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Configuration MPLS

Avaya Secure Router 2330/4134

10.3
NN47263-505, 04.01
October 2010

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Configuration MPLS

October 2010

Contents
Chapter 1: New in this release.................................................................................................9
Other changes...................................................................................................................................................9

Chapter 2: Introduction...........................................................................................................11
Navigation........................................................................................................................................................11

Chapter 3: MPLS fundamentals.............................................................................................13


MPLS elements...............................................................................................................................................13
Label switched path................................................................................................................................13
LSRs and LERs......................................................................................................................................14
Supported interfaces..............................................................................................................................14
MPLS label......................................................................................................................................................14
Label description....................................................................................................................................15
Label allocation.......................................................................................................................................15
Operations on labels...............................................................................................................................15
NHLFE....................................................................................................................................................16
ILM..........................................................................................................................................................16
FTN.........................................................................................................................................................16
Penultimate Hop Popping...............................................................................................................................16
Implicit null..............................................................................................................................................16
Explicit null..............................................................................................................................................17
PHP disabled..........................................................................................................................................17
LSP routes......................................................................................................................................................18
Routing traffic with policy-based redirection...........................................................................................18
Types of LSPs.................................................................................................................................................18
Static LSP...............................................................................................................................................19
LDP LSP.................................................................................................................................................19
RSVP-TE-signaled LSPs........................................................................................................................19
Standards compliance.....................................................................................................................................20

Chapter 4: LDP fundamentals................................................................................................23


LDP overview..................................................................................................................................................23
LDP identifier and label space................................................................................................................23
LDP discovery........................................................................................................................................23
LDP sessions..........................................................................................................................................24
LDP message types...............................................................................................................................25
LDP operation modes.....................................................................................................................................26
Label advertisement modes...................................................................................................................26
Label retention mode..............................................................................................................................27
Label control mode.................................................................................................................................28
ACL configuration with LDP............................................................................................................................29
LDP loop detection..........................................................................................................................................29
Hop count limit........................................................................................................................................29
Path vector limit......................................................................................................................................29

Chapter 5: RSVP-TE fundamentals........................................................................................31


RSVP-TE overview.........................................................................................................................................31
Control messages...................................................................................................................................31
RVSP-TE tunnel setup...........................................................................................................................32

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OSPF-TE and CSPF.......................................................................................................................................33


RSVP-TE resource reservation styles.............................................................................................................33
Fixed filter...............................................................................................................................................34
Shared explicit........................................................................................................................................34
Priority of signaled LSP...................................................................................................................................35
Setup priority..........................................................................................................................................35
Hold priority............................................................................................................................................35
Explicitly routed LSPs.....................................................................................................................................35
Route Recording.............................................................................................................................................36
Refresh reduction............................................................................................................................................36
Reliable messaging................................................................................................................................36
Fast reroute and node protection....................................................................................................................37
Node protection......................................................................................................................................37
Secondary LSP (global repair)........................................................................................................................38
Secondary LSP signaling.......................................................................................................................38
Secondary LSP with fast reroute............................................................................................................39
Administrative groups......................................................................................................................................39
MPLS QoS......................................................................................................................................................39
Ingress LER- EXP marking.....................................................................................................................40
DSCP Marking on Egress LER...............................................................................................................41

Chapter 6: MPLS Pseudowire fundamentals........................................................................43


Layer 2 virtual circuits.....................................................................................................................................43
Virtual circuit labelling.............................................................................................................................44
Binding an attachment circuit to the pseudowire....................................................................................44
LDP requirement for dynamic virtual circuits..........................................................................................44
Static virtual circuits................................................................................................................................45
Multiple virtual circuits............................................................................................................................45
PPP over MPLS..............................................................................................................................................45
HDLC over MPLS............................................................................................................................................46
Ethernet over MPLS........................................................................................................................................46
VLAN Rewrite.........................................................................................................................................46

Chapter 7: Static LSP configuration......................................................................................47


Static LSP configuration procedures...............................................................................................................47
Static LSP configuration task navigation................................................................................................48
Configuring a static FTN entry on the ingress router......................................................................................48
Configuring static ILM entries on transit and egress routers...........................................................................49
Displaying the static FTN entry.......................................................................................................................49
Displaying the static ILM entry........................................................................................................................50
Displaying static FTN statistics.......................................................................................................................50
Displaying static ILM statistics........................................................................................................................50

Chapter 8: LDP LSP configuration.........................................................................................51


LDP configuration procedures.........................................................................................................................51
LDP configuration task navigation..........................................................................................................53
Configuring loopback interface and router ID..................................................................................................53
Enabling LDP at the router level.....................................................................................................................54
Configuring targeted LDP peer adjacency......................................................................................................54
Specifying a targeted LDP peer for extended discovery........................................................................54
Configuring the global targeted LDP peer hello interval.........................................................................55
Configuring the interface targeted LDP peer hello interval.....................................................................55

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Configuring the global targeted LDP peer hold time...............................................................................56


Configuring the interface targeted LDP peer hold time..........................................................................56
Configuring LDP properties.............................................................................................................................57
Configuring explicit-null labels................................................................................................................57
Configuring the transport address for a label space...............................................................................58
Configuring global loop detection...........................................................................................................58
Configuring the global loop detection count...........................................................................................59
Configuring global request retries...........................................................................................................59
Configuring the global request retry timeout...........................................................................................60
Propagating the global release of labels to downstream routers............................................................60
Configuring the global label control mode..............................................................................................61
Applying ACL rules to LDP.....................................................................................................................61
Configuring the global label advertisement mode..................................................................................62
Configuring the interface label advertisement mode..............................................................................63
Configuring the global label retention mode...........................................................................................63
Configuring the interface label retention mode.......................................................................................64
Configuring the global LDP hello interval...............................................................................................65
Configuring the interface LDP hello interval...........................................................................................65
Configuring the global LDP hold time.....................................................................................................66
Configuring the interface LDP hold time.................................................................................................67
Configuring the global keepalive interval................................................................................................67
Configuring the interface keepalive interval............................................................................................68
Configuring the global keepalive timeout................................................................................................68
Configuring the interface keepalive timeout...........................................................................................69
Enabling LDP on an interface.........................................................................................................................70
Enabling auto-discovery of LDP peers............................................................................................................70
Configuring global multicast hellos.........................................................................................................70
Configuring interface multicast hellos.....................................................................................................71
Displaying LDP configuration and statistics....................................................................................................71
Displaying LDP adjacency......................................................................................................................71
Displaying the IP access list of LDP advertise-labels.............................................................................72
Displaying FECs known to the current LSR...........................................................................................72
Displaying detailed LDP information for interfaces.................................................................................72
Displaying LDP LSP configuration..........................................................................................................72
Displaying LDP LSP hosts corresponding to an FEC.............................................................................73
Displaying LDP LSP host.......................................................................................................................73
Displaying LDP LSP prefix.....................................................................................................................73
Displaying LDP session..........................................................................................................................74
Displaying LDP packet statistics.............................................................................................................74
Displaying LDP advertise-labels statistics..............................................................................................74
Clearing LDP adjacencies......................................................................................................................75
Clearing LDP statistics...........................................................................................................................75

Chapter 9: RSVP-TE LSP configuration................................................................................77


RSVP-TE configuration procedures................................................................................................................77
RSVP-TE configuration task navigation.................................................................................................79
Configuring loopback interface and router ID..................................................................................................79
Enabling RSVP-TE at the router level.............................................................................................................80
Enabling RSVP-TE at the interface level........................................................................................................80
Creating an RSVP-TE LSP.............................................................................................................................81
Creating an RSVP-TE LSP.....................................................................................................................81

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Configuring the ingress address for the LSP..........................................................................................81


Configuring the egress router for the LSP..............................................................................................82
Configuring an explicit path LSP.....................................................................................................................82
Disabling and enabling CSPF globally...................................................................................................82
Disabling and enabling CSPF on RSVP-TE LSPs.................................................................................83
Create the explicit route and define the hops.........................................................................................84
Associate the RSVP-TE explicit route with an LSP................................................................................84
Specifying the Route Record List as an explicit route............................................................................85
Configuring constrained path LSP properties.................................................................................................86
Reserving bandwidth for RSVP-TE LSPs...............................................................................................86
Configuring the filter style for RSVP-TE LSP.........................................................................................86
Configuring retry limit for RSVP-TE LSP................................................................................................87
Configuring retry timer for RSVP-TE LSP..............................................................................................88
Configuring setup priority for RSVP-TE LSP..........................................................................................88
Configuring the hold priority for RSVP-TE LSP......................................................................................89
Configuring CSPF retry limit...................................................................................................................90
Configuring CSPF retry timer.................................................................................................................90
Configuring the hop limit for RSVP-TE LSP...........................................................................................91
Configuring label recording.....................................................................................................................91
Configuring route recording....................................................................................................................92
Creating an MPLS administrative group.................................................................................................93
Adding an interface to an administrative group......................................................................................93
Including administrative groups in an RSVP-TE LSP.............................................................................94
Excluding administrative groups from an RSVP-TE LSP.......................................................................94
Disabling affinity.....................................................................................................................................95
Configuring Fast Reroute for constrained path LSP.......................................................................................96
Enabling and disabling one-to-one fast reroute protection.....................................................................96
Configuring fast reroute node protection................................................................................................96
Configuring fast reroute bandwidth.........................................................................................................97
Specifying the administrative groups to include in the fast reroute........................................................97
Excluding administrative groups from the fast-reroute...........................................................................98
Configuring fast reroute setup priority....................................................................................................99
Configuring fast reroute hold priority......................................................................................................99
Configuring fast reroute hop limit..........................................................................................................100
Configuring detour LSP identification method......................................................................................100
Configuring RSVP-TE LSP properties..........................................................................................................101
Configuring the extended tunnel ID in RSVP-TE messages................................................................101
Configuring the creation and tear-down method for the RSVP-TE LSP...............................................102
Restarting the RSVP-TE LSP...............................................................................................................102
Configuring hello exchanges with a specific neighbor..........................................................................103
Configuring RSVP-TE global and interface properties..................................................................................103
Configuring the RSVP-TE source address...........................................................................................103
Configuring explicit-null labels..............................................................................................................104
Configuring Penultimate-Hop-Popping.................................................................................................104
Configuring loop detection....................................................................................................................105
Configuring MPLS tunnel-mode...........................................................................................................105
Enabling the receipt of Hello messages globally..................................................................................106
Enabling the receipt of Hello messages on the interface.....................................................................107
Configuring the global Hello interval.....................................................................................................107
Configuring the Hello interval and enabling Hello transmission on the interface..................................108
Configuring the global hello timeout.....................................................................................................108

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Configuring the interface hello timeout.................................................................................................109


Configuring the global RSVP keep multiplier........................................................................................109
Configuring the interface RSVP keep multiplier....................................................................................110
Configuring the global RSVP refresh time............................................................................................111
Configuring the interface RSVP refresh time........................................................................................111
Configuring the global refresh reduction advertisement.......................................................................112
Configuring the interface refresh reduction advertisement...................................................................112
Configuring global message acknowledgement...................................................................................113
Configuring interface message acknowledgement...............................................................................113
Configuring the global acknowledgement wait timeout.........................................................................114
Configuring the interface acknowledgement wait timeout....................................................................114
Mapping routes to RSVP-TE LSPs................................................................................................................115
Displaying RSVP-TE LSP configuration and statistics..................................................................................116
Displaying session-related information for configured LSPs................................................................116
Displaying LSP session count..............................................................................................................116
Displaying session-related information for egress router......................................................................116
Displaying session-related information for specific egress router.........................................................117
Displaying session-related information for ingress router.....................................................................117
Displaying session-related information for specific ingress router........................................................118
Displaying session-related information for specific sessions................................................................118
Displaying session-related information for transit router.......................................................................118
Clearing traffic-engineered LSP data....................................................................................................119
Displaying RSVP-TE configuration and statistics..........................................................................................119
Displaying RSVP-TE interface information...........................................................................................119
Displaying RSVP-TE neighbors............................................................................................................120
Displaying next-hop data cached in RSVP-TE.....................................................................................120
Displaying RSVP-TE statistics..............................................................................................................120
Displaying RSVP-TE summary refresh data........................................................................................121
Displaying RSVP-TE version................................................................................................................121
Displaying traffic engineering path.......................................................................................................121
Displaying MPLS tunnel mode.............................................................................................................121
Displaying all configured MPLS administrative groups.........................................................................122
Clearing RSVP sessions......................................................................................................................122
Clearing RSVP statistics.......................................................................................................................122

Chapter 10: MPLS Pseudowire configuration.....................................................................123


Pseudowire configuration procedures...........................................................................................................123
Pseudowire configuration task navigation............................................................................................125
Configuring a pseudowire Layer 2 virtual circuit...........................................................................................125
Creating a Layer 2 virtual circuit...........................................................................................................125
Binding an Ethernet interface to a Layer 2 virtual circuit...............................................................................126
Binding a VLAN interface to a Layer 2 virtual circuit.....................................................................................126
Binding a WAN interface to a Layer 2 virtual circuit......................................................................................127
Configuring a static FTN entry for ingress virtual circuit................................................................................128
Configuring a static ILM entry for egress virtual circuit.................................................................................128
Displaying the pseudowire configuration and statistics.................................................................................129
Displaying the static Layer 2-circuit FTN entry.....................................................................................129
Displaying the static L2-circuit ILM entry..............................................................................................129
Displaying the Layer 2 virtual circuit summary information..................................................................129
Displaying Layer 2 virtual circuit data...................................................................................................130
Displaying Layer 2 virtual circuit group data.........................................................................................130

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Displaying Layer 2 virtual circuit statistics............................................................................................130


Displaying Layer 2 virtual circuit table..................................................................................................130

Chapter 11: Common procedures........................................................................................131


Displaying MPLS-enabled interfaces............................................................................................................131
Displaying interface statistics........................................................................................................................131
Displaying originating LSP statistics.............................................................................................................131
Displaying MPLS forwarding table................................................................................................................132
Displaying incoming label map table.............................................................................................................132
Clearing MPLS statistics...............................................................................................................................132

Chapter 12: Configuration examples...................................................................................135


Static LSP configuration................................................................................................................................135
Static LSP configuration on Secure Router 4134 1..............................................................................135
LSP configuration on Secure Router 4134 2........................................................................................136
LDP-based LSP configuration.......................................................................................................................137
RSVP-TE LSP configuration.........................................................................................................................138
LSP1 configuration on SR4134 1.........................................................................................................138
LSP2 configuration on SR4134 2.........................................................................................................140
Configuring fast reroute for SR4134 1..................................................................................................141
Configuring fast reroute for SR4134 2..................................................................................................141
Configuring policy-based redirection into an RSVP-TE LSP................................................................141
Ethernet over RSVP-TE pseudowire configuration.......................................................................................142
Ethernet over pseudowire configuration for SR4134 1.........................................................................143
Ethernet over pseudowire configuration for SR4134 2.........................................................................144
PPP over RSVP-TE pseudowire configuration.............................................................................................144
PPP over pseudowire configuration for SR4134 1...............................................................................145
PPP over pseudowire configuration for SR4134 2...............................................................................146
HDLC over MPLS pseudowire......................................................................................................................146
HDLC over pseudowire configuration for SR4134 1.............................................................................147
Static L2VPN pseudowire configuration........................................................................................................148
SR4134 1 configuration........................................................................................................................149
SR4134 2 configuration........................................................................................................................149

Configuration MPLS

October 2010

Chapter 1: New in this release


There is no new content added to Avaya Secure Router 2330/4134 Configuration MPLS
(NN47263-505) for Release 10.3.

Other changes
This document is rebranded to Avaya.

Configuration MPLS

October 2010

New in this release

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Configuration MPLS

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Chapter 2: Introduction
This document describes the operation and configuration of the MPLS features on the Avaya Secure
Router 2330/4134.

Navigation
MPLS fundamentals on page 13
LDP fundamentals on page 23
RSVP-TE fundamentals on page 31
MPLS Pseudowire fundamentals on page 43
Static LSP configuration on page 47
LDP LSP configuration on page 51
RSVP-TE LSP configuration on page 77
MPLS Pseudowire configuration on page 123
Configuration examples on page 135

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Introduction

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Chapter 3: MPLS fundamentals


In traditional IP networks, each transit node makes an independent forwarding decision when transmitting
packets through the network. MPLS defines a mechanism for forwarding traffic packets based on fixedlength labels instead of IP address-based routing at each hop.
MPLS uses an underlying interior gateway protocol (IGP) to establish network reachability, and associates
fixed-length labels with discovered routes to forward packets through the network. Packets are classified
once, when they enter the MPLS domain, then travel along a predefined Label Switched Path (LSP) to
the network egress. Transit nodes do not make any routing decisions when processing packets, but merely
forward them based on the MPLS label, independent of the information in the encapsulated IP header.
The ingress node assigns a fixed-length label to each packet as it enters the network, and forwards it to
the next hop. As traffic moves through the network, each node swaps the incoming label for an outgoing
label, based on a predefined label database on each node.

MPLS elements
The following sections describe the elements of MPLS networks.

Label switched path


A label switched path (LSP) is an end-to-end unidirectional tunnel set up between MPLSenabled routers. Data travels through the MPLS network over LSPs from the network ingress to
the network egress. The LSP is determined by a sequence of labels, initiated at the ingress
node.
Packets that require the same treatment for transport through the network are grouped into a
forwarding equivalence class (FEC). The FECs are identified by the destination subnet of the
packets to be forwarded.
All packets within the same FEC use the same LSP to travel across the network. Packets are
classified once, as they enter the network; all subsequent forwarding decisions are based on
the FEC to which each packet belongs (that is, each label corresponds to a FEC). MPLSenabled routers use a label distribution protocol (such as LDP or RSVP-TE) to generate and
distribute label-to-FEC bindings.
Because LSPs are unidirectional, you must create a pair of LSPs to support bidirectional traffic.

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MPLS fundamentals

LSRs and LERs


MPLS-enabled routers are grouped into two categories:
label switching routers (LSRs), or provider (P) nodes
label edge routers (LERs), or provider edge (PE) nodes
LSRs reside in the network core, and provide high-speed switching functions for the network.
LERs reside at the network edge, initiating and terminating LSPs and assigning packets to
FECs as traffic enters the network. Each LSR and LER builds a Label Information Base (LIB) to
map FECs to incoming and outgoing labels.

