannah and the industrial district around Mount Crowe. The Office covers such diverse functions as the transport infrastructure, and its main project now is the railway from Mount Crowe to the industrial district of New Savannah. It is also responsible for traffic coming in and out of the spaceport, and if the characters start the game by arriving from another plan- et, they will see representatives of both the Office of Public Welfare and the Office of Trade and Industry. After all, Porter is keen to limit the number of people wanting to live in New Savannah as he’s all too aware of the problems that overpopula- tion bring. The Office also deals with the thriving business community that has developed over the last few decades. Business leaders typically try to get taxes lowered; if there is ever to be a concert- ed challenge to the Porter patriarchy, more than likely it will come from the business sector. However, unless your players want to get involved in a political game, you don’t really need to worry about this, since Porter policies are popular with the vast majority of cit- izens, and businesses are strictly forbidden to sponsor candidates for election to any of the offices of government. The influence of business on policy is widely regarded as the beginning of the end for the Union’s once-democratic government, as those who had

bankrolled candidates soon made it clear that they hadn’t done so for philanthropic reasons. Scenario Hooks: There are several ways that the characters could find themselves working for the Office of Trade and Industry. Here are just a few:

1. The Office employs a team of industrial investigators who ensure that businesses are playing by the rules. With the rise of competition among firms vying for Confederate contracts to mine ore, the investigators are kept extremely busy and there is always an opportunity for players to find employment with the Office in that capacity. A few gunslingers are always welcome, simply because if a business is acting in an underhanded manner, its owner would rather silence the investigator than give up a lucra- tive contract. After all, anything can happen en route between New Savannah and Mount Crowe. Many recent investigations have surrounded two large families, the Butlers and the Dukes, more of whom you’ll hear later. 2. Bandits have stolen a transport ship from the Spaceport and the characters are hired to retrieve it. This can bring them into conflict with pirates who are trading off-world and could be the start of a long campaign – assuming the players actually want to work with the authorities and not become outlaws themselves! 3. Supplies are disappearing en route to the railway, with whole shipments and their drivers leaving New Savannah, never to be seen again. The Office wants to know what is going on: is it the work of the Union, bandits, dinosaurs or something more sin- ister? Some ranch hands believe that they’ve seen the ghosts of the drivers begging for help but have been too spooked to take any action. Others claim to have seen strange lights in the sky; could it be aliens? It is up to the characters to get to the truth.

Life in New Savannah

For the majority of citizens, life is very comfortable. The dif- ficulties of early settlement have been overcome; new arrivals don’t realize how good they’ve got it. As discussed before, the city is arranged in an array of squares, which radiate out from the inland ocean like a vast checkerboard. The older squares contain both residential and commercial buildings, but as the city has grown, squares have tended to be separated more along lines of function. There are whole squares that contain shops and others that contain only residences, giving the city a more district-like feel. For example, around the huge market are many other busi- ness squares, drawn by the vast crowds that frequent the market- place. The Chatham Theatre is surrounded by hotels, saloons, and other places of entertainment, all providing somewhere to have a drink before (and after) whatever show is currently in production. Even the residential areas have convenience stores that provide most of their needs.

A Typical Residential District

Houses make up the majority of buildings in the residential squares, with the occasional shop or bar breaking up the near per- fect (or monotonous) symmetry of Porter’s architectural model. Most houses are two-story and hold between four and seven peo- ple, typically a single family. The district we’ll look at is called Stuart District, which consists of eight squares, and is of fairly recent construction. It is based near the southern wall of the city, far away from the inland ocean. The brief outline here leaves enough room for you to inhabit the district with anyone you like. Broadly speaking, it falls under the jurisdiction of the Stuart Precinct police station, and is fairly quiet. It has two bars, three diners, and myriad small coffee shops and convenience stores. Jerry’s (Residential Bar): Stuart District’s largest bar is a popular meeting place for after work drinks as it is based near the coach house, the point at which all the locals disembark after a hard day’s work in the city center. Popular attractions include live bands playing country music every weekday evening and dancing on the weekends. The bar takes its name from owner Gerald Dwight, a resident of three years who brought enough money with him to have first dibs on the bar when it was built. He used to work on the docks and has good knowledge of the ocean, even though he now lives at the opposite end of New Savannah from his former place of employment. His old buddies still drink here most evenings, bringing with them “fishy” tales: who has caught what, and in some cases what has caught whom. Uncle Moe’s (Family Restaurant): William Greenburg runs this family-oriented diner. The establishment’s second owner, Greenburg took over from Moe Williams when the latter died (of natural causes, not food poisoning). The diner holds places for about sixty people and you’re not allowed to bring firearms onto the premises or use foul language in front of the children. Greenburg is more than capable of throwing rebarbative cus- tomers out if they refuse his polite requests to leave, an offer only given once. Meals are good, the portions are fair, and the staff friendly if you play by their rules. Jackson the Grocer: Typical of many convenience stores in New Savannah, this one, run by fifty-year-old manager Andrew Jackson, sells everything from ironmongery to boiled sweets. Prices tend to be a little high, but the store is right on the doorstep of those who live nearby, and a long haul through the city is the last thing residents want if they just need a cup of sugar. Jackson keeps a shotgun under the counter and is ably assisted by his wife Megan, a forty-three-year-old redhead with a tongue sharper than bitter lemon candy. These stores should be the first port of call for characters wanting to get a good idea of the lay of the land. Everyone in the neighborhood pops into the shop for those last- minute items, and anyone not recognized by the Jackson family either plans their shopping like a military campaign or is hiding from humanity for some possibly sinister reason.

