JAMES BOND WINS

AGAIN IN ‘SPECTRE’
WEEKEND JOURNAL PAGE 19

AN OPEN HOUSE

RYAN INVITES LAWMAKERS ONTO NEW COMMITTEE
TO WEIGH RULE CHANGES
NATION PAGE 8

KNIGHTS ARE
OCEAN CHAMPS
SPORTS PAGE 11

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula

www.smdailyjournal.com

Weekend • Nov. 7-8, 2015 • Vol XVI, Edition 71

Susan Manheimer eyes candidacy for sheriff
San Mateo top cop would run against county Undersheriff Carlos Bolanos
By Austin Walsh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

The race for San Mateo County sheriff
already beginning to heat up, as San Mateo
Police Chief Susan Manheimer said she is
strongly considering declaring her candidacy to fill the position that will be left open
when Sheriff Greg Munks retires in 2018.
Manheimer, who has served as the top
cop in San Mateo since 2000, would run

Susan
Manheimer

against
San
Mateo
County
Undersheriff
Carlos Bolanos, who has
already officially filed
his candidacy and been
endorsed by Munks in the
wake of the sheriff’s
announcement Thursday,
Nov. 5, that he does not
intend to seek re-election.

Carlos
Bolanos

Manheimer said she
was inspired to examine
the opportunity to run,
at the behest of local
officials
who
have
encouraged her to throw
her hat in the ring for the
sheriff’s race.
“I have been honored
and humbled to have
been approached and

encouraged by a significant amount of
county and state leaders,” she said. “And I’m
very seriously considering this opportunity.”
A list of endorsers, headlined by U.S.
Rep. Jackie Speier, D-San Mateo, is already
beginning to form in support of
Manheimer’s candidacy, she said, though
she has not begun fundraising.

See SHERIFF, Page 24

U.S. hiring
saw surge
in October
Likely the Federal Reserve will
raise interest rates next month
By Christopher S. Rugaber
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAMANTHA WEIGEL/DAILY JOURNAL

Cathy Moses, Meg Redden, Rose Chun, BJ Stevens and Joan Germain attend the grand opening of the Half Moon Bay Senior
Campus Wednesday afternoon. The entire 264-unit campus was constructed in phases and provides affordable housing to
seniors on the coast.

A place to age

WASHINGTON — U.S. hiring swelled in October by the
largest amount all year, and unemployment dropped another notch to 5 percent, increasing the likelihood that the
Federal Reserve will raise interest rates next month for the
first time in a decade.
With Americans spending more on everything from
restaurant meals and clothing to new cars, employers added
an impressive 271,000 jobs last month.
That was a strong rebound from August and September,
when turmoil in China and other economies overseas
proved a drag on the U.S. job market.
Unemployment declined from 5.1 percent in September

See ECONOMY, Page 23

Half Moon Bay Senior Campus complete, offers 264 affordable units
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

For many seniors, living on a fixed
income while the cost of housing skyrockets in San Mateo County is challenging.
So when a new housing campus
designed specifically for the elderly
celebrated its grand opening in Half
Moon Bay this week, residents as well
as those involved in creating the 264
units were thrilled to offer affordable
homes to the community’s aging pop-

See CAMPUS, Page 23

Cool wet weather forecast
Saturday through Monday
By Keith Burbank
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE

Forecasters expect a 10th to a half an inch to fall across
the Bay Area starting Saturday night and ending Monday,
the National Weather Service said Friday.
A storm over the Eastern Pacific Ocean is expected to
strengthen and bring rain to the North Bay late Saturday,
spreading to San Francisco Sunday morning and to Monterey
by early Sunday afternoon, according to forecasters.

See WEATHER, Page 24

2

FOR THE RECORD

Weekend • Nov. 7-8, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day
“All forms of totalitarianism try to avoid the
strange, the problematic, the critical, the rational.
To do so, they must deny the metropolitan spirit,
equalize everything in city and country, and retain
a center which is not the center of anything because
everything else is swallowed up by it.”
— Paul Tillich, American theologian

This Day in History
Washington state’s original Tacoma
Narrows
Bridge,
nicknamed
“Galloping Gertie,” collapsed into
Puget Sound during a windstorm just
four months after opening to traffic.
In 1 8 6 1 , former U.S. President John Tyler was elected to the
Confederate House of Representatives (however, Tyler died
before he could take his seat).
In 1 9 1 4 , the first issue of The New Republic magazine was
published.
In 1 9 1 6 , Republican Jeannette Rankin of Montana became
the first woman elected to Congress.
In 1 9 1 7 , Russia’s Bolshevik Revolution took place as
forces led by Vladimir Ilyich Lenin overthrew the provisional government of Alexander Kerensky.
In 1 9 4 4 , President Franklin D. Roosevelt won an unprecedented fourth term in office, defeating Republican Thomas E.
Dewey.
In 1 9 5 4 , the CBS News program “Face the Nation” premiered with Ted Koop as host; the guest was Sen. Joseph R.
McCarthy, R-Wis.
In 1 9 6 2 , Republican Richard Nixon, having lost
California’s gubernatorial race, held what he called his “last
press conference,” telling reporters, “You won’t have Nixon
to kick around anymore.” Former first lady Eleanor
Roosevelt, 78, died in New York City.
In 1 9 7 2 , President Richard Nixon was re-elected in a landslide over Democrat George McGovern.
In 1 9 7 3 , Congress overrode President Richard Nixon’s
veto of the War Powers Act, which limits a chief executive’s
power to wage war without congressional approval.
In 1 9 7 4 , British peer Richard John Bingham, 7th Earl of
Lucan, disappeared after his children’s nanny, Sandra Rivett,
was bludgeoned to death at his family’s London home; he has
not been seen since.

1940

Birthdays

Actor Christopher
Knight is 58.

Rapper Tinie
Tempah is 27.

Rock singer Lorde
is 19.

Evangelist Billy Graham is 97. Former U.S. Sen. Rudy
Boschwitz, R-Minn., is 85. Actor Barry Newman is 77.
Singer Johnny Rivers is 73. Former supermodel Jean
Shrimpton is 73. Singer-songwriter Joni Mitchell is 72.
Former CIA Director David Petraeus is 63. Rock musician
Tommy Thayer (KISS) is 55. Actress Julie Pinson is 48. Rock
musician Greg Tribbett (Mudvayne) is 47. Actress Michelle
Clunie is 46. Actor Christopher Daniel Barnes is 43. Actors
Jeremy and Jason London are 43. Actress Yunjin Kim is 42.
Actor Adam DeVine is 32. Rock musician Zach Myers
(Shinedown) is 32. Actor Lucas Neff is 30.

REUTERS

Stunt performers ride their motorcycles on the walls of the ‘Well of Death,’ at a fair on the outskirts of Bengaluru, India.

T

here is an 8-foot tall statue of
Popeye in Alma, Arkansas,
known as the “Spinach Capital of
the World.” The town is the home of
Popeye Brand Spinach.
***
The plastic tip on each end of a shoelace
is called an aglet. The holes that the
shoelaces are laced through are called
eyelets.
***
Varieties of vinegar include white, distilled, cider, rice, balsamic and wine.
***
Humpty Dumpty met Alice in Lewis
Carroll’s (1832-1898) book “Through
the Looking-Glass” (1871). Alice
encounters Humpty Dumpty sitting on a
wall and asks him “Don’t you think
you’d be safer down on the ground?”
Dumpty assures her he won’t fall, but of
course, he does.
***
With help from his friend Thomas
Edison (1847-1931), Henry Ford
(1863-1947) invented the charcoal briquette in 1920. Ford created the briquette using the wood scraps and saw-

Lotto

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Nov. 4 Powerball

Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

2

12

17

65

20

17

DUMYD

PENOLY

Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app

©2015 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.

Nov. 6 Mega Millions
10

31

35

72

50

8
Mega number

Nov. 4 Super Lotto Plus
4

10

18

29

8

14

18

19

31

3

0

6

Daily Four
5

Daily three midday
0

38

24

American parapsychologist J. B. Rhine
(1895-1980) invented the term ESP in
his book “Extrasensory Perception”
(1934). In the book, Rhine stated that
clairvoyance and telepathy could be
studied from a scientific standpoint.
***
The first movie shown Grauman’s
Chinese Theatre in Hollywood was “The
King of Kings” (1927) by Cecil B.
DeMille (1881-1959). The silent movie
was about the life of Christ. The film
was in black and white, except for the
resurrection scene, which was filmed in
Technicolor.
***
Aesop’s Fables originated from an
ancient Greek slave named Aesop (620
B.C.–560 B.C.). The stories, passed
down by oral tradition, have a moral
lesson. Aesop’s fables such as “The
Tortoise and the Hare” and “The Boy
Who Cried Wolf” are told throughout
the world.
***
“Good stuff Maynard” was a catchphrase
of the 1980s. It came from a 1983 commercial for Malt-O-Meal hot cereal in
which a boy, Maynard, is having breakfast with his father and the boy claims
his imaginary friend ate his cereal.
***
Ans wer: The total is 5,050.

Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend edition of the Daily Journal.
Questions?
Comments?
Email
knowitall(at)smdailyjournal.com or call 3445200 ext. 114.

Local Weather Forecast

Fantasy Five
Powerball

ZALEG

dust from his Model T car factory. A relative of Ford’s, E.G. Kingsford, put the
invention into commercial production.
***
A dollar bill is 2.61 inches wide and
6.14 inches long.
***
Norm, the barfly on the sitcom
“Cheers” (1982-1993), frequently ate at
a restaurant called The Hungry Heifer.
His usual order was a huge piece of beef
called the Feeding Frenzy. Norm was
played by George Wendt (born 1948).
***
Since 1971, the official state neckwear
of the state of Arizona has been the bola
tie. A fad of the 1960s and 1970s, a bola
tie is a necktie consisting of a piece of
cord fastened with an ornamental clasp.
***
A fully-grown camel weighs around
1,500 pounds and is 6 feet tall at the
shoulder and 7 feet tall at the hump.
***
After Elvis Presley (1935-1977) performed in 1956 at the in Shreveport, La.
fairgrounds, the concertgoers crowded
the exit to try to see Elvis as he left. In
an attempt to disperse the crowd an
announcement was made that said
“Please, young people ... Elvis has left
the building. He has gotten in his car
and driven away ... Please take your
seats.”
***
Do you know what the total is when you
add up the numbers 1 to 100 consecutively (1+2+3+4, etc.)? See answer at
end.
***

0

0

Daily three evening

Mega number

1

2

5

The Daily Derby race winners are Lucky Star, No.
2, in first place; California Classic, No. 5, in second
place; and Lucky Charms, No. 12, in third place.
The race time was clocked at 1:48.08.

Saturday : Partly cloudy. A chance of rain
in the afternoon. Highs around 60. North
winds around 5 mph...Becoming west in
the afternoon.
Sunday : A chance of rain in the morning...Then rain likely in the afternoon.
Highs in the upper 50s.

Correction
The story “Building strong communities: Paul Geduldig
named new CEO of Peninsula Jewish Community Center” in
the Nov. 5 edition of the Daily Journal had incorrect information. The Peninsula Jewish Community Center shares its
Foster City campus with the Ronald C. Wornick Jewish Day
School.

MARLCO
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Yesterday’s

-

Print your
answer here:

(Answers Monday)
Jumbles: DOUSE
FLOOD
ADRIFT
ACQUIT
Answer: The violinist went to the doctor because he
wasn’t — FIT AS A FIDDLE

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information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com. Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
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LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Commercial Dungeness
crab season gets delayed
Tests find high level of toxins, sport season previously postponed

Weekend • Nov. 7-8, 2015

Police reports
Why don’t we do it in the road?
A couple was seen engaged in intercourse on the street near Ninth Avenue
and South Humboldt Street in San
Mateo before 4:36 p.m. Tuesday, Nov.
3.

BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE

The commercial Dungeness crab season,
which was scheduled to start later this
month, has been delayed due to concerns
about high levels of toxins caused by algae,
state fish and wildlife officials announced
Friday.
The commercial rock crab fishery, which
is open year round, is also closed,
California Department of Fish and Wildlife
officials said.
The announcement follows a unanimous
emergency vote on Thursday by the
California Fish and Game Commission to
delay the start of the recreational fishing
season for Dungeness and rock crabs as
well.
The recreational season for Dungeness
crab was scheduled to start Saturday, and the
commercial season on Nov. 15.
The closure will remain in effect indefinitely until testing determines that levels of
domoic acid, a neurotoxin that can accumulate in shellfish and other invertebrates,
have returned to safe levels, officials said.
The fishing ban comes after a California
Department of Public Health advisory issued
on Tuesday warned people not to consume
crabs caught in waters between the Oregon
border and the southern Santa Barbara
County line because of high levels of
domoic acid found in crab meat and viscera,
also known as crab butter.

Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com
State biologists have been testing
domoic acid levels in crabs since
September, officials said Friday. Recently,
tests on crabs from nine different ports from
Santa Barbara to Crescent City found
domoic acid levels exceeding the state's
action level, according to state wildlife officials.
Domoic acid can cause illness and sometimes death in birds and marine mammals
that consume affected organisms, wildlife
officials said.
In humans, exposure to low levels of
domoic acid can cause nausea, diarrhea and
dizziness. Exposure to high levels can
result in persistent short-term memory loss,
epilepsy and in some cases death, according
to wildlife officials.
The high levels of domoic acid are attributed to a massive toxic bloom of algae
called Pseudo-nitzschia developing along
the California coast. Although algae
blooms in the ocean are common, this particular bloom is large and persistent, most
likely caused by warmer ocean water temperatures and El Niño weather conditions the
state is experiencing, according to wildlife
officials.

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BELMONT
Sus pi ci o us ci rcums tances . A vehicle

3

was rifled through without any damage or
loss of property on Laurel Avenue before
8:37 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 5.
Acci dent. A Honda Civic and a Toyota
Prius collided near Ralston Avenue and El
Camino Real before 12:16 p.m. Thursday,
Nov. 5.
Reckl es s dri v i ng . Vehicles were seen
speeding on Hallmark Drive before 4:43
p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 4.
Di s o rderl y co nduct. Two teenagers were
seen trying to break an elevator window on
El Camino Real before 10:28 p.m. Tuesday,
Oct. 27.

Obituary

Violet P. “Lea” Dunlap

July 17th, 1927 – August 8th, 2015
Violet Dunlap, better known to her friends and colleagues as “Lea”,
passed away on August 8, 2015 after a long illness. She was 88.
Lea was a native of San Francisco where as a child she belonged to a
children’s group that included singing and dancing at the Golden Gate
Theater when she was 9 years old. She went to UC Berkeley and then
continued her singing career travelling throughout the United States working in dinner clubs and
night clubs as well as singing for the soldiers at VA hospitals on holidays.
Lea married Charles Capps in 1955 and moved to San Mateo. They had 2 daughters that Lea
raised on her own until 1970 when she met Larry Dunlap. They married and she helped raise his
son and daughter from his previous marriage.
Lea became active in the Real Estate business and was active up until the year before her death. She
loved the real estate business and helping people. She established her own office in 1981, served
on the Education Committee as a member and chairperson, developed programs for new/seasoned
agents and instructed at the College of San Mateo for over 15 years in the Real Estate Internship
program. In 2004 she was recognized as an Honorary Member for Life by CAR and SAMCAR.
Lea is survived by her daughter Carol Valenti and her husband Michael, her daughter Lori Plante
and her husband Dennis, her 2 granchildren Nick and Amanda Plante, her step-daughter Debra
Kerth and her step-son Michael Dunlap. A private family memorial will be held. Donations can
be made in her name to the American Kidney Foundation.

4

LOCAL

Weekend • Nov. 7-8, 2015

Robbery suspect assaults store
employee, police investigating
Sheriff’s deputies are seeking a suspect
who tried to rob a San Carlos gas station convenience store Thursday but instead assaulted
the store’s cashier when the cashier refused to
give him money.
At 8:56 p.m., the suspect entered the store
at the Shell Gas Station, located at 1098 El
Camino Real, according to sheriff’s officials.
The suspect brandished a large, kitchenstyle knife and demanded money from the
cashier but the cashier did not comply, sheriff’s officials said.
The suspect then punched the cashier in the
face several times.
The suspect fled on foot and was last seen
running toward Cowgill Alley and Laurel
Street, according to sheriff’s officials.
The suspect was unable to make off with
any money, sheriff’s officials said.
The cashier suffered an abrasion and
swelling to his face. Paramedics treated him
at the scene, according to sheriff’s officials.
Deputies described the suspect as a man
around 30 years old wearing a black sweatshirt and black pants.
The incident was recorded on surveillance video and investigators are currently

Local briefs
reviewing the footage.
Anyone with information about the incident or the suspect is asked to contact the San
Mateo County Sheriff’s Office at (650) 3634911 or the office’s anonymous tip line at
(800) 547-2700.

Senior apartment complex
fire appears accidental
The cause for a fire Friday morning at a
Belmont apartment complex for senior citizens appears to have been accidental.
Around 4 a.m., firefighters responded to
the Lesley Terrace Senior Living Apartments,
located in the 2400 block of Carlmont Drive,
for a report of a fire, according to fire officials.
The fire was coming from an apartment on
the building’s second floor. The unit’s resident, a 78-year-old man, reported waking up
to the smell of smoke, fire officials said.
The building’s fire sprinkler system was
activated in the unit and helped suppress the
fire, according to fire officials.
Thirty-five residents were evacuated from
their apartments to the main dining area as
firefighters made sure the blaze didn’t spread

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to other apartments.
Firefighters were ultimately able to contain
the fire the second-story unit where it began,
fire officials said.
All of the residents were able to return to
their apartments, except for three people
whose apartments had been damaged as a
result of the fire, including the resident who
lived in the unit where the fire originally
started. The three will be moved to other units
in the complex, according to fire officials.
No injuries were reported.
Investigators determined the fire started
when the man, who had just moved into the
unit, left a cardboard box in front of a wall
heater. The heater apparently ignited the box
after the resident went to sleep, fire officials
said.
The Belmont Fire Department is a reminding residents to take precaution when using
heaters and to never place combustible
objects on top or in front of heaters.

Suspected car
thieves found after search
Police in Pacifica arrested three men after a
search of a neighborhood where they found a
stolen car with a replica assault rifle inside on
Tuesday night, police said.

THE DAILY JOURNAL
They found the car after responding to a
vehicle burglary in progress at Valencia Way
and La Mirada Drive at about 9:30 p.m.
Witnesses said the suspects sped away in a
white Chevrolet Tahoe, according to police.
Officers then found a Tahoe that had been
reported stolen parked in the 300 block of
Reina Del Mar Avenue, police said. A fake
AK-47 was on the driver’s seat.
Police searched the neighborhood with the
help of a dog from the San Mateo County
Sheriff’s Office. One suspect was found in the
200 block of Hillside Drive and two others
were found a short time later walking on
Reina Del Mar Avenue.
The suspects were detained and police found
evidence linking them to the stolen Tahoe
and other crimes in the county, including car
burglaries, police said.
Two of the suspects were identified as San
Jose residents 24-year-old Jesus Mario
Huerta-Hernandez and 20-year-old Jonatan
Paul Gudino-Pena. They were booked into jail
on suspicion of vehicle theft, vehicle burglary, possession of stolen property, possession of burglary tools and conspiracy.
The third suspect was not identified because
he is 17 years old. He was booked into juvenile hall, police said.

NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

VA secretary says demand is
outstripping extra resources
By Kevin Freking
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Veterans’ hospitals and
clinics are beefing up staff and seeing more
patients, but the number of appointments
not completed within 30 days continues to
grow, Department of Veterans Affairs
Secretary Robert McDonald said Friday.
Speaking at the National Press Club in
advance of Veterans Day, McDonald
described a VA that is doing much to address
problems that investigators say caused
chronic delays for veterans seeking care.
McDonald said the VA completed 3.1 million more appointments in the latest fiscal
year than the previous one. It also hired
thousands of new doctors and nurses.
Still, the organization is struggling to
keep up. McDonald said the number of
appointments not completed in 30 days has
grown from 300,000 to nearly 500,000.
McDonald said more veterans are coming
to the VA despite often having access to
Medicare, Medicaid or private insurance. He
said the VA is more convenient, effective
and cheaper. A veteran would have to pay a
$5,000 co-pay to get a knee replacement
through Medicare, but not at the VA. For

Department of Veterans Affairs Secretary Robert McDonald said the number of appointments
not completed in 30 days has grown from 300,000 to nearly 500,000.
veterans with hearing loss, going to the VA
can save them about $4,000 compared to
other coverage.
“Access to care has improved,” McDonald
said. “But here’s the inevitability:
Improved access means more demand.”

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5

Around the nation
Dakotaraptor ruled Hell Creek
Formation as lethal predator
SIOUX FALLS, S.D. — Tyrannosaurus rex
may have been known as the big guy around
the Hell Creek Formation 66 million years
ago, but a newly discovered species of raptor
would have roamed nearby as one of the
region’s most lethal predators.
Dakotaraptor stood 6 feet tall at the hips
yet moved like a springy, agile sprinter. But
the winged Dromaeosaur’s 9 1/2-inch-long
killing claw could make mincemeat out of
any herbivore in its path. Vertebrate paleontology curator Robert DePalma of Palm
Beach Museum of Natural History and
researchers including University of Kansas
paleontologists announced the new species
in a recently published study.

Angler catches digital camera
lost in Lake Michigan in 2013

Music Lessons for All Ages

Bronstein Music

Weekend • Nov. 7-8, 2015

McDonald said in the wake of the waittime scandal, some lawmakers asked him
about whether veterans should just be given
vouchers so they could access health care
wherever they want. He said he studied the
issue.

GRAND HAVEN, Mich. — Andre Monterio
has a fishing story about one that got away
and eventually was caught.
But what he pulled from Lake Michigan
near Grand Haven in September had no scales
or gills. It was a small digital camera knocked
overboard two years ago from another boat.
Monterio put the camera’s memory card in
his computer and saw “Mike’s Family
Pharmacy” in one photo. He contacted pharmacist Mike Cook at the shop in Montague,
northwest of Grand Rapids.

6

Weekend • Nov. 7-8, 2015

LOCAL/STATE

California releases plan to
use one drug in executions
By Don Thompson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SACRAMENTO — As states deal with a
nationwide shortage of execution drugs,
California proposed Friday to allow corrections officials to choose one of four types of
powerful barbiturates to execute prisoners
on death row, depending on which one is
available.
The single drug would replace the series of
three drugs that were last used when Clarence
Ray Allen was executed in 2006, strapped to
a gurney in the old gas chamber of San
Quentin State Prison.
The proposal would allow the warden of
San Quentin to choose between amobarbital,
pentobarbital, secobarbital or thiopental to
impose the death penalty.
It also puts the projected cost of an execution at nearly $187,000 and retains the
option for inmates to choose the gas cham-

ber for their execution.
Eight states already have used a single drug
for executions, and five others have
announced plans to switch to the method,
according to the nonprofit Death Penalty
Information Center, which opposes executions and tracks the issue.
However, law professor Robert Weisberg,
co-director of the Stanford Criminal Justice
Center, expects many more years of complex
legal challenges before anyone is executed
in California.
“The lawyers who are going to litigate
these things are going to demand Nobel
Prize detail on the differences between these
drugs, and if there’s any difference, why are
we letting a warden make the decision,” he
said.
Executions in California stalled in 2006
amid legal challenges, but federal and state
judges suggested the state could resume the
punishment if it began using a single drug.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

CITY GOVERNMENT
• The Bel mo nt Ci ty Co unci l will present its ninth annual
Beauti ful Bel mo nt Awards Pro g ram at its meeting 7 p.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 8, and is calling for any nominations from the community in both residential and commercial categories.
For more information on the Beauti ful Bel mo nt Awards
Pro g ram, to submit a nomination, or to obtain a nomination
form, please call the finance department at 595-7433 or look on the
city’s website at belmont.gov/beautifulbelmont.
• There will be a community meeting about the Farm Hi l l Impro v ement Pro ject
Nov. 17 to receive feedback from the community on what is and is not working with the
pilot project. The pilot project narrowed Farm Hill Boulevard in Redwood City from four
lanes to two with a turning lane. The meeting will be 6 p.m.-8 p.m. at Peni ns ul a
Co v enant Church, Fel l o ws hi p Hal l , 3560 Farm Hill Blvd., in Redwood City. Go to
redwoodcity.org/farmhill for more information.