Supported interfaces
The Avaya Secure Router 2330/4134 supports MPLS on the following interfaces:
WAN interfaces supporting PPP or HDLC encapsulation:
- T1/E1 interfaces
- CT3/DS3 interfaces
- Serial and HSSI interfaces
WAN interfaces running MLPPP are not supported.
All SR2330 Ethernet ports, and VLAN interfaces containing these ports.
SR4134 Chassis Ethernet ports, and VLAN interfaces containing only Chassis Ethernet
ports.
SR4134 Module Ethernet ports and VLAN interfaces that contain any of these ports are
not supported.
Interface-specific MPLS parameter configurations are not supported for VLAN interfaces. In
which case, the global MPLS parameters apply to MPLS over VLAN.
MPLS cannot operate on IPSec-enabled (crypto) interfaces.

MPLS label
The following sections provide additional detail about the MPLS label distribution.

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MPLS label

Label description
As traffic enters the MPLS network, each packet is marked with a label. A label, in its simplest
form, identifies the path a packet should traverse. An MPLS label is carried or encapsulated
in between the Layer 2 and the Layer 3 header. The receiving router examines the packet
for its label content to determine the next hop. Once a packet has been labeled, the rest of the
journey of the packet through the MPLS network is based on label switching. The label values
are of local significance only, meaning that they pertain only to hops between LSRs.

Figure 1: MPLS label

Label: Label Value carries the actual value of the Label.


Exp: Experimental Use. Reserved for experimental use.
S: Bottom of Stack. This bit is set to one for the last entry in the label stack, and zero
for all other label stack entries
TTL: Time to Live field is used to encode a time-to-live value.

Label allocation
As traffic enters the MPLS network, the ingress LSR groups traffic requiring similar treatment
into forward equivalence classes (FECs). Each transit LSR maps the FECs to incoming and
outgoing labels. Each downstream router advertise the FEC-to-label assignments to the
upstream router.

Operations on labels
The Secure Router 2330/4134 supports the following label operations:
Push: adds a new label onto the packet.
Pop: removes the label from the packet.
Swap: replaces the existing label with a new label.

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MPLS fundamentals

NHLFE
The Next Hop Label Forwarding Entry (NHLFE) specifies the actions to take for each labeled
packet. The details it provides include:
next hop for the packet
the operation to perform on the label: push, pop, swap

ILM
The Incoming Label Map (ILM) maps each incoming label to a set of NHLFEs. MPLS uses the
ILM to determine the action to perform on incoming labeled packets.

FTN
The FEC-to-NHLFE (FTN) maps each FEC to a set of NHLFEs. MPLS uses FTN to determine
the label to apply and the action to perform on incoming unlabeled packets.

Penultimate Hop Popping


Penultimate Hop Popping (PHP) provides a mechanism for improving label process efficiency
at the LSP egress. With full PHP enabled, the egress LSR can save processing time on the
outer label lookup by notifying its upstream neighbor to pop the outer label before forwarding
the packet.
Secure Router 2330/4134 supports three modes for Penultimate Hop Popping (PHP) behavior:
Implicit null
Explicit null
PHP Disabled

Implicit null
In implicit null mode, the Secure Router 2330/4134 router advertises the implicit null label (label
3) for LSPs that it terminates. Label 3 indicates that the upstream router must remove the outer
label before forwarding the packet to the egress router, without replacing it with another label.
Upon receipt, the Secure Router 2330/4134 router does not have to process the outer label,

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Penultimate Hop Popping

and forwards the packet based on the next inner label or the destination address in the
encapsulated IP header.

Figure 2: Implicit null

Explicit null
In explicit null mode, the Secure Router 2330/4134 router advertises the explicit null label (label
0) for LSPs that it terminates. The upstream router uses label 0 as the outgoing label for the
packet, which indicates to the Secure Router 2330/4134 router that it is the final hop on the
LSP. Upon receipt, the Secure Router 2330/4134 router pops the label without performing a
label lookup, and forwards the packet based on the next inner label or the destination address
in the encapsulated IP header.
In explicit-null mode, the system marks the EXP bits in the explicit-null label to match the EXP
bits of the popped label, so that Diff-Serv treatment is preserved at the egress LER.

Figure 3: Explicit null

PHP disabled
If PHP is disabled, the Secure Router 2330/4134 router advertises a normal label (from the
range 2064-524288) for an LSP when sending a label mapping to the upstream router. Upon
receipt of a packet, the Secure Router 2330/4134 router performs a label lookup, then pops
the label and forwards the packet based on the next inner label (if present) or the destination
address in the encapsulated IP header.

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MPLS fundamentals

Because each egress LSP is assigned a different label, this option allows traffic statistic
collection for individual egress LSPs.

Figure 4: PHP disabled

LSP routes
When you configure an LSP on an ingress router, the ingress router configures an associated
host route toward the egress router. The host route address is the destination address of the
LSP. The default administrative distance of the route is set to 10, which is higher than all routes
other than direct interfaces and static routes.
The route is configured with a 32-bit mask, which ensures that the route is a longer match and
therefore more specific than all other subnet routes.

Routing traffic with policy-based redirection


To route traffic to LSPs, you can also use the QoS policy-based redirect feature. This feature
allows you to redirect user-configured traffic flows to specific LSPs. For details, see
Performance Management Quality of Service (NN47263-601).

Types of LSPs
There are three types of LSP:
Static LSP
LDP LSP
RSVP-signaled LSP

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Types of LSPs

Static LSP
Static LSPs are manually configured LSPs. No label distribution protocol is enabled. For each
LSR along the LSP path, you must manually configure LSP labels, similar to static routes. The
following figure shows the label actions that each LSR must perform along the LSP path.

Figure 5: Static LSP

LDP LSP
LDP allows routers to discover neighbors and to establish LDP sessions with them so that they
can exchange label mapping information. An LDP LSR identifies the best routes, as selected by
the underlying IGP, and binds a locally significant label to each, then propagates this binding
to neighbors.

RSVP-TE-signaled LSPs
Resource Reservation Protocol with traffic engineering extensions (RSVP-TE) is a label
signaling protocol that allows you to set up traffic-engineered LSPs through the MPLS network.
RSVP-TE allows an ingress router to set up traffic-engineered LSPs (also called tunnels)
through the MPLS network. The intermediate and egress routers accept RSVP-TE signaling
messages from the ingress router to set up and maintain the LSP and dynamically assign
labels.
Where LDP LSPs are dynamic, RSVP-TE tunnels are user-initiated: you need only configure
the ingress router. You can use RSVP-TE to create tunnels that avoid points of congestion in
the network.
RSVP-TE-signaled LSPs can be one of two types: explicit-path LSP or constrained-path LSP.

Explicit-path LSP
With explicit-path LSPs, you can manually specify the intermediate hops along the LSP. Each
hop in the explicit-path LSP is either strict or loose. If the hop is strict, the LSP must go to the

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MPLS fundamentals

specified address directly, without traversing any intermediary nodes. If the hop is loose, the
RSVP-TE relies on IGP lookups to determine the best route to the specified address.

Constrained-path LSP
With constrained-path LSP, the router uses the Constrained Shortest Path First (CSPF)
protocol to determine the LSP path. In this case, RSVP-TE and CSPF must be enabled on all
routers along the LSP path.
With CSPF LSPs, you can specify traffic engineering parameters that must be met by each
LSR in order to create the LSP.

Standards compliance
The Secure Router 2330/4134 implementation of MPLS complies with the following RFCs:
RFC 2702, Requirements for Traffic Engineering Over MPLS
RFC 3031, MPLS Architecture
RFC 3032, Label Stack Encoding
RFC 3036, LDP Specification
RFC 3215, LDP State Machine
RFC 2205, Resource ReSerVation Protocol (RSVP)--Version 1 Functional Specifications
RFC 2209, RSVPVersion 1 Message Processing Rules
RFC 2961, RSVP Refresh Overhead Reduction Extensions
RFC 3209, RSVP-TE: Extensions to RSVP for LSP Tunnels
RFC 3210, Applicability Statement for Extensions to RSVP for LSP-tunnels
RFC 4090, Fast Reroute Extensions to RSVP-TE for LSP Tunnels
The Secure Router 2330/4134 implementation of MPLS pseudowire complies with the
following RFCs:
draft-ietf-pwe3-arch-07.txt,sept-2004, PWE3 Architecture.
draft-ietf-pwe3-requirements-08.txt,June-2004, Requirements for Pseudo-Wire
Emulation Edge-to-Edge
draft-ietf-pwe3-control-protocol-06.txt,Sept-2004, Pseudowire Setup and Maintenance
using LDP (draft-martini-l2circuit-trans-mpls-13.txt, June-2004)

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Standards compliance

draft-ietf-pwe3-ethernet-encap-06.txt,June-2004, Encapsulation Methods for Transport


of Ethernet Frames Over IP/MPLS Networks (draft-martini-l2circuit-encap-mpls-06.txt,
May-2004)
draft-ietf-pwe3-hdlc-ppp-encap-mpls-03.txt,Oct-2004, Encapsulation Methods for
Transport of PPP/HDLC Over IP and MPLS Networks

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MPLS fundamentals

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Chapter 4: LDP fundamentals


Label Distribution Protocol (LDP) provides a mechanism for dynamic hop-by-hop label distribution
between routers in an MPLS network. LDP assigns labels to IGP-learned routes and distributes these
label bindings to its peers, to establish label switched paths (LSPs) through the network.

LDP overview
LDP allows routers to discover neighbors and to establish LDP sessions so they can exchange
label mapping information. Each LDP router identifies the best routes, as selected by the
underlying IGP, and binds a locally significant label to each, then propagates this binding to
neighbors.

LDP identifier and label space


When a router running LDP communicates with its peers, it identifies itself with a unique LDP
identifier (ID). The LDP ID indicates the LSRs IP address (that is, the LSR ID) and the label
space from which the LSR assigns its labels. Thus, the LSR advertises its LDP ID in the format
<LSR ID>:<label space>.
The Avaya Secure Router 2330/4134 LSR ID is the same as the node router ID. The router
ID is a unique 32-bit address that identifies the router to routing protocols such as OSPF. The
router ID is typically a local IP address, and therefore reachable by IP. The Secure Router
2330/4134 also uses its router ID for the LDP transport address, required for the TCP session
over which LDP runs. The transport address must be one of the nodes local IP addresses
(preferably a loopback address) for LDP to operate; therefore, if LDP is running on the node,
the router ID must be a local IP address.
The Secure Router 2330/4134 supports a per-platform, or global, label space 0.

LDP discovery
LDP discovery is the process by which LDP routers discover neighboring routers, for the
purpose of exchanging label-to-FEC binding information. LDP routers exchange LDP Hello
messages to form a Hello adjacency, prior to establishing an LDP session.

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LDP fundamentals

Figure 6: LDP discovery

LDP uses two types of discovery to find LDP peers:

Basic discovery
LDP uses basic discovery to find directly-connected routers with which to exchange label
information. The router transmits multicast UDP Hello messages to all routers on the subnet.
When the neighbor responds with Hello messages to the local router, the two routers form a
Hello adjacency.

Extended discovery
Extended discovery allows an LDP router to discover peers that are not directly connected
to it, and to establish LDP sessions with them. The router transmits unicast UDP Hello
messages to a specific peer router, which may or may not be directly connected to it. If the
peer responds to these targeted Hello messages, the pair form an extended Hello adjacency
and normal LDP session establishment procedures follow.

LDP sessions
When MPLS routers have formed an LDP Hello adjacency, they establish an LDP session.
LDP sessions are bidirectional and allow LDP peers to learn each others label-to-FEC
bindings. The LDP session is identified by the pair of LDP IDs: the LDP ID of the local router
and LDP ID of the peer router.
If the Secure Router 2330/4134 connects to a peer node over multiple interfaces, the LDP ID
pair (that is, local LDP ID, peer LDP ID) is the same for each Hello adjacency between the two
nodes. When this occurs, only one LDP session is established between the two LSRs, with all
Hello adjacencies being part of that session. The LDP session remains active as long as at
least one Hello adjacency to the peer router is up; thus, a link failure does not impact the LDP
control path as long as there is at least one physical connection to the peer.

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LDP overview

Figure 7: LDP sessions

LDP message types


The following table describes the LDP message types.
Table 1: LDP message types
Discovery

Secure Router 2330/4134 uses discovery messages to


announce its presence in a network by periodically transmitting
multicast UDP Hello messages to all routers on the subnet or
unicast UDP Hello messages to a specific router.

Session

Secure Router 2330/4134 uses session messages to establish,


maintain, and terminate sessions between LDP peers. After
MPLS routers have formed an LDP Hello adjacency, they
establish an LDP session over Transmission Control Protocol
(TCP). When the session is successfully established, the two
routers can exchange advertisement messages.

Advertisement

Secure Router 2330/4134 uses advertisement messages to


advertise FEC-to-label bindings to LDP peers.

Notification

Secure Router 2330/4134 sends LDP notification messages to


report errors and events.
Error notifications signal fatal errors. If a router receives an
error notification from a peer for an LDP session, it terminates
the LDP session by closing the TCP transport connection for
the session and discarding all label mappings learned through
the session.
Advisory notifications, which pass information to a router
about the LDP session or the status of some previous
message received from the peer.

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LDP fundamentals

LDP operation modes


LDP has several control modes that affect how labels are exchanged between LSRs:
Label advertisement modes on page 26
Label retention mode on page 27
Label control mode on page 28

Label advertisement modes


The label advertisement mode determines when an LSR advertises a FEC-to-label binding to
its LDP peers. LDP has two label advertisement modes: downstream unsolicited (DU) and
downstream-on-demand (DoD) mode. The Secure Router 2330/4134 only supports the
downstream unsolicited mode. For any single LDP adjacency, the LDP peers must agree on
a label distribution mode.

Downstream-unsolicited label advertisement


With downstream-unsolicited label advertisement, each LSR advertises its FEC-to-label
assignments to upstream routers as soon as they are available; thus, upstream routers do not
have to send label mapping requests for FECs.
Downstream-unsolicited advertisement is typically used with the liberal label retention mode.

Figure 8: Downstream-unsolicited label advertisement

Downstream-on-demand label advertisement


The Secure Router 2330/4134 does not support downstream-on-demand label advertisement.
The following information is provided for reference only.
With Downstream-on-demand label advertisement, LSRs only advertise a FEC-to-label
assignment in response to a specific request from an upstream router.

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LDP operation modes

Downstream-on-demand advertisement is typically used with the conservative label retention


mode.

Figure 9: Downstream-on-demand label advertisement

Label retention mode


The label retention mode determines which labels an LSR retains in its Label Information Base
(LIB), particularly those FEC-to-label bindings that are learned from neighbors that are not next
hops for the FEC.
LDP provides supports two label retention modes: liberal and conservative. The Secure Router
2330/4134 only supports the liberal label retention mode.

Liberal label retention


In liberal label retention mode, the LSR accepts and retains all label mappings received from
LDP peers, regardless of whether the neighboring router is actually the next hop for the FEC.
This means that the router can quickly adapt to routing changes in the network because it
already has alternate labels for the same FEC; however, it requires that the LSR maintain a
much larger LIB and retain labels that it may never use.

Figure 10: Liberal label retention

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LDP fundamentals

Conservative label retention


The Secure Router 2330/4134 does not support conservative label retention. The following
information is provided for reference only.
In conservative label retention mode, the LSR discards any label mappings it receives that
were not originated by the current next hop for the FEC. This means that the router has fewer
labels to maintain in the LIB; however, if the next hop for a FEC changes, the router must
request a new label mapping from new next hop, resulting in slower network convergence.

Figure 11: Conservative label retention

Label control mode


The label control mode controls when labels are distributed between LDP peers when creating
an LSP. The Secure Router 2330/4134 supports both LDP label control modes: ordered and
independent.

Independent
In independent mode, an LSR advertises label mappings for FECs at any time, regardless of
whether it is the egress for the FEC or has received a label mapping from the next hop for the
FEC. FEC-to-label bindings are advertised as soon as the next hop has been recognized.
In independent downstream-on-demand mode, an LSR can answer requests for label
mappings immediately, without waiting for a label mapping from the next hop. In independent
downstream unsolicited mode, an LSR can advertise a label mapping for an FEC to neighbors
whenever it is prepared to label-switch that FEC.

Ordered
In ordered mode, an LSR only advertises label mappings for an FEC when it is the egress
router for the FEC, or when it has received a label mapping from the current next hop for the

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ACL configuration with LDP

FEC. If neither of these conditions are met, the LSR must wait for a label mapping from a
downstream neighbor before it can map the FEC to a label and advertise the binding to an
upstream neighbor. In this way, an LSP is set up from egress to ingress, hop-by-hop.

ACL configuration with LDP


With LDP, you can use ACL to modify the routes to be distributed to peering neighbors. You
can configure ACL rules to permit or deny the advertisement of labels for specific routes to a
configured list of neighbors. After the routes are redistributed, denied routes are no longer
advertised to the listed LDP neighbors.

LDP loop detection


LDP supports two mechanisms for LDP loop detection:
Hop count limit
Path vector limit
The Secure Router 2330/4134 only supports the hop count limit mechanism for loop detection.

Hop count limit


With the hop count limit method, each LSR increments the hop count field in the LDP packet
as it traverses the network. If the value in the hop count field exceeds a predetermined value
(established by the router that initiates the LSP), the LSR assumes a routing loop and discards
the packet.

Path vector limit


The Secure Router 2330/4134 does not support the path vector limit mechanism for loop
detection. The following information is provided for reference only.
With the path vector limit method, each LSR adds its router ID to the path vector field as it
processes a packet. If an LSR sees its own router ID in the list of intermediate hops, or if the
number of entries in the path vector field exceeds a predetermined value (established by the
router that initiates the LSP), the LSR assumes a routing loop and discards the packet.

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LDP fundamentals

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Chapter 5: RSVP-TE fundamentals


Resource Reservation Protocol with traffic engineering extensions (RSVP-TE) is a label signaling protocol
that allows you to set up traffic-engineered LSPs through the MPLS network. You can set up multiple
RSVP LSPs to the same destination with the same or different traffic engineering parameters.