Dinosaurs in New Savannah Dinosaurs are quite difficult to domesticate, but people make pets out of

Dinosaurs in New Savannah

Dinosaurs are quite difficult to domesticate, but people make pets out of them anyway. Small dinos in particular are kept in cages, in yards, on chains, or loose in people’s houses. It’s rare to find someone who doesn’t keep two or three small dinosaurs (squirrel- to dog-sized) around the house. Brightly-colored dinos are particularly popular; many of the domesticated versions are actually poisonous creatures with their venom sacs removed. Dinos smaller than dog-sized generally do not speak and range in cleverness from the level of a monkey to the level of a rabbit. They vary widely in temperament and habits. It’s also important to note that some of these dinos will bite, scratch, and attack their owners (who are not at all their masters). Most are not fully domesticated and do not toilet train. People keep them around at their own risk, but it seems to satisfy some deep psychological urge, or perhaps allay fears of the uncon- quered hordes of dinosaurs outside the settled areas. A few types of dino have been fully gentled for use in the house and are tame enough to be kept around small children. Butterfly lizards have a delicate pair of gliding wings and bright- ly colored scales; they are greedy and eager eaters which skitter around walls and ceilings like geckos on speed. White Jagers are

tiny pale nocturnal bipeds that keep the house clear of vermin by patient, quiet stalking of their prey. They imprint like ducks: once bonded to a particular person, they will respect, obey, and protect that person forever. Both of these species breed well in captivity, although butterfly lizards are notoriously frail and temperature- sensitive, requiring a warm, moist atmosphere or their wings dry out and they perish.

It is illegal for dinosaurs to walk loose down the streets of New Savannah. Riding them or walking them on a leash is allowed, but otherwise they need to stay indoors. New arrivals are sometimes surprised to see compsognathus, clipped pterosaurs, and edaphosaurs wandering up and down the street on leashes. Raptors and protoceratops, being of human-level intelligence, are an exception to this rule, although raptors are rarely seen in the streets without a military escort. The larger dinosaurs are often under the tenuous control of an injection harness, but most civilians still give them a wide berth, remembering the rare (but infamous) lapses when they have mauled a passer-by or attacked each other or even turned on their owners. Even at their best, they leave enormous piles of dino dung in the middle of the roads. Dinosaur leashes are constructed of thin but sturdy links of metal, with a thick metal collar. Owners are required to wrap their

dinosaurs’ leashes, not around their arm or hand, but around their torso: a mere handhold is not enough to restrain the larger ones and the authorities figure that people will try their hardest to avoid exciting their pets if failure means being dragged through the dusty streets! Electrified leashes are also available for especially wary owners. (Breaking a standard dinosaur leash is a DC 25 Strength check; slipping a chain is a DC 30 Escape Artist check. Attempting to restrain a dinosaur using a standard chain is a straight Strength contest, holder vs. dino; using a choke chain gives the human a +5 bonus to the roll, although it may antago- nize the dinosaur!) Very large dinosaurs need not be chained to a person, but they do need to be linked in a chain that eventually leads to a dino rid- den by a human, or to a vehicle. Strings of chained brachies are a common sight on the outskirts of New Savannah.

