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YOUNG WOMENS HEALTH:

GLOBAL ATTITUDES TOWARDS


HEALTH, FITNESS AND
WELLBEING AMONG THE
UNDER 30S AND MARKET
IMPACT
Euromonitor International
September 2015

YOUNG W OMENS HEALTH: GLOBAL ATTITUDES T OW ARDS HEALTH, FITNE SS AND W ELLBEING AMO NG THE UNDER
30S AND MARKET IMPACT

LIST OF CONTENTS AND TABLES


Executive Summary ..................................................................................................................... 1
General Health.......................................................................................................................... 1
Health Prevention and Wellbeing.............................................................................................. 1
Smoking and Drinking............................................................................................................... 2
Attitudes Towards Fitness ........................................................................................................ 3
Eating Habits and Nutrition ....................................................................................................... 4
Market Trends .......................................................................................................................... 6
Outlook ..................................................................................................................................... 8
Summary 1

Young Womens Health: Opportunities For Marketers ................................. 9

Introduction................................................................................................................................. 10
Demographics ........................................................................................................................ 10
Table 1

Number of Women Aged 15-29 by Country 2009/2014.............................. 10

Later Motherhood ................................................................................................................... 11


Chart 1

Age of Women at First Childbirth in Selected Markets 2014 ...................... 12

Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends Survey ................................................ 13


General Health ........................................................................................................................... 13
Perception of Personal Health ................................................................................................ 13
Chart 2
Chart 3

Young Women: Perception of Personal Health by Age Group 2013 .......... 13


Young Women: Perception of Personal Health by Country 2013 ............... 14

Health Prevention ................................................................................................................... 15


Chart 4
Chart 5
Summary 2
Table 2

Young Women: Frequency of Taking Health Supplements/Vitamins


by Age Group 2013 .................................................................................... 15
Young Women: Frequency of Taking Health Supplements/Vitamins
by Country 2013 ......................................................................................... 16
Vitamins and Dietary Supplements Beneficial to Women ........................... 18
Global Sales of Health Supplements 2009/2014 ........................................ 19

Wellbeing ................................................................................................................................ 20
Chart 6
Chart 7

Young Women: Frequency of Participating in Stress-Lowering


Activities by Age Group 2013 ..................................................................... 20
Young Women: Frequency of Participating in Stress-Reduction
Activities by Country 2013 .......................................................................... 21

SpA Trends ............................................................................................................................. 22


Table 3

Revenues from Spas in Key Markets 2009/2014 ....................................... 23

Smoking.................................................................................................................................. 24
Chart 8
Chart 9
Table 4

Young Women: Frequency of Smoking Cigarettes by Age Group 2013..... 24


Young Women: Frequency of Smoking Cigarettes by Country 2013 ......... 25
Female Smoking Prevalence by Country 2009/2014 ................................. 27

Alcohol .................................................................................................................................... 28
Chart 10
Chart 11

Young Women: Frequency of Consuming Alcohol at Home by Age


Group 2013 ................................................................................................ 28
Young Women: Frequency of Consuming Alcohol Away From Home
by Age Group 2013 .................................................................................... 29

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Chart 12
Chart 13

Young Women: Frequency of Consuming Alcohol at Home by


Country 2013.............................................................................................. 31
Young Women: Frequency of Consuming Alcohol Away From Home
by Country 2013 ......................................................................................... 32

Physical Activity.......................................................................................................................... 34
Chart 14
Chart 15
Table 5
Table 6

Young Women: Frequency of Taking Part in Physical Exercise by Age


Group 2013 ................................................................................................ 35
Young Women: Frequency of Taking Part in Physical Exercise by
Country 2013.............................................................................................. 37
Young Women: Frequency of Sports Participation by Age Group 2013 ..... 39
Young Women: Frequency of Sports Participation by Country 2013.......... 40

Womens Sportswear.............................................................................................................. 41
Table 7