RSVP-TE overview
RSVP-TE allows an ingress router to set up traffic-engineered LSPs (also called tunnels)
through the MPLS network. You can use RSVP-TE to create tunnels that avoid points of
congestion in the network or load balance across of available network resources. Where LDP
LSPs are dynamic, RSVP-TE tunnels are user-initiated.
RSVP tunnels are persistent: that is, when an LSP goes down, the router attempts to reestablish the LSP, based on a configurable retry limit and retry interval. When the node reaches
the retry limit without restoring the LSP, no further attempts are made to establish the LSP
until it is administratively disabled and re-enabled.

Control messages
RSVP-TE is a soft-state protocol. LSRs exchange periodic control messages to refresh state
information, and any non-refreshed states time out automatically. This allows RSVP-TE to
adapt to changes in topology and resource availability, and to recover from any failures more
quickly.
RSVP-TE uses two primary messages to set up and maintain tunnels: the Path message, to
request resources and label bindings, and the Resv message, to confirm available resources
and distribute label-to-FEC bindings. You can control how often the Path and Resv messages
are sent, and how long the Avaya Secure Router 2330/4134 waits before removing forwarding
states and resource reservations after receiving a control message.
Table 2: RSVP-TE message types
Message

Description

Path

Requests resources and label mapping for a new LSP, or


refreshes path state information for an existing LSP.

Resv

Reserves resources for a new LSP and specifies label mapping,


or refreshes reservation state information for an existing LSP.

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RSVP-TE fundamentals

Message

Description

PathTear

Removes path states in routers along an LSP; usually initiated


by the sender.

ResvTear

Releases reservation states along an LSP; usually initiated by


the receiver.

PathErr

Indicates a problem establishing a new path or refreshing


existing state information (advisory message only).

ResvErr

Indicates a problem reserving resources for a new LSP, or


refreshing existing resource reservation information (advisory
message only).

ResvConfirm

Confirms that resources have been reserved for a new LSP.

RVSP-TE tunnel setup


RSVP-TE tunnels are source-routed. The ingress LER determines the path through the
network to the destination, based on a user-provided list of explicit hops, or along the best
route selected by the underlying IGP (calculated from local routing tables). LSRs exchange
Path and Resv messages to set up and maintain RSVP-TE tunnels, using the Label Object in
the Resv messages for label distribution.
When setting up an RSVP-TE tunnel, the ingress LER sends a Path message to the egress
LER, requesting resources and label mapping information. The Path message is propagated
downstream through the network, and stores a path state (indicating the previous and nexthop address) in each transit node as it travels to the egress LER.
The egress LER responds with a Resv message, confirming that resources are available for
the LSP. The Resv message travels upstream to the ingress router, along the same route as
the original Path message (in the reverse direction). The Resv message stores a reservation
state in each transit node, and specifies the local label binding for the LSP to each successive
upstream router. When the ingress LER receives the Resv message, the tunnel is established.

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OSPF-TE and CSPF

Figure 12: RSVP-TE tunnel setup

OSPF-TE and CSPF


OSPF-TE is an extension to OSPF that can identify the shortest path to a destination node
that can meet specific bandwidth requirements. It is used to identify and propagate bandwidthconstrained routes throughout the network.
Using the routes provided by OSPF-TE, the Secure Router 2330/4134 uses the CSPF
algorithm to compute the best paths for LSPs that are subject to various constraints such as:
bandwidth, hop count, administrative groups, priority and explicit routes. When computing
paths for LSPs, CSPF considers not only the topology of the network and the attributes defined
for the LSP but also the links. It attempts to minimize congestion by intelligently balancing the
network load.
Using the information calculated with CSPF, the Secure Router 2330/4134 then uses RSVPTE as the signaling protocol to set up and maintain the traffic-engineered LSPs through the
MPLS network.

RSVP-TE resource reservation styles


Resource reservation provides control over bandwidth allocation during LSP setup. Secure
Router 2330/4134 supports both RSVP-TE resource reservation styles:
Fixed filter
Shared explicit

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RSVP-TE fundamentals

Fixed filter
A fixed filter (FF) reservation creates a distinct resource reservation for each sender in a
specified list. Each reservation is specific to a sender, and is not shared with any other sender in
the session. Fixed filter reservation is appropriate for traffic flows that are independent but likely
to be transmitted at the same time (such as video applications).
RSVP-TE tunnels reserved with fixed filter (FF) style never share bandwidth with other LSPs.
The tunnel consumes its own share of the bandwidth on all links traversed.

Figure 13: Fixed filter

Shared explicit
A shared explicit (SE) reservation creates a single resource reservation that is shared by all
senders in a specified list.
RSVP-TE tunnels reserved with shared explicit (SE) style in the same RSVP session can share
bandwidth on common links. SE style is usually used when traffic can only flow on one of the
LSPs in the session at a given time, for instance, for primary and backup LSPs, or when
performing LSP optimization or modification. LSPs that belong to different sessions, even when
SE style is used, cannot share bandwidth.

Figure 14: Shared explicit

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Priority of signaled LSP

Priority of signaled LSP


In cases where there is insufficient bandwidth to accommodate the creation of a new LSP, the
Secure Router 2330/4134 can remove less important existing LSPs to free up the necessary
bandwidth for the new LSP. This can be done by preempting one or more of the signaled LSPs.
To specify the relative priority for the existing LSP and the new LSP, you can configure the
following parameters:

Setup priority
The setup priority determines if a new LSP can preempt an existing LSP. The setup priority of
the new LSP must be higher than the hold priority of an existing LSP for the existing LSP to
be preempted.
Please note that for a trunk, the setup priority should not be higher than the hold priority.

Hold priority
The hold priority determines the degree to which an LSP holds onto its reservation for a session
after the LSP has been set up successfully. When the hold priority is high, the existing LSP is
less likely to give up its reservation.

Explicitly routed LSPs


RSVP-TE tunnels can be configured to traverse specific nodes through the network. The
Explicit Route Object (ERO) in the Path message defines one or more hops in the LSP,
specified by an IP address.
Each hop in the ERO is either strict or loose. If the hop is strict, the LSP must go to the specified
address directly, without traversing any intermediary nodes. If the hop is loose, the RSVPTE relies on IGP lookups to determine the best route to the specified address (either directly
or otherwise). If no ERO is specified, the tunnel destination is treated as a single loose hop.
Secure Router 2330/4134 supports a combination of strict or loose hops in the ERO.
A hop can identify a link or a loopback address (such as a router ID). To ensure that an RSVPTE tunnel takes a specific link, you must specify the IP address of the link interface on the
neighboring router; otherwise, specify the router loopback address, so that the LSP can be rerouted in the event of a link failure.

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RSVP-TE fundamentals

Once established, explicitly routed RSVP-TE tunnels are pinned: changes in the network
topology (for example, when the IGP learns of a better route) have no impact on the LSP path. If
the LSP is torn down (for example, because of a link failure), the node attempts to reestablish the LSP and uses the most recent IGP information to setup the LSP path.

Route Recording
Route recording describes the actual path taken by an LSP, as a list of all the nodes traversed
from ingress to egress. When route recording is enabled, each node records its LSR ID in the
Route Record Object (RRO) of the Path message before forwarding it to the next hop.
Route recording is a useful diagnostic tool when examining the path of an LSP (particularly for
LSPs with loose hops, that rely on the IGP for the best path), or for loop detection.

Refresh reduction
Due to the soft-state nature of RSVP, LSRs must exchange control messages periodically to
refresh installed state information in each node. Additionally, because control messages are
sent as IP datagrams (with no guaranteed delivery), periodic refresh messages cover any lost
messages. However, as the number of RSVP-TE sessions increases, so does the volume of
control traffic between nodes.
Refresh reduction allows you to reduce the amount of RSVP control traffic in the network. To
provide RSVP refresh reduction, the Secure Router 2330/4134 supports reliable messaging.

Reliable messaging
Reliable messaging provides an acknowledgement mechanism between RSVP-TE neighbors
to confirm that control messages have been delivered successfully. Since message loss can
be detected independently, RSVP does not have to rely on periodic refresh messages to
recover from any dropped messages, and the refresh interval can be longer. This reduces the
amount of control traffic between RSVP-TE neighbors.
A receiver acknowledges successful RSVP message delivery with either an ACK message
(that references the original messages ID) or piggy-backed in another RSVP message.

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Fast reroute and node protection

Fast reroute and node protection


For an LSP to survive the failure of a node in the path, you can configure fast reroute one-toone protection. Fast reroute protection provides an alternate path to a downstream router in
case of a link failure. The alternate path uses a different interface to reach the same
downstream router. The upstream router signals the ingress router about the failure to maintain
the flow of traffic.

Figure 15: Fast reroute

If the failed LSR comes back up, the LSP reverts to the original protected path.

Node protection
The Secure Router 2330/4134 also supports fast reroute with node protection. In this case,
if an LSR fails, the alternate path initiated by the upstream router bypasses the failed router
completely, reconnecting to the original LSP path at the next downstream router.

Figure 16: Fast reroute with node protection

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RSVP-TE fundamentals

Secondary LSP (global repair)


The Secure Router 2330/4134 supports RSVP-TE LSP protection through primary and
secondary paths.
An LSP can have a primary path and (optionally) a secondary backup path. The secondary
path is always pre-established, thus eliminating the need to calculate a new route and signal
a new path during a failure. However, no traffic is allowed on the secondary LSP path until it
is promoted to active LSP status.
You only need to configure the secondary LSP on the ingress router. If the primary LSP fails,
the ingress router automatically reroutes traffic over to the secondary LSP. When the primary
LSP recovers, the traffic automatically reverts back to the primary LSP.

Figure 17: Primary and secondary LSP

Secondary LSP signaling


The Secure Router 2330/4134 can perform Secondary LSP signaling using either of 2
independent methods:
Sender-Template Identification method: In this method, a detour shares the RSVP
Session object and LSPID with the protected LSP and changes the ingress IP address
in the RSVP PATH message. According to the RSVP resource sharing rules, this LSP
can be merged with the protected LSP as they have same session object.
Path Specific method: In this method, a new RSVP object (DETOUR) is added to the
PATH message to differentiate it from the protected LSP's path messages. Since, a detour
has the same session object as the protected LSP, it can share common network
resources.

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Administrative groups

Secondary LSP with fast reroute


Fast reroute and secondary LSP are independent features which can be enabled for the LSP at
the same time. In this case, if the primary LSP goes down, the route switches first to the fast
reroute. Then, if a secondary LSP is configured, the LSP switches to the secondary LSP as
the permanent LSP.
Fast reroute is typically used only as a temporary entity, as the detour LSP is not necessarily
traffic-engineering optimal, unlike the primary and secondary LSP, which are always optimal
paths.

Administrative groups
Administrative groups are manually assigned attributes that describe the "color" of links, so
that links with the same color are in one class. These groups are used to implement different
policy-based LSP setups.
With RSVP-TE, you can specify the administrative groups to include or exclude in the primary
or secondary path for an LSP. The available options are:
include-any:
all links must belong to at least one of the administrative groups listed in the includeany list.
include-all
all links must belong to all of the administrative groups listed in the include-all list
exclude-any
none of the links must have a color found in the list of groups.

MPLS QoS
MPLS QoS provides support for global DSCP-to-EXP mapping on the ingress LER, and global
EXP-to-DSCP mapping on the egress LER. On the ingress LER, MPLS QoS also supports
flow-based EXP marking for inbound traffic, and class-based queueing for outbound traffic.
The following sections provide an overview of the supported MPLS QoS features. For detailed
QoS configuration information, see Configuration Traffic Management (NN47263-601).

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RSVP-TE fundamentals

Ingress LER- EXP marking


In order to give fair and expected QoS treatment for various traffic flows funneling through the
MPLS LSP tunnels, each packet must be marked with the correct EXP value on the ingress
LER. The following are the available methods of mapping/marking of the EXP value for packets
on the ingress LER:
Global DSCP-to-EXP Mapping
Flow-based EXP Marking
If provisioned, these methods can operate in tandem.

Global DSCP-to-EXP Mapping


In the ingress QoS processing stage of ingress LER, by default, every packet is marked with
the EXP value based on the global DSCP-to-EXP mapping table shown below. For any packet,
if DSCP is not applicable, then the EXP value in the global DSCP-to-EXP table, corresponding
to the DSCP value of 0, is marked.
Each MPLS per-EXP flow is serviced at the defined priority and bandwidth. The peak rate
allows LSP flows to utilize the unused bandwidth up to the full interface bandwidth. By default,
this table is used on the ingress LER to map DSCP code points to EXP values.
Table 3: Global DSCP to EXP mapping
Class

40

DSCP

EXP

Bandwidth allocated per EXP


within LSP (specified as % of
LSP, unless otherwise stated)

Critical Control
Traffic

Class Selector 7

CR: 10%, PR: 100% of interface


Tail Drop, Priority : 1

Network Control
Traffic

Class Selector 6

CR: 10%, PR: 100% of interface


Tail Drop: Priority: 2

Real Time

EF

CR= 35%, PR=50%, Tail Drop,


Priority: 3

Class 1

AF 4X

CR=10%, PR: 100% of interface,


Priority: 6

Class 2

AF 3X

CR=10%, PR: 100% of interface

Class 3

AF 2X

CR=5%, PR: 100% of interface,


Priority: 6

Class 4

AF 1X

CR=10%, PR: 100% of interface


Priority: 7

Best Effort

Default

CR=10%, PR: 100% of interface


Priority: 8

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October 2010

MPLS QoS

Flow-based EXP Marking


This method of EXP marking is optional and is user driven. The flow-based EXP marking is
supported on inbound traffic only. You can use multifield classification to define traffic classes,
and specify EXP marking as the action on leaf classes.

Class-based queueing
MPLS QoS also supports class based queuing of per-EXP traffic, based on the EXP value of
the data after applying the global DSCP-to-EXP mapping, and flow-based EXP marking, if
applicable.

DSCP Marking on Egress LER


In order to give fair and expected QoS treatment for various traffic flows coming out of the
MPLS LSP, each of the packets can remarked with proper DSCP code points in the egress
LER. The following are the available methods of marking the DSCP code points for packets
on the egress LER.
Global EXP-to-DSCP marking
Flow-based DSCP marking
If provisioned, these methods can operate in tandem.

Global EXP-to-DSCP Marking


In the ingress QoS processing stage of egress LER, by default, every packet is re-marked with
the DSCP value based on the global EXP-to-DSCP mapping table.
The following table provides EXP-to-DSCP mapping per EXP class in a given LSP. By default,
this table is used on the egress LER to map EXP values to DSCP code points.
Table 4: Global EXP to DSCP mapping
Class

EXP

DSCP

Critical Control Traffic

Class Selector 7

Network Control Traffic

Class Selector 6

Premium, Real time

EF

Platinum, Class 1

AF 41

Gold, Class 2

AF 31

Silver, Class 3

AF 21

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RSVP-TE fundamentals

Bronze, Class 4

AF 11

Best Effort

Class Selector 0, Default

The EXP-to-DSCP functionality depends on the configured MPLS tunnel mode. The tunnel
modes control whether the DiffServ markings for IP packets remain independent from, or are
a function of, the MPLS label EXP values. These modes are only applicable when labels are
pushed or popped. They have no influence on the label swapping on intermediate LSRs.
There are three tunnel modes that control the application of EXP values in various scenarios:

Uniform mode
Changes made to the EXP value on the uppermost label are applied to all labels in the stack,
including the IP packet.
In the egress LER, the changes to the EXP values along the MPLS network path are reflected
into the packet by appropriately re-marking the DSCP value based on the global EXP-toDSCP mapping table.

Pipe mode
Changes made to the EXP value on the uppermost label are propagated to other MPLS labels
but not to the IP packet. Here, the DSCP value in the IP packet remains unchanged, but the
PHB at the egress LER is chosen based on the removed EXP value.

Short-pipe mode
Changes made to the EXP value on the uppermost label are propagated to other MPLS labels
but not to the IP packet. Here, the DSCP value in the IP packet remains unchanged, and the
PHB at the egress LER is chosen based on the removed EXP value.

Flow-based DSCP Marking


This method of EXP marking is optional and is user driven. The flow-based DSCP marking is
supported on inbound or outbound direction. You can use multifield classification to define
traffic classes and assign DSCP marking as an action. This method of marking is useful in the
inbound and outbound directions of egress LER.

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Chapter 6: MPLS Pseudowire fundamentals


MPLS pseudowire (also known as MPLS L2VPN or Martini VPN) provides the ability to transport Layer 2
packets over MPLS-enabled Ethernet packet-switched networks. The MPLS pseudowire is a virtual pointto-point connection that can emulate Layer 2 protocols over MPLS tunnels.
You can configure the Avaya Secure Router 2330/4134 MPLS pseudowire to provide support for one of
the following types of traffic:
PPP over MPLS
Ethernet over MPLS
HDLC over MPLS
MPLS pseudowire provides a common infrastructure to encapsulate and transport the supported types of
Layer 2 traffic over the MPLS network.

Layer 2 virtual circuits


An MPLS pseudowire consists of two Layer 2 virtual circuits, each operating over a single
MPLS LSP tunnel. To configure the pseudowire, two LSPs must be established between the
endpoints. As each LSP can only carry unidirectional traffic, one virtual circuit is configured on
each LSP. From the perspective of each router, one virtual circuit carries the ingress traffic,
and the other virtual circuit carries the egress traffic.
To provide a bidirectional path, you must configure one virtual circuit with the same ID on each
endpoint. The egress path and ingress path that are created with the same virtual circuit ID
are then bound together into a single pseudowire.
After you specify the desired encapsulation (HDLC, PPP, Ethernet, or VLAN) end to end, then
the pseudowire is established.
The following figure shows an Ethernet over MPLS Pseudowire emulating a VLAN between
two endpoints.

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MPLS Pseudowire fundamentals

Figure 18: Ethernet over MPLS

Virtual circuit labelling


In addition to the standard MPLS label used to route packets across the MPLS network, virtual
circuits support an additional VC label that identifies the egress Layer 2 interface that receives
the VC traffic.
The egress LER binds the VC label to a user-specified egress interface. When the egress
router receives a VC-labeled packet, it forwards the packet to the interface associated with the
VC label. The egress LER propagates the label binding to the ingress LER.