qrfel and Zagmo, Dinosaur Researchers

qrfel is a representative of Underglen, a little-known proto- ceratops city to the north. He is the emissary to New Savannah. (qrfel comes from a group of protoceratops who do not capitalize their names; they feel it’s a sign of arrogance and too much attach- ment to the self.) There are two emissaries, actually: qrban, qrfel’s elder brother, handles negotiations with the Confederates, while qrfel aims to learn as much as he can from these strange outsiders. qrfel has somehow acquired the services of Zagmo, an ornit- holestes. Zagmo obeys qrfel’s orders, and in general serves as his hands. qrfel is a common sight, walking around town with Zagmo in his special harness. At least, that’s the story that’s heard on the streets. In reality, qrfel and Zagmo are saboteurs. They represent the “aggressive pacifism” faction of the protoceratops, and work as best they can to prevent development in the Main Valley and the expansion of the Confederate military presence. They have contacts with various factions of smugglers, and work to facilitate weapons deals that put guns in the hands of raptors. Zagmo is an accomplished thief, and often enters houses in the dead of night to steal important documents. They also gather information which might be useful to various resistance groups (Dinozonians, wild ones, raptor tribes, and any other opponents of progress). qrfel and Zagmo finance their activities with sales of native artifacts through a fence named Anders. qrfel is soft-spoken and often buys rounds of drinks for new- comers at some of New Savannah’s many bars. If drawn out, he praises human science and human accomplishments and plays the role of humble student very well. Zagmo never speaks. In fact, his tongue was cut out by sci- entists interested in ornitholestes speech patterns, which led him to hate humankind. After they were finished with him, the scien- tists sold him to smugglers, who taught him to rob. He often swal- lowed stolen items in order to prevent them from being found. He was quite accomplished by the time he managed to slaughter his

owners and escape, wounded, to the alleys, a feat which brought him to qrfel’s attention. qrfel nursed him back to health, for which he feels grateful, and he shares qrfel’s goal of sweeping the valley clean of humans. Zagmo often dresses in a fool’s motley, complete with jester’s cap, because it makes humans think he’s not a threat. He is.

qrfel, Proteceratops Spy5: CR 7; Small Animal; HD 7d10+14; hp 52; Init +0; Spd 20 ft.; AC 18 front (+7 natural, +1 size)*, 14 sides and back (+2 natural, +1 size)*; Atk +7 melee (1d8+2, bite); SA Spy class abilities; AL LG (zealot); SV Fort +10, Ref +7, Will +10; Str 16, Con 18, Dex 10, Int 14, Wis 16, Cha 18. Skills: Bluff +15 (11), Ciphers +7 (5), Diplomacy +15 (11), Gather Information +10 (6), Intuit Direction +4 (1), Knowledge (nature) +8 (6), Knowledge (dinosaurs) +8 (6), Knowledge (geography) +8 (6), Knowledge (history) +11 (9), Knowledge (local) +11 (9), Knowledge (human society) +11 (9), Listen +13 (10), Sense Motive +15 (11), Speak Language (Common, Latin, Anglit, Protoceratops, Raptor), Search +5 (3), Spot +7 (4), Wilderness Lore +5 (2). Feats:

Dodge, Mobility. Possessions: qrfel wears modified saddlebags to store his finds. * SA – Spy class: As with all fifth level spies, qrfel can use Slip of the Tongue fives times per day, receives a +1 dodge to AC vs. ranged weapons, and can use Nick of Time and Intriguing once per day. His dodge feat can also add +1 AC against a designated opponent. Zagmo, Ornitholestes Ftr1/Rog2: CR 4; Medium Animal (6 ft.); HD 5d10+20; hp 54; Init +7 (+3 Dex, +4 improved initiative); Spd 60 ft.; AC 16 (+3 Dex, +4 natural, - 1 size); Atk +11 melee (2d8+7/crit 19-20, laser sword), +11 melee (1d4+7, bite), or +8 melee (1d3+5, 2 claws); AL NE; SV Fort +7, Ref +7, Will +2; Str 24, Con 19, Dex 16, Int 6, Wis 10, Cha 4. Skills: Hide +8 (5), Climb +8 (1), Move Silently +8 (5), Listen +4 (4), Spot +6 (6), Pick Pockets +8 (5). Feats:

Weapon Proficiency: Laser Sword, Improved Initiative. Possessions: Cloak, laser sword. Zagmo’s archaic and specialized training gives him two levels of rogue and one of fighter. Like any second-level rogue, he can use the abilities evasion and sneak attack

+1d6.

The Confederate Planets Center for Knowledge (C.P.C.K.)

While New Savannah is famed for its hospitality, excitement, and picturesque way of life, it is also the last point of contact for many explorers before they venture into the unknown. There are many forests, mountains, and valleys far beyond the frontier of the inland ocean. Not only does New Savannah serve as the nerve center for all the farms, ranches, and industries on the plain, but

it’s also the origin point for many expeditions of discovery. Several offices offer contracts to brave souls willing to risk themselves in the wilderness to further the Confederacy’s knowl- edge. Whether the expeditions are to make maps of the area, search for resources, or simply to discover the fate of the last com- pany that never returned, there is usually an opening for a deter- mined and adventurous sort. Despite its rather official-sounding title, the C.P.C.K. is run by a private citizen by the name of Richard Montague. Montague is of old Louisiana stock and funds expeditions into the unknown on behalf of the Confederacy. He takes a keen interest in all the rumors brought in by other explorers and even the frontier. His people were the first