Sales of Womens Sports Apparel in Key Markets 2013/2014 ................... 44

Fitness Apps and Wearable Tech ........................................................................................... 44


Sports Nutrition ....................................................................................................................... 46
Table 8

Global Sports Nutrition Sales 2009/2014 ................................................... 47

Obesity ................................................................................................................................... 47
Chart 16

Female Obesity by Country 2009/2014 ...................................................... 48

Weight Management............................................................................................................... 48
Chart 17
Chart 18

Young Women: Weight Management by Age Group 2013......................... 50


Young Women: Weight Management by Country 2013 ............................. 50

the Weight Management Market ............................................................................................. 51


Table 9

Global Sales of Weight Management by Type 2009/2014 ......................... 53

Special Diets ........................................................................................................................... 53


Chart 19
Chart 20
Table 10

Young Women: Food Intolerances by Age Group 2013 ............................. 54


Young Women: Food Intolerances by Country 2013 .................................. 54
Global Sales of Food Intolerance Products 2009/2014 .............................. 56

Meat Avoidance ...................................................................................................................... 56


Chart 21
Chart 22

Young Women: Dietary Preferences by Age Group 2013 .......................... 57


Young Women: Dietary Preferences by Country 2013 ............................... 57

Food Attributes ....................................................................................................................... 58


Chart 23
Chart 24
Chart 25

Young Women: Food Factors Sought by Age Group 2013 ........................ 60


Young Women: Sought-For Food Attributes on Food Labels by
Country 2013.............................................................................................. 61
Young Women: Ingredients on Food Labels Sought by Country 2013 ....... 62

Trends in Health and Wellness Products ................................................................................ 63


Table 11

The Global Market for Selected Healthy Food and Drinks 2009/2014........ 65

Outlook ....................................................................................................................................... 66
Chart 26
Chart 27
Table 12
Table 13

Forecast Age of Women at First Childbirth in Selected Markets


2014/2019 .................................................................................................. 67
Forecast Mean Female BMI in Selected Markets 2014/2019 ..................... 68
Forecast Global Sales of Weight Management Products 2014/2019 ......... 69
Forecast Global Sales of Selected Health Foods and Drinks
2014/2019 .................................................................................................. 71

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Table 14

Forecast Global Sales of Selected Health Foods and Drinks


2014/2019 .................................................................................................. 72

Appendix .................................................................................................................................... 74
Questions Included the Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends Survey of 2013:74

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YOUNG WOMENS HEALTH: GLOBAL


ATTITUDES TOWARDS HEALTH,
FITNESS AND WELLBEING AMONG
THE UNDER 30S AND MARKET
IMPACT
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
General Health
Although only a slow-rising demographic, young women are becoming more economically
empowered, due to their increasing tendency to further their education, gain professional
employment and delay marriage and starting a family often until their 30s or 40s.
Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey of 2013 found that, on the whole,
under 30s females perceive themselves to be in good health. 71% rated their health as 8-11
on a scale of 1-11, while just 6% rated their health as 1-4.
French and Brazilian women were most likely to consider themselves to be very healthy, with
41% of French and 40% of Brazilian women under 30 years giving their health a 10 or 11 on
the scale.
Despite having the lowest female obesity rate, the longest life expectancies and among the
healthiest diets in the world, Japan scored lowest in terms of the number of under 30s
females perceiving themselves to be very healthy (15%).
Young women in the UK and Germany were also among the least likely to say they were very
healthy (18% and 19%, respectively). This may be related to the high levels of overweight and
obesity in these two countries.