Home owner interrupts attempted
burglary, police seeking suspect
Police are seeking a person who tried to
burglarize a home Tuesday in Palo Alto, but
was thwarted when the home’s owner interrupted the burglary.
Around 9:30 p.m., the unknown suspect
allegedly tried to enter a house on the 200
block of Dundee Drive by attempting to
remove a window screen, according to
police.
As the suspect tried to manipulate the

Local brief
window, the homeowner appeared and
scared off the alleged burglar, police said.
Police did not have a description of the
suspect.
Anyone with information about the incident is asked to contact South San
Francisco police at (650) 877-8900.
Callers who wish to remain anonymous can
call (650) 952-2244 or leave messages at
tips@ssf.net.

STATE/NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

7

Weekend • Nov. 7-8, 2015

Defiant Carson:
Questions about
West Point unfair
By Steve Peoples
and Sergio Bustos
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PALM BEACH GARDENS, Fla.
— A defiant Ben Carson on Friday
rejected the idea his past descriptions of receiving a scholarship
offer to attend West Point were
inaccurate, and called questions
about the veracity of the story
irrelevant to his campaign for
president.
“I think what it shows, and
these kinds of things show, is
there is a desperation on behalf of
some to try to find a way to tarnish
me,” Carson told reporters at a
news conference near West Palm
Beach. “Because they have been
looking through everything.
They have been talking to everyone I have ever known and everybody I have ever seen. There has
got to be a scandal.”
Carson, a newcomer to national
politics, has developed a passionate following based in part on his
inspirational personal story and
devotion to Christian values. The
only African-American in the
Republican 2016 class, Carson
grew up in inner-city Detroit and
often speaks about his brushes

with violence and poverty during
his early years.
Following a story published by
Politico earlier on Friday, his
campaign sought to clarify
Carson’s story about his interest
in attending the U. S. Military
Academy in his breakout book,
“Gifted Hands,” in which he outlines his participation with the
Reserve Officers’ Training Corps,
commonly known as ROTC, while
in high school.
“I was offered a full scholarship
to West Point,” Carson wrote in
the 1996 book. “I didn’t refuse the
scholarship outright, but I let
them know that a military career
wasn’t where I saw myself going.
As overjoyed as I felt to be offered
such a scholarship, I wasn’t really
tempted.”
Carson has repeated the story
over the years, including in an
interview in October with talkshow host Charlie Rose.
Campaign spokesman Doug
Watts said Carson was “the top
ROTC student in the city of
Detroit” and “was introduced to
folks from West Point by his
ROTC supervisors.”
“They told him they could help
him get an appointment based on

REUTERS

Ben Carson reacts to a question about his past at a news conference before he delivers the keynote speech at
the Black Republican Caucus of South Florida’s scholarship gala.
his grades and performance in
ROTC. He considered it but in the
end did not seek admission, ”
Watts said.
Students granted admission to
West Point are not awarded scholarships. Instead, they are said to
earn appointments to the military
academy, which come with
tuition, room and board and
expenses paid, in exchange for

five years of service in the Army
after graduation.
A West Point spokesman on
Friday said the academy “cannot
confirm whether anyone during
that time period was nominated to
West Point if they chose not to
pursue completion of the application process.”
At his news conference on
Friday night, Carson said, “it was

Clinton has tough question: What to call Bill if she wins
By Michael R. Blood
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES — Hillary
Rodham Clinton is facing a question with global implications as
she seeks the White House: What
do you call the husband of a U.S.
president?
First man? First gentleman?
Funnyman Jimmy Kimmel asked
the Democratic presidential contender about that quandary Thursday
should her husband, former
President Bill Clinton, become the
official White House spouse.
Appearing on “Jimmy Kimmel

Live,”
she
offered a couple
of ideas with a
smile:
“first
dude” and “first
mate.”
“We have to
really work on
what to call
she
Hillary Clinton him,”
quipped.
Clinton said that her husband has
told her he’s determined to break
the “iron grip” that women have
had on being the spouse of a president.
Kimmel wanted to know if Bill

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula

Clinton would
pick out the
official china
pattern for the
White House,
typically a role
of the first lady.
But
Clinton
said she had
other ideas for
Bill Clinton
her husband:
talking to him about how to create
jobs.
Clinton has been a favorite target of Donald Trump and other
Republican candidates, but she told
Kimmel the criticism is just elec-

tion-season noise. Actually,
Republicans like her, she said.
When she’s not on the ticket
“Republicans say nice things,”
Clinton told Kimmel.
“We have a long list of the nice
things Republicans have said about
me,” she added. “You may be hearing more about it.”
She wasn’t necessarily kind in
return. Clinton said watching the
Republicans debate left her “being
appalled and being amused.”
“I disagree with a lot of what they
are saying,” she said. “I wish they
would actually address the problems America is trying to face.”

an offer to me. It was specifically
made.” He said he could not recall
specifically who made the offer,
but he pushed back against the
idea that he should be able to do
so.
“I don’t remember the names of
the people,” Carson said. “It’s
almost 50 years ago. I bet you
don’t remember all the people you
talked to 50 years ago.”

Around the state
Lawmaker plans law to
end killer whale captivity
SAN DIEGO — A California congressman is planning federal legislation that aims to phase out the
captivity of killer whales by banning breeding, importing and
exporting the animals for public
display.
Democratic Rep. Adam Schiff
announced Friday that he plans to
introduce the Orca Responsibility
and Care Advancement Act to
ensure that orcas now at aquatic
parks such as SeaWorld are the last
ones and that when they die, none
would replace them.

8

STATE/NATION

Weekend • Nov. 7-8, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Paul Ryan ushers in
a more open House
By Erica Werner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Late nights dealing
with scores of amendments on the House
floor.
An invitation extended to the famously
staid Senate majority leader, Mitch
McConnell of Kentucky, to appear at an
open mic session.
A conversation so inclusive that “people
were shocked,” according to one GOP lawmaker, Mike Conaway of Texas.
Welcome to Paul Ryan’s House.
A week into his tenure, the new speaker
looks determined to make good on promises
of opening up the House of Representatives
to participation from all lawmakers — perhaps especially those hardliners on the
right who booted out his predecessor, John
Boehner.
He is inviting lawmakers onto a new committee to weigh rule changes in the House.

He’s encouraging their input into processing must-pass spending legislation on the
floor, despite skepticism from the powerful
House Appropriations Committee with time
short before a Dec. 11 deadline to fund the
government or risk a shutdown.
And a far-reaching transportation bill on
the House floor this week involved votes on
126 amendments, including plenty from the
hard-line crowd, though some were defeated
and the House stayed in session until past 1
a.m. Thursday.
Said Rep. Matt Salmon of Arizona, a member of the hard-line Freedom Caucus: “Be
careful what you wish for. But in this case a
little hard work never killed anybody.”
Indeed Ryan’s approach is drawing uncharacteristically rave reviews from lawmakers
who spent months grousing under
Boehner’s leadership.
“There’s a bounce in my step now,” said
Rep. Phil Roe, R-Tenn. “People are excited,
and they’re excited because Paul really did

REUTERS

Paul Ryan holds a news conference at Republican National Committee headquarters.
open the process up.”
Ryan, R-Wis., the 45-year-old former GOP
vice presidential nominee and one of his
party’s rising young stars, clearly starts out
with a reservoir of good will from lawmakers eager to move on from years of dysfunction and fiscal crises. He himself voiced cautious optimism on Thursday, calling action
on the highway bill “a good start, it’s a

glimpse of how we should be doing the people’s business.”
At the same time he exercised his political
capital to push an ally, Rep. Kevin Brady of
Texas, to replace him as chairman of the taxwriting Ways and Means Committee. Passed
over was Rep. Pat Tiberi of Ohio, who
remarked that “When the speaker comes out
for your opponent, it’s gonna matter.”

U.S. Customs and Border Protection staff rejects body cameras
By Elliott Spagat
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN DIEGO — Customs and Border
Protection staff concluded after an internal
review that agents and officers shouldn’t be
required to wear body cameras, positioning
the nation’s largest law enforcement agency
as a counterweight to a growing number of
police forces that use the devices to pro-

mote public trust and accountability.
The yearlong review cited cost and a host
of other reasons to hold off, according to
two people familiar with the findings who
spoke on condition of anonymity because
the findings have not been made public. It
found operating cameras may distract
agents while they’re performing their jobs,
may hurt employee morale, and may be
unsuited to the hot, dusty conditions in

Saving lives, from crisis to independence

which Border Patrol agents often work.
The findings, in an August draft report,
are subject to approval by Commissioner
R. Gil Kerlikowske, who last year
announced plans to test cameras at the
agency that employs roughly 60,000 people.
The staff report doesn’t rule out body
cameras but questions their effectiveness
and calls for more analysis before they

are widely distributed.
Customs and Border Protection said
Friday that it has been transparent about its
body camera effort from the start, providing
regular public updates.
“The draft report referenced is a dated version that does not reflect the agency’s
deliberations over the past months or conclusions of CBP leadership,” it said in a
statement.

WORLD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Nov. 7-8, 2015

9

Russia suspends flights
to Egypt, citing security
By Jim Heints and Merrit Kennedy
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MOSCOW — In an abrupt turnaround, Russia on Friday
suspended all passenger flights to Egypt after days of
resisting U.S. and British suggestions that a bomb may
have brought down a Russian plane in the Sinai Peninsula a
week ago.
The move dealt a sharp blow to both countries’ tourism
sectors amid fears about security in Egypt.
Russia’s federal aviation agency said airlines would be
allowed to send empty planes to bring home travelers, but
it was unclear when the Russians in Egypt, estimated to
number at least 40,000, would be able to return home as
planned from the Red Sea resorts including Sharm elSheikh.
Within hours of the Oct. 31 crash of the Metrojet Airbus
321-200 that killed all 224 aboard — mostly Russians — a
faction of the Islamic State militant group claimed to have
downed it in retaliation for Moscow’s airstrikes that began
a month earlier against fighters in Syria. The claim was initially dismissed on the grounds that the IS affiliate in
Egypt’s troubled Sinai region didn’t have missiles capable
of hitting high-flying planes.
British and U.S. officials, guided primarily by intelligence intercepts and satellite imagery, suggested a bomb
might have been aboard the aircraft. The Russians and
Egyptians called that premature, saying the investigation
had not concluded.
France 2 TV, citing an investigator who had access to one
of the Metrojet plane’s flight recorders, reported that “the
sound of an explosion can be distinctly heard during the
flight.” France’s BEA accident investigation agency said it
could not confirm the report.

Around the world
Mine dams burst in Brazil;
two dead, homes covered in mud
MARIANA, Brazil — Rescuers on Friday spirited survivors out of a mountainous area of southeastern Brazil that
was flooded with a sea of viscous, clay-red mud after two
dams burst at an iron ore mine. Officials said two people
were killed, four were injured and 13 were missing.
The rupture unleashed a mix of water and mining residue
on a village 4 miles (7 kilometers) downhill, smothering
the enclave of Bento Rodrigues. Only about 10 of the village’s around 200 houses were left standing, and cars and
other objects were tossed by what survivors described as an
eruption of mud.
Residents said no alarms sounded to warn them about the
dam break Thursday afternoon, but they scrambled for higher ground after hearing a deafening burst. Officials have not
said what caused the breach.
Guilherme de Sa Meneghin of the state prosecutor’s office
and Minas Gerais state Gov. Fernando Pimentel said two
people died, though the state fire department had confirmed
only one death so far. The department said four people were
injured and another 13 missing, though it warned that the
latter figure could rise.

REUTERS

Syrian migrants Zake Khalil, third right, his wife Nagwa, right, and their four children Joan,Torin, Ellen and newborn Hevin arrive
at the Austrian-German border in Achleiten near Passau, Germany.

German interior minister wants
restricted Syrian asylum status
By Geir Moulson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BERLIN — Germany’s interior minister said Friday he wants to give many
Syrians arriving in the country a form
of protection that falls short of full
asylum and wouldn’t allow them to
bring relatives to Germany for two
years.
The proposal by Interior Minister
Thomas de Maiziere appeared to catch
at least part of Chancellor Angela
Merkel’s governing coalition by surprise and created new confusion over
the government’s crisis response.
De Maiziere’s ministry said the idea
was that Syrians who don’t present
authorities with evidence of individual
persecution but are fleeing the civil
war in general should be given “subsidiary protection,” something that
falls short of full asylum status but is
granted to people who face serious

risks in their homeland. While people
with full asylum status get a three-year
residence permit,
those with “subsidiary protection”
get a one-year permit that can be
extended repeatedly.
Thomas de
On
Thursday,
Maiziere
Merkel and her
coalition partners agreed that people
with “subsidiary protection” shouldn’t
be able to bring relatives to Germany
for two years. They didn’t mention
Syrians, and that agreement came
alongside a deal to set up new centers
to process more quickly people who
have little hope of asylum — such as
those from Balkan countries.
De Maiziere told Deutschlandfunk
radio Friday that other countries in
similar situations grant residence “for

a limited time, and we will do this in
the future with the Syrians as well, in
that we tell them: you will get protection, but the so-called ‘subsidiary protection.”’
It wasn’t clear to what extent the
conservative de Maiziere had discussed
the idea with anyone else in Merkel’s
coalition. Ralf Stegner, a deputy leader
of the center-left Social Democrats,
said his response was a “clear no.”
Hours later, de Maiziere appeared to
walk back from his proposal.
“There is no change in the approval
practice for Syrian refugees,” he said,
adding that a change had been planned
at the beginning of the week.
However, he said, in light of the
decision Thursday on limiting some
people’s ability to bring relatives to
Germany, “there is need for discussion
in the coalition, and so things will
now stay as they are until there is a
new decision.”

10

BUSINESS

Weekend • Nov. 7-8, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Stocks end mixed as market factors interest rate hike
By Ken Sweet
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Dow
17,910.33
Nasdaq 5,147.12
S&P 500 2,099.20

+46.90
+19.38
-0.73

10-Yr Bond 2.33 +0.09
Oil (per barrel) 44.52
Gold
1,088.90

Big movers
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Thursday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Kate Spade & Co., up $1.76 to $21.50
The clothing, handbag, and accessories company reported better-thanexpected third-quarter profit on higher demand.
Pandora Media Inc., up 67 cents to $12.45
The Internet radio service reached a direct licensing deal for songwriting
rights with Sony/ATV music publishing, the world’s largest music publisher.
GoDaddy Inc., up $4.98 to $32.41
The Web hosting company reported better-than-expected third-quarter
earnings and revenue.
Nasdaq
Select Comfort Corp., up $4.06 to $25.50
The seller of beds, mattresses and bedding products reported betterthan-expected third-quarter results.
Whole Foods Market Inc., down 65 cents to $30.11
The grocery chain reported a drop in fiscal fourth-quarter profit that fell
short of forecasts, along with disappointing revenue.
Qualcomm Inc., down $9.19 to $51.07
The chipmaker reported better-than-expected fiscal fourth-quarter
results, but it gave a soft profit outlook.
Facebook Inc., up $4.82 to $108.76
The social media company reported better-than-expected third-quarter
profit and revenue, partly driven by mobile advertising.
HomeAway Inc., up $8.11 to $40.15
Travel booking site Expedia is buying the short-term rental marketplace
for $3.9 billion to expand into the vacation rental market.

NEW YORK — Stocks had a mixed
reaction Friday to the surprisingly
strong October jobs report as
investors adjusted to the prospect of
higher interest rates as early as next
month.
While the major indexes, on the
surface, had a muted reaction to the
jobs numbers, a look at the individual
parts of the market showed investors
were actively reshuffling their portfolios.
Dividend-paying stocks, which are
typically bought for their higherthan-average payouts when interest
rates and bond yields are low, dropped
sharply on Friday. The Dow Jones
utility index, a basket of 15 dividendpaying utility stocks, sank 4 percent.
In contrast, bank stocks rose
sharply as investors bet that higher
interest rates would translate into
higher profits, since they may be able
to charge more for lending. JPMorgan
Chase rose $2.02, or 3 percent, to
$68. 46, Bank of America rose 64
cents, or 3.7 percent, to $17.95 and
Morgan Stanley rose $1.53, or 4.5
percent, to $35.41.
“You just need to look at those two
groups and see that the market is
positioning itself for higher interest

rates,” said Ryan Larson, head of equity trading at RBC Global Asset
Management.
Wall Street has been in a monthslong guessing game about the Federal
Reserve, trying to figure out when the
policymakers at the nation’s central
bank will finally raise interest rates.
The market turmoil over the summer
kept the Fed from raising rates at their
September meeting, and policymakers decided to wait yet again at their
October meeting to see more signs
the U.S. economy was on sure footing.
By nearly every account, the
October jobs report gave the Fed
exactly what they wanted. The Labor
Department said U.S. employers added
271,000 jobs, far more than the most
hopeful of expectations, and the
unemployment rate dipped to a fresh
seven-year low of 5 percent, from 5.1
percent. The burst of hiring, the most
in 10 months, filled jobs across a
range of industries.
“This makes it pretty likely the Fed
will raise rates in December,” said
Priscilla Hancock, a global fixed
income strategist for J. P. Morgan
Asset Management.
Fed fund futures, which are securities that bet on which way the Fed
will move interest rates, now show a
74 percent chance of the central bank

Obama administration kills Keystone XL pipeline
By Josh Lederman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The Obama
administration rejected a Canadian
energy giant’s application to build
the Keystone XL pipeline on Friday,
three individuals familiar with the
decision said, capping a seven-year
saga that spiraled into one of the
biggest environmental flashpoints of
Barack Obama’s presidency.
Obama was to announce the decision at the White House after meeting
with Secretary of State John Kerry.
The individuals confirming Obama’s
decision weren’t authorized to comment publicly and spoke on condition
of anonymity.
Killing the pipeline allows Obama
to claim aggressive action on the

environment, potentially strengthening his hand as world leaders prepare
to finalize major global climate pact
within weeks that Obama hopes will
be a crowning jewel for his environmental legacy. Yet it also puts the
president in a direct confrontation
with Republicans and energy advocates that will almost surely spill
over into the 2016 presidential election.
Although the project is dead for
now, Obama’s rejection will likely
not be the last word for Keystone XL.
The pipeline’s backers are expected
to challenge his decision in court, and
the Republican-controlled Congress
may try to override the president,
although those efforts have previously failed. The project could also get a
fresh look in 2017 if a Republican

wins the White House and invites
TransCanada to reapply.
Another open question is whether
TransCanada will try to recoup the
more than $2 billion it says it has
already spent on the project’s development. Earlier in the year, the company left the door open to suing the
U.S. government under NAFTA.
“This is a day of celebration,” said
Bill McKibben of the environmental
group 350.org. One of the pipeline’s
most vocal opponents, McKibben
said the decision gives Obama “new
stature as an environmental leader.”
Energy groups immediately blasted
the decision, arguing that Obama was
discounting years of analysis by federal agencies that they said proved
Keystone could be built to be safe and
environmentally sound.

Consumer credit up a record $28.9B in September
By Martin Crutsinger
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — U. S. consumer
borrowing jumped by a record amount
in September, driven higher by big
gains in borrowing for auto and student loans.
The Federal Reserve said Friday that
consumer borrowing increased $28.9
billion, the largest one-month
increase on record going back to
1941. It followed a gain of $16 billion

in August and pushed total consumer
borrowing to an all-time high of $3.5
trillion.
The big September gain reflected a
$22.2 billion increase in the category
that covers auto loans and student
loans and a $6.7 billion increase in
credit card borrowing. It was the
biggest increase in auto and student
loans since July 2011.
Economists believe consumer
spending, which accounts for 70 percent of economic activity, will remain

You are invited!
FRIDAY EVENING SOCIAL HOURS: 4:30-5:30 P.M.

strong in coming months. A healthy
labor market is helping give consumers confidence to spend and
finance part of their purchases by taking on more debt. The Labor
Department reported earlier Friday that
the economy created 271,000 jobs in
September, the most this year, pushing the unemployment rate down to a
seven-year low of 5 percent.
Economists are looking for a strong
consumer sector to help offset soft
spots in other parts of the economy.\

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raising rates in December, up from 60
percent on Wednesday and up from
well below 50 percent as recently as
late summer. But the size of the predicted interest rate increase remains
modest. Investors expect interest
rates will go from their current 0-to0.25 percent levels to 0.5 percent.
“The Fed is still going to be
extremely
accommodative
for
investors. A rate hike in December is
removing those emergency measures
that the bank put into place during the
financial crisis,” Hancock said.
The Dow Jones industrial average
rose 46.90 points, or 0.3 percent, to
close at 17,910.33. The Standard &
Poor’s 500 index fell less than a
point to 2, 099. 20 and the Nasdaq
composite rose 19.38 points, or 0.4
percent, to close 5,147.12.
The bond market’s reaction to the
jobs number was far more volatile
than the stock market’s, with bond
prices sinking as investors scaled
back their holdings of Treasuries and
safer investments.
The benchmark 10-year U. S.
Treasury note rose to a yield of 2.32
percent from 2. 23 percent on
Thursday, a big move for that security. The two-year note jumped to a
yield of 0.89 percent, a five-year high
for that note, from 0.83 percent the
day before.

Business briefs
While markets tumbled in
the summer, many savers held tight
NEW YORK — When fear was pumping through the stock
market this summer, most retirement savers kept their
cool.
So say figures from Fidelity, which could see how individual investors in general behaved by looking at its 13.5
million 401(k) and 6 million IRA accounts as stocks tumbled in New York, Shanghai and places in between during
the turbulent third quarter. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index
sank more than 10 percent within a week during August,
driving the index to its worst quarter in four years.
Even amid the tumult, only 4.9 percent of Fidelity’s
401(k) account holders made changes to how their nest
eggs were invested, such as selling stocks to move into
bonds or cash. Workers also diverted more of their paychecks into their 401(k) accounts than they did a year earlier, not less: an average of 8.2 percent of their pay last quarter, up from 8 percent.
“People are starting to get the message,” says Jeanne
Thompson, vice president at Fidelity Investments. “During
volatility, many times the best course of action is none at
all.”

Square boosts expected IPO
value by 47 percent in rocky market
NEW YORK — Square, the six-year-old company known
for its white, cube-shaped credit and debit card readers that
plug into smartphones, is boosting its planned initial public offering value by 47 percent in what has become a tough
market for new companies trying to raise cash.
The San Francisco financial-services startup was founded
and is led by Jack Dorsey, who co-founded Twitter and
recently returned to lead that company again. Dorsey, 38,
who owns 24.4 percent of Square, did not give up the CEO
job at Square when he returned to his former company.
The traditional manner of valuing a company, done by
multiplying the total outstanding shares by the price of
each share, puts Square’s worth at $4.2 billion if the top end
of the pricing range is used. That is a substantially lower
than a $6 billion valuation by the private investors in connection with the $150 million Series E fundraising in
October 2014, according to the website crunchbase.com,
which tracks investments in tech companies.

Zuckerberg talks success,
lessons learned in Newark schools
NEWARK, N.J. — Five years after donating $100 million
to remake education in Newark, Facebook’s Mark
Zuckerberg says he’s using lessons learned about the need
for community involvement in his next effort in
California. He also highlighted some successes in New
Jersey’s largest city.
In a Facebook post Friday, Zuckerberg acknowledged
increased graduation rates in Newark and successful charter
schools, but also noted the “challenges, mistakes and honest differences among people with good intentions.”
“It’s very important to understand the desires of a community, to listen and learn from families, teachers, elected
officials and other experts,” he wrote.