Binding an attachment circuit to the pseudowire


At each endpoint, you must bind a local Layer 2 interface to the virtual circuit to identify the
source and destination for the virtual circuit traffic. This local interface, referred to as the
attachment circuit, can be a PPP- or HDLC-enabled WAN bundle or one of the Ethernet ports
(including SR4134 module Ethernet ports).
While the attachment circuit can be a module Ethernet port, on the SR4134, the underlying
LSPs on which the virtual circuit operates can only be configured on WAN interfaces or chassis
Ethernet ports.
The SR2330 has no such limitation.

LDP requirement for dynamic virtual circuits


Like MPLS LSPs, you can create Layer 2 virtual circuits dynamically or statically. With dynamic
virtual circuits, the LSP that is used to establish the virtual circuits can be a static LSP, RSVP-

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PPP over MPLS

TE LSP, or an LDP LSP. However, to dynamically generate and transmit virtual circuit label
mapping messages between the peers, MPLS pseudowire uses only LDP. As a result, in order
to enable dynamic MPLS pseudowire, an LDP session must be configured between the peers
regardless of the type of LSP that is used to establish the pseudowire.
With remote peers, a targeted LDP session is required. With directly connected peers, a local
LDP session is sufficient.
If multiple LSPs are configured between the peers when a dynamic virtual circuit is enabled,
the LER adheres to the following order of precedence to choose the LSP to use:
1. Static LSP
2. RSVP-TE LSP
3. LDP LSP

Static virtual circuits


To create static pseudowires, you must specify static VC-FTN and VC-ILM entries.
The static VC-FTN entry specifies the source Layer 2 interface and outgoing LSP, while the
static VC-ILM entry specifies the incoming LSP and destination Layer 2 interface. In this case,
LDP is not required to establish the virtual circuits.

Multiple virtual circuits


One MPLS LSP can support multiple unidirectional virtual circuits. As a result, you can
configure multiple pseudowires over one pair of LSPs.

PPP over MPLS


With MPLS pseudowire, you can direct PPP traffic over an MPLS tunnel. This allows you to
transmit PPP traffic between sites over Ethernet packet-switched networks.
The pseudowire encapsulates the Layer 2 PPP packets at the ingress and forwards them to
the egress router. The egress router removes the encapsulation and forwards the Layer 2
packets.
MPLS does not forward the entire PPP packet across the pseudowire. The PPP control and
address information (0xff03, which is statically present in each PPP packet) is stripped from
the transported PPP packet. The pseudowire egress endpoint resets this information in the
packet before forwarding it to the destination interface.

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MPLS Pseudowire fundamentals

HDLC over MPLS


With Release 10.2 and later, the Secure Router 2330/4134 supports HDLC over MPLS
pseudowire. With this feature, you can transmit HDLC traffic between sites over Ethernet
packet-switched networks.

Ethernet over MPLS


Ethernet over MPLS is also referred to as Transparent LAN Services (TLS). With TLS, you can
connect two distant Ethernet networks together so that they function as a single logical Ethernet
or VLAN domain.
With Ethernet over MPLS, there are no changes to the transported Ethernet packet. MPLS
pseudowire operates as a transparent transport protocol. Therefore, the pseudowire does not
perform MAC learning, Layer 2 look ups, nor any interpretation of the forwarded packet for
broadcasting.

VLAN Rewrite
Typically, when Ethernet over MPLS is emulating VLAN, the VLAN IDs at each end of the link
must have the same value. The Secure Router 2330/4134 supports the VLAN rewrite feature,
which allows you to use different VLAN IDs at each end of the link.

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Chapter 7: Static LSP configuration


Configure a static LSP to set up a manually-configured, static path through the MPLS network.

Static LSP configuration procedures


The following task flow shows you the sequence of procedures you perform to configure a
static LSP. To link to the referenced procedures, see Static LSP configuration task
navigation on page 48

Figure 19: Static LSP configuration procedures

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Static LSP configuration

Static LSP configuration task navigation


Configuring a static FTN entry on the ingress router on page 48
Configuring static ILM entries on transit and egress routers on page 49
Displaying the static FTN entry on page 49
Displaying the static ILM entry on page 50

Configuring a static FTN entry on the ingress router


Configure a static FTN entry on an ingress LER to set a static MPLS action for a specific FEC.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To configure a static FTN entry, enter:
[no] mpls static-ftn <FEC/Mask> <outgoing-label> <next-hop>
<outgoing-if-name>
Table 5: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Deletes the specified static FTN entry.

<FEC/Mask>

Specifies the Forwarding Equivalence Class, with mask


(A.B.C.D/M).

<outgoing-label>

Specifies the outgoing label value:


0: explicit null
3: implicit null
16-1048575

48

<next-hop>

Specifies the next hop IPv4 address.

<outgoing-if-name>

Specifies the outgoing interface name.

Configuration MPLS

October 2010

Configuring static ILM entries on transit and egress routers

Configuring static ILM entries on transit and egress routers


Configure a static ILM entry on a transit or egress LSR interface to set a static MPLS action
for packets with a specific label.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To configure a static ILM entry, enter:
[no] mpls static-ilm <label-in> <if-name-in> [pop] | [swap
<label-out> <next-hop> <if-name-out>]
Table 6: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Deletes the specified static ILM entry.

<label-in>

Specifies the incoming label value. (16 - 1039)

<if-name-in>

Specifies the incoming interface name.

[pop]

Specifies to pop the incoming label.

swap

Specifies to swap the incoming label.

<label-out>

Specifies the outgoing label value for swap:


0: explicit null
3: implicit null
16-1048575

<next-hop>

Specifies the next hop IP address.

<if-name-out>

Specifies the outgoing interface name for swap:

Displaying the static FTN entry


Display the static FTN entry to verify the configuration.

Procedure steps
To display the static FTN entry configurations, enter:

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Static LSP configuration

show mpls static-ftn

Displaying the static ILM entry


Display the static ILM entry to verify the configuration.

Procedure steps
To display the static ILM entry configurations, enter:
show mpls static-ilm

Displaying static FTN statistics


Display the statistics for the MPLS static FTN.

Procedure steps
To display the static FTN entries, enter:
show mpls stats-ftn

Displaying static ILM statistics


Display the statistics for the MPLS static ILM.

Procedure steps
To display the static ILM entries, enter:
show mpls stats-ilm

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Chapter 8: LDP LSP configuration


Configure an LDP LSP to set up a best effort path through the MPLS network.

LDP configuration procedures


The following task flow shows you the sequence of procedures you perform to configure an
LDP LSP. To link to the referenced procedures, see

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LDP LSP configuration

Figure 20: LDP configuration procedures

Important:
If you configure ECMP using LDP LSPs, you must enable LDP (using the mpls protocolldp command) on all interfaces that are used in the ECMP configuration.

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Configuring loopback interface and router ID

LDP configuration task navigation


Configuring loopback interface and router ID on page 53
Enabling LDP at the router level on page 54
Configuring targeted LDP peer adjacency on page 54
Configuring LDP properties on page 57
Enabling LDP on an interface on page 70
Displaying LDP configuration and statistics on page 71

Configuring loopback interface and router ID


Configure a loopback interface with an IP address and assign the interface as the router ID to
enable the configuration of MPLS properties on the router.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To specify a bundle name for the loopback interface, enter:
interface loopback <loopback-if-name>
3. To configure the loopback address, enter:
ip address <loopback-ip> <subnet-mask>
4. To exit from the loopback configuration, enter:
exit
5. To configure the router-id, enter:
[no] router-id <router-id>
Table 7: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

<loopback-if-name>

Specifies the loopback interface name.

<loopback-ip>

Specifies the loopback IP address and mask.

<subnet-mask>

Specifies the subnet mask for the loopback IP.

[no]

Deletes the specified router ID.

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LDP LSP configuration

Variable
<router-id>

Value
Specifies the router ID. This value must be a valid loopback
address.

Enabling LDP at the router level


Enable LDP to allow configuration of LDP properties on the router.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To enable LDP, enter:
router ldp

Configuring targeted LDP peer adjacency


Specifying a targeted LDP peer for extended discovery
Specify a targeted LDP peer to send targeted hello messages to a specific IP address. This
allows the router to establish an LDP session to a non-directly connected LSR.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To choose LDP configuration mode, enter:
router ldp
3. To specify the targeted LDP peer, enter:
targeted-peer <targeted-peer-ip>
Table 8: Variable definitions
Variable
<targeted-peer-ip>

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Configuration MPLS

Value
Specifies the IPv4 address of the targeted peer.

October 2010

Configuring targeted LDP peer adjacency

Variable

Value
For the targeted peer IP, specify the address which is
configured as the transport address on the peer side
(preferably a loopback address).

Configuring the global targeted LDP peer hello interval


Configure the targeted peer hello interval for sending unicast hello packets through the
interface to the targeted peer.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To choose LDP configuration mode, enter:
router ldp
3. To configure the targeted peer hello interval, enter:
[no] targeted-peer-hello-interval <1-65535>
Table 9: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Sets the targeted peer hello interval to the default value.

<1-65535>

Specifies the targeted peer hello interval in seconds.

Configuring the interface targeted LDP peer hello interval


Configure the targeted peer hello interval for sending hello packets through the interface to the
targeted peer.
The targeted LDP peer hello interval configure for an interface overrides the global value.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select an MPLS interface, enter:
interface [ bundle <bundle-name> | ethernet <0/1-0/4>]
3. To configure the targeted peer hello interval, enter:

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LDP LSP configuration

[no] ldp targeted-peer-hello-interval <1-65535>


Table 10: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

<bundle-name>

Specifies the name of the WAN bundle.

<0/1-0/4>

Specifies the chassis Ethernet port number.

[no]

Sets the targeted peer hello interval to the default value.

<1-65535>

Specifies the targeted peer hello interval in seconds.

Configuring the global targeted LDP peer hold time


Configure the targeted LDP peer hold time to set time that the router waits before rejecting an
adjacency with targeted peers. For optimal performance, set this value to no less than three
times the hello interval value for targeted peers.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To choose LDP configuration mode, enter:
router ldp
3. To configure the targeted peer hold time, enter:
[no] targeted-peer-hold-time <1-65535>
Table 11: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Sets the hold time to the default value.

<1-65535>

Specifies the hold time in seconds. The default is 45


seconds.

Configuring the interface targeted LDP peer hold time


Configure the targeted LDP peer hold time to set time that the router waits before rejecting an
adjacency with targeted peers. For optimal performance, set this value to no less than three
times the hello interval value for targeted peers.
The targeted LDP peer hold time you configure for an interface overrides the global value.

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Configuring LDP properties

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select an MPLS interface, enter:
interface [ bundle <bundle-name> | ethernet <0/1-0/4>]
3. To configure the targeted peer hold time, enter:
[no] ldp targeted-peer-hold-time <1-65535>
Table 12: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Sets the hold time to the global value.

<1-65535>

Specifies the hold time in seconds.

Configuring LDP properties


Configuring explicit-null labels
Enable explicit null labels on router. By default, implicit null labels are advertised on the egress
route.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To choose LDP configuration mode, enter:
router ldp
3. To configure explicit null labels, enter:
[no] explicit-null
Table 13: Variable definitions
Variable
[no]

Configuration MPLS

Value
Disables explicit null labels.

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57

LDP LSP configuration

Configuring the transport address for a label space


Configure the transport address for a label space. The transport address is the address used
for the TCP session over which LDP is running.
If you manually configure the transport address for the label space, the transport address must
be a loopback address.
If you do not manually configure the transport address, LDP uses a physical interface address
as the transport address.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To choose LDP configuration mode, enter:
router ldp
3. To configure the transport address, enter:
[no] transport-address <transport-ip-address>
Table 14: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Deletes the transport address.

<transport-ip-address>

Specifies the transport IP address.

Configuring global loop detection


Enable loop detection using the hop count limit method to detect looping LSPs. Loop detection
ensures that a loop is detected while establishing a label switched path and before any data
is passed over that LSP.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To choose LDP configuration mode, enter:
router ldp
3. To configure loop detection, enter, enter:
[no] loop-detection

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Configuring LDP properties

Table 15: Variable definitions


Variable
[no]

Value
Disables loop-detection.

Configuring the global loop detection count


Configure the loop detection count to set the maximum hop-count value for loop detection.
An LSR that detects a maximum hop count behaves as if the containing message has traversed
a loop. The use of the loop-detection-count ensures that a loop is detected while establishing a
label switched path before any data is passed over that LSP.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To choose LDP configuration mode, enter:
router ldp
3. To configure the loop detection count, enter, enter:
[no] loop-detection-count <1-255>
Table 16: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Sets the loop detection count to the default value.

<1-255>

Specifies the loop detection count.

Configuring global request retries


Enable request retries to allow repeated requests for a label when it has been rejected for a
valid reason.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To choose LDP configuration mode, enter:
router ldp
3. To enable request retries, enter, enter:

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LDP LSP configuration

[no] request-retry
Table 17: Variable definitions
Variable
[no]

Value
Disables request retries.

Configuring the global request retry timeout


Configure the request retry timeout to set the interval between request retries.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To choose LDP configuration mode, enter:
router ldp
3. To configure the request retry timeout, enter:
[no] request-retry-timeout <1-65535>
Table 18: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Sets the request retry timeout to the default value. The


default timeout is 5 seconds.

<1-65535>

Specifies the interval between request retries in seconds.

Propagating the global release of labels to downstream routers


The label advertisement mode (downstream unsolicited) controls how labels are propagated
to upstream routers. You can enable the propagation of labels to next-hop routers even if the
upstream router does not hold a label for the specified FEC. In this case, the LSR can
propagate the label to the Next Hop.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To choose LDP configuration mode, enter:

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Configuring LDP properties

router ldp
3. To propagate the release of labels to downstream routers, enter, enter:
[no] propagate-release
Table 19: Variable definitions
Variable
[no]

Value
Disables the release of labels to downstream routers.

Configuring the global label control mode


Set the control mode for label processing.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To choose LDP configuration mode, enter:
router ldp
3. To configure the label control mode, enter:
[no] control-mode {independent | ordered}
Table 20: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Sets the label control mode to the default value


(independent).

independent

Independent processing sets the mode to instant replies: the


LSR advertises label mappings to neighbors at any time.

ordered

In ordered mode, an LSR only advertises label mappings for


an FEC when it is the egress router for the FEC, or when it
has received a label mapping from the current next hop for
the FEC.

Applying ACL rules to LDP


Configure ACL rules to permit or deny the advertisement of labels for specific routes to a
configured list of neighbors. After the routes are redistributed, denied routes are no longer
advertised to the listed LDP neighbors.

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LDP LSP configuration

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To choose LDP configuration mode, enter:
router ldp
3. To configure label advertisement, enter, enter:
[no] advertise-labels [for any to none] | {for <prefix-acl>
to [any | <peer-acl>] }
Table 21: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Specifies destinations that do not advertise their labels to


specified LDP neighbors. (When used together with for any
to none, this enables the distribution of all locally assigned
labels to all LDP neighbors.)

[for any to none]

Prevents the distribution of any locally assigned labels to any


neighbors.

<prefix-acl>

Prefix access control list that specifies the destinations that


have their labels advertised.

[any | <peer-acl>]

Specifies the neighbors that receive label advertisements,


using a peer access control list name. Enter any to specify
all neighbors.

Configuring the global label advertisement mode


Configure the label advertisement mode to control how the router advertises FEC-to-label
bindings to LDP peers.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To choose LDP configuration mode, enter:
router ldp
3. To configure the label advertisement mode, enter:
[no] advertisement-mode {downstream-unsolicited}

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Table 22: Variable definitions


Variable

Value

[no]

Sets the default advertisement mode to the default value.


(Default: downstream-unsolicited.)

{downstream-unsolicited}

Specifies downstream-unsolicited mode: the router


distributes labels to peers without waiting for a label
request. This mode is typically used with the liberal label
retention mode.

Configuring the interface label advertisement mode


Configure the label advertisement mode to control when the interface advertises FEC-tolabel bindings to LDP peers.
The label advertisement mode you configure for an interface overrides the global
advertisement mode.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select an MPLS interface, enter:
interface [ bundle <bundle-name> | ethernet <0/1-0/4>]
3. To configure the label advertisement mode, enter:
[no] ldp advertisement-mode {downstream-unsolicited}
Table 23: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Sets the interface label advertisement mode to the global


value.

{downstream-unsolicited}

Specifies downstream-unsolicited mode: the router


distributes labels to peers without waiting for a label
request. This mode is typically used with the liberal label
retention mode.

Configuring the global label retention mode


Set the retention mode to be used for all labels exchanged through all interfaces.

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LDP LSP configuration

If an LDP session is already operational, any changes made to the retention mode apply only to
labels received after the router processes the mode change command. All previously received
labels remain unchanged.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To choose LDP configuration mode, enter:
router ldp
3. To configure the label retention mode, enter:
[no] label-retention-mode {liberal}
Table 24: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Sets the interface label advertisement mode to the default


value.

{liberal}

Specifies to retain all labels binding to FEC received from


label distribution peers, even if the LSR is not the current next
hop.

Configuring the interface label retention mode


Set the retention mode to be used for all labels exchanged through the specified interface.
If an LDP session is already operational, any changes made to the retention mode apply only to
labels received after the router processes the mode change command. All previously received
labels remain unchanged.
The label retention mode you configure for an interface overrides the global value.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select an MPLS interface, enter:
interface [ bundle <bundle-name> | ethernet <0/1-0/4>]
3. To configure the label retention mode, enter:
[no] ldp label-retention-mode {liberal}

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Table 25: Variable definitions


Variable

Value

[no]

Sets the interface label retention mode to the global value.

{liberal}

Specifies to retain all labels binding to FEC received from


label distribution peers, even if the LSR is not the current next
hop.

Configuring the global LDP hello interval


Configure the interval for sending hello packets through LSR interfaces to create and maintain
adjacencies.
Whenever a new router comes up, it sends out a hello packet to a specified, multicast address
announcing itself to the network. Hello messages are sent to the All Routers Multicast Group
(224.0.0.2). Receipt of a hello packet from another LSR creates a hello adjacency with that
LSR.
For optimum performance, set the hello-interval value to no more than one-third the holdtime value.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To choose LDP configuration mode, enter:
router ldp
3. To configure the hello interval, enter:
[no] hello-interval <1-65535>
Table 26: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Sets the hello interval to the default value (2 seconds).