Health Prevention and Wellbeing


The Global Consumer Trends survey revealed that taking health supplements is very
common among under 30s females. As many as 71% of this group said they take health
supplements or vitamins, although a below average 15% take them on a daily basis.
Consumption of health supplements seems to increase with age, as only 67% of females in
the younger segment (aged 15-19 years) take them at all, and only 12% of this younger age
group takes them daily.
According to the survey, American women take the most supplements, with 36% taking them
near daily. Health supplements are also popular in the UK, where 24% of under 30s females
take them almost every day.
In contrast, a mere 6% of French women said they take health supplements or vitamins
almost every day. This reflects the fact that French consumers generally have a highly
balanced diet, and may not feel the need to supplement it with extra vitamins.
Studies show that stress, depression, anxiety and mental fatigue are becoming increasingly
common among young women, as they struggle to cope with the ever faster pace of modern
lifestyles sometimes combining a career with young children.

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Factors such as urbanisation, a rise in the number of women holding professional positions
and the always on mentality, are making it difficult for women to achieve a satisfying worklife balance, leading to higher stress levels.
Young women cope with stress in various ways, turning to alcohol, tobacco, yoga classes or
even medication to help them relax, or visiting spas or beauty salons for some me time.
A growing number of women are developing back and shoulder pain because of the spread of
computer use in the workplace, which is also creating higher demand for massage
treatments.
The Global Consumer Trends survey found that women in their 20s were more likely than all
respondents to say they engage in stress-busting activities, such as meditation or massage.
70% of 20-29 year-olds did this at least once a month, versus 65% of all respondents.
Chinese women were most likely to say they participate in stress-reduction activities at least
occasionally, with only 12% saying they never do so. However, Indian women do them most
regularly, with as many as 12% of them saying engage in such activities almost every day.

Smoking and Drinking


The survey confirmed that young women who smoke are in the minority. As many as 71% of
under 30s females said they never smoke, compared to 66% of all respondents. The
percentage of non-smokers was much higher among the teenage contingent (80%).
Smoking among under 30s females was most prevalent in Germany and France. In these two
markets, only 55% and 57% of respondents, respectively, said they never smoke, while 25%
in Germany and 24% in France said they smoke two or more times a day.
By contrast, levels of smoking were found to be lowest in Japan and Brazil, where 88% and
86% of under 30s females said they never smoke. In India, a mere 2% of women in this age
group smoke two or more times a day.
National statistics show that France also has the highest smoking prevalence among women,
at 28%, and this continues to rise. This has led to a trend towards more feminine slim,
superslim and flavoured cigarettes, such as lilac or rose flavours, in France.
Vaping (or e-cigarettes) is becoming increasingly popular among young women all over the
world, and is frequently used as a way to quit smoking. The global market for vapour devices
is estimated at US$5 billion globally, led by the US and the UK.
Alcohol consumption is common among young women, as they increasingly delay marriage
and children in order to live life to the full. In addition, many are joining professions
traditionally dominated by men, such as finance, which have a strong drinking culture.
Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey found that, although the majority
of under 30s females consume alcohol at least once a month, they are more likely than the
average consumer to be teetotal. 38% said they never drink alcohol at home, versus 27% of
all respondents.
The percentage of women in their 20s who drink away from home once or twice a month, and
once or twice a week, was higher than for all respondents, at 22% and 15%, respectively.
Under 30s females in Germany were the least likely to abstain from drinking alcohol, with only
18% of them saying they never drink at home and 14% never drinking outside the home.
The share of young women who said they drink once or twice a week was highest in the UK
both at home (24%) and away from home (23%). The UK has a long-standing youth bingedrinking culture, although this is reportedly declining due to a trend towards healthier living.

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A fifth of French women also reported drinking away from home once or twice a week. This
ties in with recent government reports that suggest that binge drinking is becoming more
common among young French women.
Drinking is less common in India, where 78% and 72% of under 30s females said they never
drink alcohol at home or away, respectively. India is still a conservative society where women
rarely go to bars, while for its large Muslim population, alcohol is frowned upon.