NFL SUNDAY: 49ERS HOST FALCONS; RAIDERS ON THE ROAD IN PITTSBURGH >> PAGE 13

<<< Page 12, Another
easy win for the Warriors
Weekend • Nov. 7-8, 2015

NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL

Capuchino quarterback Joe Gutierrez threw
for 157 yards and four touchdowns during
the Mustangs’ 40-6 win over Carlmont Friday.

Cap routs
Carlmont
Hillsdale: Ocean champs
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL

The Hillsdale offensive line opens a massive hole for running back Cameron Taylor during the Knights’ 34-14 win over Menlo, which clinched
the Ocean Division title for Hillsdale.

By Terry Bernal

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

The Hillsdale football team has been one
of the most complete units in the Peninsula
Athletic League this season. From its
strong running game, lethal passing attack
and a solid defense, the Knights have leaned
on all three at varying points of the season.
Friday against visiting Menlo School,
Hillsdale had all three on display. Hillsdale
running back Cameron Taylor rushed for
125 yards and a touchdown on 20 carries,

quarterback Brett Wetteland threw for 177
yards and three scores and the Hillsdale
defense held Menlo to 226 yards of offense
and came up with a pair of turnovers, turning
one
into
a
touchdown.
Put it all together and it added up to a 34-14
win for Hillsdale, clinching the PAL’s
Ocean Division championship and a spot in
the Central Coast Section playoffs.
“We strive for perfection,” said Hillsdale
coach Mike Parodi. “Knowing that if we get
close it’s pretty good.”
Taylor was held in check most of the

night running the ball, with Menlo holding
him to just 54 yards on his first 18 carries.
On his last two? He rushed for 71 on carries
of 25 and 40 yards.
“I knew it was going to open up,” Taylor
said.
If that was all Taylor did on the night, he
might have been frustrated, but when you
are a talent like Taylor, there are other ways
he made his impact felt. Like catching a
screen pass that he turned into a 60-yard

See HILLSDALE, Page 18

Burlingame grabs piece of Bay crown
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

After 18 years, the Burlingame Panthers’
drought is over.
It was 1997 when the Panthers last captured a Peninsula Athletic League Bay
Division championship. And even though
this year’s bid looked to be in dire straights
after last week’s loss to Sacred Heart Prep,
Burlingame bounced back in Friday’s Bay
Division finale with a 14-0 victory over
Menlo-Atherton at Umland Stadium.
With the win, the Panthers (4-1 in PAL

Bay, 8-1 overall) close the season in a threeway co-championship with Sacred Heart
Prep and Menlo-Atherton. For Burlingame
head coach John Philipopoulos, the cochampionship is just as sweet as a solo deal.
“In my mind, the way these kids have
played all year, they’re champions,”
Philipopoulos said.
It was certainly a crowning achievement
for the Burlingame defense, which entered
into play Friday having given up an average
of 23 points per game through four previous
Bay Division matchups. But, for all the bignumber rushing performances M-A (4-1, 5-

4) has posted this season, the Panthers held
the Bears to just 97 team rushing yards
Friday.
“Our defense has been the backbone all
season long and tonight was no different,”
Philipopoulos said.
Not that the Bears didn’t have their
chances. They closed the first half with two
possessions inside the red zone, but were
denied both times by a Panthers defensive
line that seemed to derive power from having its back up against the wall.
The goal-line stand at the end of the first
half will certainly be spotlighted as one of

The Capuchino Mustangs didn’t get much
respect entering into the 2015 season. So,
they went out and earned it.
Friday afternoon, the Mustangs’ mission
to prove the doubters wrong culminated in
40-6 victory over Carlmont at Reyna Field.
With the win, Capuchino (4-0 in PAL Lake,
5-4 overall) clinches at least a share of the
Peninsula Athletic League Lake Division
title; it also locks up the C-league’s lone
playoff berth.
Now in his second year, Capuchino head
coach Ben White has reestablished a winner. Last year the Mustangs fell one game
shy of the Lake Division title, settling for
second place after a battle with eventual
champion The King’s Academy. Graduating
23 seniors from that squad, including a
third-year starting quarterback and most of
the offensive line, makes this year’s
improvement all the more fulfilling.
“We didn’t get much respect coming
back,” White said. “So, we used that for
motivation all year.”
After senior fullback Damien Jacobs
totaled 648 rushing yards over the previous
two weeks in wins over San Mateo and
Jefferson, the Mustangs showed they are
more than just a one-man show. Jacobs

See MUSTANGS, Page 18

12

SPORTS

Weekend • Nov. 7-8, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Curry goes for 34 in Warriors’ win over Nuggets
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKLAND — Stephen Curry led the way
once more with 34 points and 10 assists, his
supporting cast did plenty to take the pressure
off, and the defending champion Golden State
Warriors beat the Denver Nuggets 119-104 on
Friday night to stay unbeaten.
Harrison Barnes scored 21 points for
Golden State and Festus Ezeli had a career-high
16 points to go with seven rebounds and two
blocked shots.
At 6-0, Golden State is off to the franchise’s
best start in its West Coast era dating to 196263. The Warriors are three victories from
tying the Philadelphia team’s 9-0 start in
1960-61.
Klay Thompson added 18 points, six
rebounds and five assists and Draymond Green
added 12 points, nine rebounds and eight

assists as Golden State
extended its franchiserecord home unbeaten
streak to 22 games.
Danilo Gallinari led
Denver with 25 points,
nine on free throws in the
Nuggets’ third straight
loss at Golden State and
Steph Curry sixth in nine games.
Jameer Nelson’s jumper
with 3:44 left pulled Denver within 10 points
after the Warriors had led by as many as 32.
Ezeli, filling in for the injured Andrew
Bogut, dunked on two straight second-quarter
possessions with a blocked shot in between
and the Warriors’ 28 first-half assists were a
franchise record for any half.
This team has been tested just once so far, in
Wednesday’s 112-108 win against the
Clippers — and certainly looks like a group

poised for another special season even if this
one’s not even two weeks old.
NBA MVP Curry has 30 points in five of his
first six games, the first Warriors player to do
so since Hall of Famer Rick Barry in 1974-75.
Hall of Famer Chris Mullin was the last player with 25 in each of the season’s first six
games (1990-91).
Curry made a 3-pointer in his 79th straight
game, matching Michael Adams for the thirdlongest streak in NBA history.
Curry knocked down 8 of 15 3-pointers for
Golden State, which had opened defense of its
title with five straight games against Western
Conference playoff teams from last season.
Denver beat Golden State at Oracle Arena
114-103 in the preseason on Oct. 13, but the
Nuggets lost their fourth in five under former
Warriors assistant and first-year coach
Michael Malone.

Letdowns
Interim coach Luke Walton figures it won’t
always be going quite this smoothly for the
reigning champs.
Golden State showed that in the second half.
“It’s just natural to have a letdown, and I’m
sure at some point throughout this long season we’ll have one,” Walton said. “It’s up to
the staff to help prepare the guys for everything and it’s up to the players to want it just
as bad as they did last year. From my view,
they do right now. They talk about it all the
time, they want more championships.
They’re not happy with just the one that we
have.”

Up next
Nug g ets : Host Portland on Monday.
Warri o rs : Visits Sacramento on Saturday.

Twenty players receive $15.8M qualifying offers
By Ronald Blum
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — The qualifying offers are in. Based on
recent history, few if any big leaguers will accept.
Second baseman Daniel Murphy and outfielder Colby
Rasmus were among a record 20 free agents who received
$15.8 million qualifying offers before Friday’s deadline.
With teams sensing that starting pitching will be prized,
Jeff Samardzija (Chicago White Sox), Marco Estrada
(Toronto), Yovani Gallardo (Texas), Ian Kennedy (San
Diego), Wei-Yin Chen (Baltimore), Hisashi Iwakuma
(Seattle) and Brett Anderson (Los Angeles Dodgers) also
received offers.
Players have until Nov. 13 to accept. In the three previous

Baptist

Lutheran

PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH
Dr. Larry Wayne Ellis, Pastor

GLORIA DEI LUTHERAN
CHURCH AND SCHOOL
(WELS)

(650) 343-5415

217 North Grant Street, San Mateo
Sunday Worship Services 8 & 11 am
Sunday School 9:30 am
Wednesday Worship 7pm

www.pilgrimbcsm.org
LISTEN TO OUR
RADIO BROADCAST!
(KFAX 1100 on the AM Dial)
4:30 a.m.at 5:30 PM

offseasons of the current collective bargaining agreement,
none of the 34 qualifying offers was taken as free agents
sought contracts with longer terms.
Teams had easy decisions in making offers to top pitchers
such as Zack Greinke (Dodgers), Jordan Zimmermann
(Washington) and John Lackey (St. Louis), and to hitters
such as outfielder Jason Heyward (Cardinals) and first baseman Chris Davis (Baltimore).
For a less-sought-after free agent, a qualifying offer could
dampen his market because clubs hesitate to give up a high
draft pick.
“I expect free agent compensation will be an important
part of bargaining in 2016, as it has been over our entire
history,” players’ association head Tony Clark said last offseason.

2600 Ralston Ave., Belmont,
(650) 593-3361
Sunday Schedule: Sunday
School / Adult Bible Class,
9:15am; Worship, 10:30am

GIVE SAVE

Non-Denominational

BLOOD LIVES

REDWOOD CHURCH
Our mission...

Buddhist

To know Christ and make him known.

SAN MATEO
BUDDHIST TEMPLE
Jodo Shinshu Buddhist
(Pure Land Buddhism)
2 So. Claremont St.
San Mateo

(650) 342-2541

901 Madison Ave., Redwood City
(650)366-1223

Sunday services:

9:00AM & 10:45AM
www.redwoodchurch.org

REDWOOD CHURCH
Our mission...

Sunday English Service &
Dharma School - 9:30 AM

To know Christ and make him known.

Reverend Henry Adams
www.sanmateobuddhisttemple.org

901 Madison Ave., Redwood City
(650)366-1223

Sunday services:

Church of Christ

9:00AM & 10:45AM
www.redwoodchurch.org

CHURCH OF CHRIST
525 South Bayshore Blvd. SM
650-343-4997
Bible School 9:45am
Services 11:00am and
2:00pm
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pm
Minister J.S. Oxendine
www.church-of-christ.org/cocsm

HOPE EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
600 W. 42nd Ave., San Mateo
Worship Service
Sunday School

10:00 AM
11:00 AM

Hope Lutheran Preschool
admits students of any race, color and national or ethnic origin.
License No. 410500322.

Call (650) 349-0100

HopeLutheranSanMateo.org

Church of the Highlands
“A community of caring Christians”

1900 Monterey Drive (corner Sneath Lane) San Bruno

(650)873-4095

A FAMILY SHARING HOPE IN CHRIST

The 30-year-old Murphy homered in a record six straight
postseason games for the New York Mets but then slumped
in the World Series, hitting .150 (3 for 20) and making key
errors in Games 4 and 5. He batted .281 during the regular
season with 73 RBIs and a career-best 14 homers.
Rasmus hit .238 with a career-high 25 homers and 61
RBIs for Houston, then batted .412 in the postseason with
four homers, six RBIs and seven talks.
Others who received offers were catcher Matt Wieters
(Baltimore), second baseman Howie Kendrick (Dodgers),
shortstop Ian Desmond (Nationals), and outfielders Alex
Gordon (Kansas City), Dexter Fowler (Chicago Cubs) and
Justin Upton (San Diego).
This year’s total was up from nine in 2012, 13 in 2013
and 12 last year.
An offer could be made only to a free agent who was with
the team for the entire season, a provision blocking
Toronto from making an offer to pitcher David Price and the
Mets from giving one to outfielder Yoenis Cespedes. The
price was determined by the average of the top 125 major
league contracts this year by average annual value.
If a team made a qualifying offer to a player who signs a
major league contract with another club before the June
amateur draft, his former club would receive a draft pick as
compensation at the end of the first round.
The club signing that player loses its first-round pick in
the amateur draft, unless that pick is among the top 10, in
which case the club signing that player loses its next-highest pick.

Adult Worship Services:
Friday: 7:30 pm (singles)
Saturday: 7:00 pm
Sun 7, 8:30, 10, & 11:30 am, 5 pm
Youth Worship Service:
For high school & young college
Sunday at 10:00 am
Sunday School:
For adults & children of all ages
Sunday at 10:00 am
Donald Sheley, Founding Pastor
Leighton Sheley, Senior Pastor

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Weekend • Nov. 7-8, 2015

13

Can Gabbert test questionable Falcons’ defense?
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SANTA CLARA — Blaine Gabbert is back
on the field for a second chance with all the
skeptics figuring he can’t begin to fix a
problem that goes far beyond the quarterback position.
Colin Kaepernick had his opportunities
and then some for San Francisco, and he’s
headed to the bench after failing to deliver
week after week.
The turmoil inside Levi’s Stadium hit new
levels this week as the 49ers (2-6) prepared
for the Falcons with a new man under center
in Gabbert behind a shaky offensive line
that has done little to protect the quarterback.
“It’s always kind of a funny deal in the
NFL when you hear your number called

because you never know
when it’s going to be,”
Gabbert said.
“And that’s kind of why
you always got to stick to
your routine and just
always
be
prepared
because, like they always
say, you’re one play away
Blaine Gabbert from playing and you’re
one play away from not
playing.”
Dan Quinn’s Atlanta team (6-2) should like
its chances of bouncing back from last
week’s three-point loss to Tampa Bay in
which the Buccaneers capitalized on the
Falcons’ mistakes.
This hardly looks like a rematch of the
NFC championship game the 49ers won in
January 2013 at Atlanta on the way to the
Super Bowl — but rather more of a mismatch.

Bay Area Sports Guy, the Web site that
first reported the Niners’ quarterback move
late Monday, said the team considered
benching Kaepernick last week but wanted
Gabbert to debut at home against a “weak”
Falcons defense.
Yes, Atlanta saw that.
To which the Falcons posted on Twitter:
“oh.”
That might just provide the opposing
team the extra motivation it needs. The
49ers might do the rest.
“I have heard it and what I can say is we
don’t allow anyone else to help get us
ready,” Quinn said.
Atlanta has committed six turnovers and
17 penalties in two games, and Quinn wants
to clean things up in a hurry.
Former first-round pick Gabbert will make
his first start since Week 5 of the 2013 season with Jacksonville.

Gabbert has lost his past 10 starts since
beating Indianapolis on Sept. 23, 2012,
and his teams are 5-22 in his career as a
starter.
“We all just embraced Blaine,” center
Marcus Martin said.
Atlanta lost playing the last game at
Candlestick Park in December 2013.
“We’ve changed a lot since that game,”
quarterback Matt Ryan said.
Falcons safety William Moore (groin)
could miss his second straight game and two
more starters, cornerbacks Robert Alford
(groin) and Desmond Trufant (lower back)
also have missed practice time or have been
limited by injuries this week. Alford and
Trufant left last week’s loss to Tampa Bay
with their injuries. Kemal Ishmael started
for Moore last week, while rookie Jalen
Collins and Phillip Adams filled in at cornerback.

Raiders looking to make a statement as Steelers regroup
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PITTSBURGH — Oakland gave the
Pittsburgh Steelers fits during the Raiders’
decade-plus run as a comically hot mess.
Imagine the issues that might crop up now
that Oakland might be ... good?
A victory on the road Sunday would give the
Raiders (4-3) their best record at the midway
point since 2001 and serve notice that firstyear head coach Jack Del Rio’s rebuilding
program is well ahead of schedule.
“This is a different team,” Oakland running
back Latavius Murray said. “I won’t say completely different, but there are new faces and
the atmosphere has changed around here. It’s
great what we have going on now, but we
want to continue doing what we’re doing.”
Namely, playing with a swagger not seen
since Jon Gruden was scowling on the sideline instead of analyzing in the TV booth.

Quarterback Derek Carr is taking care of the
ball. Murray is ripping through holes and
ageless Charles Woodson is picking off passes as if it was still the late-90s.
“We can’t think of it as just a bigger
moment or smaller moment,” Carr said. “For
us it’s just we have the Pittsburgh Steelers at
their place and that’s never easy for anybody.”
Well, maybe anybody but the Raiders.
Oakland is 4-1 against Pittsburgh since 2006
and 43-103 against the rest of the league. Del
Rio and Carr expect a playoff-type atmosphere, and in some ways it could be an elimination game for the Steelers (4-4).
Injuries have decimated Pittsburgh since
training camp with running back Le’Veon
Bell the latest to head to injured reserve after
tearing the MCL in his right knee last week
against Cincinnati.
DeAngelo Williams filled in capably in

September while Bell sat out two games for
violating the league’s substance abuse policy
and his 4.9 yards per carry rank in the top 10
in the league.
Coach Mike Tomlin has preached faith in
Williams, and it will be tested as the 32-yearold returns to a feature role at an age when
most backs are slowing down. That’s not an
option if Pittsburgh wants to reach the postseason.
“Listen, he’s not Le’Veon and he’s not
going to try to be Le’Veon,” Roethlisberger
said. “But he’s DeAngelo and he’s done it in
this league for a while now and he’s done it at
a high level.”
Other things to look for as the Raiders try
for consecutive wins in the Eastern time zone
for the first time since 2002.
Roethlisberger wasn’t exactly sharp in his
first game back after missing a month with a
sprained knee. He threw three picks against

the Bengals, including one that set up
Cincinnati’s game-winning drive. Still, he’s
hardly backing off the idea set forth by offensive coordinator Todd Haley in the preseason
that Pittsburgh can average 30 points a game.
“I don’t see why anything has changed, and
it shouldn’t,” Roethlisberger said.
The Raiders have jumped on teams early the
past two weeks. They scored on their first
seven drives against San Diego two weeks
ago and followed that with scores on six of
the first seven drives last week against the
Jets. Only a missed field goal by Sebastian
Janikowski marred the first three quarters
against New York. But despite the lofty numbers, the Raiders believe they can do more.
“We’re doing some good things,” Murray
said. “We need to continue to build on that.
There’s still things we leave out on the field
and things we can get better at. We keep
working to be great.”

14

SPORTS

Weekend • Nov. 7-8, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Hogan on verge of becoming Stanford’s all-time winningest QB
By Pat Graham
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BOULDER, Colo. — This Stanford quarterback doesn’t have NFL teams hoping to
finish bad enough to draft him with the No.
1 pick. Or a “Horrible For Hogan” type slogan like there was during the “Suck For
Luck” sweepstakes a few years ago.
Still, Kevin Hogan is on the verge of
holding a hallowed place in program history. He can pass Andrew Luck as the winningest starting QB at Stanford on Saturday
when the ninth-ranked Cardinal (7-1, 6-0
Pac-12, No. 11 CFP) travel to Colorado (45, 1-4).
A fourth-year starter, Hogan has 31 victories, which is tied with Luck for the top
spot. That’s more than other Cardinal lumi-

naries to play the position — familiar
names like John Elway and Jim Plunkett.
Unlike Luck, he doesn’t have the NFL
watching his every throw, hoping to draft
him with the top pick. Although, Hogan’s
team sure understands his importance.
“He doesn’t blink an eye. He’s got ice in
his veins,” said sophomore tailback
Christian McCaffrey, who’s from Denver
and the son of former Denver Broncos
receiver Ed McCaffrey. “He’s helped us out
so much.”
Hogan and Stanford need to be virtually
perfect over the final month to have any sort
of chance at crashing the College Football
Playoff party. Since a season-opening loss
to Northwestern, the Cardinal have won by
an average of 18.6 points. However, they
narrowly escaped Washington State 30-28

last weekend when the Cougars missed a 43yard field goal as time expired.
In Hogan, the Buffaloes face a quarterback
who has 14 TD tosses and two more rushing.
“The thing that he does really well is he
understands where he is supposed to go with
the ball,” Colorado coach Mike MacIntyre
said. “He gets them in the right protections
and in the right running plays.”
It’s simple, really: Call McCaffrey’s number. A lot. A dangerous tailback and receiving threat, he also returns kicks and punt.
The 6-foot, 201-pound McCaffrey leads the
nation with 244.3 all-purpose yards a game.
“I don’t remember a guy that can do as
many things as he does,” MacIntyre said.
“He’s just a really good football player.”
Here are things to know as Colorado hosts
Stanford and tries to break a 20-game skid

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against ranked teams:

Lopsided
Stanford has outscored Colorado 96-7 in
two games since the Buffaloes joined the
Pac-12 in 2011. “They play hard, the way
you want your team to play,” Stanford coach
David Shaw said. “The mistakes you make,
they’re going to capitalize.”

Rankled
The Buffaloes haven’t beaten a ranked
team since Oct. 17, 2009, when they
knocked off Kansas, 34-30. “We want to
play as close to a perfect game as we possibly can,” said Colorado quarterback Sefo
Liufau, who’s 232 yards away from breaking
the school’s all-time passing mark held by
Cody Hawkins (7,409 from 2007-10).

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Nov. 7-8, 2015

BGAME
Continued from page 11

TERRY BERNAL/DAILY JOURNAL

Burlingame’s Laipeli Palu, left, rushed for a game-high 95 yards on 23 carries.

the highlights of Burlingame’s season.
Facing second-and-goal from the 10, the
Bears advanced the ball to the Burlingame 1yard line on a 9-yard run by the PAL Bay
Division’s second leading rusher Jordan
Mims.
But the Panthers defense was up to the task
to keep M-A from crossing the goal line on
the following two plays.
Burlingame senior linebacker Will Costelli
got in on the third-down stop on a dive play
to Mims. Then on fourth down, defensive
tackles Alex Furr and Andrew Friedeberg
walled out fullback Stavro Papadakis with an
assist from defensive back Cole Friedlander.
Costelli, a third-year varsity player, said
the stand is tops on his all-time highlight
reel.
“For me, it’s got to be No. 1,” Burlingame
Costelli said. “That was huge.”
Furr concurred.
“By far the best,” Furr said.
The stop sent the Panthers into the halftime
locker room up 7-0. The Panthers’ offense
may not have put up a spectacular performance — running back Laipeli Palu managed a
game-high of 95 yards on 23 carries — but
they controlled the tempo of the game, and
grinded out two gutsy scoring drives.
“That’s what we do,” Philipopoulos said.
“We run the ball, try to control the clock and
keep them on the sidelines.”
Burlingame dominated time of possession
in the game at 27:10, and really hit the breaks
in the second half after going up by two
scores.
“They were able to run the ball consistently
enough and they beat us up with their front
eight on defense,” M-A head coach Adhir
Ravipati said.
The Panthers got on the board in the first
quarter on a 10-play, 52-yard drive using a

15

three-prong running attack with a strong finish from senior Joevani Garcia. The 5-7 senior pounded the ball across the goal line with
a 2-yard sweep around the right side to stake
Burlingame to a 7-0 lead.
Then on their first possession of the second
half, the Panthers trekked even further for an
eight-play, 84-yard scoring drive. M-A
seemed like it was finally gathering momentum, keeping the Burlingame rush in check
and forcing the Panthers into a third-and-12
look from their own 37-yard line. But quarterback Cam Kelaita peeled off a long, towering
pass down the left side to senior Cooper
Gindraux, who outleapt the M-A cornerback
to make the reception 20 yards shy of the end
zone; the stealthy receiver then broke a tackle and juked around the M-A safety for the
score.
The Burlingame defense then stuck M-A to
two consecutive three-and-outs. The Bears’
next first down didn’t come until after
Burlingame maintained a drive that ate up
more than half of the fourth quarter. By the
time M-A got the ball back with 5:55 in the
game, quarterback Miles Conrad led his team
downfield with completions of 13, 16, 5 and
3 yards. But then on third-and-10 from the
Burlingame 27-yard line, Conrad forced a pass
into the middle that turned into a backbreaking interception by Burlingame senior Vinny
Ferrari.
“We tried to get some momentum and confidence and we just didn’t,” Ravipati said.
Mims totaled 73 rushing yards on 11 carries
to surpass the 1,000-yard plateau in the
junior’s first full varsity season.
For Burlingame, the shutout marks its first
in PAL Bay Division play since Oct. 12, 2007
when the Panthers battled to a 0-0 tie with
Terra Nova. The Panthers’ had one other
shutout this season in nonleague play with a
30-0 win over Everett Alvarez. Their last
league shutout was in 2013 against archrival
San Mateo in PAL Ocean Division play to cap
their last overall PAL league title.