<1-65535>

Specifies the hello interval in seconds.

Configuring the interface LDP hello interval


Configure the interval for sending hello packets through the interface to create maintain
adjacencies.
Whenever a new router comes up, it sends out a hello packet to a specified, multicast address
announcing itself to the network. Hello messages are sent to the All Routers Multicast Group

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(224.0.0.2). Receipt of a hello packet from another LSR creates a hello adjacency with that
LSR.
For optimum performance, set the hello-interval value to no more than one-third the hold time
value.
The hello interval you configure for an interface overrides the global value.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select an MPLS interface, enter:
interface [ bundle <bundle-name> | ethernet <0/1-0/4>]
3. To configure the hello interval, enter:
[no] ldp hello-interval <1-65535>
Table 27: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Sets the hello interval to the global value.

<1-65535>

Specifies the hello interval in seconds.

Configuring the global LDP hold time


Configure the hold time value to set the maximum period that the LSR waits for a hello packet
from a peer before it rejects an existing adjacency. The hold timer is reset every time a hello
packet is received from the peer in question.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To choose LDP configuration mode, enter:
router ldp
3. To configure the hold time, enter:
[no] hold-time <1-65535>
Table 28: Variable definitions
Variable
[no]

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Value
Sets the hold time to the default value (15 seconds).

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Configuring LDP properties

Variable
<1-65535>

Value
Specifies the hold time in seconds.

Configuring the interface LDP hold time


Configure the hold time value to set the maximum period that the interface waits for a hello
packet from a peer before it rejects an existing adjacency. The hold time timer is reset every
time a hello packet is received from the peer in question.
The hold time you configure for an interface overrides the global value.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select an MPLS interface, enter:
interface [ bundle <bundle-name> | ethernet <0/1-0/4>]
3. To configure the hold time, enter:
[no] ldp hold-time <1-65535>
Table 29: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Sets the hold time to the global value.

<1-65535>

Specifies the hold time in seconds.

Configuring the global keepalive interval


Set the interval at which the LSR sends keepalive messages to the peer in order to maintain
an LDP session.
Each LSR must send keepalive messages at regular intervals to LDP peers to keep the
sessions active. The keepalive interval determines the time-interval between successive
keepalive messages.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To choose LDP configuration mode, enter:

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router ldp
3. To configure the keepalive interval, enter:
[no] keepalive-interval <1-65535>
Table 30: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Sets the keepalive interval to the default value (30 seconds).

<1-65535>

Specifies the keepalive interval in seconds.

Configuring the interface keepalive interval


Set the interval at which the LSR sends keepalive messages to the peer in order to maintain
an LDP session.
Each LSR must send keepalive messages at regular intervals to LDP peers to keep the
sessions active. The keepalive interval determines the time-interval between successive
keepalive messages.
The keepalive interval you configure for an interface overrides the global value.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select an MPLS interface, enter:
interface [ bundle <bundle-name> | ethernet <0/1-0/4>]
3. To configure the keepalive interval, enter:
[no] ldp keepalive-interval <1-65535>
Table 31: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Sets the keepalive interval to the global value.

<1-65535>

Specifies the keepalive interval in seconds.

Configuring the global keepalive timeout


Configure the keepalive timeout to set the maximum period that the LSR waits for a keepalive
message from a peer before the LDP session times out. The keepalive timer is reset every

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Configuring LDP properties

time a keepalive packet is received from the peer in question. For optimum performance, set
this value to no more than three times the keepalive interval value

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To choose LDP configuration mode, enter:
router ldp
3. To configure the keepalive timeout, enter:
[no] keepalive-timeout <1-65535>
Table 32: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Sets the keepalive timeout to the default value. (30 seconds)

<1-65535>

Specifies the keepalive timeout in seconds.

Configuring the interface keepalive timeout


Configure the keepalive timeout to set the maximum period that the LSR waits for a keepalive
message from a peer before the LDP session times out. The keepalive timer is reset every
time a keepalive packet is received from the peer in question. For optimum performance, set
this value to no more than three times the keepalive interval value
When you configure this property at the interface level, the configured value overrides the value
set using the global keepalive-timeout command.
The keepalive timeout you configure for an interface overrides the global value.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select an MPLS interface, enter:
interface [ bundle <bundle-name> | ethernet <0/1-0/4>]
3. To configure the keepalive timeout, enter:
[no] ldp keepalive-timeout <1-65535>

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Table 33: Variable definitions


Variable

Value

[no]

Sets the keepalive timeout to the global value.

<1-65535>

Specifies the keepalive timeout in seconds.

Enabling LDP on an interface


Enable LDP on the interface.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select the interface, enter:
interface [bundle <wan_bundle_name> | ethernet <0/1-0/4> |
vlan <vid>]
3. To enable MPLS on the interface, enter:
mpls ip
4. To enable the LDP protocol for the interface, enter:
mpls protocol-ldp

Enabling auto-discovery of LDP peers


Configuring global multicast hellos
Enable multicast hello exchange on all interfaces to enable auto-discovery of LDP peers on
directly connected networks. When LDP is enabled, Multicast hellos are enabled by default.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To choose LDP configuration mode, enter:

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router ldp
3. To enable multicast hellos on the interface, enter:
[no] multicast-hellos
Table 34: Variable definitions
Variable
[no]

Value
Disables multicast hellos on all interfaces.

Configuring interface multicast hellos


Enable multicast hello exchange on an interface to enable auto-discovery of LDP peers on
directly connected networks. Multicast hellos are enabled by default.
Enabling or disabling multicast hellos for an interface overrides the global state.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select an MPLS interface, enter:
interface [ bundle <bundle-name> | ethernet <0/1-0/4>]
3. To enable multicast hellos on the interface, enter:
[no] ldp multicast-hellos
Table 35: Variable definitions
Variable
[no]

Value
Disables multicast hellos on the interface.

Displaying LDP configuration and statistics


Displaying LDP adjacency
Procedure steps
To display the LDP adjacency, enter:

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show ldp adjacency

Displaying the IP access list of LDP advertise-labels


Procedure steps
To display the IP access list of LDP advertise-labels, enter:
show ldp advertise-labels

Displaying FECs known to the current LSR


Procedure steps
To display the FECs known to the current LSR, enter:
show ldp fec [A.B.C.D/M]
If the IP address is not specified, all FECs are displayed.

Displaying detailed LDP information for interfaces


Procedure steps
To display the detailed LDP information for an interface, enter:
show ldp interface <interface-name>
Table 36: Variable definitions
Variable
<interface-name>

Value
Displays LDP information for the specified interface. If this
value is not specified, information for all interfaces is
displayed.

Displaying LDP LSP configuration


Procedure steps
To display the LDP LSP configuration, enter:

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Displaying LDP configuration and statistics

show ldp lsp [detail]


Table 37: Variable definitions
Variable
[detail]

Value
Displays advertise-label information in addition to LDP LSP
information.

Displaying LDP LSP hosts corresponding to an FEC


Procedure steps
To display the configuration of the LDP LSP corresponding to a particular FEC, enter:
show ldp lsp fec <A.B.C.D/M> [detail]
Table 38: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

<A.B.C.D/M>

FEC with mask.

[detail]

Displays advertise-label information in addition to LDP LSP


information.

Displaying LDP LSP host


Procedure steps
To display the LDP LSP host, enter:
show ldp lsp host [detail]
Table 39: Variable definitions
Variable
[detail]

Value
Displays advertise-label information in addition to LDP LSP
host information.

Displaying LDP LSP prefix


Procedure steps
To display the LDP LSP prefix, enter:

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show ldp lsp prefix [detail]


Table 40: Variable definitions
Variable
[detail]

Value
Displays advertise-label information in addition to LDP LSP
prefix information.

Displaying LDP session


Procedure steps
To display LDP session, enter:
show ldp session [<A.B.C.D> | detail]
Table 41: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

<A.B.C.D>

Displays information for established sessions with the peer


specified by this IP address. If this value is not specified,
information for all peers is displayed.

detail

Displays detailed information for all sessions established


between the current LSR and other LSRs.

Displaying LDP packet statistics


Procedure steps
To display the LDP packet statistics, enter:
show ldp statistics

Displaying LDP advertise-labels statistics


Procedure steps
To display the LDP advertise-labels statistics, enter:

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show ldp statistics advertise-labels

Clearing LDP adjacencies


Procedure steps
To clear LDP adjacencies, enter:
clear ldp adjacency {<A.B.C.D>|all}
Table 42: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

<A.B.C.D>

LDP adjacency address.

all

Clears all LDP adjacencies.

Clearing LDP statistics


Procedure steps
To clear LDP adjacencies, enter:
clear ldp statistics [advertise-labels for <prefix-list>]
Table 43: Variable definitions
Variable
[advertise-labels for <prefix-list>]

Configuration MPLS

Value
Clears IP prefix list of advertise-labels.

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Chapter 9: RSVP-TE LSP configuration


Configure an RSVP-TE LSP to set up a traffic-engineered LSP through the MPLS network.

RSVP-TE configuration procedures


The following task flow shows you the sequence of procedures you perform to configure an
RSVP-TE LSP. To link to the referenced procedures, see RSVP-TE configuration task
navigation on page 79

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Figure 21: RSVP-TE configuration procedures

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Configuring loopback interface and router ID

RSVP-TE configuration task navigation


Configuring loopback interface and router ID on page 79
Enabling RSVP-TE at the router level on page 80
Enabling RSVP-TE at the interface level on page 80
Creating an RSVP-TE LSP on page 81
Configuring an explicit path LSP on page 82
Configuring constrained path LSP properties on page 86
Configuring Fast Reroute for constrained path LSP on page 96
Configuring RSVP-TE LSP properties on page 101
Configuring RSVP-TE global and interface properties on page 103
Mapping routes to RSVP-TE LSPs on page 115
Displaying RSVP-TE LSP configuration and statistics on page 116
Displaying RSVP-TE configuration and statistics on page 119

Configuring loopback interface and router ID


Configure a loopback interface with an IP address and assign the interface as the router ID to
enable the configuration of MPLS properties on the router.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To specify a bundle name for the loopback interface, enter:
interface loopback <loopback-if-name>
3. To configure the loopback address, enter:
ip address <loopback-ip> <subnet-mask>
4. To exit from the loopback configuration, enter:
exit
5. To configure the router-id, enter:
[no] router-id <router-id>

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Table 44: Variable definitions


Variable

Value

<loopback-if-name>

Specifies the loopback interface name.

<loopback-ip>

Specifies the loopback IP address and mask.

<subnet-mask>

Specifies the subnet mask for the loopback IP.

[no]

Deletes the specified router ID.

<router-id>

Specifies the router ID. This value must be a valid loopback


address.

Enabling RSVP-TE at the router level


Enable RSVP-TE to enable configuration of RSVP-TE properties on the router.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To enable RSVP-TE, enter:
router rsvp

Enabling RSVP-TE at the interface level


Enable RSVP-TE on the interface.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select the interface, enter:
interface [bundle <wan_bundle_name> | ethernet
<chassis_ethernet_port> | vlan <vid>]
3. To enable MPLS on the interface, enter:
mpls ip
4. To enable the RSVP-TE protocol for the interface, enter:
mpls protocol-rsvp

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Creating an RSVP-TE LSP

Creating an RSVP-TE LSP


Creating an RSVP-TE LSP
Create a new RSVP traffic-engineered LSP. Once the traffic-engineered LSP is minimally
configured with required attributes (ingress and egress IP addresses), an RSVP session is
created for this LSP, which enables the exchange of messages and completes the LSP setup.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To configure the LSP name
[no] mpls traffic-eng-lsp <LSP-name>
Table 45: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Removes the traffic-engineering LSP and all the configured


attributes, except the specified primary path.

<LSP-name>

Specifies the name of the LSP.

Configuring the ingress address for the LSP


Specify the IPv4 address of the LSP ingress. This address is typically the router-id.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select the traffic engineering LSP, enter:
mpls traffic-eng-lsp <LSP-name>
3. To specify the IP address for tunnel ingress, enter:
from <ingress-IP>

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Table 46: Variable definitions


Variable

Value

<LSP-name>

Specifies the traffic engineered LSP name.

<ingress-IP>

Specifies the IPv4 address for the LSP ingress router or


interface. The address specified is uses as the sender
address in the sender template object in Path messages.

Configuring the egress router for the LSP


When configuring a traffic-engineered LSP, you must specify the address of the egress router to
create an RSVP session.
This is a mandatory step in the creation of a traffic-engineered LSP. If an egress router is not
defined, no RSVP-TE session can be created.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select the LSP, enter:
mpls traffic-eng-lsp <LSP-name>
3. To configure the egress address, enter:
[no] to <egress-IP>
Table 47: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

<LSP-name>

Specifies the traffic engineered LSP name.

[no]

Deletes the specified LSP egress IP address.

<egress-IP>

Specifies the IPv4 address for the LSP egress router.

Configuring an explicit path LSP


Disabling and enabling CSPF globally
By default, CSPF is enabled for traffic-engineered LSPs. Disable CSPF when all nodes in the
path do not support the required traffic engineering extensions. You must then manually

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Configuring an explicit path LSP

configure LSPs to use an explicit path. The LSP is then established only along the manually
configured path.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To choose RSVP configuration mode, enter:
router rsvp
3. To enable or disable CSPF, enter:
{no-cspf | cspf}

Disabling and enabling CSPF on RSVP-TE LSPs


Disable or enable CSPF on a particular LSP. To enable CSPF on an LSP, CSPF must be
globally enabled.
CSPF is enabled by default for traffic-engineered LSPs.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select the LSP, enter:
mpls traffic-eng-lsp <LSP-name>
3. To configure CSPF status, enter:
{primary | secondary} {no-cspf | cspf}
Table 48: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

primary

Specifies the primary LSP.

secondary

Specifies the secondary LSP.

no-cspf

Disables CSPF on the LSP.

cspf

Sets CSPF status to the default setting (enabled).

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Create the explicit route and define the hops


When all nodes in the path do not support the required traffic engineering extensions to enable
CSPF, configure an RSVP-TE explicit route. When you configure the explicit route, you can
define all hops along the path, and specify for each hop whether it is loose or strict.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select the traffic engineering path, enter:
mpls traffic-eng-path <path-name>
3. To configure hop, enter:
[no] hop-address <hop-address> [loose|strict]
Table 49: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Removes the specified hop.

<hop-address>

IPv4 address of the hop.

loose

Specifies loose hops: the route taken form one router to the
next need not be a direct path: messages exchanged
between the two routers can pass through other routers.

strict

Specifies strict hops: the route taken from one router to the
next must be a directly connected path. This ensures that
routing is enforced on the basis of each link.

Associate the RSVP-TE explicit route with an LSP


After you define the path in the RSVP-TE explicit route, you can associate the route with a
primary or secondary LSP.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select the LSP, enter:
mpls-traffic-eng-lsp <LSP-name>
3. To associate an explicit route with the LSP, enter:

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[no] {primary | secondary} traffic-eng-path <path-name>


Table 50: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Removes the configured explicit route.

primary

Specifies the primary LSP.

secondary

Specifies the secondary LSP.

<path-name>

Specifies the name of the path.

Specifying the Route Record List as an explicit route


You can use the updated Route Record List as an Explicit Route (with all strict nodes) when a
path message is sent out at the next refresh. Use the no parameter to disable the use of the
Route Record List as the explicit route.
The ERO list contains the hops to be taken to reach the egress from the current LSR. If CSPF is
not available, to place an ERO with all strict routes, use this command to modify the ERO after
receiving the Resv message. The future Path messages have the ERO with all strict nodes,
identifying each and every node to be traversed.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select the LSP, enter:
mpls traffic-eng-lsp <LSP-name>
3. To configure route record list as an explicit route, enter:
[no] {primary | secondary} reuse-route-record
Table 51: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Disables the route record list as an explicit route.

primary

Specifies the primary LSP.

secondary

Specifies the secondary LSP.

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Configuring constrained path LSP properties


Reserving bandwidth for RSVP-TE LSPs
Specify the bandwidth for the RSVP-TE LSP to ensure the LSP meets desired traffic
requirements.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select the LSP, enter:
mpls traffic-eng-lsp <LSP-name>
3. To specify RSVP-TE LSP bandwidth, enter:
[no] [primary|secondary] {bandwidth <bandwidth> [k|m|g]}
Table 52: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Removes the specified configuration.

primary

Specifies the primary LSP.

secondary

Specifies the secondary LSP.

{bandwidth <bandwidth> [k|


m|g]}

1000 - 10000000000 bits. You can also specify the bandwidth


in terms of kilobits (k) megabits (m) or gigabits (g). For
example, for 1 megabit, enter 1m

Configuring the filter style for RSVP-TE LSP


Configure the filter to fixed or shared filter style for RSVP-TE LSP. Use the fixed filter style to
prevent rerouting of an LSP and to prevent other LSPs from using the bandwidth reserved for
this LSP.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:

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configure terminal
2. To select the LSP, enter:
mpls traffic-eng-lsp <LSP-name>
3. To configure the filter style, enter:
[no] {primary | secondary} filter {fixed | shared-explicit}
Table 53: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

primary

Specifies the primary LSP.

secondary

Specifies the secondary LSP.

fixed

Specifies a distinct reservation. A distinct reservation request


is created for data packets from this LSP.

shared-explicit

Specifies a shared reservation environment. It creates a


single reservation into which flows from all LSPs are
combined.

Configuring retry limit for RSVP-TE LSP


If a session is in a nonexistent state due to the receipt of a Path Error message, it tries to
recreate the LSP for the number of times specified by the retry-limit command.
Although the same retry command controls both the MPLS traffic engineering tunnel and the
session, the retry-limit value affects only the session and not the traffic-engineering tunnel. If
the traffic tunnel is in an incomplete state, the code keeps trying forever to bring it to a complete
state, irrespective of the retry-limit value.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select the LSP, enter:
mpls traffic-eng-lsp <LSP-name>
3. To configure retry limit, enter:
[no] {primary | secondary} retry-limit <1-65535>
Table 54: Variable definitions
Variable
primary

Configuration MPLS

Value
Specifies the primary LSP.

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Variable

Value

secondary

Specifies the secondary LSP.

<1-65535>

The number of times the system tries to set up the LSP.