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PJCC–800 Foster City Boulevard, Foster City

16

Weekend • Nov. 7-8, 2015

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Cal, Oregon seeking bowl eligibility
By Anne M. Peterson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

EUGENE, Ore. — His injury trouble behind
him, Oregon quarterback Vernon Adams is back
to having fun.
The heralded senior transfer got off to a disappointing start with the Ducks after breaking
his index finger in the opener against his former team, Eastern Washington. Adams struggled with the injury in subsequent games before
he was relegated to the sideline to heal while
backup Jeff Lockie and newcomer Taylor Alie
stepped in.
Adams returned two weeks ago against
Washington, throwing for 272 yards and two
touchdowns in a 26-20 Oregon victory. Last
Thursday, he threw for 315 yards and four TDs
in a 61-55 triple-overtime win at Arizona State.
Adams was named the Pac-12 offensive
Player of the Week for his performance. He’ll
look to continue the comeback on Saturday
night when the Ducks host California.
“It was definitely the best game I played here
fun-wise,” he said. “It was really fun for myself

and the team, I think. We had a great time
enjoying that but now we’re moving on to
Cal.”
Oregon (5-3, 3-2), with losses to Michigan
State, Utah and Washington State this season,
sits in second place in the Pac-12 North standings with the Cougars. The Ducks will have to
catch No. 9 Stanford (7-1, 6-0) if they hope to
defend their Pac-12 title, but time is running
short.
Oregon visits the Cardinal next week.
Like the Ducks, Cal (5-3, 2-3) needs one
more victory to be bowl eligible, but the
Golden Bears have lost three straight after a
promising 5-0 start.
“We have to come out this week with our hair
on fire and want this one like we haven’t wanted any other game, and that’s how they’ll get it.
Because I know they want this one just as bad,”
defensive lineman Mustafa Jalil said. “Actually
I take that back. They don’t want this one as
bad as we do. This game means a lot to us.”
Other things to consider when the Golden
Bears visit the Ducks on Saturday:
SO MANY YARDS: Cal junior quarterback

Jared Goff threw for 272 yards and two touchdowns in last weekend’s 27-21 loss to USC,
which put him in the 10,000 yards-passing
club. Goff has 10,018 yards passing and is the
92nd player in FBS history to reach the mark.
He’s also got a school-record 75 touchdown
passes.
Oregon coach Mark Helfrich said this week
that he met with Goff on a recruiting visit years
back. The teenager was wearing a Cal sweatshirt.
“Never a good sign,” Helfrich said.

History
The series hasn’t gone Cal’s way of late.
Oregon has a six-game winning streak over the
Golden Bears, who haven’t defeated the Ducks
since a 26-16 victory in Strawberry Canyon in
2008. Oregon has outscored California 273105 over that span.

Royce rolls
Oregon sophomore running back Royce
Freeman has amassed 1,109 yards rushing this
season, becoming the fourth RB in school his-

tory to have back-to-back 1,000-yard seasons.
He ranks eighth nationally with 138.6 yards a
game.
“He’s a great back, a step above what he did
last year. They use him really well for what they
do,” Jalil said. “Big back, hard running but I
think we have a pretty big defense that’s a little
bit harder hitter than he is.”

Last trip to Eugene
In 2013, Goff went into the game against
Oregon as the nation’s leader with an average of
more than 435 yards passing a game, but after
completing just three of six passes for 11 yards
in the first quarter, he was replaced by Zach
Kline. The Golden Bears lost 55-16.
But what Goff remembers most was the rain.
“I think they said it was the worst they’d ever
seen. It was the worst rain that I’ve ever seen.
I’m excited to go back up there and have another chance in Autzen and have a chance to do
something special and hopefully get a win,” he
said.
By the way, the forecast calls for rain on
Saturday.

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SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Boxing brief
Bradley, Rios meet in
welterweight fight
LAS VEGAS — Timothy Bradley
has a new trainer known more lately
for talking about fighters than
watching over them. Brandon Rios
has a new resolve not to let his career
slip away from him.
They meet Saturday night for a
piece of the welterweight title in a
crossroads fight with a lot at stake
for each fighter.
For Bradley, it’s a chance to stay
relevant in a division where there is
still a lot of money to be made
despite the departure of Floyd
Mayweather Jr.
For Rios, it may be the last opportunity to salvage a once promising
career that was damaged by a lackluster loss to Manny Pacquiao.
“My back is against the wall in
this fight,” Rios said. “I want to get
back on top in boxing. Bradley is
going to be my ticket back to the
top.”
Rios will have to overcome the
odds if he is going to get there, with
the smart money in this gambling
town favoring Bradley by a 5-1 margin. And he’ll have to do it in a division that’s two weight classes over
where he was fighting a little more
than three years ago.
Just how much of that fighter is
left will likely be seen in a fight that
matches two boxers who don’t mind
brawling a bit, too. Both have a
common opponent in Pacquiao —
Bradley won a disputed decision
against him, before losing their second fight — and a common promoter in Bob Arum.
That may not be enough to get the
winner in the ring next year against
Pacquiao in what could be the
Filipino’s last fight.

TRANSACTIONS
NFL
NFL — Fined Seattle DE Michael Bennett $20,000
for his late hit on Dallas QB Matt Cassel and Cincinnati S George Iloka $23,152 for his helmet-to-helmet
hit on Pittsburgh TE Heath Miller during Nov. 1
games.
ATLANTA FALCONS — Waived S Dezmen Southward. Signed CB Akeem King from the practice
squad.
BUFFALO BILLS — Signed WR Walter Powell to the
practice squad. Released OT Chris Martin from the
practice squad.
BASEBALL
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF BASEBALL
— Suspended Texas minor league 2B Evan Van
Hoosier (High Desert-Cal) 50 games after testing
positive for Amphetamine and for a second positive
test for a drug of abuse in violation of the Minor
League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program.
American League
OAKLAND ATHLETICS — Promoted Billy Owens to
assistant general manager/director of player personnel and Dan Feinstein to assistant general
manager, pro scouting and player personnel.
National League
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Announced OF Juan
Perez cleared waivers.

WHAT’S ON TAP
SATURDAY
Football
Serra at St. Ignatius, 2 p.m.
Cross Country
PAL championships at Crystal Springs course, 12:45
p.m.
Girls’ varsity, 2:55 p.m.; boys’ varsity, 3:25 p.m.
Boys’ water polo
PAL tournament at Menlo-Atherton
Championship round
Seventh-place, 9:15 a.m.; fifth-place, 11:45 a.m.; third
place, 2:15 p.m.; championship match, 4:45 p.m.
WCAL championship match
Bellarmine at Sacred Heart Prep, 7:30 p.m.
Girls’ water polo
PAL tournament at Menlo-Atherton
Championship round
Seventh-place, 8 a.m.; fifth-place, 10:30 a.m.; thirdplace 1 p.m.; championship match, 3:30 p.m.
WCAL tournament
Championship match
St. Francis at Sacred Heart Prep, 6 p.m.
College basketball
Women
Cabrillo at CSM, 3 p.m.

NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T
N.Y. Giants
4 4 0
Washington 3 4 0
Philadelphia 3 4 0
Dallas
2 5 0
South
Carolina
7 0 0
Atlanta
6 2 0
New Orleans 4 4 0
Tampa Bay
3 4 0
North
Green Bay
6 1 0
Minnesota
5 2 0
Chicago
2 5 0
Detroit
1 7 0
West
Arizona
6 2 0
St. Louis
4 3 0
Seattle
4 4 0
49ers
2 6 0

Pct PF
1.000 249
.571 172
.429 176
.429 154

PA
133
139
173
173

.375
.375
.286
.143

173
174
147
125

203
205
207
159

1.000 198
.500 168
.250 167
.250 190

132
147
216
214

1.000 168
.571 178
.375 195
.250 191

112
173
182
227

Pct
.500
.429
.429
.286

NHL GLANCE

NBA GLANCE

NFL GLANCE
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T
New England 7 0 0
N.Y. Jets
4 3 0
Buffalo
3 4 0
Miami
3 4 0
South
Indianapolis 3 5 0
Houston
3 5 0
Jacksonville 2 5 0
Tennessee
1 6 0
North
Cincinnati
8 0 0
Pittsburgh
4 5 0
Cleveland
2 6 0
Baltimore
2 6 0
West
Denver
7 0 0
Raiders
4 3 0
Kansas City 3 5 0
San Diego
2 6 0

17

Weekend • Nov. 7-8, 2015

PF
215
148
160
133

PA
208
168
137
171

1.000 191
.750 213
.500 213
.429 163

136
173
234
199

.857
.714
.286
.125

174
147
140
149

130
122
202
245

.750
.571
.500
.250

263
135
167
109

153
125
140
207

Thursday’s Game
Cincinnati 31, Cleveland 10
Sunday’s Games
Tennessee at New Orleans, 10 a.m.
St. Louis at Minnesota, 10 a.m.
Green Bay at Carolina, 10 a.m.
Washington at New England, 10 a.m.
Miami at Buffalo, 10 a.m.
Jacksonville at N.Y. Jets, 10 a.m.
Oakland at Pittsburgh, 10 a.m.
Atlanta at San Francisco, 1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Tampa Bay, 1:05 p.m.
Denver at Indianapolis, 1:25 p.m.
Philadelphia at Dallas, 5:30 p.m.
Open: Arizona, Baltimore, Detroit, Houston, Kansas
City, Seattle
Monday’s Game
Chicago at San Diego, 5:30 p.m.

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W
Toronto
5
Boston
2
New York
2
Philadelphia
0
Brooklyn
0
Southeast Division
Atlanta
6
Washington
3
Miami
3
Charlotte
2
Orlando
2
Central Division
Cleveland
5
Detroit
4
Chicago
4
Indiana
3
Milwaukee
3
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
San Antonio
3
Memphis
3
Dallas
2
Houston
2
New Orleans
0
Northwest Division
Portland
4
Utah
3
Oklahoma City
3
Minnesota
2
Denver
2
Pacific Division
Warriors
6
L.A. Clippers
4
Phoenix
3
L.A. Lakers
1
Sacramento
1

L
1
3
4
5
6

Pct
.833
.400
.333
.000
.000

GB

2 1/2
3
4 1/2
5

1
2
3
3
4

.857
.600
.500
.400
.333


2
2 1/2
3
3 1/2

1
1
2
3
3

.833
.800
.667
.500
.500


1/2
1
2
2

2
3
3
3
5

.600
.500
.400
.400
.000


1/2
1
1
3

2
2
3
2
4

.667
.600
.500
.500
.333


1/2
1
1
2

0
1
3
4
5

1.000
.800
.500
.200
.167


1 1/2
3
4 1/2
5

Friday’s Games
Orlando 92, Toronto 87
Cleveland 108, Philadelphia 102
L.A. Lakers 104, Brooklyn 98
Boston 118, Washington 98
Milwaukee 99, New York 92
Atlanta 121, New Orleans 115
Indiana 90, Miami 87
Detroit 100, Phoenix 92
Golden State 119, Denver 104
Houston 116, Sacramento, 110
Saturday’s Games
Minnesota at Chicago, 3 p.m.
Orlando at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
Washington at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m.
Charlotte at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m.
Brooklyn at Milwaukee, 5:30 p.m.
New Orleans at Dallas, 5:30 p.m.
Memphis at Utah, 6 p.m.
Golden State at Sacramento, 7 p.m.
Houston at L.A. Clippers, 7:30 p.m.

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W
Montreal
15 12
Ottawa
13 7
Tampa Bay
15 7
Detroit
13 7
Boston
12 6
Florida
13 5
Buffalo
13 5
Toronto
13 2
Metropolitan Division
GP W
N.Y. Rangers
13 9
Washington
12 9
Pittsburgh
13 9
N.Y. Islanders 14 7
New Jersey
13 7
Philadelphia
13 4
Carolina
13 5
Columbus
15 4

L
2
4
6
5
5
5
8
8

OT Pts
1 25
2 16
2 16
1 15
1 13
3 13
0 10
3 7

GF GA
55 27
40 39
38 37
32 32
43 40
36 31
29 39
27 42

L OT Pts
2 2 20
3 0 18
4 0 18
4 3 17
5 1 15
6 3 11
8 0 10
11 0 8

GF GA
38 24
40 29
29 23
39 35
33 33
25 39
27 38
35 54

WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L
Dallas
14 11 3
St. Louis
13 9 3
Nashville
12 8 2
Winnipeg
14 8 4
Minnesota
12 7 3
Chicago
14 7 6
Colorado
14 4 9
Pacific Division
GP W L
Los Angeles
13 8 5
Vancouver
13 6 3
Sharks
13 7 6
Arizona
12 6 5
Anaheim
13 4 7
Edmonton
14 5 9
Calgary
14 4 9

OT Pts
0 22
1 19
2 18
2 18
2 16
1 15
1 9

GF GA
50 38
36 31
35 27
42 38
37 35
35 36
36 42

OT Pts
0 16
4 16
0 14
1 13
2 10
0 10
1 9

GF GA
31 28
38 29
38 35
34 34
21 33
37 43
32 57

Friday’s Games
Detroit 2, Toronto 1, OT
New Jersey 4, Chicago 2
Dallas 4, Carolina 1
N.Y. Rangers 2, Colorado 1
Pittsburgh 2, Edmonton 1
Anaheim 4, Columbus 2
Saturday’s Games
Vancouver at Buffalo, 10 a.m.
Florida at Los Angeles, 1 p.m.
Boston at Montreal, 4 p.m.
Toronto at Washington, 4 p.m.
Ottawa at Carolina, 4 p.m.
Philadelphia at Winnipeg, 4 p.m.
St. Louis at Nashville, 5 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Minnesota, 5 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Arizona, 6 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Calgary, 7 p.m.
Anaheim at San Jose, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Dallas at Detroit, noon
Vancouver at New Jersey, 2 p.m.
Boston at N.Y. Islanders, 2 p.m.
Edmonton at Chicago, 5 p.m.

18

SPORTS

Weekend • Nov. 7-8, 2015

HILLSDALE
Continued from page 11
touchdown, or the 17-yard pick-6 he had
while playing defensive back.
“He’s a great competitor,” Wetteland said
of Taylor. “He love to fight, loves to compete.”
Wetteland also had a solid performance,
completing 10 of 17 passes. He completed
his first five passes of the game and finished the first half 7 of 10 for 167 yards and
three touchdowns.
“[Menlo] did a good job on [Taylor], but
that allowed us to do other stuff,” Parodi
said. “To see [Wetteland’s] development
(from his sophomore year) … to where he is
now … It’s fun to watch him run our offense.
He took advantage of what the defense was
giving him.”
Hillsdale (5-0 PAL Ocean, 8-1 overall)

was nearly perfect on its first drive of the
game. It took the opening kickoff and starting from its own 22, Hillsdale drove down
to the Menlo 33 before Wetteland hooked up
with Nate Shani, who ran an inside-outside
route and was wide open. Wetteland nearly
overthrew him, but Shani made a finger-tip
catch and went into the end zone for a 33yard score.
Menlo (2-3, 6-3) was forced to punt on its
first possession, but got the ball back when
the Hillsdale center snapped a worm burner
that Wetteland couldn’t handle and was
recovered by Menlo. Four plays later, the
game was tied at 7 after Menlo quarterback
Mackenzie Morehead hit Charlie Roth with
a shovel pass that he turned into a 10-yard
score.
Hillsdale answered right back, driving 60
yards on six plays. The drive was aided by a
pass interference call and it was capped
when Wetteland hit receiver Isaiah
Cozzolino on a bubble screen along the left
sideline. The blocking was perfect and

MUSTANGS
Continued from page 11
aggravated a shoulder injury Friday and departed in the first
quarter, but Cap still manufactured 333 total offensive
yards.
“We’ve got four ball carriers,” White said. “The offense
is built for deception and to keep guys going in different
directions, and to keep [defenses] guessing.”
With a reputation for the ground game, Cap certainly
kept Carlmont (2-3, 3-6) guessing by gaining nearly half
its yards via the air attack. Senior quarterback Joe Gutierrez
got off to a rough start, but completed his last seven
attempts of the day to go 8-of-10 for 157 yards and four
touchdowns.
White noted it was the most productive game of
Gutierrez’s varsity career, and the senior helped put the
game out of reach in the first half. His first completion of
the day came with 2:53 remaining in the first quarter on a
37-yard laser beam to Raynaz Obregon-Halim for a touchdown.
Then the Mustangs went on a tear, scoring three times
inside the final five minutes of the first half. And Gutierrez
capped the surge with a 24-yard TD strike to Phil
McGoldrick with just seven seconds remaining on the
clock.
White said, with Carlmont consistently stacking the
defensive line, it was time to let his quarterback loose. And
Gutierrez responded, adding two more touchdown passes in
the second half — a 19-yarder to Obregon-Halim in the
third quarter to make it 33-0, and the final score of the
game with a 10-yarder to Ramon Enriquez in the fourth.
“We just look at what the defense is giving us and we
attack,” White said.
Meanwhile, the Cap defense attacked relentlessly. The
Mustangs’ ‘D’ was rewarded with a score for its efforts in
the closing minutes of the first half. After Cap made it 130 on a 6-yard run scoring run by junior Teisina Fifita —
who ran for a game-high 67 yards on 10 carries — the
Mustangs held Carlmont to a three-and-out.
But the “out” turned into disaster for the Scots, when a
botched punt snap went flying over the punter’s head. As
the Scots’ punter attempted to dive on the loose ball,
Obregon-Halim came flying in to blindside the punter to
prevent him from covering the ball. That allowed junior
Pemasa Aumavae to scoop it up and run 25 yards for a
touchdown, giving Cap a 20-0 lead.
Carlmont committed six turnovers in the game, with
three fumbles and three interceptions. All three Cap interceptions were grabbed by sophomore Abnan Grajeda, also
gained 24 rushing yards on a team-high 12 carries.
It was middle linebacker Iloilo Amataga who sealed the
defensive gem for the Mustangs though. The lone returning player on the offensive line this season, Amataga is
also pulling two-way duty for his second straight season.
And when it became clear Carlmont was intent on pounding the weak side with running plays, Amatage stepped up.
“I told [White] I could handle that weak side spot and he
just started blitzing me,” Amataga said.
Amataga and Co. nearly produced their third shutout of
the season, but Carlmont connected for one big touchdown
pass on an 87-yarder from quarterback Shanil Patel to
receiver Blake O’Connor. In fact, had it not been for that
pass, Cap would have held the Carlmont offense to negative yards.
“We’re not the biggest and fastest team, but what we do
have is a lot of heart,” said Tarik Moore, Cap senior fullback/outside linebacker.
The unofficial prognosis on Jacobs’ shoulder was he was
withheld from the remainder of the game for precautionary
reasons.
“He’s going to be back,” Moore said. “He’s a strong kid.
He’s going to bounce back strong.”

Cozzolino tip-toed down the sideline
untouched for a 36-yard score with just under
10 minutes to play in the first half.
After forcing Menlo to turn the ball over
on downs near midfield, Hillsdale took over
and needed just two plays to cover 60 yards.
Wetteland was sacked for a 10-yard loss on
the first play, but on the second, he found
Taylor with a screen pass, who then weaved
his way through the defense and down the
left sideline for a 60-yard score and a 21-7
Hillsdale lead.
Menlo put together its best drive of the
game on its next possession, driving 69
yards on 10 plays. Menlo converted a fake
punt on fourth-and-7, with Jared Lucian hitting Joey Sabel for a 43-yard catch and run.
Four plays later, Morehead found RJ Babiera
for a 13-yard scoring pass on fourth down
with 41 seconds to play in the half.
It would be the last time Menlo would find
the end zone.
The teams exchanged punts to start the
third quarter, but on Menlo’s second posses-

THE DAILY JOURNAL
sion, Morehead dropped back and threw a
pass that was tipped into the air by
Hillsdale’s Josh Janakes. The ball floated
right to Taylor, who made the interception
and bolted the short distance to the end zone
for a 27-14 Hillsdale advantage.
Early in the fourth quarter, Taylor all but
sealed the deal for Hillsdale, when he scored
from 31 yards out, running over a would-be
tackler on his way to the end zone.
After several years of being one of the
worst teams in the PAL, Hillsdale is
methodically moving up the ranks. The
Knights won the Lake Division title two
years ago and now add the Ocean crown.
“I think it says a lot about our kids,”
Parodi said.
Said Wetteland: “It’s a great accomplishment. All that hard work paid off.”

‘Trumbo’
Cranston commands
as blacklisted writer

SEE PAGE 21

Does alma matter?
By Kelly Song

I

(Daniel Craig), masked but
unmissable in a skeleton costume, through the festive
throngs. He ushers a woman
(Stephanie Sigman) out of the
masses and into her bed, only
to disrobe into a suit, step out
the window and stride down

t’s 11:58 a.m. and you’re almost
ready to send it in. Just one last check
and the moment is here. You hit the
submit button and, from that moment on,
your future is in the hands of someone else.
Amidst the long nights staring at a computer and stressful days fueled by caffeine,
college application season has finally arrived.
For prospective freshman students, pressing
the submit button is the
defining moment
between those cringeworthy embarrassing
days in high school and
the freedom of intellectual life. But this seemingly-heavenly gateway to freedom has its dark side.
More often than ever, the humanistic elements of individuals are lost in the application process. Seventeen years of someone’s life, defined in a stack of papers. The
paradoxity of it all is baffling. How can
one’s entire existence possibly be captured
in something so superficial? The process of
college admissions, and the hype surrounding it, has become more of a big-name
chase than anything else.
To put it simply, the search for the “perfect” college has simply lost its value.
There is no consideration for fulfillment or
looking toward the long-term future; college has become the only goal at the end of
the road. Many seem to have forgotten that
college is simply one step in a very long
journey. They seem to forget that whatever
college a student chooses does not guarantee their happiness.
No matter how impossible to believe,
how absurd and sunken into the norm the
concept seems to be, college truly is just
minor step along the way. College is not
the end, nor is it the defining moment in
one’s life. There seems to be a widespread
belief that a person’s ultimate college is
directly correlated to fulfillment. And it is a
belief that must be refuted, quickly and
swiftly, before it spreads even further.
According to Unigo, one of the most
well-known college match online services,
an admissions officer spends around only
10 to 20 minutes per student reading an

See SPECTRE, Page 22

See STUDENT, Page 22

‘Spectre’ stirs, does not
shake old Bond formula
By Jake Coyle
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Where to go when 53 years
of action-scene set pieces
have exhausted seemingly
every exotic corner of the
Earth? How much globe can a
globe-trotter trot?

The answer kicking off the
latest James Bond film,
“Spectre,” is a doozy.
Beginning with the words
“the dead are alive” across the
screen, director Sam Mendes
opens on a long shot through
the Day of the Dead in
Mexico City, tracking Bond

‘My Mañana Comes’ raises serious social issues
By Judy Richter
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT

Four men working as busboys in an
upscale French restaurant in New York City
learn that their pay has been drastically cut.
They must decide between taking the cut
or resisting in Elizabeth Irwin’s “My
Mañana Comes, ” presented by Marin
Theatre Company.
All four desperately need the money,
especially since they have no benefits, but
there are complicating factors. One is that
they could lose their jobs.
Moreover, two of them are undocumented
Mexican immigrants who could face deportation and the loss of their American dream.
One is Jorge (Eric Avilés), who has been
in the country four years. He has been care-

fully saving his money so that he can return
to his wife and children and finish building
their house.
The other is Pepe (Carlos Jose Gonzalez
Morales), youngest of the four. He has been
in the country only four months and hopes
his brother can join him.
The two citizens are Peter (Shaun Patrick
Tubbs) and Whalid (Caleb Cabrera). Peter,
who is black, has a wife and child. He seems
to be the unofficial leader of the group.
Whalid, who is Latino but American-born,
still lives with his parents and has an eye
for women.
The men don’t get a salary. Instead they
get $25 per shift plus a share of tips. Shift
pay is being taken away.
KEVIN BERNE

See PLAY, Page 20 Peter (Shaun Patrick Tubbs) and Jorge (Eric Avilés) star in ‘My Mañana Comes.’

20

Weekend • Nov. 7-8, 2015

WEEKEND JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Riveting ‘Spotlight’ uncovers church scandal
By Lindesy Bahr
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Mark Ruffalo never walks in “Spotlight.”
His very slowest is just shy of a flat out jog.
It’s a minor detail, but it’s crucial to appreciating why this studied, smart look at The
Boston Globe’s Pulitzer Prize-winning
investigation into the abuses of the Catholic
Church is also utterly exhilarating.
This is the kind of simmering process film

that makes you want to roll up your sleeves
and do some work. To knock on some doors,
ask some questions, ignore warnings, crack
open a beer, burn the midnight oil and really
do something — or maybe that’s just what
every journalist watching this film will
think.
After all, investigative print journalism
isn’t the most cinematic of endeavors. It’s
tedious and quiet and there are more dead ends
than big revelations. It’s a test of endurance

— a long distance run where the finish is not
even clear.
Of course, unlike an ongoing investigation, we know the outcome here already. The
trick of “Spotlight” is making the potentially unsexy “how they got there” into not only
one of the best movies of the year, but one of
the best journalism movies of all time.
Spotlight refers to the paper’s four person
investigative team responsible for exposing
the systematic cover-up of the pedophilia of
more than 70 local priests — editor Walter
“Robby” Robinson (Michael Keaton),
reporters Sacha Pfeiffer (Rachel McAdams)
and Michael Rezendes (Mark Ruffalo), and
researcher Matt Carroll (Brian d’Arcy James).
Director Tom McCarthy’s movie presents a
realistic, but still absorbing portrait of a
close knit town and the well-meaning folks
at the local paper who for years remained
unwittingly complicit in the rampant abuse
of power in the Church. “Spotlight” pulls off
the tricky feat of detailing the tick-tock of it
all, while also giving due respect to the victims, the enablers and the believers.
It takes the arrival of a true outsider to
challenge everyone to look a little harder
at what’s happening. In this case, it’s the
Globe’s new editor in chief Marty Baron
(Liev Schreiber). One character who questions his arrival notes he’s an unmarried
Jew who hates baseball. But most damning

of all — he’s not a local.
Early on, the publisher warns him that over
50 percent of their subscriber base is
Catholic. Baron retorts that he thinks they’ll
find it interesting, and he proceeds.
There’s a wonderful and all too true resistance in the Globe’s ranks when the investigation gets underway. The paper hasn’t shied
away from covering the one off cases over the
years, and there’s a well-earned weariness in
agitating the Church. Even though many of
the reporters refer to themselves as “lapsed”
Catholics, the institution remains paramount
and the connections run deep.
The Globe editors attend events for
Catholic charity, they have sit downs with
the leaders of the Boston Archdiocese, and
they golf with litigators who settle cases that
victims have brought against the Church. A
major American city has never seemed like
such a small town.
Thankfully the viewer need not have
Boston or Catholic roots to care. The thrill of
watching a charismatic crew work to accomplish something societally important is
enough. This isn’t some hand-wringing,
grandstanding, exploitative drama either.
Everyone in the ensemble feels very deeply
human — they are smart and funny, but serious when they need to be. You know you’re in

PLAY

and in Kirsten Brandt’s direction.
The acting is uneven. Tubbs as Peter is the
most assured, while Morales as Pepe is the
weak link. Moreover, the heavy accents and
some exchanges in Spanish limit understanding for many viewers.
“My Mañana Comes” shows promise, but
it’s Irwin’s first produced play and feels that
way.
It runs about 90 minutes with no intermission. It will continue through Nov. 22 at
Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave.,
Mill Valley. For tickets and information call
(415) 388-5208 or visit www.marintheatre.org.

Continued from page 19
Peter insists that the only way to get their
money is for all four to walk out, forcing
management to realize how important they
are to the restaurant’s smooth functioning.
The play raises important issues such as
the plight of undocumented immigrants and
the low pay for service workers. However,
its effectiveness is diluted because some
scenes seem repetitious both in the writing

See CHURCH, Page 23

THE DAILY JOURNAL

WEEKEND JOURNAL

Weekend • Nov. 7-8, 2015

21

By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR CORRESPONDENT

WHERE BIRDS FLOCK AND BATS
HANG: THE NATIONAL AVIARY IN
PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA. You
expect to see birds at an aviary, of course.
But in Pittsburgh, The National Aviary’s
large walk-through exhibits create an experience unlike any other — an intimate, upclose interaction between visitors and freeflying birds which includes opportunities
to hand-feed and meet many species rarely
found in zoos anywhere else in the world.
The Aviary has a diverse collection of more
than 600 birds, representing more than 200
species from every continent except
Antarctica, many of them threatened or
endangered in the wild.
THE NATIONAL AVIARY AND THE
AZA SPECIES SURVIVAL PLAN PROGRAM. The National Aviary is an accredited institution within the Association of
Zoos and Aquariums (AZA), a non-profit
organization dedicated to the advancement
of accredited zoos and aquariums in the
areas of animal care, wildlife conservation,
education and science. The Aviary participates in the AZA Species Survival Plan
Program, which helps ensure the survival
of selected wildlife species within zoos
through breeding management and the
maintenance of a healthy, self-sustaining
population that is both genetically diverse
and stable. The National Aviary is home to
more than 60 bird species that are part of
the Species Survival Plan program, including the Andean condor, African pygmy
goose, fairy bluebird, great argus pheasant,
Guam rail, rhinoceros Hornbill, burrowing
owl, African penguin, keel-billed toucan,
Micronesian kingfisher and victoria
crowned pigeon. The aviary’s first two
African penguin chicks hatched in February
2012, and on March 13, 2013, the aviary
celebrated another success of its breeding
program, when a female Eurasian owlet
hatched and, within five days, doubled in
size.

GET A PECK ON THE CHEEK, OR
MAYB E S OMETHING ON YOUR
SHIRT. The National Aviary offers you a
chance to get a close look at the brightly
colored rainbow lorikeets by letting you
enter their enclosure bearing a cup of nectar. The lories, as they are affectionately
known, happily zoom in, landing on outstretched hands to drink. If they happen to
leave a little something on you in
exchange, don’t be glum – zoo personnel
will bestow an over-sized badge that says “I
got it at the National Aviary.” If you earn
one, wear it proudly!
A BIT BATTY. It’s not all birds at the
National Aviary. In 2013, the aviary
acquired a colony of six female Malayan
flying foxes from the Lubee Bat
Conservancy in Florida. Flying foxes are
fruit bats and important pollinators and
seed dispersers in the tropical forests of
Southeast Asia. Their arrival to the
National Aviary corresponded with the
opening of the Canary’s Call exhibit,
which portrays the ways in which birds act
as indicators of environmental change. In
their exhibit, bats and birds are living
together to demonstrate the rich biodiversity of our planet. The bats sleep during the
day and begin to awaken in late afternoon,
at which time ample provisions of cut up
fruit are placed into their enclosure. Aviary
visitors gather to watch as Senior
Aviculturist Diane Lavsa hangs fruit skewers and puts out plates piled with fresh fruit.
As she feeds some of the bats by hand, gently placing fruit pieces into their mouths,
Lavsa explains that the bats will feed
throughout the night. An aviary volunteer

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE NATIONAL AVIARY

Diane Lavsa, Senior Aviculturist at the National Aviary in Pittsburgh, Penn., offers a piece of
fruit to a Malayan Flying Fox, a species of megabat. The Aviary, home to over 600 birds
representing about 200 species, acquired the colony of six female flying foxes in 2013 from
the Lubee Bat Conservancy in Florida.
noted: “When guests visit the National
Aviary’s Malayan flying fox exhibit, they
are intrigued and curious to learn about
bats. There is a lot of misinformation and
folklore surrounding bats, so visitors are
often surprised by what they learn during
the daily feedings. While visitors watch the
bats eat, our trainers talk about how bats
care for their young, why they hang upside
down and the importance of megabats in
the environment. Visitors leave the exhibit with a better understanding and appreciation for this important species.”
NATIONAL AVIARY PARTICULARS. The National Aviary is located at
700 Arch St. on Pittsburgh’s historic North
Side, just minutes from downtown
Pittsburgh. The Aviary theater is currently
home to “Wings!” an indoor-avian adven-

ture featuring flighted birds and special
effects. The Aviary also offers outdoor
shows (weather permitting) from its new
Sky Deck, featuring live flight demonstrations of eagles, falcons and kites. The
Aviary is open daily except Thanksgiving
Day, Christmas Eve and Christmas. For
more information visit www.aviary.org or
call (412) 323-7235.
AND REMEMBER: “Two great talkers
will not travel far together.” — George
Borrow.
Susan Cohn is a member of the North American
Travel Journalists Association, Bay Area Travel
Writers, and the International Food, Wine &
Travel Writers Association. She may be reached at
susan@smdailyjournal.com. More of her stories
may be found at http://ifwtwa.org/author/susancohn.

Cranston commands as blacklisted writer in ‘Trumbo’
By Sandy Cohen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sitting in a bathtub with a pen in one hand
and glass of whiskey in the other, a long cigarette holder dangling beneath his wiry moustache, Dalton Trumbo wrote countless
Hollywood screenplays. From B-movies to
Oscar winners, he remained prolific throughout his career, even during the 13 years he was
blacklisted by the movie business for being a
communist. He went to prison for holding
fast to his ideals — that Americans have the
right to believe as they please without retribution from the government — and upon his
release, he worked constantly and defiantly,
but at significant personal and professional
cost.
But you don’t have to know a thing about
Trumbo, Hollywood or communism to enjoy
watching “Trumbo.” A biopic lovingly rendered with input and approval from his daughters, “Trumbo” is about an idealistic yet
imperfect man who stands up for what he
believes is right, even when it means risking
‘Trumbo,’ starring Bryan Cranston, resurrects the darkest chapter in Hollywood history — the things he holds most dear. The script is
the blacklist — and celebrates one of the men the movie industry once tragically shunned. funny and fact-filled; the acting outstanding.
As the title character, Bryan Cranston gives
a performance as compelling and complex as
the man himself must have been. Cranston’s
name is back in theaters — and this time, Trumbo is eminently interesting, from his
By Jake Coyle
it’s not below the title but right in it. rounded posture and curious eyes to his disTHE ASSOCIATED PRESS
“Trumbo,” starring Bryan Cranston, resur- tinct cadence and diction. Appearing in nearNEW YORK — The subpoena came like a rects the darkest chapter in Hollywood his- ly every frame of the film, Cranston infuses
tory — the blacklist — and celebrates one John McNamara’s clever screenplay with
death sentence.
Dalton Trumbo, the famed Hollywood of the men the movie industry once tragi- even more life. With a vocabulary of witticisms, Trumbo speaks like a man who loves
screenwriter, knew what it meant when he cally shunned.
“To watch it turn around, to watch him go language.
was officially summoned to appear before
The ensemble of supporting actors is also
the House Un-American Activities from villain to hero, is fascinating,” says
Committee in 1947. He knew they would Mitzi Trumbo, the 70-year-old daughter of excellent. As Trumbo’s wife, Cleo, Diane
Lane embodies quiet strength, conveying
pry into his political beliefs and slander the screenwriter.
During the decade-long blacklist, studios heartbreak, pride and concern with just her
him as a Soviet operative. And he knew
eyes. Louis C.K. plays Trumbo’s fictional
that he would refuse their invasion, protest refused to hire any of the so-called friend Arlen Hird, who delivers sharp one-lintheir witch hunt and be jailed for doing so. Hollywood Ten — those who, like Trumbo, ers and clever retorts just like the comedian
After the subpoena, came a race to pre- refused to cooperate with the HUAC, which himself might. Dean O’Gorman is uncanny as
pare for the coming storm: sell his fami- was acting in the grip of Cold War para- Kirk Douglas, right down to the chin dimple.
ly’s house, finish what work he could and, noia.
Michael Stuhlbarg brings the necessary gravThe period — “a time of evil,” Trumbo
as he said, “get ready to be a nobody.”
itas as actor Edward G. Robinson. Helen
Once erased from movies, Trumbo’s
See TRUMBO, Page 23 Mirren’s grounded performance keeps the outlandish gossip columnist Hedda Hopper from

Film resurrects Hollywood’s darkest chapter

becoming a caricature.
And John Goodman absolutely steals his
scenes as B-movie producer Frank King.
Watching him smash up his office with a bat
and explain what keeps him in the movie
business is alone worth a trip to the theater.
Director Jay Roach (“Game Change,”
‘’Meet the Parents”) keeps these big performances of even bigger personalities in balance,
an oscillation of stars around Trumbo.
The story begins in 1947. Trumbo, a laborunion supporter, would regularly meet with
his friends — Hird, Robinson and other
Hollywood colleagues — to discuss political
and social ideas. Like many others, Trumbo
had become a communist after the Great
Depression, and the group was concerned
about the state of the country. As Louis C.K.
describes it: It was “kind of like blogging,
but they did it in person.”
The U.S. government, meanwhile, was concerned about the rise of communism, and
thought movies were one way communists
conspired to control American minds. The
House Un-American Activities Committee
called on Trumbo and other artists to testify
about their political beliefs and identify colleagues who might be communists. Trumbo
declined to name names, and said his right to
peaceably assemble and share ideas is protected by the Constitution. He was held in
contempt of Congress and spent a year in jail.
Others in Hollywood did name names, and
those believed to be associated with communism were suddenly indefinitely unemployed.
The industry policed itself through the
Motion Picture Alliance for the Preservation
of American Ideals (which sounds fake, but
wasn’t). John Wayne (David James Elliot)
was its leader, and gossip columnist Hopper
its unofficial enforcer. By combining
archival footage with shots of the cast, Roach
effectively inserts them into history, lending
a sense of realism to the events. Production
designer Mark Ricker and costume designer
Daniel Orlandi bring mid-century L.A. to life
with vintage cars and short neckties.
It all makes for an enthralling story about
how far government, industry and individuals
might go to uphold what they believe is
right.

22

WEEKEND JOURNAL

Weekend • Nov. 7-8, 2015

SPECTRE
Continued from page 19
the ledge. Finally spying his real prey,
explosions follow, walls collapse and the
resulting chase spins into a helicopter
careening over a mobbed Zocalo Square.
It’s a sequence of such startling audacity
(some 1,500 extra were used) and gorgeous
black-on-sepia tones that a nagging desire
to hit “rewind” persists through the rest of
“Spectre.” Handsome and riveting as it
often is, the film never again reaches such
heights.
It’s not for lack of effort. Mendes, who
helmed the last entry, the smash “Skyfall,”
has raised the bar on 007, pushing the budgets and the grandiosity in a bid to not just
reinvent the franchise but overwhelm it
with eye-popping craft.
“Spectre” is Craig’s fourth Bond movie
and his muscular tenure has been defined not
just by his full embodiment of the character,
but his overall stewardship. His ability to

STUDENT
Continued from page 19
application. Let that sink in. That means
hours of work and years of preparation
only come down to several minutes of evaluation. Students spend so much time and
mental strength throughout high school,
simply to be forced to portray their entire
existence in under half an hour. If a school
is unable to see a student in a developed,
humanistic way, how can it possibly guarantee fulfillment?
The world is filled with students who are
frustrated, depressed and sleep-deprived,
simply so they can be admitted to the college of their choice. They spend their
entire four years in high school striving
toward an abstract dream, only to reach college and proceed on another ruthless chase

attract top-notch talent, in front and behind
the camera, and to imbue the spy series with
a seriousness of purpose reads in every
frame. His Bond may still sip martinis, but
he’s stone-cold sober.
Having ushered 007 through the Eva
Green highs of “Casino Royale,” the overwrought lows of “Quantum of Solace” and
the climactic extravagance of “Skyfall,”
“Spectre” finds Craig’s Bond pursuing the
videotaped orders of Judi Dench’s late M in
a more traditional 007 plot. Her instructions lead him to a shadowy international
criminal organization led by a longtime
Bond villain, Franz Oberhauser (Christoph
Waltz).
The pursuit skirts the snowy peaks of
Austria, the cloak-and-danger cobblestones
of Rome and the Mediterranean maze of
Tangier, with enough corresponding outfit
changes to stock a runway show. Bond is
operating outside of MI5, where new head
Max Denbigh (Andrew Scott) is overhauling the intelligence services with digital
surveillance that he says will render the oldfashioned 00 program obsolete.
The surveillance reference is a mostly

shallow attempt at political depth. But such
self-aware conflicts between new and old
now constantly bounce throughout Bond
films. The mythology, fearful of showing
its age, is perpetually torn down and built
back up again like an ever-rebooting superhero. Every gesture (and drink order) is a
winking comment on 007 traditions; even
the opening recalls the New Orleans funeral
march of “Live and Let Die.” When it works,
it’s refreshing; when it doesn’t, it’s merely
repackaging.
“Spectre,” scripted by John Logan, Neal
Purvis and Robert Wade, feels more like the
latter. For the first time, all of Craig’s reinvention hasn’t carried Bond all that much
further than where the spy always was —
especially when it comes to the women that
adorn “Spectre.”
First there’s Monica Belluci as the widow
of the man Bond kills in Mexico City. He
sleeps with her after picking her up at the
funeral. She’s quickly dispatched for
Madeleine Swann (Lea Seydoux), whose
family connections bring Bond closer to
the elusive Oberhauser.
Seydoux, the French actress of “Blue is

the Warmest Color,” gives the film a jolt,
but the romance between Swann and Bond is
slight and the character is little more than
Bond’s usual love interest. That said, the
seductive Seydoux and the sinewy Craig
make an attractive pair. When they eventually arrive at a remote Sahara outpost, they
could really just stay there, handsomely
smoldering in the dry heat like a
Hemingway couple.
What’s missing most is the steely spine
of Dench. The off-kilter menace of Waltz
would seem perfectly suited for “Spectre,”
but his scenes pale in comparison with
Javier Bardem’s Raoul Silva in “Skyfall.”
Also with big shoes to fill is cinematographer Hoyte van Hoytema, stepping in for
Roger Deakins. He surrounds the film with
shadows and reflective mirrors, ably capturing Craig’s slinky stride in any locale.
“Spectre,” a Sony Pictures release, is
rated PG-13 by the Motion Picture
Association of America for “intense
sequences of action and violence, some disturbing images, sensuality and language.”
Running time: 148 minutes. Two and a half
stars out of four.

for another dream. There is such a pressure
to be accepted by the perfect college that
we become blinded by the endless cycle of
chasing perfection, and suddenly there is
an entire generation of teenagers caught in
its wrath.
But the truth is, college is a place to
grow. Students cram for the most competitive schools, but they take no consideration in how that college will shape them.
The only concern that seems to be of relevance in the search for college is its ranking. But college is so much more; it is an
environment which will shape adulthood
and views of society. Simply because a college is ranked “number one,” does not
mean it is number one for any one individual personally. To feel welcomed and
accepted in an environment is crucial, and
it is often overshadowed.
According to a November 2013 study by
future-oriented website CareerBuilder, about
one third of college-educated American

workers age 35 and up are never employed
in their degree field. This means thousands
of dollars are being poured into an education that is not even in use. Pursuing
dreams often do not require an incredible
amount of knowledge and is mainly driven
by passion, yet people still apply for the
“big name” of a college. If something is
destined to be a job, it will come down to
character, not a diploma. It’s all irrelevant
in the end.
College is simply one step. Look
around: there are entrepreneurs who
dropped out of school and there are fastfood workers who disregarded their degree.
The spectrum of human success is broad.
The name of a college does not determine
success. To make a true impact, on the
lives of society and on oneself, does not
depend on the caliber of a college. It
depends on the willingness to channel education to develop a broader understanding
of the world. It depends on assertiveness

and determination, and the ability to gain
something greater from education. And at
the end of the day, it is not a degree or the
name of a college that defines a person, but
rather their character and their ability to
touch the lives of others with their knowledge.
It is time to look past the name of a college and focus on the impact of its education. People are defined by more than a
number. They are defined by more than a
couple sheets of paper or the letters on a
report card. They are an entity, a free-flowing soul, who cannot be confined to the
boundaries surrounding them. Too many
times is humanity lost in the sea of college
applications.

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news@smdailyjournal.com.

WEEKEND JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

ECONOMY
Continued from page 1
and is now at its lowest point since April
2008, just a few months after the Great
Recession began.
Even before Friday’s report, expectations
for a Fed rate increase in December were
building. Fed chief Janet Yellen and other
top officials said this week that the economy is generally healthy and a move at next
month’s meeting is a “live possibility.”
“This data tips the scales toward a rate
hike in December, but more importantly is a
sign that our economy may have more
punch than we thought,” said Tara Sinclair,
chief economist for job site Indeed.com.
The Fed cut the short-term rate it controls
to a record low of nearly zero in December
2008 to try to stimulate growth during the
recession. An increase would eventually
raise borrowing costs for mortgages, auto
loans and business loans.