Default is 0 (indefinite).

Configuring retry timer for RSVP-TE LSP


Specify a retry interval for an RSVP-TE LSP. Use the no parameter to revert to the default.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select the LSP, enter:
mpls traffic-eng-lsp <LSP-name>
3. To configure the retry timer, enter:
[no] {primary | secondary} retry-timer <1-600>
Table 55: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Reverts to the default value (30 seconds).

primary

Specifies the primary LSP.

secondary

Specifies the secondary LSP.

<1-600>

Time, in seconds, that the system waits before retrying LSP


setup.

Configuring setup priority for RSVP-TE LSP


Configure the setup priority to determine whether a new LSP can preempt an existing LSP.
The setup priority of the new LSP must be higher than the hold priority of an existing LSP for
the existing LSP to be preempted.
For RSVP-TE LSP, do not configure the setup priority to be higher than the hold priority.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:

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Configuring constrained path LSP properties

configure terminal
2. To select the LSP, enter:
mpls traffic-eng-lsp <LSP-name>
3. To configure the setup priority for RSVP-TE LSP, enter:
[no] {primary | secondary} setup-priority <0-7>
Table 56: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Sets the setup priority to the default value: 7 (lowest).

primary

Specifies the primary LSP.

secondary

Specifies the secondary LSP.

<0-7>

Specifies the setup priority, from highest priority (0) to lowest


priority (7)

Configuring the hold priority for RSVP-TE LSP


Configure the hold priority value for the selected RSVP-TE LSP. The hold priority determines
the degree to which an LSP holds onto its reservation for a session after the LSP has been
set up successfully. When the hold priority is high, the existing LSP is less likely to give up its
reservation.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select the LSP, enter:
mpls traffic-eng-lsp <LSP-name>
3. To configure the hold priority, enter:
[no] {primary | secondary} hold-priority <0-7>
Table 57: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Sets the hold priority to the default value: 0 (highest).

primary

Specifies the primary LSP.

secondary

Specifies the secondary LSP.

<0-7>

Specifies the hold priority, from highest priority (0) to lowest


priority (7)

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Configuring CSPF retry limit


Specify the number of retries that CSPF performs for a request received from RSVP.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select the LSP, enter:
mpls traffic-eng-lsp <LSP-name>
3. To configure the CSPF retry limit, enter:
[no] {primary | secondary} cspf-retry-limit <1-65535>
Table 58: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Sets the retry limit to the default value: 0 (indefinite).

primary

Specifies the primary LSP.

secondary

Specifies the secondary LSP.

<1-65535>

Specifies the number of times CSPF tries to perform a


request received from RSVP.

Configuring CSPF retry timer


Use this command to specify the time between each retry that CSPF performs for a request
received from RSVP.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select the LSP, enter:
mpls traffic-eng-lsp <LSP-name>
3. To configure CSPF retry timer, enter:
[no] {primary | secondary} cspf-retry-timer <1-600>

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Configuring constrained path LSP properties

Table 59: Variable definitions


Variable

Value

[no]

Sets the retry timer to the default value: 0 (indefinite).

primary

Specifies the primary LSP.

secondary

Specifies the secondary LSP.

<1-600>

Timeout between successive retries, in seconds.

Configuring the hop limit for RSVP-TE LSP


Specify the hop limit for an RSVP-TE LSP to place a limit on the number of hops in the LSP.
If a primary path exists when you configure a hop limit, the hop limit is compared with the
current number of hops in the primary path. If the number of hops in the primary path exceeds
the configure hop limit, the existing session is torn down and no Path messages are sent out.
The hop limit data is sent to the CSPF server, if CSPF is being used.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select the LSP, enter:
mpls traffic-eng-lsp <LSP-name>
3. To configure the hop limit, enter:
[no] {primary | secondary} hop-limit <1-255>
Table 60: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Sets the hop limit to the default value (255).

primary

Specifies the primary LSP.

secondary

Specifies the secondary LSP.

<1-255>

Specifies the acceptable number of hops.

Configuring label recording


Configure label record to set whether to record all labels exchanged between RSVP enabled
routers during the reservation setup process. Label recording can help in debugging problems.

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Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select the LSP, enter:
mpls traffic-eng-lsp <LSP-name>
3. To configure label recording, enter:
[no] {primary | secondary} label-record
Table 61: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Disables label recording.

primary

Specifies the primary LSP.

secondary

Specifies the secondary LSP.

label-record

Specifies to record all the labels exchanged for an LSP from


the ingress to the egress.

Configuring route recording


You can disable recording of the route taken by PATH and RESV messages, which confirm
the establishment of reservations and identify errors. Route recording is enabled by default.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select the LSP, enter:
mpls traffic-eng-lsp <LSP-name>
3. To configure route recording, enter:
{primary|secondary} {no-record-route | record-route}
Table 62: Variable definitions
Variable

92

Value

primary

Specifies the primary LSP.

secondary

Specifies the secondary LSP.

no-record-route

Disables route recording.

record-route

Enables route recording.

Configuration MPLS

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Configuring constrained path LSP properties

Creating an MPLS administrative group


Create administrative groups to classify links or interfaces. Administrative groups are
meaningful only when CSPF is enabled. You can use these groups to implement different
policy-based LSP setups. Each interface can be a member of one or more, or no, administrative
groups.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To create an administrative group, enter:
[no] mpls admin-group <admin-group-name> <0-31>
Table 63: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Deletes the specified administrative group.

<admin-group-name>

Specifies the name or color of the administrative group.

<0-31>

Specifies the value of the administrative group to be added


(0-31).

Adding an interface to an administrative group


Assign an interface to an administrative group to classify the interfaces.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select an MPLS interface, enter:
interface [bundle <bundle-name> | ethernet <0/1-0/4> | vlan
<vid>]
3. To assign the interface to an administrative group, enter:
[no] mpls admin-group <admin-group-name>

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Table 64: Variable definitions


Variable

Value

[no]

Removes the interface from the specified administrative


group.

<admin-group-name>

Specifies the name of the administrative group.

Including administrative groups in an RSVP-TE LSP


Configure the include-any parameter to set the administrative groups to include in an LSP. To
be added to the LSP, links must belong to at least one of the administrative groups listed in the
include-any list.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select the LSP, enter:
mpls traffic-eng-lsp <LSP-name>
3. To configure the administrative groups to include in the LSP, enter:
[no] {primary | secondary} include-any <admin-group-name>
Table 65: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Removes a previously configured group from the specified


list.

primary

Specifies the primary LSP.

secondary

Specifies the secondary LSP.

<admin-group-name>

Specifies the administrative group name.

Excluding administrative groups from an RSVP-TE LSP


Specify the administrative groups to be excluded from an LSP.
If you specify an exclude-any list, any link that belongs to even one of the groups specified
in the exclude list cannot be chosen for the LSP.

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Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select the LSP, enter:
mpls traffic-eng-lsp <LSP-name>
3. To configure the administrative groups to exclude, enter:
[no] {primary | secondary} exclude-any <admin-group-name>
Table 66: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Removes the specified group from the exclude-any list.

primary

Specifies the primary LSP.

secondary

Specifies the secondary LSP.

<admin-group-name>

Specifies the name of the administrative group to exclude


from the LSP.

Disabling affinity
Disable the use of sending out session attribute objects with resource affinity data.
With affinity enabled, the LSP can match desired attributes, represented by affinity bits, to link
attributes. This allows the LSP to include (include-any) or exclude (exclude-any) the configured
administrative groups in the LSP.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select the LSP, enter:
mpls traffic-eng-lsp <LSP-name>
3. To configure affinity, enter:
{primary | secondary} {no-affinity | affinity}
Table 67: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

primary

Specifies the primary LSP.

secondary

Specifies the secondary LSP.

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Variable

Value

no-affinity

Disables affinity.

affinity

Enables affinity.

Configuring Fast Reroute for constrained path LSP


Enabling and disabling one-to-one fast reroute protection
Enable the local repair of explicit routes for which this router is a transit node. Use the no
parameter with this command to disable local repair of explicit routes.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select the LSP, enter:
mpls traffic-eng-lsp <LSP-name>
3. To configure one-to-one fast reroute protection, enter:
[no] primary fast-reroute protection one-to-one
Table 68: Variable definitions
Variable
[no]

Value
Disables one-to-one fast reroute protection.

Configuring fast reroute node protection


Set node protection to bypass the failed node completely during fast reroute.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select the LSP, enter:

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mpls traffic-eng-lsp <LSP-name>


3. To configure node protection, enter:
[no] primary fast-reroute node-protection
Table 69: Variable definitions
Variable
[no]

Value
Disables node protection.

Configuring fast reroute bandwidth


Configure bandwidth for fast reroute.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select the LSP, enter:
mpls traffic-eng-lsp <LSP-name>
3. To configure the fast reroute bandwidth, enter:
[no] primary fast-reroute bandwidth <bandwidth>
Table 70: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Deletes the fast reroute bandwidth configuration.

<bandwidth>

Specifies the fast reroute bandwidth, from 1 to 10000000000


bits. You can also specify the bandwidth in units of kilobits,
megabits, or gigabits (k, m, or g). For example, to specify 10
kilobits, enter 10k.

Specifying the administrative groups to include in the fast reroute


Specify the administrative groups to include in the fast reroute set up. To be added to the
alternate route, links must belong to at least one of the administrative groups listed in the
include-any list.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:

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configure terminal
2. To select the LSP, enter:
mpls traffic-eng-lsp <LSP-name>
3. To configure the administrative groups to include, enter:
[no] primary fast-reroute include-any <groupname>
Table 71: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Deletes the specified group from the include-any list.

<groupname>

Specifies the administrative groups to include in the fast


reroute set up.

Excluding administrative groups from the fast-reroute


Specify the administrative groups to be excluded from the fast reroute set up.
When you specify the exclude-any list, any link that belongs to even one of the groups specified
in the exclude list cannot be chosen for the alternate route.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select the LSP, enter:
mpls traffic-eng-lsp <LSP-name>
3. To configure the administrative groups to exclude, enter:
[no] primary fast-reroute exclude-any <groupname>
Table 72: Variable definitions
Variable

98

Value

[no]

Deletes the specified group from the exclude-any list.

<groupname>

Specify the administrative group to be excluded from the fast


reroute set up.

Configuration MPLS

October 2010

Configuring Fast Reroute for constrained path LSP

Configuring fast reroute setup priority


Configure the setup priority to determine whether the alternate path can preempt an existing
LSP. The setup priority of the alternate path must be higher than the hold priority of an existing
LSP for the existing LSP to be preempted.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select the LSP, enter:
mpls traffic-eng-lsp <LSP-name>
3. To configure fast reroute setup priority, enter:
[no] primary fast-reroute setup-priority <0-7>
Table 73: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Sets the setup priority to the default value: 7 (lowest).

<0-7>

Specifies the fast-reroute setup priority, from highest priority


(0) to lowest priority (7)

Configuring fast reroute hold priority


Set the hold priority for the detour LSP
Configure the hold priority value for the alternate path. The hold priority determines the degree
to which the alternate path holds onto its reservation for a session after the path has been
set up successfully. When the hold priority is high, the existing path is less likely to give up its
reservation.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select the LSP, enter:
mpls traffic-eng-lsp <LSP-name>
3. To configure the hold priority, enter:
[no] primary fast-reroute hold-priority <0-7>

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Table 74: Variable definitions


Variable

Value

[no]

Sets the hold priority to the default value: 0 (highest).

<0-7>

Specifies the fast reroute hold priority, from highest priority


(0) to lowest priority (7)

Configuring fast reroute hop limit


Specify the fast reroute hop limit to place a limit on the number of hops in the alternate path.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select the LSP, enter:
mpls traffic-eng-lsp <LSP-name>
3. To configure the fast reroute hop limit, enter:
[no] primary fast-reroute hop-limit <1-255>
Table 75: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Sets the configured hop limit to the default value (255).

<1-255>

Specifies the maximum number of hops for fast reroute.

Configuring detour LSP identification method


Specify the detour LSP identification method, either path-specific or sender-template.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To choose RSVP configuration mode, enter:
router rsvp
3. To configure the LSP detour identification method, enter:
[no] detour-identification {path | sender-template}

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Table 76: Variable definitions


Variable

Value

[no]

Sets the detour LSP identification method to the default value


(sender-template).

path

Sets path specific detour LSP identification method. In this


method, a new RSVP object (DETOUR) is added to the PATH
message to differentiate it from the protected LSP's path
messages. Since, a detour has the same session object as
the protected LSP, it might share common network
resources.

sender-template

Sets sender-template specific detour LSP identification


method. In this method, a detour shares the RSVP Session
object and LSPID with the protected LSP and changes the
ingress IP address in the RSVP PATH message. According
to the RSVP resource sharing rules, this LSP can be merged
with the protected LSP as they have same session object.

Configuring RSVP-TE LSP properties


Configuring the extended tunnel ID in RSVP-TE messages
Configure the extended tunnel identifier used in RSVP messages. The extended tunnel ID
specifies a unique 4 octet identifier for all sessions. If no extended tunnel ID is specified, the
LSR-ID for the router is used as the extended tunnel ID for all LSPs.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select the LSP, enter:
mpls traffic-eng-lsp <LSP-name>
3. To configure the extended tunnel ID, enter:
[no] ext-tunnel-id <A.B.C.D>
Table 77: Variable definitions
Variable
[no]

Configuration MPLS

Value
Deletes the extended tunnel ID.

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Variable
<A.B.C.D>

Value
IPv4 representation for extended tunnel ID.

Configuring the creation and tear-down method for the RSVP-TE


LSP
Configure the method of creating and tearing down sessions (primary and secondary) when
attributes for the MPLS traffic-engineering LSP are modified.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select the LSP, enter:
mpls traffic-eng-lsp <LSP-name>
3. To configure the LSP update method, enter:
update-type {make-before-break | break-before-make }
Table 78: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

make-before-break

Specifies that a new LSP is created for each attribute update.


Once the new LSP becomes operational, the original LSP is
torn down. (Default value)

break-before-make

Specifies that, for each attribute update, the existing LSP is


torn down and then re-created with the new attributes.

Restarting the RSVP-TE LSP


If the creation of an RSVP-TE LSP fails, you must restart the LSP setup procedure.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select the LSP, enter:
mpls traffic-eng-lsp <LSP-name>
3. Restart the LSP, enter:

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traffic-eng-lsp-restart

Configuring hello exchanges with a specific neighbor


Use this command to explicitly specify a neighbor to exchange Hello messages with. Any Hello
messages from a neighbor that is not explicitly specified will be rejected. Use the no parameter
to remove an IPv4 neighbor from the system.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To choose RSVP configuration mode, enter:
router rsvp
3. To configure hello exchanges with a specific neighbor, enter:
[no] neighbor <neighbor-IP-address>
Table 79: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Removes an IPv4 neighbor from the system.

<neighbor-IP-address>

IPv4 address of the neighbor.

Configuring RSVP-TE global and interface properties


Configuring the RSVP-TE source address
Specify the source loopback address for IPv4 packets being sent out by the RSVP daemon.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To choose RSVP configuration mode, enter:
router rsvp
3. To specify the source address, enter, enter:

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[no] from <loopback-IP-address>


Table 80: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Deletes the specified loopback address.

<loopback-IP-address>

Loopback IPv4 address.

Configuring explicit-null labels


Enable explicit null labels on the router. By default, implicit null labels are advertised on the
egress router.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To choose RSVP configuration mode, enter:
router rsvp
3. To configure explicit null labels, enter:
[no] explicit-null
Table 81: Variable definitions
Variable
[no]

Value
Disable explicit null labels.

Configuring Penultimate-Hop-Popping
With the PHP state set to enabled on the router (the default state), an egress router sends
either implicit null or explicit null labels for LSPs. If you disable PHP using the no-php command,
the egress router sends neither implicit null nor explicit null labels. Rather, it sends nonreserved labels (labels from the label pool range allotted to RSVP) to the upstream router.
Use the show rsvp command to display the status of Penultimate-Hop-Popping.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To choose RSVP configuration mode, enter:

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router rsvp
3. To configure PHP, enter:
[php | no-php ]
Table 82: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

php

Re-enables penultimate-hop-popping on the router.

no-php

Disables penultimate-hop-popping on the router.

Configuring loop detection


Configure the loop detection mode to detect looping LSPs. Loop detection ensures that a loop
is detected while establishing a label switched path and before any data is passed over that
LSP.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To choose RSVP configuration mode, enter:
router rsvp
3. To enable or disable loop detection, enter:
[no-loop-detection | loop-detection]
Table 83: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

loop-detection

Enables loop detection.

no-loop-detection

Disables loop detection.

Configuring MPLS tunnel-mode


Configure the MPLS tunnel mode to determine the relationship between label EXP and IP
packet DSCP values.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:

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configure terminal
2. To specify the mpls tunnel-mode, enter, enter:
[no] mpls tunnel-mode {pipe | short-pipe | uniform}
Table 84: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Sets the MPLS tunnel mode to the default value (uniform).

pipe

Specifies that changes made to the EXP value on the


uppermost label are propagated to other MPLS labels but not
to the IP packet. Here, the DSCP value in the IP packet
remains unchanged, but the PHB is chosen based on the
removed EXP value.

short-pipe

Specifies that changes made to the EXP value on the


uppermost label are propagated to other MPLS labels but not
to the IP packet. Here, the DSCP value in the IP packet
remains unchanged, and the PHB is chosen based on the
removed EXP value.

uniform

Specifies that changes made to the EXP value on the


uppermost label are applied to all labels in the stack,
including the IP packet.

Enabling the receipt of Hello messages globally


Enable the receipt of Hello messages from peers connected through all RSVP interfaces.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To choose RSVP configuration mode, enter:
router rsvp
3. To configure the hello receipt, enter:
[no] hello-receipt
Table 85: Variable definitions
Variable
[no]

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Configuration MPLS

Value
Disables hello receipt.

October 2010

Configuring RSVP-TE global and interface properties

Enabling the receipt of Hello messages on the interface


Enable the receipt of Hello messages from peers connected through this interface.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select an MPLS interface, enter:
interface [ bundle <bundle-name> | ethernet <0/1-0/4>]
3. To configure the hello receipt, enter:
[no] rsvp hello-receipt
Table 86: Variable definitions
Variable
[no]

Value
Disables hello receipt.