CAMPUS
Continued from page 1
ulation.
The collaborative effort amongst affordable housing developers, nonprofits, the
city and county culminated Wednesday with
a ceremony marking the completion of the
$56. 6 million Half Moon Bay Senior
Campus.
Built in phases, Half Moon Village was
the final piece of the entire campus that
includes outdoor gardens, community
rooms, a fitness center and a bocce ball
court. It is just south of downtown on
Bloom Lane off Main Street.
“You’re not just creating housing, you’re
creating homes. Each of us has our own
home here now and we’re creating new family, we’re creating new friends,” said resident Stephen Perez, who moved to the
development in July with his wife. “It’s

TRUMBO
Continued from page 21
called it — has occasionally been the
backdrop for movies, most notably
Sydney Pollack’s “The Way We Were”
and Martin Ritt’s “The Front.” But
“Trumbo,” which opens Friday, is the
first major release to tell the story
through its actual people.
Screenwriter
John
McNamara
believes it’s long overdue. “This is the
only important story Hollywood has to
tell about itself,” he says.
McNamara’s first encounter with the
blacklist was decades ago as a student at
New York University. When he told
screenwriter professor Ian McLellan
Hunter that he liked his 1953 romantic
comedy “Roman Holiday,” Hunter
responded: “I didn’t write that movie.
My friend Dalton Trumbo did.”
Trumbo, who also wrote the novel
“Johnny Got His Gun,” was one of
Hollywood’s top screenwriters for
years, with credits including “Thirty
Seconds Over Tokyo” and “Five Came
Back.” In the lean years he was blacklisted, Trumbo secretly wrote under
pseudonyms and fronts. Both his
“Roman Holiday” and “The Brave One”
won Oscars without his name on it.
The blacklist began to break when
director Otto Preminger announced he

CHURCH
Continued from page 20
good company when Stanley Tucci and
John Slattery are there as support.
Ruffalo, in particular, uses his full
physicality to embody a reporter
who’s determined to the point of near
mania (though he goes too far in a wet-

Weekend • Nov. 7-8, 2015

23

The prospect of higher interest rates initially drove down financial markets
Thursday, though stock indexes finished
mixed. The yield on the benchmark 10-year
Treasury note surged to 2.33 percent from
2.23 percent, suggesting that investors see
a greater likelihood of a rate increase.
After a prolonged period of relatively
stagnant pay for many Americans, hourly
wages climbed a solid 9 cents in October to
$25.20. Average pay is up 2.5 percent in the
past year, the largest annual gain since
2009.
The pay gains should fuel more consumer
spending in coming months, which, in
turn, could support further hiring.
“These are very strong numbers and likely
to continue,” said Carl Tannenbaum, chief
economist at Northern Trust. “The two summer months that were low now look like the
aberration.”
Manufacturing employment was flat in
October, after two months of job cuts. The
strong dollar and faltering growth in China,
Europe and Japan have cut into exports of
factory goods. Oil and gas drillers also shed

workers as oil prices stayed low.
But retailers added nearly 44,000 jobs last
month, a sign that they expect a good holiday shopping season. Hotels and restaurants added 41, 000, while health care
providers hired nearly 57,000.
Higher-paying sectors also gained,
notably professional and business services,
which include architects, engineers and
many IT workers. That sector added 78,000
positions, the most in nearly a year.
Matt Friedman, chief executive of the
Wing Zone restaurant chain, said he thinks
lower gas prices are encouraging more people to eat out and boosting sales at his company’s 93 U.S. sites. Company sales have
grown 6 percent this year from 2014.
Wing Zone expects to open 15 stores this
year and 19 next year.
“People are spending more money, ”

Friedman said. “Fuel prices have a big
impact.”
The company receives plenty of applications for its hourly jobs and hasn’t had to
increase pay for those positions to attract
applicants, Friedman said.
But it has had to raise pay to fill professional jobs in marketing, training and operations, he said. Pay for those positions has
increased about 10 percent in the past two
years.
Eric Renninger, vice president of Honest1 Auto Care, said his 54-shop chain is seeing evidence that cheaper gas is encouraging more travel.
“You are seeing people bringing in vehicles in preparation for road trips,” he said.
The company expects to open five more
locations this year.
The economy grew at just a 1.5 percent
annual rate in the July-September quarter.
Still, Americans boosted their spending at a
healthy 3.2 percent annual pace.
Economists expect growth to rebound to
2. 5 percent or more in the final three
months of the year.

such a wonderful design and development.
We’re privileged to be here.”
The 160 subsidized units were the largest
component of the campus and designed to
house seniors earning between 30 percent
and 50 percent of the area’s median income.
The village was created by the well-established affordable housing developer MidPen
Housing Corporation, with financing from
the
county’s
Housing
Authority,
Department of Housing as well as state and
federal tax credits.
Already fully occupied, the new residences
neighbor the 40-unit Coastside Senior
Housing project, that includes an adult day
health center, and the 64-unit Lesley
Gardens.
The project came to fruition after the
county’s Housing Authority sought to redevelop the former 60-unit mobile home site
and vacant lot into a larger campus that
could allow San Mateo County residents to
age in place. Built in phases, the original
residents were allowed to relocate into one

of the new developments as the entire site
was transformed.
“It’s the fulfillment of a dream we’ve had
for a long time. This is the final piece in the
mosaic of a really exciting senior campus
160 new units. New homes for seniors and
they’re part of a campus plan that has 265
units and adult day health center on site with
medical services and the Senior Coastsider’s
senior center for social activities, all integrated in a really beautiful campus,” said
MidPen President Matt Franklin, who noted
the senior community is vibrant and active.
Built in a refined architectural style with
plenty of common space and outdoor gardens, hundreds of people gathered for the
celebration at the site that provides regular
activities from arts and crafts workshops to
cooking demonstrations.
State Sen. Jerry Hill, D-San Mateo,
attended the event with Supervisor Don
Horsley. Both noted the value of providing
for seniors in a region where affordable
housing is scarce and difficult to construct.

Hill commended the collaboration of the
public entities alongside private nonprofits
to support a growing need — particularly as
statistics indicate one in four county residents will be seniors by 2030.
“It’s the great lives they house in a day
where that’s not easy to do,” Hill said. “The
need is there, the need is growing. … This is
really a template and a model. We need to do
more of this.”
New resident 77-year-old Joan Germain
met with Half Moon Bay Mayor Marina
Frasier and expressed her gratitude for the
home she moved into about a month ago.
“The longer I’m here, the more I realize
what a gift it is to be here. So I feel blessed
and appreciative,” said Germain, a longtime
Half Moon Bay resident.
Fraser said meeting some of the residents
highlighted why the yearslong housing
project was so worthwhile.
“You’re one of the people that can age in
place,” Fraser said to Germain. “You’re the
reason we did this.”

Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com

would credit Trumbo for 1960’s
“Exodus.” Kirk Douglas did the same for
that year’s “Spartacus,” which President
John F. Kennedy crossed picket lines to
see.
“It’s a repressed memory of
Hollywood,” says director Jay Roach
(“Meet the Parents,” ‘’Recall”). “It’s
almost like it’s so ugly the way it went
down, people might in a way prefer not
to be reminded. It’s not a story that gets
told a lot around here.”
“Trumbo” recreates
a 1950s
Hollywood of colorful characters with
Helen Mirren as gossip columnist Hedda
Hopper, Michael Stuhlbarg as Edward G.
Robinson, David James Elliot as John
Wayne and Dean O’Gorman as Douglas.
But none was more of an iconoclast
than Trumbo, a loquacious, cigarettesmoking scribe who often typed in the
bathtub. Daughter Nikola Trumbo, 76,
recalls life around him as in “technicolor.” Stubbornly principled, Trumbo’s
immaculate speech could be biting. “He
could destroy someone in 12 words,”
says Mitzi Trumbo.
McNamara relished digging through
Trumbo’s writing and correspondence.
‘There’s a letter he writes to his contractor and the first line is ‘Dear burglars,’”
says McNamara. “He made disobedience
an art form.”
Snappy and chatty, “Trumbo” owes
much of its tone to its main character,
who died in 1976.
“He’s very serious and sometimes

almost zealous or strident,” says Roach.
“But he was a good enough showman or
communicator that he knew to add in
humor or wit or irony to almost undercut
his own seriousness.”
Nikola and Mitzi Trumbo had more
reason than anyone to distrust a
Hollywood production of their father.
“We grew up not comfortable talking
about anything to anybody,” says Mitzi
Trumbo. The sisters were insistent on
some changes, like giving Preminger
the credit that’s often gone solely to
Douglas.
“I was a thorn in their side with this
screenplay for the longest time, as poor
John will tell you,” says Mitzi Trumbo.
“But I ultimately felt they were very sincere in wanting to get the correct story.”
McNamara, Roach and Cranston met
at length with the Trumbo daughters.
Collectively, they view the lessons of
the blacklist as hugely relevant — that
the politics of fear and the circus of
politically motivated congressional
committees remain very much in use
today.
“There are periods of time when fear
takes over, the last time being these last
14 years,” says Cranston. “And the First
Amendment is often pushed aside, and
actions motivated by fear take over. And
I think that’s wrong.”
For the Trumbos, the movie is a kind
of public confirmation. Says Nikola
Trumbo: “I always thought that my
father was a hero.”

eyed monologue late in the film).
McAdams also shows grit and power
both in executing the professional
duties of her character and in making
the viewer feel how the revelations of
the investigation impacts her close
relationship with her religious grandmother.
The filmmaking might rely too
much on the cheap cutaway — the
school bus outside the house of a suspected priest, the laughing kids riding

their bicycles in the area, the young
choir singing Christmas carols — but
that too recedes to the background as
you root for the scrappy reporters to
defy the system, their families and
their town for the greater good.
“Spotlight,” an Open Road Films
release, is rated R by the Motion
Picture Association of America for
“some language including sexual references.” Running time: 128 minutes.
Three and a half stars out of four.

24

Weekend • Nov. 7-8, 2015

WEEKEND JOURNAL

Activision planning ‘Call of Duty’ film, ‘Skylanders’ show
By Derrik J. Lang
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ANAHEIM — Activision Blizzard
Inc. is moving deeper into the film
and TV business.
The video game maker unveiled
plans Friday at an investors meeting
during the annual BlizzCon fan convention to create and release its own
film and TV series.
The first projects from the newly
formed Activision Blizzard Studios
will be based on the “Call of Duty”
military shooter franchise and kidfocused “Skylanders” toy-game
series.
Activision Blizzard Studios co-president Nick van Dyk noted that the
division will be directly involved in
the creation, development and market-

SHERIFF
Continued from page 1
Bolanos said he too has an extensive
list of endorsers, and has already started fundraising, but feels it is too early
to begin identifying the assets and
pledges of support he has collected,
beyond the blessing of Munks.
He said his extensive experience in
law enforcement, including more than
30 years combined working in police
departments in Palo Alto and Redwood
City, where he served a police chief,
prior to joining the Sheriff’s Office
makes him the right candidate for the
position.
“My overall experience, and more
importantly my specific experience in
the Sheriff’s Office make me the best
qualified person for the job,” he said.
Bolanos said he plans to spend the
time leading up to the 2018 election
focusing on his obligations as an
administrator overseeing the daily
operation of the Sheriff’s Office.
“We live in an outstanding county
that is very safe, and I think that is
based on the high level of service that
is provided by the Sheriff’s Office and
the police departments,” he said. “And
I want to make sure those are at the

WEATHER
Continued from page 1
The storm will bring colder daytime
highs to the area Monday and cold temperatures Wednesday morning, NWS
forecaster Diana Henderson said.
Daytime temperatures will be in the
mid to upper 50s Monday with a gradual warming to the low to mid 60s by

ing of movies and TV series based on
Activision Blizzard properties.
“We’ll have a fraction of the overhead of the typical studio since we’re
starting with a blank page and building an organization that is right-sized
for our intended creative output and for
the future of the industry,” van Dyk
told investors.
The first TV series from Activision
Blizzard Studios will be “Skylanders
Academy. ” The computer-generated
show is set to debut in 2016 and will
feature the voices of Justin Long,
Ashley Tisdale and Jonathan Banks.
The studio also is working on a
“Call of Duty” film series, with the
first installment likely ready for
deployment in 2018 or 2019, according to van Dky.
“Our releases will be consistent with

the high adrenaline, bad-(expletive)
action that fans expect from this franchise, but we’re going to deliver this
intellectual property to the broadest
movie-going audience,” van Dyk said.
“This will be tent-pole action-adventure of the widest appeal.”
The move follows Activision
Blizzard partnering with Legendary
Pictures for a film based on Blizzard’s
“Warcraft” fantasy franchise. The
movie centering on the battle between
the game’s orcs and humans is set for
release June 10 and will be distributed
by Universal Pictures.
“Warcraft” filmmaker Duncan Jones
was on hand Friday with the film’s
cast to debut a trailer for the movie at
BlizzCon, a two-day celebration of
Blizzard series at the Anaheim
Convention Center.

highest possible level.”
The Sheriff’s Office shares many of
the same law enforcement obligations
as local police departments, said
Bolanos, but also has the added
responsibility of helping run the
county’s correctional and court systems.
The extensive job requirements of
the Sheriff’s Office are such that only a
candidate with familiarity of the position are qualified to be elected, said
Bolanos.
“I don’t think running another
organization can give you that level of
experience or qualification,” he said.
Manheimer disagrees, and said she
has the track record required to be a successful sheriff, citing the variety of
county and regional boards and commissions she has served on which are
focused on corrections.
Ultimately though, she said the
Sheriff’s Office would benefit from a
new perspective.
“A fresh set of eyes and a progressive approach is sometimes just the
thing needed to embrace the important
evolution of corrections and programs
that we are now looking at,” she said.
The law enforcement career of
Manheimer began in the San Francisco
Police Department, where she served
for 16 years prior to taking the reins of
the force in San Mateo.

During her time as chief, community
engagement has been a priority of
Manheimer, as she has established initiatives such as a task force reaching
out to the homeless, a gang intervention program, detention diversion for
juvenile delinquents and other efforts.
Another passion of Manheimer, she
said, is cracking down on human trafficking and providing assistance to
those victimized through the market
for illegal sex.
Should she be elected, Manheimer
said she would focus on bringing some
of the initiatives which she has established in San Mateo to a larger, regional platform.
“It’s exciting to think some of these
things could become countywide programs in the future,” she said.
Should she officially declare her
interest, Manheimer said she expects
she would do so around January.
“I would imagine it would be sometime after the holidays, ” said
Manheimer.
Manheimer noted there is substantial time left before candidates would
need to declare, and she will spend the
interim focusing on her obligations of
leading the local police force.
“Until there are any changes, I am an
engaged, energetic and delighted chief
of an incredible department in San
Mateo,” she said.

Thursday, she said.
Wednesday morning temperatures
will be in the mid to upper 40s, she
said.
The amount of rain falling could be
higher in areas if thunderstorms materialize Monday, forecasters said. The
best chance for thunderstorms will be
in the North Bay and East Bay, according to forecasters.
Small hail and gusty winds may
accompany the thunderstorms, forecasters said.

The expected rain may mix with
snow at elevations above 4,500 feet,
but forecasters expect no accumulation, according to the National
Weather Service.
Forecasters warned boaters, surfers
and beachgoers that the rain event will
bring rough surf and rip currents to Bay
Area waters.
Forecasters said they have low to
moderate confidence in the rainfall
amounts and moderate confidence in
the timing and coverage of the event

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Calendar
SATURDAY, NOV. 7
10th Annual Toy and Food Drive
and Car Show. 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Santo
Cristo Hall, 41 Oak Ave, South San
Francisco. Car collectors and enthusiasts are invited to participate in this
unique event. Entry free is a new toy
and bag of non-perishable food to be
donated to less fortunate members
of the community. For more information call 787-1954.
Flu Crew: Free Flu Shots for All
Ages. 10 a.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. For
your convenience, the entire family
can receive free flu immunizations at
the library. The Stanford Flue Crew
has been working to provide costfree vaccinations, increase awareness
of the need for the flu shot, and educate the public on other methods to
prevent the spread of infections. For
more
information
email
belmont@smcl.org.
Hillsborough Antiques + Art +
Design Show. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. San
Mateo County Event Center, 1346
Saratoga Drive, San Mateo. Over 200
dealers from across the world present
a broad range of items. Admission is
$10 and good for the weekend. For
more information go to www.hillsboroughantiquesartdesign.com.
Overeaters Anonymous. 10:15 a.m.
to noon. 610 Elm St., San Carlos.
Overeaters Anonymous meets every
Saturday. For more information call
591-0341 ext. 237.
La Nebbia Winery Craft Faire and
Tasting. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. La Nebbia
Winery, 12341 San Mateo Road, Half
Moon Bay. Food, handmade jewelry,
arts and crafts, picnic and bocce ball.
Free. For more information call 5916596.
Open Studios. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. 1777
California Drive, Burlingame. For more
information go to www.peninsulaartinstitute.org.
David Scouffas and Lynne Todaro
Sculpture
and
Photography
Exhibition opening reception. 2
p.m. to 4 p.m. 1777 California Drive,
Burlingame. Free. Exhibit runs
through Jan. 17, 2016, during normal
hours. For more information call 6922133.

Pulgas, Belmont. A full afternoon of
performance and craft will be featured in celebration of Diwali. For
more
information
email
belmont@smcl.org.
‘Rent.’ 2 p.m. Hillsdale High School,
3115 Del Monte St., San Mateo.
Purchase tickets at http://hhs.schoolloop.com/drama.
‘Working for the Mouse.’ 2 p.m.
Dragon Theatre, 2120 Broadway,
Redwood City. To purchase tickets call
493-2006 ext. 2.
Art Contest. 10:30 a.m., 2 p.m., 4 p.m.
1335 El Camino Real, Millbrae.
Masterpiece Gallery invites public to
annual art contest. $10 per contestant. For more information and to register call 636-4706.
Hillsborough Antiques + Art +
Design Show. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. San
Mateo County Event Center, 1346
Saratoga Drive, San Mateo. Over 200
dealers from across the world present
a broad range of items. Admission is
$10 and good for all weekend. For
more information go to www.hillsboroughantiquesartdesign.com.
Guided Tour of Sea Level Rise.
Noon. Corner of Ellsworth and Santa
Inez avenues., San Mateo. Bring the
whole family for a leisurely, guided
walk that will explore the issue of sea
level rise and view firsthand where
the San Mateo tideline will be all too
soon. For more information contact
educaryl@gmail.com.
Rangoli. 1:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Features bharata natyam
Indian dance, art workshop and live
painting, poetry recitation and lego
Rangoli designs. For more information email lefteri28@gmail.com.
Crestmont Conservatory Student
Recital. 2 p.m. 2575 Flores St., San
Mateo. The recital will feature piano
and violin performances. For more
information call 574-4633.
MONDAY, NOV. 9
Sons in Retirement Branch 91
Monthly Luncheon. 11 a.m. South
San Francisco Elks Lodge, 920
Southgate Drive, South San Francisco.
$17. For more information call 5951973.

NaNoWriMo at the Library: Chris
Baty. 6 p.m. 840 W. Orange Ave.,
South San Francisco. NaNoWrimo
founder Chris Baty will discuss the
National Novel Writing Month program, and encourage you to join. For
more information call 829-3860.

Burlingame Music Club. 1 p.m. 241
Park Road, Burlingame. An afternoon
of music featuring the Amethyst Trio,
art and jewelry sale and refreshments. For more information go to
www.burlingamemusicclub.net.

Art Contest. 10:30 a.m., 2 p.m., 4 p.m.
1335 El Camino Real, Millbrae.
Masterpiece Gallery invites public to
annual art contest. $10 per contestant. For more information and to register call 636-4706.

Get Ready Disaster Preparedness
Class. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. San Mateo
Senior Center, 2645 Alameda de las
Pulgas, San Mateo. Free. For more
information and to register email
abrown@cityofsanmateo.org.

Singer/Songwriter
Michael
McNevin. 11 a.m. Menlo Park City
Council Chambers, 701 Laurel St.,
Menlo Park. Folk singer performs at
free concert. For more information
call 330-2501.

Three Gluten-Free Holiday Dishes
with Amy Fothergill. 6 p.m. to 7:30
p.m. New Leaf Community Markets,
150 San Mateo Road, Half Moon Bay.
Join Chef Amy and learn to create
simple and delicious gluten-free
dishes. $25. Register at newleafhalfmoonbay.eventbrite.com. For more
information call 726-3110 or email
patti@bondmarcom.com.

‘The Laramie Project.’ 2 p.m. CSUS
Bovet Theatre, 400 Uplands Drive,
Hillsborough. For more information
email ritayuchen@gmail.com.
American Anti-Corruption Act by
Represent the San Francisco
Peninsula,
a
chapter
of
Represent.Us. 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Redwood Shores Library, Community
Room, 399 Marine Parkway, Redwood
City. Presentation followed by questions and discussion. For more information call 773-3842 or email
gtgrah@yahoo.com.
Concert at the Canyon. 6:30 p.m.
Devil’s Canyon Brewing Co., 935
Washington St., San Carlos. Tickets are
$10 in advance and $12 at the door.
Ages 21 and up. For more information
go to devilscanyon.com/cac2015.
International Taiko Festival. 7 p.m.
Capuchino High Performing Arts
Center, 1501 Magnolia Ave., San
Bruno. For more information and to
buy tickets call (415) 928-2456.
Working for the Mouse. 7 p.m.
Dragon Theatre, 2120 Broadway,
Redwood City. To purchase tickets call
493-2006 ext. 2.
‘Rent.’ 7 p.m. Hillsdale High School,
3115 Del Monte St., San Mateo.
Purchase tickets at http://hhs.schoolloop.com/drama.
SUNDAY, NOV. 8
Family Worship. 10:30 a.m. 2000
Woodside Road, Redwood City. The
congregation is the sermon this week
and everyone will have the opportunity to share insights and discoveries
while exploring the Bible as a community. For more information email
katiemgoetz@gmail.com.

Rain Gardens for Native Plants. 7
p.m. Belmont Public Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont.
Learn how to harvest the rain for your
native plant garden. For more information email belmont@smcl.org.
TUESDAY, NOV. 10
Documentary Club. 6:30 p.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont. The library will be
playing ‘Inside,’ a joyous cinematic
exploration of music’s capacity to
reawaken our souls and uncover the
deepest parts of our humanity. For
more
information
email
belmont@smcl.org.
Republican Debate Watch Party. 6
p.m. to 8 p.m. 4200 Farm Hill Blvd.,
Redwood City. The Cañada College
Republicans host their first major
event by presenting the Republican
debate. For more information call
701-5720.
Printmaking. 7 p.m. Menlo Park
Library, 800 Alma St., Menlo Park. A
printmaking art workshop for adults.
For more information call 330-2501.
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 11
Veteran’s Day Celebration. 11:30
a.m. to 1 p.m. Peninsula Volunteers
Little House, 800 Middle Ave., Menlo
Park. Enjoy great speakers, music and
food to celebrate Veteran’s Day.
Tickets will be $10. Admission is free
for veterans. For more information
and to RSVP call 326-2025.

Open Studios. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. 1777
California Drive, Burlingame. For more
information go to www.peninsulaartinstitute.org.

San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon
to 1 p.m. Kingfish Restaurant (in the
King’s Room), 201 S. B St., San Mateo.
Join the SMPA for lunch and networking, and meet new business
connections. Free. For more information contact 430-6500.

Diwali Celebration. 1:30 p.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las

For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.

COMICS/GAMES

THE DAILY JOURNAL

DILBERT®

Weekend • Nov. 7-8, 2015

25

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

HOLY MOLE®

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®

ACROSS
1 Bleach bottle
4 Ka-pow!
7 Metal for galvanizing
11 To and —
12 Phoenix cagers
13 The chills
14 Tapping
16 Twig juncture
17 Slow mover
18 Catastrophic
19 Baby beaver
20 Diner coffee
21 Poe’s visitor
24 Throat feature
27 Pilot’s sighting
28 Increased
30 Garden dweller
32 A Great Lake
34 Nobel Prize city
36 Sporty truck
37 Most weird
39 Peer Gynt creator
41 Dorm climber
42 Feeling lousy

GET FUZZY®

43
45
48
49
52
53
54
55
56
57

Be overly fond
Face coverings
Moore of “G.I. Jane”
It has a venomous tail
Gambler’s town
Goes wrong
Comic — Costello
Twirl
Flirtatious
Explosive letters

DOWN
1 Oliver Stone film
2 Vases with feet
3 Hired muscle
4 Put up
5 Dear Abby’s sister
6 Chow mein additive
7 Most wacky
8 Mr. Stravinsky
9 Undressed
10 So-so grade
12 Winter sport
15 Wedding fixture
18 “— Giovanni”

20
21
22
23
24
25
26
29
31
33
35
38
40
42
43
44
46
47
48
49
50
51

Dewlap
Oaters’ Lash La —
Big hairdo
Null’s partner
Trial balloon
Debt memos
Behind schedule
Promising
Cave, often
Newspaper issue
Crude carriers
Festive night
Brief upturn
Elephant tusk
Not shallow
All, in combos
Cheery tone
By and by
AMA members
Dry
— -Magnon
Bolt holder

11-7-15

PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS



SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2015
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Plan an inexpensive
entertaining outing with the people closest to you. An
outdoor hike or sightseeing adventure will get you back
in touch with nature and it won’t stretch your budget.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Being diligent
about your work habits will bring favorable results
and comments from your colleagues and employer.
Keep your personal and professional lives separate.
Romance is heating up.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Someone is
threatened or jealous of your popularity. Make
sure your loved ones know they are important

KenKen® is a registered trademark of Nextoy, LLC. ©2015 KenKen Puzzle LLC. All rights reserved.
Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS, Inc. www.kenken.com

FRIDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED

Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.
The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.
Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.

to you by reserving some quality time free from
professional distractions.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Lucrative rewards
are in store if you can present your ideas in a favorable
light to the right audience. You will outwit the
competition if you research your topic carefully.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — An impulsive
decision will be your downfall. Reconsider any
investment or banking notions until you have all the
facts required to make a good decision. An elderly
relative will offer reliable advice.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Don’t let critics prevent
you from making a good impression. Put your best
foot forward and have faith in your abilities. Avoid
exaggerating or making promises you cannot keep.

11-7-15
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook

TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Participate in activities
that hold special meaning for you. Sports or intellectual
challenges will be invigorating. Spending time with the
younger generation will give you a new perspective.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — Play host to friends and
neighbors and you will find out what is going on in
your community as well as make mutually rewarding
connections. Don’t overspend.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — Don’t let anyone compel
you to spend time or money. Learn to identify those
who are sincere and those who are just out to take
advantage of you or use you to get ahead.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Try something out of the
ordinary. A creative outlet will lead to new friendships.
Joining a theater group, art class or cultural club will

lead to contact with interesting individuals.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Be prepared to defend
yourself if someone makes unreasonable demands or
accusations. Hold your ground. As long as you have
been playing by the rules, you have nothing to fear.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Unforeseen household
expenses will eat into your savings. Be cautious when
performing delicate tasks or working with machinery.
You are likely to encounter someone who has hurt
you in the past.
COPYRIGHT 2015 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.

26

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Nov. 7-8, 2015

104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classifieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its liability shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be submitted within 30 days. For full advertising conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.

110 Employment
APPLY NOW! Individual wanted with
shoemaking skills or willing to learn. Location, San Carlos. Contact Phil,
(650)593-2093

110 Employment

AUTO -

Body shop in Palo Alto seeks Journey
man Body man and Painter's helper.
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TestNG & WebDriver; exp w/Inventory
mgmt, Sales & Purchase Order Processing and mobile automation using Appium. Kenandy, Inc., hr@kenandy.com.

110 Employment

110 Employment

110 Employment

CAREGIVERS

Crystal Cleaning
Center

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required.

San Mateo, CA

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Are you dependable and
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Call
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required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
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HOUSE CLEANERS NEEDED
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Call Molly Maid at (650)837-9788.
1700 S. Amphlett, #218, San Mateo.

MANUFACTURING -

Jeweler/Setters
Setting + repair
Top Pay + ben + bonus

650-367-6500 FX: 367-6400

jobs@jewelryexchange.com

SOFTWARE TEST ENGINEER (Burlingame, CA 94010): Design & enhance automat’n frameworks to create company
website for multiple platforms; expand
company test automat’n practices &
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reqs, pls apply w/ Virgin America Inc.
at
https://www.virginamerica.apply2jobs.co
m/ProfExt/index.cfm?fuseaction=mExternal.showJob&RID=1964

(650) 458-2202
1660 S. Amphlett Blvd., Suite 115
San Mateo, CA 94402
www.homebridgeca.org

Candidate TIPVMEIBWF t$BSFGVMBUUFOUJPOUPEFUBJMJOVQTDBMFFOWJSPONFOUTt"CJMJUZUPMFBEBOECVJMETUSPOH XFMMUSBJOFEBOEDPNQFOTBUFE
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building operations including commercial kitchen, laundry, resident
space, offices, and common areas.
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monitoring, electrical, plumbing, and mechanical systems.
Candidate must be able to respond to and resolve emergencies such
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other services as needed.
Must be a friendly, flexible team player, able to learn and teach, and love
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as meals, generous paid time off, medical, dental, vision, disability,
life insurance, and more.
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523 LINDEN AVE
SO. SAN FRANCISCO
94080

NOW HIRING!
Licensed Stylists
and Barbers
4 seats available
Manicure and Pedicure
One Table Available
***

(650) 219-5163
(650) 270-3151
(650) 703-2626

The Daily Journal is looking for interns to do entry level reporting, research, updates of our ongoing features and interviews. Photo interns also welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented interns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time reporters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not necessarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you apply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by regular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.

SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com

RETAIL -

RETAIL JEWELRY SALES +
EXP DIAMOND SALES ASSOC

NOW HIRING:
t Room Attendants t Laundry Attendants
t Line/Banquet Cook t Banquet Set-Up
t Dishwasher t PBX Hotel Operator

Benefits-BonusNo Nights!
650-367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com

AM & PM Shifts Available
Employee Benefits Package

Call Michelle D. (650) 295-6141
1221 Chess Drive Foster City 94010
Director of Maintenance / Environmental Services needed for
busy, upscale Assisted Living Memory Care community. This position
ensures residents and families have a clean, comfortable, positive
overall experience from first visit to move-in to lifelong care.

GRAND OPENING

NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM

TALENTED P.M. LINE COOK
Apply in person or call Johnston's Saltbox, 1696 Laurel Street, San Carlos.
(650) 592 7258

CAREGIVERS NEEDED
No Experience Necessary
Training Provided
FT & PT. Driving required.

SALON

110 Employment

DRIVERS
WANTED
San Mateo Daily Journal
Newspaper Routes

Early mornings, six days per week,
Monday through Saturday
Pick up papers between 3:30 a.m.
and 4:30 a.m. 2 to 4 hour routes
available from South SF to Palo Alto and the Coast.
Pay dependent on route size.
Call 650-344-5200.

Home Care Attendants wanted in San Mateo County
Transportation preferred
Work one-on-one in the client's home
Competitive rates of pay

Call (650) 347-6903
or visit our employment page on our website

www.irishhelpathome.com

GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation

Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Nov. 7-8, 2015
110 Employment

Tundra

Tundra

Tundra

Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

27

127 Elderly Care
FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE

The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.

Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in today’s paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.

203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT M-266980
The following person is doing business
as: Pueo, 34 Clifton Dr, DALY CITY, CA
94015 Registered Owner(s): Elsie Shumacher, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/Elsie Schumacher/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/13/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/17/15, 10/24/15, 10/31/15, 11/7/15)

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #266735
The following person is doing business
as: Paint Rescue, 121 N. Humboldt St,
#A, SAN MATEO, CA 94401. Registered
Owner(s): 1) Alfredo C. Ubau, same address. 2) David Tzoc, 1101 Tilton Ave,
#1, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 The business is conducted by a General Partnership. The registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on
/s/Alfredo C. Ubau/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 09/18/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/17/15, 10/24/15, 10/31/15, 11/07/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT M-267015
The following person is doing business
as: Convenient Auto Care, 209 A El Camino Real, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080. Registered Owner(s): Omer
Faruk Gunes, 863 North Humboldt St.,
Apt 3, SAN MATEO, CA 94401. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrant commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A
/s/Omer Faruk Gunes/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/16/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/17/15, 10/24/15, 10/31/15, 11/07/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #267008
The following person is doing business
as: Dominic’s Car Appraisal, 1231 California Drive, BURLINGAME, CA 94010.
Registered Owner(s): Dominic Tsang,
1229 California Dr, BURLINGAME, CA
94010. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrant commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/Dominic Tsang/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/16/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/17/15, 10/24/15, 10/31/15, 11/07/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #266997
The following person is doing business
as: Eakin Consulting, 303 Tadley Ct,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94061. Registered
Owner(s): 1) Kaia Eakin 2) Bryan Beck,
same address. The business is conducted by a General Partnership. The registrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/Kaia Eakin/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/14/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/17/15, 10/24/15, 10/31/15, 11/07/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #266986
The following person is doing business
as: Conversations in English, 720 Highland Ave, #4, SAN MATEO, CA 94401.
Registered Owner(s): Earl Hayes, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrant commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
/s/Earl Hayes/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/14/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/17/15, 10/24/15, 10/31/15, 11/07/15)

Exciting Opportunities at
Applicants who are committed to Quality and Excellence welcome to apply.

CANDY MAKER TRAINING PROGRAM – Starting Rate: $15.00/hr
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SEASONAL OPPORTUNITIES
UTILITY – Starting Rate: $12.50/hr
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PRODUCTION SPECIALIST – Starting Rate: $13.50/hr
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SANITATION – Starting Rate: $13.50/hr
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MACHINE OPERATOR – Starting Rate: $13.50/hr
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SHIPPING – Starting Rate: $14.00/hr
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Requirements for all positions include:
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t
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Apply at 210 El Camino Real, So. San Francisco, Monday-Friday, 8:30 am – 3:30 pm,
at the Guard Station on Spruce Street, Rear Parking Lot. EOE

THE SAN Bruno Planning Commission will meet Tuesday, November 17, 2015 at 7:00 p.m., at the Senior Center, 1555
Crystal Springs Road, San Bruno, CA and take action on the
following item. All interested persons are invited to attend.
APN 020-364-070. Request for a Temporary Use Permit to allow an off-site construction staging area within a portion of the
City parking lot located on the west side of Mastick Avenue just
north of Taylor Avenue per SBMC Section 12.84.030. Recommended Environmental Determination: Categorical Exemption
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal, November 7, 2015.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT M-267067
The following person is doing business
as: Bermuda Cafe and Sandwiches, 705
Bermuda Drive, San Mateo CA 94403.
Registered Owner(s): Victoria Co, 693
Applause Pl, San Jose CA 95134. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrant commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 9-10-15
/s/Victoria Co/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/22/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/24/15, 10/31/15, 11/7/15, 11/14/15)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #266796
The following person is doing business
as: Bonded Maids Cleaning Service, 715
El Camino Real, Suite 20A, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066. Registered Owner(s): Michaella G. Payumo, 4 Morton Dr, DALY
CITY, CA 94015. The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/Michaella G. Payumo/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 09/25/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/24/15, 10/31/15, 11/7/15, 11/14/15)

28

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Nov. 7-8, 2015
203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

210 Lost & Found

296 Appliances

302 Antiques

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #267024
The following person is doing business
as: Cuts and Colours by Lennie, 140
Brentwood Drive, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080. Registered Owner(s):
Leonila B. Morano-Mangalonzo, 27490
Coronado Way, HAYWARD, CA 94545.
The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on Dec. 1,
2015
/s/Leonila B. Morano-Mangalonzo/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/19/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/24/15, 10/31/15, 11/07/15, 11/14/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT M-267101
The following person is doing business
as: Medina Tax Solutions, 881 Sneath
Lane, Ste 110, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066.
Registered Owner(s): 1) Sergio Medina II
2) Angelica Medina, 3848 Fairfax Way,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080.
The business is conducted by a Married
Couple. The registrant commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/Sergio Medina II/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/26/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/31/15, 11/07/15, 11/14/15, 11/21/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #267191
The following person is doing business
as: SVP TRAVELANDTOURS, 1231
SOUTHDOWN
ROAD,
HILLSBOROUGH, CA 94010. Registered Owner(s):
Sumati Patel-Pareek. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A
/s/Sumati Patel-Pareek/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/05/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/07/15, 11/14/15, 11/21/15, 11/28/15)

LOST - Woman’s diamond ring. Lost
12/18. Broadway, Redwood City.
REWARD! (650)339-2410

PORTABLE AIR conditioner by windchaser 9000 btu s cools 5,600 ft easily
$90 obo (650)591-6842

HAND DRILLS and several bits & old
hand plane. $40. (650)596-0513

LOST CAT Our Felicity, weighs 7 lbs,
she has a white nose, mouth, chin, all
four legs, chest stomach, around her
neck. Black mask/ears, back, tail. Nice
REWARD.
Please
email
us
at
joandbill@msn.com or call 650-5768745. She drinks water out of her paws.

SHARK FLOOR steamer,exc condition
$45 (650) 756-9516.

MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bevelled glass, $700. (650)766-3024

UPRIGHT VACUUM Cleane, $10. Call
Ed, (415)298-0645 South San Francisco

OLD COFFEE grinder with glass jar.
$40. (650)596-0513

297 Bicycles

OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65
(650)591-3313

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT M-266987
The following person is doing business
as: The Striped Pig, 917 Main Street,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063. Registered
Owner(s): AV Cleaning & Restoration
Corp., CA. The business is conducted
by a Limited Liability Company. The registrant commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/Malinda Mitchell/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/14/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/31/15, 11/07/15, 11/14/15, 11/21/15)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT M-266859
The following person is doing business
as: Menlo Cafe, 620 Santa Cruz Avenue
#A, MENLO PARK, CA 94025. Registered Owner: Elvia Franco, 1720 West
Bayshore Rd, #7, EAST PALO ALTO,
CA 94303. The business is conducted
by an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/Elvia Franco/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/01/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/31/15, 11/07/15, 11/14/15, 11/21/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #267139
The following person is doing business
as: Simpfy Rewards Consulting, 645
Ventura Ave, SAN MATEO, CA 94403.
Registered Owner(s): Phuong Thai,
same address. The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/Phuong Thai/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/30/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/31/15, 11/07/15, 11/14/15, 11/21/15)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT M-267005
The following person is doing business
as: 1) PCS Cleaning & Restoration 2)
PCS of Bay Area, 541 Taylor Way Suite
#3, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070. Registered Owner(s): AV Cleaning & Restoration Corp., CA. The business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/Sandaya Dave/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/15/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/31/15, 11/07/15, 11/14/15, 11/21/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #267173
The following person is doing business
as: Tselogs, 6055 Mission St, DALY
CITY, CA 94014. Registered Owner(s):
Tselogs Corporation, CA. The business
is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/Maria Theresa Camus/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/03/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/07/15, 11/14/15, 11/21/15, 11/28/15)

LOST SMALL gray and green Parrot.
Redwood Shores. (650)207-2303.

Books

210 Lost & Found
FOUND: LADIES watch outside Safeway Millbrae 11/10/14 call Matt,
(415)378-3634

16 BOOKS on History of WWII Excellent
condition. $95 all obo, (650)345-5502

FOUND: RING Silver color ring found
on 1/7/2014 in Burlingame. Parking Lot
M (next to Dethrone). Brand inscribed.
Gary @ (650)347-2301
FOUND: WEDDING BAND Tuesday
September 8th Near Whole Foods, Hillsdale. Pls call to identify. 415.860.1940
LOST - Apple Ipad, Sunday 5.3 on Caltrain #426, between Burlingame and
Redwood City, south bound. REWARD.
(415)830-0012

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
DOWN
1 Pisan possessive
2 It’s dropped on
purpose
3 Cinema __
4 Ovid work
5 Dumps
6 Just
7 Prepare for a
grilling
8 Jazz followers
9 Memorable ’70s
Ford
10 Capital SSW of
Tangier
11 Tar Heel State
campus
12 Attack from
above
13 1964 World’s Fair
giant tire Ferris
wheel creator
14 Enchant
21 Cause of worry
23 Blabbed
26 Compound with
five carbon
atoms
27 Crab house
accessory
28 In good shape
30 Fruit served with
a cracker?

LOST PRESCRIPTION glasses (2
pairs). REWARD! 1 pair dark tinted bifocals, green flames in black case with red
zero & red arrow. 2nd pair clear lenses
bifocals. Green frames. Lost at Lucky
Chances Casino in Colma or Chili’s in
San Bruno. (650)245-9061

11/22/63. 4-BOOK collection on the assassination of JFK. 650-794-0839. San
Bruno. $30.

LOST - MY COLLAPSIBLE music stand,
clip lights, and music in black bags were
taken from my car in Foster City and may
have been thrown out by disappointed
thieves. Please call (650)704-3595

ACROSS
1 Four Corners
collectible
10 Edit, as a
soundtrack
15 “Be right there”
16 Dior style
17 Windowadjusting tool
18 Sheep or goat
19 Two after love?
20 Aria from
“Carmen”
22 Some drills
23 Champagne
toast
24 English lit
pseudonym
25 Father of
Phobos
26 Bounty maker,
briefly
27 R&B’s __ II
Men
28 Murky milieus
29 __ cracker
31 Facing
dauntlessly
35 Like sparkling
wine
36 Real estate
pioneer with a
Long Island
town named for
him
37 Clan member
38 Ruler of
Asgard
39 American
Leaguer since
2013
41 Ray
45 1975 ABC debut,
for short
46 Like music to
one’s ears?
47 Skater Harding
48 Best ever
50 Evil
51 Splatter catcher
52 will.i.am, for one
54 Baggage
carousel feeder
55 Eatery serving
47-Downs
56 State with a red,
white and blue
flag
57 Strips at a party

LOST DOG, 14 year old Bichon, white
and Fluffy. Reward $500 cash. Her name
is Pumpkin. Lost in Redwood City.
(650) 281-4331.

31 Online clip
32 Colorful fall tree
33 Anne Morrow
Lindbergh, but
not Charles
34 Café quaff
35 “__ in the Dark”:
1988 Neill/Streep
film
37 Noah’s
predecessor
40 Hybrid apparel

41 Rear end
42 Complete
43 Bos’n’s response
44 Large rays
46 Exeunt __: all go
out
47 55-Across
dessert
49 __ cracker
50 Assign value to
53 Four on
Augusta’s fifth

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:

BOOK
"LIFETIME"
(408)249-3858

WW1

$12.,

MAGAZINES. SIX “Arizona Highways”
magazines from 1974 and 1975. Very
good condition. $15. 650-794-0839.
NICHOLAS SPARKS Hardback Books
2 @ $3.00 each - (650)341-1861
STEPHEN KING Hardback Books
2 @ $3.00 each - (650)341-1861

294 Baby Stuff
GRACO 3 way pack n play for kid in
good condition $20. Daly City (650) 7569516.
GRACO DOUBLE Stroll $90 My Cell
650-537-1095. Will email pictures upon
request.
SIT AND Stand Stroll $95 My Cell 650537-1095. Will email pictures upon request.

295 Art
BOB TALBOT Marine Lithograph (Signed Framed 24x31 Like New. $99.
(650)572-8895

296 Appliances
AIR CONDITIONER 10000 BTU w/remote. Slider model fits all windows. LG
brand $199 runs like new. (650)2350898
CHEFMATE TOASTER oven, brand
new, bakes, broils, toasts, adjustable
temperature. $25 OBO. (650)580-4763
CHICKEN ROASTERS (4) vertical, One
pulsing chopper, both unopened, in original packaging, $27.(650) 578 9208
DESIGNER LADIES hand bag, yellow
three zippers. purchase price $150.0 sell
price $45 (650)515-2605
HAMILTONBEACH juicer new still in
original packing. purchase price $59.99
sale price $25. (650)515-2605
ICE MAKER brand new $90. (415)2653395
JACK LALANE juicer $25 or best offer.
650-593-0893.
KIRBY MODEL G7D vacuum with accessories and a supply of HEPA bags.
$150 obo. 650-465-2344
RIVAL 11/2 quart ice cream maker
(New) $20.(650)756-9516.

2 BIKES for kids $60.My Cell 650-5371095. Will email pictures upon request.
LANDRIDER
AUTO-SHIFT.
Never
Used. Paid $320. Asking $75.(650)4588280
MAGNA-GLACIERPOINT 26" 15 speed.
Hardly used . Bluish purple color .$ 59.00
San Mateo 650-255-3514.

298 Collectibles
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pockets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BELT BUCKLE-MICKEY Mouse 1937
Marked Sterling. Sun Rubber company.
$300 (650) 355-2167.
CHERISHED TEDDIES Figurines. Over
90 figurines, 1992-1999 (mostly '93-'95).
Mint in Boxes. $99. (408) 506-7691
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated
with
Holder
$15/all,
(408)249-3858
MONOPOLY GAME, 1930's, $35, 650591-9769 San Carlos
NUTCRACKERS 1 large 2 small $10 for
all 3 (650) 692-3260
OLD BLACK Mountain 5 Gallon Glass
Water Jar $39 (650) 692-3260
RENO SILVER LEGACY Casino four
rare memorabilia items, casino key, two
coins, small charm. $95. (650)676-0974
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
TRANSFORMERS SDCC Shockwave
Lab Beast Hunters, $75 OBO Dan 650303-3568 lv msg

PAIR OF beautiful candalabras . Marble
and brass. $90. (650)697-7862
VINTAGE ATWATER Kent Radio. Circa
1929 $100. (650)245-7517

303 Electronics
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIC TURNTABLE Model 940.
Good Shape $40. (650)245-7517

Very

COMPLETE COLOR photo developer –
Besler Enlarger, Color Head, trays, photo
tools $50/ 650-921-1996
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
MOTOROLA BRAVO MB 520 (android
4.1 upgrade) smart phone 35$ 8GB SD
card Belmont (650)595-8855
ONKYO AV Receiver HT-R570 .Digital
Surround, HDMI, Dolby, Sirius Ready,
Cinema Filter.$95/ Offer 650-591-2393
OPTIMUS H36 ST5800 Tower Speaker
36x10x11 $30. (650)580-6324
PIONEER HOUSE Speakers, pair. 15
inch 3-way, black with screens. Work
great. $99.(650)243-8198
PORTABLE AC/DC Altec Lansing
speaker system for IPods/audio sources.
Great for travel. $15. 650-654-9252
SONY DHG-HDD250 DVR and programable remote.
Record OTA. Clock set issues $99 650595-8855
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with remote good condition $99 (650)345-1111

304 Furniture

299 Computers

ANTIQUE DINING table for six people
with chairs $99. (650)580-6324

DELL
LAPTOP
Computer
Bag
Fabric/Nylon great condition $20 (650)
692-3260

ANTIQUE MAHOGONY double bed with
adjustable steelframe $225.00. OBO.
(650)592-4529

RECORDABLE CD-R 74, Sealed, Unopened, original packaging, Samsung, 12X,
(650) 578 9208

ANTIQUE MOHAGANY Bookcase. Four
feet tall. $75. (415) 282-0966.

300 Toys
3-STORY BARBIE Dollhouse with spiral
staircase and elevator. $60. (650)5588142
5 RARE purple card Star Wars figures
mint unopened. $75. Steve, 650-5186614.
COMPLETE 1999 UD1&2 set of 525
baseball cards - mint. $50. Steve, 650518-6614.
STAR WARS SDCC Stormtrooper
Commander $29 OBO Dan,
650-303-3568 lv msg

302 Antiques
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
BEAUTIFUL AND UNIQUE Victorian
Side Sewing Table, All original. Rosewood. Carved. EXCELLENT CONDITION! $350. (650)815-8999.

BRASS / METAL ETAGERE 6.5 ft tall.
Rugs, Pictures, Mirrors. Four shelf. $200.
(650) 343-0631
CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644
COFFEE TABLE @ end table Very nice
condition $80. 650 697 7862
COMPUTER DESK $25 , drawer for keyboard, 40" x 19.5" (619)417-0465
COMPUTER SWIVEL CHAIR. Padded
Leather. $80. (650) 455-3409
CUSTOM MADE wood sewing storage
cabinet perfect condition $75. (650)4831222
DINETTE TABLE with Chrome Legs: 36"
x58" (with one leaf 11 1/2") - $50.
(650)341-5347
DINING ROOM table – Good Condition
$90.00 or best offer ( 650)-780-0193
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condition, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
ESPRESSO TABLE 30” square, 40” tall,
$95 (650)375-8021
FREE 2 piece china cabinet. Pecan finish. Located in SSF. I'll email picture.
650-243-1461
FULL SIZED mattress with metal type
frame $35. (650)580-6324
FUTON COUCH into double bed, linens
D41"xW60"xH34" 415-509-8000 $99

xwordeditor@aol.com

11/07/15

GLASS TOP dining table w/ 6 chairs
$75. (415)265-3395
INFINITY FLOOR speakers H 38" x W
11 1/2" x D 10" good $50. (650)756-9516
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LOVE SEAT, Upholstered pale yellow
floral $99. (650)574-4021
MAPLE COFFEE table. Excellent Condition $75.00 (650)593-1780
MAPLE LAMP table with tiffany shade
$95.00 (650)593-1780
MIRROR, SOLID OAK. 30" x 19 1/2",
curved edges; beautiful. $85.00 OBO.
Linda 650 366-2135.
OAK BOOKCASE, 30"x30" x12". $25.
(650)726-6429
OAK SIX SHELF Book Case 6FT 4FT
$55 (650)458-8280
OAK WINE CABINET, beautiful, glass
front, 18” x 25” x 48” 5 shelves, grooved
for bottles. 25-bottle capacity. $299.
(360)624-1898
OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - new $80
obo Retail $130 (650)873-8167
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
RECLINING SWIVEL chair almost new
$99 650-766-4858
ROCKING CHAIR fine light, oak condition with pads, $85/OBO. 650 369 9762
TABLE, HD. 2'x4'. pair of folding legs at
each end. Laminate top. Perfect.
$60.(650)591-4141

By Ed Sessa
©2015 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

11/07/15

TEAK CABINET 28"x32", used for stereo equipment $25. (650)726-6429

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Nov. 7-8, 2015

304 Furniture

308 Tools

TEAK-VENEER COMPUTER desk with
single drawer and stacked shelves. $30
obo. 650-465-2344

WILLIAMS #40251, 4 PC. Tool Set
(Hose Remover, Cotter Puller, Awl, Scraper). Mint. $29. 650-218-7059.