Configuring the global Hello interval


Enable the sending of Hello packets on all interfaces and set the interval value between
successive Hello packets to neighbors.
Whenever a new router comes up, it sends out a hello packet to a specified, multicast address
announcing itself to the network. Hello messages are sent to the All Routers Multicast Group
(224.0.0.2). Receipt of a hello packet from another LSR creates a hello adjacency with that
LSR.
For optimum performance, set the hello-interval value to no more than one-third the holdtime value.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To choose RSVP configuration mode, enter:
router rsvp
3. To configure the hello interval, enter:
[no] hello-interval <1-65535>

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Table 87: Variable definitions


Variable
<1-65535>

Value
Specifies the hello interval in seconds.

Configuring the Hello interval and enabling Hello transmission on


the interface
Enable the sending of Hello packets on the interface and set the interval value between
successive Hello packets to neighbors.
For optimum performance, set the Hello interval value to no more than one-third the hold time
value.
The hello interval you configure for an interface overrides the global value.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select an MPLS interface, enter:
interface [ bundle <bundle-name> | ethernet <0/1-0/4>]
3. To configure the hello interval, enter:
[no] rsvp hello-interval <1-65535>
Table 88: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

<1-65535>

Specifies the hello interval in seconds.

[no]

Sets the hello interval to the default value (2 seconds).

Configuring the global hello timeout


Configure the global hello timeout to specify the interval that the LSR waits for a Hello message
from a connected peer before the LSR resets all sessions shared with this particular peer.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To choose RSVP configuration mode, enter:

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router rsvp
3. To configure the Hello timeout, enter:
[no] hello-timeout <1-65535>
Table 89: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Sets the Hello timeout to the default value (10 seconds).

<1-65535>

Specifies the Hello timeout in seconds.

Configuring the interface hello timeout


Configure the hello timeout on the interface to specify the interval that the interface waits for
a Hello message from a connected peer before the interface resets all sessions shared with
this particular peer.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select an MPLS interface, enter:
interface [ bundle <bundle-name> | ethernet <0/1-0/4>]
3. To configure the Hello timeout, enter:
[no] rsvp hello-timeout <1-65535>
Table 90: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Sets the hello timeout to the default value (10 seconds).

<1-65535>

Specifies the hello timeout in seconds.

Configuring the global RSVP keep multiplier


Configure the keep multiplier to set the constant for calculating a valid reservation lifetime for an
LSP for messages exchanged on this interface.
The refresh time and keep multiplier are two interrelated timing parameters used to calculate
the valid Reservation Lifetime for an LSP. Use the following formula to calculate the reservation
lifetime for an LSP: L >= (K + 0.5)* 1.5 * R K = keep-multiplier R = refresh timer Refresh
messages are sent periodically so that the neighbors do not timeout.

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Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To choose RSVP configuration mode, enter:
router rsvp
3. To configure the keep multiplier, enter:
[no] keep-multiplier <1-255>
Table 91: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Sets the keep multiplier to the default value (3).

<1-255>

Sets the keep multiplier value.

Configuring the interface RSVP keep multiplier


Configure the keep multiplier to set the constant for calculating a valid reservation lifetime for an
LSP for messages exchanged on this interface.
The refresh time and keep multiplier are two interrelated timing parameters used to calculate
the valid Reservation Lifetime for an LSP. Use the following formula to calculate the reservation
lifetime for an LSP: L >= (K + 0.5)* 1.5 * R K = keep-multiplier R = refresh timer Refresh
messages are sent periodically so that the neighbors do not timeout.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select an MPLS interface, enter:
interface [ bundle <bundle-name> | ethernet <0/1-0/4>]
3. To configure the keep multiplier, enter:
[no] rsvp keep-multiplier <1-255>
Table 92: Variable definitions
Variable

110

Value

[no]

Sets the keep multiplier to the global value.

<1-255>

Sets the keep multiplier value.

Configuration MPLS

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Configuring RSVP-TE global and interface properties

Configuring the global RSVP refresh time


The refresh time and keep multiplier are two interrelated timing parameters used to calculate
the valid Reservation Lifetime for an LSP. Refresh time regulates the interval between Refresh
messages which include Path and Reservation Request (Resv) messages. Refresh messages
are sent periodically so that the reservation does not timeout in the neighboring nodes. Each
sender and receiver host sends Path and Resv messages, downstream and upstream
respectively, along the paths.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To choose RSVP configuration mode, enter:
router rsvp
3. To configure the refresh time, enter:
[no] refresh-time <1-65535>
Table 93: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Sets the global RSVP refresh time to the default value.

<1-65535>

Sets the global RSVP refresh time.

Configuring the interface RSVP refresh time


The refresh time and keep multiplier are two interrelated timing parameters used to calculate
the valid Reservation Lifetime for an LSP. Refresh time regulates the interval between Refresh
messages which include Path and Reservation Request (Resv) messages. Refresh messages
are sent periodically so that the reservation does not timeout in the neighboring nodes. Each
sender and receiver host sends Path and Resv messages, downstream and upstream
respectively, along the paths.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select an MPLS interface, enter:
interface [ bundle <bundle-name> | ethernet <0/1-0/4>]
3. To configure the refresh time, enter:

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[no] rsvp refresh-time <1-65535>


Table 94: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Sets the interface RSVP refresh time to the global value.

<1-65535>

Sets the interface RSVP refresh time.

Configuring the global refresh reduction advertisement


Enable Refresh Reduction capability advertisement to allow the LSR to advertise the refresh
reduction capability.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To choose RSVP configuration mode, enter:
router rsvp
3. To configure refresh reduction advertisement, enter:
[no] refresh-reduction
Table 95: Variable definitions
Variable
[no]

Value
Disables refresh reduction capability advertisement.

Configuring the interface refresh reduction advertisement


Enable Refresh Reduction capability advertisement to allow an interface to advertise the
refresh reduction capability.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select an MPLS interface, enter:
interface [ bundle <bundle-name> | ethernet <0/1-0/4>]
3. To configure refresh reduction advertisement, enter:

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[no] rsvp refresh-reduction


Table 96: Variable definitions
Variable
[no]

Value
Disable refresh reduction capability advertisement on the
interface.

Configuring global message acknowledgement


Enable message acknowledgement to enable the reliable messaging form of refresh reduction
for all messages being sent to the neighbors that have been detected on the LSR.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To choose RSVP configuration mode, enter:
router rsvp
3. To configure message acknowledgement, enter:
[no] message-ack
Table 97: Variable definitions
Variable
[no]

Value
Disables message acknowledgement.

Configuring interface message acknowledgement


Enable message acknowledgement to enable the reliable messaging form of refresh reduction
for all messages being sent to the neighbors that have been detected on the specified interface.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select an MPLS interface, enter:
interface [ bundle <bundle-name> | ethernet <0/1-0/4>]
3. To configure message acknowledgement, enter:
[no] rsvp message-ack

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Table 98: Variable definitions


Variable
[no]

Value
Disables message acknowledgement.

Configuring the global acknowledgement wait timeout


Configure the acknowledgement wait timeout for reliable messaging for all neighbors detected
on the LSR.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To choose RSVP configuration mode, enter:
router rsvp
3. To configure the acknowledgement wait timeout, enter:
[no] ack-wait-timeout <1-65535>
Table 99: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Sets the acknowledgement wait timeout to the default value.


(10 seconds)

<1-65535>

Specifies the acknowledgement wait timeout value in


seconds.

Configuring the interface acknowledgement wait timeout


Configure the acknowledgement wait timeout for reliable messaging for all neighbors detected
on the specified interface.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select an MPLS interface, enter:
interface [ bundle <bundle-name> | ethernet <0/1-0/4>]
3. To configure the acknowledgement wait timeout

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Mapping routes to RSVP-TE LSPs

[no] rsvp ack-wait-timeout <1-65535>


Table 100: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Sets the acknowledgement wait timeout to the default value.


(10 seconds)

<1-65535>

Specifies the acknowledgement wait timeout value in


seconds.

Mapping routes to RSVP-TE LSPs


Map routes to a given RSVP-TE LSP to forward traffic to the LSP.
If the primary LSP goes down, all the mapped routes can automatically use a secondary LSP as
a backup for the primary LSP, if the secondary LSP is configured.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select the LSP, enter:
mpls traffic-eng-lsp <LSP-name>
3. To map a route to the LSP, enter:
[no] map-route <ipaddr/mask>
Table 101: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

[no]

Removes the route mapping.

<ipaddr/mask>

Specifies the IP address to be mapped. The IP address and


mask can be in format A.B.C.D X.X.X.X or A.B.C.D/X.

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Displaying RSVP-TE LSP configuration and statistics


Displaying session-related information for configured LSPs
Use this command to display the session-related information for configured LSPs.

Procedure steps
To display the session-related information for LSPs, enter:
show mpls traffic-eng-lsp session [up|down] [detail]
Table 102: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

up

Displays sessions that are currently operational.

down

Displays sessions that are currently not operational.

[detail]

Displays detailed session-related information.

Displaying LSP session count


Use this command to display the count of existing sessions on the router.

Procedure steps
To display the LSP session count, enter:
show mpls traffic-eng-lsp session count

Displaying session-related information for egress router


Use this command to display the session-related information for an egress router.

Procedure steps
To display the session-related information for egress router, enter:

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Displaying RSVP-TE LSP configuration and statistics

show mpls traffic-eng-lsp session egress [up|down] [detail]


Table 103: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

up

Displays sessions that are currently operational.

down

Displays sessions that are currently not operational.

[detail]

Displays detailed session-related information.

Displaying session-related information for specific egress router


Use this command to display the session-related information for a specified egress router.

Procedure steps
To display the session-related information for the specified router, enter:
show mpls traffic-eng-lsp session egress <A.B.C.D>
Table 104: Variable definitions
Variable
<A.B.C.D>

Value
IPv4 address of the router being specified as the egress
router.

Displaying session-related information for ingress router


Use this command to display the session-related information for an ingress router.

Procedure steps
To display the session-related information for ingress router, enter:
show mpls traffic-eng-lsp session ingress [up|down] [detail]
Table 105: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

up

Displays sessions that are currently operational.

down

Displays sessions that are currently not operational.

[detail]

Displays detailed session-related information.

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Displaying session-related information for specific ingress router


Use this command to display the session-related information for a specified ingress router.

Procedure steps
To display the session-related information for the specified router, enter:
show mpls traffic-eng-lsp session ingress <A.B.C.D>
Table 106: Variable definitions
Variable
<A.B.C.D>

Value
IPv4 address of the router being specified as the ingress
router.

Displaying session-related information for specific sessions


Use this command to display the information only for sessions with a specified name.

Procedure steps
To display the session-related information for specific sessions, enter:
show mpls traffic-eng-lsp session <lsp-name> [primary |
secondary]
Table 107: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

<lsp-name>

Specifies the name of the LSP to be displayed.

primary

Displays primary sessions.

secondary

Displays secondary sessions.

Displaying session-related information for transit router


Use this command to display the session-related information for the transit or intermediate
router.

Procedure steps
To display the session-related information for specific sessions, enter:

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Displaying RSVP-TE configuration and statistics

show mpls traffic-eng-lsp session transit [up | down] [detail]


Table 108: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

up

Displays sessions that are currently operational.

down

Displays sessions that are currently not operational.

[detail]

Displays detailed session-related information.

Clearing traffic-engineered LSP data


Use this command to clear data for MPLS traffic-engineered LSPs.

Procedure steps
To clear enter:
clear mpls traffic-eng-lsp [ingress | non-ingress | all | <LSPname>]
Table 109: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

ingress

Clears data for ingress LSP.

non-ingress

Clears data for non-ingress LSP.

all

Clears data for all configured LSPs.

<LSP-name>

Clears data for the specifies LSP.

Displaying RSVP-TE configuration and statistics


Displaying RSVP-TE interface information
Procedure steps
To display the RSVP-TE interface information, enter:

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show rsvp interface <interface-name>


Table 110: Variable definitions
Variable
<interface-name>

Value
Displays RSVP-TE information for the specified interface. If
this value is not specified, information for all interfaces is
displayed.

Displaying RSVP-TE neighbors


Procedure steps
To display the list of IPv4 RSVP neighbors, enter:
show rsvp neighbor <A.B.C.D>
Table 111: Variable definitions
Variable
<A.B.C.D>

Value
Specifies the IPv4 address of the neighbor.

Displaying next-hop data cached in RSVP-TE


Procedure steps
To display the current next-hops being cached by RSVP-TE
show rsvp nexthop-cache

Displaying RSVP-TE statistics


Use this command to display the counts for various messages exchanged by the daemon. This
displays the list of packet types, the number of sent packets and the number of received
packets.

Procedure steps
To display the RSVP-TE statistics, enter:

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Displaying RSVP-TE configuration and statistics

show rsvp statistics

Displaying RSVP-TE summary refresh data


Procedure steps
To display the summary refresh data, enter:
show rsvp summary-refresh

Displaying RSVP-TE version


Use this command to display the version of the RSVP daemon. Current RSVP version is 1.

Procedure steps
To display the RSVP version, enter:
show rsvp version

Displaying traffic engineering path


Use this command to display the configured MPLS traffic engineering paths and their
configured hops. Specify the path name to show hops related to a specific path. If no path
name is specified all the mpls traffic engineering paths are displayed.

Procedure steps
To display the traffic engineering path, enter:
show mpls traffic-eng-path <path-name>
Table 112: Variable definitions
Variable
<path-name>

Value
Specifies the path name.

Displaying MPLS tunnel mode


Use this command to display the tunnel mode information.

Procedure steps
To display the MPLS tunnel mode, enter:

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show mpls tunnel-mode

Displaying all configured MPLS administrative groups


Procedure steps
To display all the configured administrative groups, enter:
show mpls admin-groups

Clearing RSVP sessions


Procedure steps
To clear RSVP sessions, enter:
clear rsvp session {<session-tunnel-id> | all}
Table 113: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

<session-tunnel-id>

Specifies the session tunnel ID to clear.

all

Clears all RSVP sessions configured.

Clearing RSVP statistics


Procedure steps
To clear all RSVP statistics, enter:
clear rsvp statistics

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Chapter 10: MPLS Pseudowire configuration


Configure an MPLS Pseudowire to provide a virtual point-to-point connection that can connect your
Ethernet or PPP networks over an MPLS tunnel.

Pseudowire configuration procedures


The following task flow shows you the sequence of procedures you perform to configure an
MPLS pseudowire. To link to the referenced procedures, see Pseudowire configuration task
navigation on page 125

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MPLS Pseudowire configuration

Figure 22: Pseudowire configuration procedures

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Configuring a pseudowire Layer 2 virtual circuit

Pseudowire configuration task navigation


Configuring a pseudowire Layer 2 virtual circuit on page 125
Binding an Ethernet interface to a Layer 2 virtual circuit on page 126
Binding a VLAN interface to a Layer 2 virtual circuit on page 126
Binding a WAN interface to a Layer 2 virtual circuit on page 127
Static LSP configuration on page 47
LDP LSP configuration on page 51
RSVP-TE LSP configuration on page 77
Configuring a static FTN entry for ingress virtual circuit on page 128
Configuring a static ILM entry for egress virtual circuit on page 128
Enabling LDP at the router level on page 54
Configuring targeted LDP peer adjacency on page 54

Configuring a pseudowire Layer 2 virtual circuit


Creating a Layer 2 virtual circuit
Create a Layer 2 virtual circuit.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To configure a Layer 2 virtual circuit, enter:
[no] mpls l2-circuit <VC-name> <VC-ID> <peer-ip> [<VCgroupname>]
Table 114: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

<VC-name>

Virtual circuit name.

<VC-ID>

Virtual circuit ID: 1-1000000.

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Variable

Value

<peer-ip>

IPv4 address for the virtual circuit end point.

[<VC-groupname>]

Virtual circuit group name identifier. Not currently supported.

Binding an Ethernet interface to a Layer 2 virtual circuit


Bind an interface (attachment circuit) to an MPLS Layer 2 virtual circuit. This specifies the
source interface where virtual circuit traffic is sent and received. You can choose to bind WAN
bundles running HDLC or PPP or any Ethernet ports (including ports on Ethernet modules).
However, on the Secure Router 4134, the virtual circuit peer must be reachable through a WAN
interface or a chassis Ethernet port, otherwise, the pseudowire cannot be established. The
Avaya Secure Router 2330 has no such limitation.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select the interface, enter:
interface ethernet <slot/port>
3. To configure the interface as a Layer 2 switchport, enter:
switchport
4. To configure the Layer 2 interface mode as L2VPN, enter:
switchport mode l2vpn
5. To bind the interface to the Layer 2 circuit, enter:
mpls l2-circuit <VC-name>
6. Configure the encapsulation for the bound interface:
encapsulation {ethernet | vlan}

Binding a VLAN interface to a Layer 2 virtual circuit


Use the following procedure to bind a VLAN interface to a Layer 2 virtual circuit.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:

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Binding a WAN interface to a Layer 2 virtual circuit

configure terminal
2. To select the interface, enter:
interface vlan vlan<vid>
3. To bind the interface to the Layer 2 circuit, enter:
mpls l2-circuit <VC-name>
4. Configure the encapsulation for the bound interface:
encapsulation {ethernet | vlan}

Binding a WAN interface to a Layer 2 virtual circuit


Bind an interface (attachment circuit) to an MPLS Layer 2 virtual circuit. This specifies the
source interface where virtual circuit traffic is sent and received. In addition to Ethernet ports,
with the Secure Router 2330/4134, you can bind WAN bundles running HDLC or PPP.
To bind a bundle to the Layer 2 virtual circuit, you must first encapsulate the bundle with HDLC
or PPP. Then, after you bind the bundle to the circuit, you must also set the encapsulation
for the bound WAN interface to HDLC or PPP, as required.