TV STAND in great condition. 3'x 20"x
18", light grey. $20. (650)366-8168

WIZARD STAINED Glass Grinder, extra
bit, good condition, shield included,
$50. Jack @348-6310

VINTAGE LARGE Marble Coffee Table,
round. $75.(650)458-8280
WALNUT CHEST, small (4 drawer with
upper bookcase $50. (650)726-6429
WHITE BOOKCASE :H 72" x W 30" x D
12" exc condition $30. (650)756-9516.
WHITE WICKER Shelf unit, adjustable.
Excellent condition. 5 ft by 2 ft. $50.
(650)315-6184
WOOD - wall Unit - 30" long x 6' tall x
17.5" deep. $90. (650)631-9311
WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condition $65. (650)504-6058
WOOD FURNITURE- one end table and
coffee table. In good condition. $30
OBO. (760)996-0767.
WOODEN MINI bar with 2 bar stools
$75. (415)265-3395

306 Housewares
BBQ UTENSILS, Stainless steel, Grillmark, flippers tongs, baster, winebarrel,
staves, $25. (650) 578 9208.
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
PRE-LIT 7 ft Christmas tree. Three sections, easy to assemble. $50. 650 349
2963.
SHEER DRAPES (White) for two glass
sliding doors great condition $50 (650)
692-3260
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483

307 Jewelry & Clothing
DANISH WATCH, ultra thin elegant, lifetime warranty, $59, 650-595-3933

308 Tools
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269

310 Misc. For Sale
"MOTHER-IN-LAW TONGUES" plants,
3 in 5-gal cans. $10.00 each. 650/5937408.
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, perfect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
INCUBATOR, $99, (650)678-5133
LIONEL ENGINE #221 ‘Rio Grande diesel, runs good ex-condition
$90.
(650)867-7433
SAMSONITE 26" tan hard-sided suit
case, lt. wt., wheels, used once/like new.
$60. 650-328-6709
STAR TREK VCR tape Colombia House,
Complete set 79 episodes $50
(650)355-2167
TASCO LUMINOVA Telescope.with tripod stand, And extra Lenses. Good condition.$90. call 650-591-2393
ULTRASONIC JEWELRY Cleaning Machine Cleans jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures, keys. Concentrate included. $30
OBO. (650)580-4763
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$30. (650)873-8167
WROUGHT IRON Plant/Curio stand, 5
platforms, 5’ high x 1.5’ wide. Beautiful
designer style, good condition. $25.
(650)588-1946. San Bruno

311 Musical Instruments
ALVAREZ ACOUSTICAL guitar with
tuning device - excellent to learn on, like
new $95. 925-784-1447

CHIPPER/SHREDDER 4.5 horsepower,
Craftsman $150 OBO. (650) 349-2963

BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, excellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call
(510)784-2598

CLICKER TORQUE Wrench, 20-150 lbs,
1/2", new, $25, 650-595-3933

HAILUN PIANO for sale, brand new, excellent condition. $6,000. (650)308-5296

COMMERCIAL PADDLE CONCRETE
MIXER, Electric Driven. $875. (650) 3336275.
COMMERCIAL PADDLE CONCRETE
MIXER, Motor Driven. $1,350. (650) 3336275.
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373

HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. private owner, (650)349-1172
KIMBALL MAHOGANY Baby Grand
Piano, Bench and Sheet Music. $1,100.
(650)341-2271
MONARCH UPRIGHT player piano $99
(650) 583-4549

CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402

UPRIGHT PIANO. In tune. Fair condition. $300 OBO (650) 533-4886.

CRAFTSMAN JIGSAW 3.9 amp. with
variable speeds $65 (650)359-9269

WURLITZER PIANO, console, 40” high,
light brown, good condition. $490.
(650)593-7001

CRAFTSMAN RADIAL Arm Saw Stand.
In box. $30. (650)245-7517
DEWALT DRILL/FLASHLIGHT Set $99
My Cell 650-537-1095. Will email pictures upon request.
HEAVY DUTY Mattock/Pick, Less Handle $5. (650)368-0748
PULLEYS- FOUR 2-1/8 to 7 1/4" --all for
$16. 650 341-8342
SHOPSMITH MARK V 50th Anniversary
most
attachments.
$1,500/OBO.
(650)504-0585
SKILL SAW 7/1/4" CRAFTMAN profesional unused $ 45. (650)992-4544

BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate design - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
FRENCH BULLDOG puppies. Many
colors.
AKC Registration. Call
(415)596-0538.
ONE KENNEL Cab ll one Pet Taxi animal carriers 26x16. Excellent cond. $60..
650-593-2066

Cleaning

Cleaning

TWO SETS of 10lb barbell weights @
$10 each set. (650)593-0893
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167

400 Broadway - Millbrae

650-697-2685

VINTAGE GOLF Set for $75 My Cell
650-537-1095. Will email pictures upon
request.

316 Clothes

WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878

BLACK LEATHER belt, wide, non-slip,
43" middle hole, $2, 650-595-3933

WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955

LEATHER JACKET, New Black Italian
style, size M Ladies $45 (650) 875-1708

335 Rugs

LEATHER JACKET, New Dark Brown ,
Italian style, Size L $49 (650) 875-1708

CARPET RUNNER, new, 30 inches,
bound on both sides, burgundy color, 30
lineal feet, $290. Call (650)579-0933.

PARIS HILTON purse white & silver unused, about 12" long x 9" high $23. 650592-2648
SUNGLASSSES UNISEX TOMS Lobamba S007 w/ Tortoise Frames. Polarized lenses 100% UVA/UVB NEW
$65.(650)591-6596
VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622
VEST, BROWN Leather , Size 42 Regular, Like New, $25 (650) 875-1708
VINTAGE 1970’S Grecian made dress,
size 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167

317 Building Materials
32 PAVING/EDGING bricks, 12” x 5”x1”
Brown, smooth surface, good clean condition. $32. (650)588-1946 San Bruno
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink, $65. (650)348-6955
CULTURED MARBLE 2 tone BR vanity
counter top. New toe skin/ scribe. 29” x
19” $300 (408)744-1041
EXTERIOR BRASS lanterns 20" 2 NEW,
both $30. (650)574-4439
INTERIOR DOORS, 8, free.
call 573-7381.
SHUTTERS 2 wooden shutters 32x72
like new $50.00 ea.call 650 368-7891
WHITE DOUBLE pane window for $29
or Best offer. Call Halim @ (650) 6785133.
WOODEN SHUTTERS 12x36" Six available. $20. (650)574-4439

318 Sports Equipment
ATOMIC SKI bag -- 215 cm. Lightly
used, great condition. $15. (650) 5730556.
BUCK TACTICAL folding knife, Masonic
logo, NEW $19, 650-595-3933
DELUXE OVER the door chin up bar; excellent shape; $10; 650-591-9769 San
Carlos

340 Camera & Photo Equip.
NIKON N80 SLR film camera with 2880mm Nikkor lens, Like new with leather
case. $90. 510-684-0187

345 Medical Equipment
ADULT DIAPERS, disposable, 10 bags,
20 diapers per bag, $10 each. (650)3420935

GOLF CLUBS, 4-9 irons, oversize driver,
metal 3, putter, bag; nice; $25; San Carlos (650)591-9769
IN-GROUND BASKETBALL hoop, fiberglass backboard, adjustable height, $80
obo 650-364-1270
LADIES MCGREGOR Golf Clubs
Right handed with covers and pull cart
$150 o.b.o. (650)344-3104
NEW AB Lounger $39 (650) 692-3260
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine
(650)368-3037

$99

SOCCER BALLS - $8.00 each (like new)
4 available. (650)341-5347

Concrete

379 Open Houses

620 Automobiles

SAN MATEO
OPEN NOV 8TH,1-4pm

FORD ‘98 Mustang. GT Convertible.
Summer fun car. Green, Tan, Leather interior, Excellent Condition. 128,000
Miles. $3700. (650) 440-4697.

2 BR, 2 BA Condo, pool, jacuzzi,
Sauna, RecRoom, corner unit,
upgraded Kitchen. $699K.
58 N. El Camino.
Claudia Byrnes (650)387-5998
KW Realty

OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200

LEXUS 97 ES300 very clean, 175K,
smog and clean title, $3900. (650)3426342
MERCEDES BENZ ‘98 E320 Silver,
black interior, 1 owner, good condition.
Factory chrome wheels, new brakes,
new tires, needs a/c compressor.
195,000 miles. $2,000. (650)867-3399

625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 thunderbird Hardtop, 390 engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$5,400. /OBO (650)364-1374

630 Trucks & SUV’s
DODGE ‘01 DURANGO, V-8 SUV, 1
owner, dark blue, CLEAN! $5,000/obo.
Call (650)492-1298
TOYOTA 97 FOURRUNNER white clean
$4700 obo. (650)342-6342

640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003

380 Real Estate Services

DAINESE BOOTS Zipper & Velcro Closure, Cushioned Ankle, Excellent Condition Unisex EU40 $55 (650)357-7484

BATH CHAIR LIFT. Peterman battery
operated bath chair lift. Stainless steel
frame. Accepts up to 350lbs. Easily inserted I/O tub.$250 OBO.
(650) 739-6489.

FISHING/HUNTING CLUB on Sacramento River. Leave message
(925) 838-2858.

BATH TRANSFER bench, back rest and
side arm, suction cups for the floor.
$75/obo. (650)757-0149

STUDIO APT. One Person Only. Belmont. $1800 a month. Call Between 8am
- 6pm. (650) 508-0946.

MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS, with
mounting hardware and other parts $35.
Call (650)670-2888

QUICKIE WHEELCHAIR - Removable
arms for transferring standard size.
$350.00. (650) 345-3017

470 Rooms

670 Auto Service

HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660

MENLO ATHERTON
AUTO REPAIR
WE SMOG ALL CARS

TRAVEL WHEEL chair Light weight travel w/carrying case. $300. (650)596-0513

Garage Sales

MOVING SALE
Saturday, Nov 7th
7AM-10AM

18 Mounds Rd.
Apt #4
San Mateo
94402
Furniture, Dishware, Bedroom,
Cabinets

G.I. ammo can, medium, good cond.
$10. Call (650) 591-4553, days only.

312 Pets & Animals

PET CARRIER, brown ,Very good condition, $15.00 medium zize leave txt or call
650 773-7201

www.MyErrandServicesCA.com

Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957

GOLF CLUBS, 2 sets of $30 & $60.
(415)265-3395

WILLIAMS #1191 CHROME 2 1/16"
Combination "SuperRrench". Mint. $89.
650-218-7059.

650.918.0354

WE BUY

Gold, Silver, Platinum
Always True & Honest values

GOLF BALLS-15 dozen. All Brands: Titeslist, Taylor Made, Callaway. $5 per
dozen. (650)345-3840.

PARROT CAGE, Steel, Large - approx
4 ft by 4 ft, Excellent condition $300 best
offer. (650)245-4084

Move in/out; Post Construction;
Commercial & Residential;
Carpet Cleaning; Powerwashing

318 Sports Equipment
TREADMILL BY PRO-FORM. (Hardly
Used). 10% incline, 2.5 HP motor, 300lb
weight capacity. $329 (650)598-9804

YAMAHA PIANO, Upright, Model M-305,
$750. Call (650)572-2337

VINTAGE CRAFTSMAN Jig Saw. Circa
1947. $60. (650)245-7517

ANGIE’S CLEANING &
POWERWASHING

315 Wanted to Buy

29

GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!

List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200

Concrete

AAA CONCRETE DESIGN
Stamps • Color • Driveways •
Patios • Masonry • Block walls
• Landscaping

Quality Workmanship,
Free Estimates

(650)533-0187
Lic# 947476

Construction
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
• New Construction
• Remodeling
• Kitchen/Bathrooms
• Decks/Fences
(650)589-0372
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596

440 Apartments

DUCATI ‘01 750 Monster, 15K miles,
very clean. ONLY $3,500. (650)342-6342
This is a steal!

1279 El Camino Real

620 Automobiles

AA SMOG

Complete Repair& Service
$29.75 plus certificate & fee
869 California Drive .
Burlingame

(650) 340-0492
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $42!
We’ll run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto

Menlo Park

650 -273-5120

www.MenloAthertonAutoRepair

670 Auto Parts
BRIDGESTONE TURANZA RFT (Run
Flat) 205/55/16 EL42 used 70% left $80.
(650)483-1222
BRIDGESTONE TURANZA RFT (Run
Flat) 205/55/16 EL 42 All Season Like
New $100. (650)483-1222
NEVER
MOUNTED
new Metzeler
120/70ZR-18 tire $50, 650-595-3933
NEW CONTINENTAL Temporary tire
mounted on 5 lug rim Size T125/70/R1798M $100. (650)483-1222
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912

680 Autos Wanted
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483

Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com

CHEVY ‘10 HHR . 68K. EXCELLENT
CONDITION. $8888. (650)274-8284.
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
DODGE
‘99 Van, Good Condition,
$4,200 OBO (650)481-5296

Construction

Construction

30

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Nov. 7-8, 2015

Decks & Fences

Housecleaning

Hauling

MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.

PENINSULA
CLEANING

INDEPENDENT
HAULERS

State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500

RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERICAL

BONDED
FREE ESTIMATES

1-800-344-7771
TIDY CLEANERS

Electricians

ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE

650-322-9288

for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP

Gardening
CALL NOW FOR
FALL LAWN
PREPARATION

Drought Tolerant Planting
Drip Systems, Rock Gardens
Pressure Washing,
and lots more!
Call Robert
STERLING GARDENS
650-703-3831
Lic #751832

Flooring

Services Included:
General House Cleaning,
Move In/Out, Window Washing.
20 + Experinece/Free Estimates
Please Call:
Donna (650) 839-3768,
Maria (650) 361-1135;
Cell (650)815-1635

Mention this ad for
Free Delivery
See website for more info.

kaprizhardwoodfloors.com

650-560-8119

PAINTING

Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates

$40 & UP
HAUL

(650)368-8861
Lic #514269

Since 1988/Licensed & Insured
Monthly Specials
Fast, Dependable Service

NICK MEJIA PAINTING

A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Staining, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!

Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating

(650)341-7482

(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564

CHAINEY HAULING

PROFESSIONAL

CONTRERAS HANDYMAN
SERVICES

Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo

Int./Ext.All prep included
10 years experience
Satisfaction guaranteed
Free Estimates

• Fences • Tree Trimming
• Decks • Concrete Work
• Kitchen and Bathroom
remodeling
Free Estimates

(650)288-9225
(650)350-9968

contrerashandy12@yahoo.com

SENIOR HANDYMAN

“Specializing in any size project”

• Painting • Electrical
• Carpentry • Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience

CONSUELOS HOUSE
CLEANING
Bi-Weekly/Once a Month,
Moving In & Out
28 yrs. in Business

Free Estimates, 15% off First Visit

(650)219-4066
Lic#1211534

Roofing

JON LA MOTTE

AAA RATED!

Junk & Debris Clean Up

PAINTING

Starting at $40 & Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592

GREG (510) 706-7914

Stucco
N.C. CONSTRUCTION
Patchwork, Texture, Matching,
Water Damage, Wall Paper Removal, Small Jobs.

(650) 248-4205
Free Estimates. L/B/Ins

SUNNY BAY PAINTING CO.

Residential Commercial
Interior Exterior
Water Damage, Fences,
Decks, Stain Work
Free Estimates
CA Lic 982576
(415)828-9484

CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700

Plumbing

650-201-6854

MEYER PLUMBING SUPPLY
Toilets, Sinks, Vanities,
Faucets, Water heaters,
Whirlpools and more!
Wholesale Pricing &
Closeout Specials.
2030 S Delaware St
San Mateo
650-350-1960

THE VILLAGE
CONTRACTOR
Licensed General and
Painting Contractor

• Remodels • Carpentry
• Drywall • Tile • Painting
Lic#979435

Housecleaning

Painting

Handy Help

Retired Licensed Contractor

SPECIALS
AS LOW AS $2.50/sf.

Hauling

(650)701-6072
WESTBAY HANDYMAN
SERVICES
*painting *plumbing *Flooring
*bathroom & kitchen
*remodeling
No job too small

(650) 773-5941

Tree Service

Hillside Tree

Service

LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming

Pruning

• Shaping
• Large

Removal
Grinding

• Stump

Free
Estimates
Mention

The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers

Landscaping

NATE LANDSCAPING

Call Luis (650) 704-9635

* Tree Service * Fence
* Deck * Pavers
* Pruning & Removal
* New Lawn * Irrigation
* All Concrete * Ret. Wall
* Sprinkler System
* Stamp Concrete
* Yard Clean-Up,
Haul & Maintenance

Window Washing

Free Estimate

650.353.6554
Lic. #973081

AUTUMN LAWN

PREPARATION!
Drought Tolerant Planting
Drip Systems, Rock Gardens
Pressure Washing,
and lots more!

Roofing

REED
ROOFERS

Serving the entire Bay Area
Residential & Commercial
License #931457

Call for Free Estimate

(650) 591-8291

Saving lives, from crisis to independence

Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contractor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their license number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State License Board.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker

BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation

650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com

Weekend • Nov. 7-8, 2015

Dental Services

Food

Health & Medical

Insurance

Real Estate Loans

I - SMILE

PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA

DENTAL
IMPLANTS

LIFE INSURANCE
America's Lowest Cost!

We Fund Bank Turndowns!

Implant & Orthodontict Center
1702 Miramonte Ave. Suite B
Mountain View

Exceptional.
Reliable. Inovative
650-282-5555

MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER

Law Office of Jason Honaker

BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation

650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Cemetery

LASTING
IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST
PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com

Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken

(650)697-9000

15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA

$5 CHARLEY'S

(650)771-6564

Dental Services
Do you want a White,Brighter
Smile?
Safe, Painless, Long Lasting

Maui Whitening
650.508.8669

1217 Laurel St., San Carlos
(Between Greenwood & Howard)
www.mauiwhitening.com

Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com

Dental Implants
Free Consultation& Panoramic
Digital Survey
1101 El Camino RL ,San Bruno

(650)583-2273

www.russodentalcare.com

Food

BRUNCH EVERY

A touch of Europe

1308 Burlingame Ave
Burlingame
650 344-1006
www.burlingamecakery.com
Find us on Facebook

Financial

UNITED AMERICAN BANK
San Mateo , Redwood City,
Half Moon Bay

Call (650)579-1500
for simply better banking
unitedamericanbank.com

SUNDAY

Fitness

Omelette Station, Carving Station
$24.95 / adult $9.95 /Child

Houlihans

& Holiday Inn SFO Airport
275 So Airport blvd.
South San Francisco

LOSE WEIGHT
In Just 10 Weeks !
with the ultimate body shaping course
contact us today.

CROWNE PLAZA
Foster City-San Mateo

(650) 490-4414
www. SanBrunoMartialArts.com

The Clubhouse Bistro
Wedding, Event &
Meeting Facilities

(650) 295-6123

1221 Chess Drive Foster City
Hwy 92 at Foster City Blvd. Exit

GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com

NOTHING BUNDTCAKES
Make Life Sweeter
*864 Laurel Street, San Carlos

650.592.1600

*140 So. El Camino Real, Millbrae

650.552.9625

Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.

Furniture

Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin

2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com

Larry Hutcherson
Belmont, CA
Lic #OJ11250

Legal Services

EYE EXAMINATIONS

LEGAL

579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net

DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded

(650)574-2087

KAY'S HEALTH
& BEAUTY

legaldocumentsplus.com

381 El Camino Real
Millbrae

Marketing

"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."

Facials • Waxing • Fitness
Body Fat Reduction

(650)697-6868

SKIN TASTIC
MEDICAL LASER
Cosmetic Spa Cool Sculpting
Laser&Cosmetic Dermatology
1838 El Camino Rl#130
Burlingame. 650 542-7055
www.skintasticmedicalspa.com

SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening

650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental

Health & Medical

Insurance

BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?

AFFORDABLE
LIFE INSURANCE

Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com

(510)282.2466

Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880

THE CAKERY

RUSSO DENTAL CARE

Clothing
Sporting apparel from your
49ers, Giants & Warriors,
low prices, large selection.
450 W. San Bruno Ave.
San Bruno

31

GROW

YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter

Massage Therapy
BEST ASIAN BODY
MASSAGE

$35/hr First time visitors
$39.99/hr Current Clients
Home Care Assistance
Health Care Consultant

(650)692-1989

1838 El Camino #103, Burlingame

COMFORT PRO
MASSAGE
Foot Massage $24.99

Body Massage $44.99/hr
10 am - 10 pm
1115 California Dr. Burlingame

(650)389-2468

www.barrettinsuranceservices.net

Eric L. Barrett,

CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226

Easy online
booking

FULL BODY MASSAGE

$48

Belbien Day Spa

1204 West Hillsdale Blvd.
SAN MATEO
(650)403-1400

GRAND
OPENING

No messy take
home trays

Asian Massage
$5 OFF W/THIS AD

Soothing, beautiful
salon allows you
to relax while your
teeth whiten

(650)556-9888
633 Veterans Blvd #C
Redwood City

10-15 SHADES WHITER TEETH IN ABOUT AN HOUR

Maui Whitening is awesome.
No pain, no issues and white teeth!
I will highly recommend Maui
Whitening to all my friends!.

GRAND
OPENING
L & R WELLNESS
CENTER
Relaxing & healing massage
$50 per hour
39 N. San Mateo Dr. #1
San Mateo

(650)557-2286

Open 7 days 10am - 9pm
Free parking behind bldg

Music
Gift cards available–the perfect gift anytime
.POEBZo'SJEBZBNQNt4BUVSEBZ4VOEBZBNQN

1217 Laurel Street, San Carlos, 650-508-8669
walk-ins welcome; BQQPJOUNFOUTIBWFQSJPSJUZ

www.mauiwhitening.com

Music Lessons
Sales • Repairs • Rentals

Bronstein Music

363 Grand Ave, So. San Francisco

(650)588-2502

bronsteinmusic.com

REAL ESTATE LOANS
Equity based direct lender
Homes • Multi-family
Mixed-use • Commercial
All Credit Accepted
Purchase / Refinance/
Cash Out
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979

650-348-7191

Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker
CA Bureau of Real Estate#746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268

Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living Care
located in Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
Burlingame Villa
Short Term Stays
Dementia & Alzheimers Care
Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633

Tax Preparation

IRS TAX
PROBLEM?

Call:
Trust The Tax Pros

(650)349-4492
Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL
GROUP
(650) 595-7750

www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises • Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
1495 Laurel St. SAN CARLOS
CST#100209-10

32

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Nov. 7-8, 2015

It’s The Weekend! Time TO FINALLY
Clean Out The Garage Before The
Holidays Arrive!
Call me today!
650-337-1122

650-337-1122

Delivering Peninsula Home Owners Superior Effort, Service and Value

Holiday Season Specials
AMERICA’S GREENEST JUNK REMOVAL SERVICE

$50
off any job

1.888.888.5865 (JUNK)

$100
off a full truck

EXCEPT MINIMUM CHARGE
Cannot be combined. Expires 12/31/15
Valid in San Francisco Co. & San MateoCo.

Locally Owned

AMERICA’S GREENEST JUNK REMOVAL SERVICE

Cannot be combined. Expires 12/31/15
Valid in San Francisco Co. & San MateoCo.

155 Reviews on Yelp
www.Junk-King.com/SanCarlos