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To select the interface, enter:
interface bundle <wan-bundle>
3. Configure a link for the bundle:
link [t1 | e1 | ct3 | ds3 | serial | hssi] <slot/port>
4. Configure the encapsulation for the bundle:
encapsulation {hdlc | ppp}
5. To bind the interface to the Layer 2 circuit, enter:
mpls l2-circuit <VC-name>
6. To configure the encapsulation for the bound virtual circuit interface, enter:
encapsulation {hdlc | ppp}

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Configuring a static FTN entry for ingress virtual circuit


Create an MPLS Layer 2 Virtual Circuit static FTN entry for an interface. Note: The interface
must be bound to the Virtual Circuit ID specified before this command is executed

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To configure a static FTN entry for a Layer 2 virtual circuit, enter:
[no] mpls static-l2-circuit-ftn <VC-ID> <label-out> <peerip> <incoming-l2-if-name> <outgoing-if-name>
Table 115: Variable definitions
Variable

Value

<VC-ID>

Virtual circuit ID: 1-1000000.

<label-out>

Outgoing label for the FEC.

<peer-ip>

IPv4 address for the virtual circuit peer.

<incoming-l2-if-name>

Specifies the incoming Layer 2 interface name.

<outgoing-if-name>

Specifies the outgoing MPLS tunnel interface name.

Configuring a static ILM entry for egress virtual circuit


Use this command to create an MPLS Layer 2 Virtual Circuit static ILM entry in the ILM table
to which the incoming interface specified is bound. Upon receipt of a labeled packet on an
MPLS-enabled router, a lookup is done based on the incoming label in the ILM table. If a match
is found, the packet is forwarded directly to the bound Layer 2 interface (without further
analysis).

Procedure steps
1. To enter the configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To configure a static ILM entry for a Layer 2 virtual circuit, enter:
[no] mpls static-l2-circuit-ilm <VC-ID> <label-in> <peer-ip>
<incoming-if-name> <outgoing-l2-if-name>

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Displaying the pseudowire configuration and statistics

Table 116: Variable definitions


Variable

Value

<VC-ID>

Virtual circuit ID: 1-1000000.

<label-in>

Incoming VC label: 1040-2063.

<peer-ip>

IPv4 address for the virtual circuit peer.

<incoming-if-name>

Specifies the incoming MPLS tunnel interface name.

<outgoing-l2-if-name>

Specifies the outgoing Layer 2 interface name.

Displaying the pseudowire configuration and statistics


Displaying the static Layer 2-circuit FTN entry
Display the static Layer 2-circuit FTN entry.

Procedure steps
To display the static Layer 2-circuit FTN entry, enter:
show mpls static-l2-circuit-ftn

Displaying the static L2-circuit ILM entry


Display the static L2-circuit ILM entry.

Procedure steps
To display the static Layer 2-circuit ILM entry, enter:
show mpls static-l2-circuit-ilm

Displaying the Layer 2 virtual circuit summary information


Display the Layer 2 virtual circuit summary information.

Procedure steps
To display the Layer 2-circuit virtual circuit summary, enter:

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show ldp mpls-l2-circuit [<VC-ID>] [detail]

Displaying Layer 2 virtual circuit data


Use this command to display the MPLS Layer 2 Virtual Circuit data.

Procedure steps
To display the Layer 2 virtual circuit data, enter:
show mpls l2-circuit [<VC-name>]

Displaying Layer 2 virtual circuit group data


Use this command to display the MPLS Layer 2 Virtual Circuit group data.

Procedure steps
To display the Layer 2 virtual circuit group data
show mpls l2-circuit-group [<VC-group-name>]

Displaying Layer 2 virtual circuit statistics


Display the Layer 2 virtual circuit statistics.

Procedure steps
To display the Layer 2 virtual circuit statistics, enter:
show mpls stats-vc

Displaying Layer 2 virtual circuit table


Display the Layer 2 virtual circuit table.

Procedure steps
To display the Layer 2 virtual circuit table, enter:
show mpls table-vc

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Chapter 11: Common procedures


The following sections describe common procedures that you use while configuring MPLS.
Displaying MPLS-enabled interfaces on page 131
Displaying interface statistics on page 131
Displaying originating LSP statistics on page 131
Displaying MPLS forwarding table on page 132
Displaying incoming label map table on page 132

Displaying MPLS-enabled interfaces


Use this command to display the summarized information of the MPLS-enabled interfaces.

Procedure steps
To display the MPLS-enabled interfaces, enter:
show mpls interface

Displaying interface statistics


Use this command to display the MPLS interface statistics.

Procedure steps
To display the interface statistics, enter:
show mpls stats-interface

Displaying originating LSP statistics


Use this command to display the originating LSP statistics

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Procedure steps
To display the originating LSP statistics, enter:
show mpls stats-lsp

Displaying MPLS forwarding table


Use this command to display all the LSPs originating from this router. It also displays codes
indicating the selected FTN (FEC to Next-Hop-Label-Forwarding-Entry).

Procedure steps
To display the MPLS forwarding table, enter:
show mpls table-forwarding

Displaying incoming label map table


Use this command to display the MPLS Incoming Label Map table.

Procedure steps
To display the incoming label map table, enter:
show mpls table-ilm

Clearing MPLS statistics


Use this command to clear MPLS statistics.

Procedure steps
To clear MPLS statistics, enter:
clear mpls statistics [ftn | ilm | interface | lsp | vc]
Table 117: Variable definitions
Variable

132

Value

ftn

Clears FTN Statistics

ilm

Clears ILM Statistics

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Clearing MPLS statistics

Variable

Value

interface

Clears MPLS Interface Statistics

lsp

Clears Originating LSP Statistics

vc

Clears VC Statistics

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Chapter 12: Configuration examples

Static LSP configuration


The following figure shows a sample static LSP configuration.

Figure 23: Static LSP configuration

Refer to the following sections for instructions to configure the static LSPs shown in this
example.

Static LSP configuration on Secure Router 4134 1


Configure the LSPs on Secure Router 4134 1.

Procedure steps
1. To enter configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To configure an IP address for Ethernet 0/2, enter:

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interface ethernet 0/2 ip address 192.168.1.1 16 exit


3. To configure an MPLS static FTN entry on Secure Router 4134 1:
mpls static-ftn 192.168.2.0/24 1000 192.168.0.1 ethernet0/2
4. Configure an MPLS static ILM entry on Secure Router 4134 1:
mpls static-ilm 1020 ethernet0/2 swap 1030 192.168.2.2
ethernet5/4
5. To display the configured static FTN entry, enter:
show mpls static-ftn
6. To display the configured static ILM entry, enter:
show mpls static-ilm

LSP configuration on Secure Router 4134 2


Configure the LSPs on Secure Router 4134 2.

Procedure steps
1. To enter configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To configure an IP address for Ethernet 0/3, enter:
interface ethernet 0/3 ip address 192.168.0.1 16 exit
3. To configure an MPLS static FTN entry on Secure Router 4134 2, enter:
mpls static-ftn 192.168.3.0/24 1020 192.168.1.1 ethernet0/3
4. To configure an MPLS static ILM entry on Secure Router 4134 2, enter:
mpls static-ilm 1000 ethernet0/2 swap 1010 192.168.3.2
ethernet5/5
5. To display the configured static FTN entry, enter:
show mpls static-ftn
6. To display the configured static ILM entry, enter:
show mpls static-ilm

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LDP-based LSP configuration

LDP-based LSP configuration

Figure 24: LDP-based LSP

Procedure steps
1. Configuring loopback address:
interface loopback 0
ip address 192.168.0.10 32
exit
2. Configure the router-id:
router-id 192.168.0.10
3. Configure LDP at router level:
router ldp explicit-null exit
4. Configure LDP at interface level
interface bundle WAN1
link t1 2/1
encapsulation ppp
ip address 192.168.0.1 16
5. Enable MPLS at interface level:
mpls ip
6. Enable LDP at interface level:

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Configuration examples

mpls protocol-ldp
exit
7. Configure OSPF:
router ospf 1
redistribute connected
network 192.168.0.0/16 area 0
exit

RSVP-TE LSP configuration


The following figure shows a sample RSVP-TE configuration.

Figure 25: RSVP-TE LSP configuration

Refer to the following sections for instructions on how to configure the RSVP-TE LSPs for the
SR4134 1 and SR4134 2 shown in the preceding figure.

LSP1 configuration on SR4134 1


Configure LSP1 on SR4134 1.

Procedure steps
1. To enter configuration mode, enter:

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RSVP-TE LSP configuration

configure terminal
2. To configure a loopback address, enter:
interface loopback 0
ip address 192.168.1.10 255.255.255.255
exit
3. To configure the router-id, enter:
router-id 192.168.1.10
4. To configure RSVP at the router level, enter:
router rsvp
exit
5. To configure interface properties for LSP1, enter:
interface ethernet 0/2
ip address 192.168.1.1 16
6. To enable MPLS at the interface level, enter:
mpls ip
7. To enable RSVP at the interface level, enter:
mpls protocol-rsvp
exit
8. To configure RSVP LSP1, enter:
mpls traffic-eng-lsp LSP1
9. To specify the source address (usually the router-id), enter:
from 192.168.1.10
10. To specify the tunnel destination address, enter:
to 192.168.0.21
11. To map a route (FEC) to the LSP, enter:
map-route 10.3.0.0 16
exit
12. To configure OSPF on the router, enter:
router ospf 1
redistribute connected
network 192.168.1.0/16 area 0
exit

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Configuration examples

LSP2 configuration on SR4134 2


Configure LSP2 on SR4134 2.

Procedure steps
1. To enter configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To configure a loopback address, enter:
interface loopback 1
ip address 192.168.0.21 255.255.255.255
exit
3. To configure the router-id, enter:
router-id 192.168.0.21
4. To configure RSVP at router level, enter:
router rsvp
exit
5. To configure interface properties for LSP2, enter:
interface ethernet 0/3
ip address 192.168.0.1 16
6. To enable MPLS at the interface level, enter:
mpls ip
7. To enable RSVP at the interface level, enter:
mpls protocol-rsvp
exit
8. To configure RSVP LSP2, enter:
mpls traffic-eng-lsp LSP2
9. To specify the source address (usually the router-id), enter:
from 192.168.0.21
10. To specify the tunnel destination address, enter:
to 192.168.1.10
11. To map route to the LSP, enter:
map-route 10.3.1.0 16

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RSVP-TE LSP configuration

exit
12. To configure OSPF on the router, enter:
router ospf 2
redistribute connected
network 192.168.0.0/16 area 1
exit

Configuring fast reroute for SR4134 1


Enable fast reroute to recover from the failure of a node in the path of LSP1.

Procedure steps
1. To enter configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To configure the RSVP LSP with one-to-one fast reroute:
mpls traffic-eng-lsp LSP1
primary fast-reroute protection one-to-one
exit

Configuring fast reroute for SR4134 2


Enable fast reroute to recover from the failure of a node in the path of LSP2.

Procedure steps
1. To enter configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To configure the RSVP LSP with one-to-one fast reroute:
mpls traffic-eng-lsp LSP2
primary fast-reroute protection one-to-one
exit

Configuring policy-based redirection into an RSVP-TE LSP


Configure policy-based redirection to direct traffic entering the Secure Router 4134 1 to LSP1.

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Procedure steps
1. To enter configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To configure an Ethernet module QoS policy map and class for redirection, enter:
qos module
policy-map rsvp-lsp
class-map pbr-interface
3. To configure rules to classify packets to be re-directed to the specified interface,
enter:
match ipv4 src-address 10.1.2.0/24
4. To redirect packets matching the class to a specific RSVP LSP, enter:
pbr-redirect lsp LSP1
pop
5. To apply the policy map to an Ethernet module interface, enter:
interface ethernet 6/12
qos module
service-policy input rsvp-lsp
6. To display the policy configuration, enter:
show qos module policy-map rsvp-lsp

Ethernet over RSVP-TE pseudowire configuration


The following figure shows a sample configuration for Ethernet over RSVP-TE LSP
pseudowire.

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Ethernet over RSVP-TE pseudowire configuration

Figure 26: Pseudowire over RSVP

Refer to the following sections for instructions to configure the pseudowire connections shown
in this example.

Ethernet over pseudowire configuration for SR4134 1


Procedure steps
1. Configure RSVP as stated in the preceding RSVP LSP example to establish a PSN
tunnel.
2. To configure an MPLS pseudowire virtual circuit, enter:
mpls l2-circuit PW1 100 192.168.0.21
3. To configure an Ethernet interface as an attachment circuit for the MPLS virtual
circuit, enter:
interface ethernet 5/4
switchport
switchport mode l2vpn
mpls l2-circuit PW1
4. To specify the encapsulation for the virtual circuit, enter:
encapsulation ethernet
exit
exit

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Ethernet over pseudowire configuration for SR4134 2


Procedure steps
1. Configure RSVP as stated in the preceding RSVP LSP example to establish a PSN
tunnel.
2. To configure an MPLS pseudowire virtual circuit, enter:
mpls l2-circuit PW1 100 192.168.1.10
3. To configure an Ethernet interface as an attachment circuit for the MPLS virtual
circuit, enter:
interface ethernet 5/5
switchport
switchport mode l2vpn
mpls l2-circuit PW1
4. To specify the encapsulation for the virtual circuit, enter:
encapsulation ethernet
exit
exit

PPP over RSVP-TE pseudowire configuration


The following figure shows a sample configuration for PPP over RSVP-TE LSP pseudowire.

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PPP over RSVP-TE pseudowire configuration

Figure 27: Pseudowire over RSVP

Refer to the following sections for instructions to configure the pseudowire connections shown
in this example.

PPP over pseudowire configuration for SR4134 1


Procedure steps
1. Configure RSVP as stated in the preceding RSVP LSP example to establish a PSN
tunnel.
2. To configure an MPLS L2-circuit Pseudowire, enter:
mpls l2-circuit PW1 100 192.168.0.21
3. To configure the WAN1 PPP bundle interface as the attachment circuit interface,
enter:
interface bundle WAN1
link t1 2/1
encapsulation ppp
mpls l2-circuit PW1
4. To specify the encapsulation for the virtual circuit to PPP, enter:
encapsulation ppp
exit
exit

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PPP over pseudowire configuration for SR4134 2


Procedure steps
1. Configure RSVP as stated in the preceding RSVP LSP example to establish a PSN
tunnel.
2. To configure an MPLS L2-circuit PW:
mpls l2-circuit PW1 100 192.168.1.10
3. To configure the WAN2 PPP bundle interface as the attachment circuit interface,
enter:
interface bundle WAN2
link t1 2/2
encapsulation ppp
mpls l2-circuit PW1
4. To specify the encapsulation for the virtual circuit to PPP, enter:
encapsulation ppp
exit
exit

HDLC over MPLS pseudowire


The following figure shows a sample configuration for HDLC over RSVP-TE LSP pseudowire.

Figure 28: HDLC over MPLS pseudowires

A pseudowire is setup between SR 2330/4134 1 and SR 2330/4134 2. The RSVP-TE LSPs


are used between the two routers, acting as the PSN. In SR 2330/4134 1, traffic from source

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HDLC over MPLS pseudowire

interface WAN bundle (WAN1) is tunneled through PW1 and LSP1 to SR 2330/4134 2. The
PW1 and LSP1 use the chassis Ethernet Interface 0/4 for signaling.

HDLC over pseudowire configuration for SR4134 1


Procedure steps
1. To enter configuration mode, enter:
configure terminal
2. To configure the loopback interface, enter:
interface loopback 0
ip address 1.1.1.1/32
exit
3. To configure the router ID, enter:
router-id 1.1.1.1
4. To enable LDP, enter:
router ldp exit
5. To enable RSVP, enter:
router rsvp exit
6. To configure an MPLS L2-circuit PW, enter:
mpls l2-circuit PW1 100 2.2.2.2 control-word
7. To configure the WAN interface as the attachment circuit interface, enter:
interface bundle WAN1
link t1 2/1
encapsulation hdlc
mpls-l2-circuit PW1
encapsulation hdlc
exit
8. To configure the Ethernet interface IP address and enable MPLS and RSVP on the
interface, enter:
interface ethernet 0/4
ip address 90.2.15.100/16
mpls ip
mpls protocol-rsvp

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exit
9. To configure RSVP LSP1, enter:
mpls label-switching-lsp LSP1
to 2.2.2.2
exit
10. To configure OSPF, enter:
router ospf 1
network redistribute connected
network 90.2.0.0/16 area 0
exit

Static L2VPN pseudowire configuration


The following figure shows a sample static pseudowire configuration for PPP over MPLS.

Figure 29: Static pseudowire

Refer to the following sections for instructions on how to configure the static pseudowire
connections shown in this example.

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Static L2VPN pseudowire configuration

SR4134 1 configuration
Procedure steps
1. Configure an underlying LSP to SR4134 2, either using RSVP-TE, LDP, or static
LSP, as described in the preceding examples.
2. To configure an MPLS Layer 2-circuit PW, enter:
mpls l2-circuit PW1 100 192.168.0.21
3. To configure the WAN1 PPP bundle interface, enter:
interface bundle WAN1
link t1 2/2
encapsulation ppp
exit
4. To configure an MPLS static Layer 2-VPN FTN entry, enter:
mpls static-l2-circuit-ftn 100 1050 192.168.0.21 WAN1
ethernet0/2
5. To configure an MPLS static Layer 2-VPN ILM entry, enter:
mpls static-l2-circuit-ilm 100 1040 192.168.0.21 ethernet0/2
WAN1
6. To display the configured static Layer 2-VPN FTN entry, enter:
show mpls static-l2-circuit-ftn
7. To display the configured static Layer 2-VPN ILM entry, enter:
show mpls static-l2-circut-ilm

SR4134 2 configuration
Procedure steps
1. Configure an underlying LSP to SR4134 1, either using RSVP-TE, LDP, or static
LSP, as described in the preceding examples.
2. To configure an MPLS Layer 2-circuit PW, enter:
mpls l2-circuit PW1 100 192.168.1.10
3. To configure the WAN2 PPP bundle, enter:
interface bundle WAN2
link t1 2/2

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encapsulation ppp
exit
4. To configure an MPLS static Layer 2-VPN FTN entry, enter:
mpls static-l2-circuit-ftn 100 1040 192.168.0.10 WAN2
ethernet0/3
5. To configure an MPLS static Layer 2-VPN ILM entry, enter:
mpls static-l2-circuit-ilm 100 1050 192.168.0.10 ethernet0/3
WAN2
6. To display the configured static Layer 2-VPN FTN entry, enter:
show mpls static-l2-circuit-ftn
7. To display the configured static Layer 2-VPN ILM entry, enter:
show mpls static-l2-circut-ilm

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