Attitudes Towards Fitness


Women still lag some way behind men in terms of sports participation, a factor that has been
blamed partly on the lack of womens sports coverage in the media, and partly on the stigma
attached to female sports participation in some societies.
Nevertheless, more women than ever are taking up fitness activities, inspired by social media
posts, energetic celebrities, the proliferation of fitness devices and apps, and government and
sports companies efforts to engage women.
Celebrity and the media are a driving influence on young womens attitudes towards health
and fitness. Health-conscious female role models, such as Kim Kardashian, regularly post socalled fitspiration images on social media websites showing themselves working out.
While fashion magazines are featuring more female sports stars on their covers, celebrities
such as Beyonc Knowles and Kate Hudson have launched their own activewear brands,
while US model Karlie Kloss and British singer Ellie Goulding have been named ambassadors
for Nike.
The internet is even creating its own celebrities from inspirational fitness fanatics. Several
female instructors have cult-like followings, such as Jen Selter, with six million Instagram
followers, and Rachel Brathen, a yoga instructor with 1.3 million followers.
Unlike men, the main motivations of female fitness fanatics are not to build muscle but to burn
fat and get the toned and lean bodies. Young women are reportedly taking up more
resistance training and functional fitness/strength programmes, like CrossFit.
Simultaneously, there has been a rise in competitive fitness events, such as Tough Mudder
obstacle races, distance running and triathlons. Tough Mudder has burgeoned into an
international phenomenon and seen its female participation nearly double to 30% since it
started in 2010.
Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey found that under 30s females are
more likely than average to take part in regular physical exercise, with 63% exercising at least
once a week, versus 59% of all respondents. This was even higher among the 15-19s
contingent, at 65%.
Exercise among under 30s females was most frequent in India, where 39% said they partake
in it almost every day. Levels were also found to be high in Brazil and the US, where 35% of
young women exercised almost every day.
Under 30s females in France and the UK were most likely to say they exercise once or twice
a week (40% each), while as many as 13% in Japan said they never exercise.
British women have been inspired by initiatives such as UK Sport Englands This Girl Can
campaign of 2015. This campaign aims to challenge the cultural assumptions about femininity
that may prevent women from engaging in sport and exercise.
Womens sport is a growing trend in emerging markets such as China, thanks partly to a
desire for personal empowerment. As Chinese women gain economic and social status, they
are trying out new activities, such as running, yoga, tai chi, dancing, swimming and golf.
When younger women were asked as part of the Euromonitor International Global Consumer
Trends survey how frequently they took part in a variety of sporting activities, they scored

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higher than average on all counts except walking or hiking for exercise, which tends to be
associated with older consumers.
Most notably, under 30s females were significantly more likely than average to take part in
team sports at least once a month (39%, rising to 46% for women aged 15-19). This is
because many teenage girls are still at high school and belong to associated sports teams.
Regular participation in team sports is highest in Brazil and India, where 55% and 52% of
under 30s females, respectively, did this at least once a month. These two countries also
scored highest on going to the gym at least once a month (52% and 51%, respectively).
Individual sports, such as running and cycling, are more popular than ever among women.
The survey found that 62% of under 30s females take part in individual sports at least once a
month, compared with 56% of all respondents.
With regard to regular participation in individual sports, China ranked far higher than any other
country, with a substantial 86% of women saying they undertake these activities at least once
a month, and 33% almost every day.
According to the organisation Running USA, over the last five years there has been a notable
increase in the number of women participating in half marathons and 5Ks. Its research found
that women accounted for over 60% of half marathon finishers in the US.
There has also been a notable shift in womens running from a solitary to a social event, due
to the rise in interactive fun runs, such as The Color Run, and women-only races, such as the
Nike Womens Half Marathon and the Divas Half Marathon & 5K Series.
Women also appear to be embracing the current trend for obstacle races, or mud runs.
Women reportedly make up half of all participants in the Warrior Dash, which has prompted
the establishment of women-only events, such as Dirty Girl, Pretty Muddy and Mudderella.
Intensive physical activities, such as yoga, dance classes, workouts or Pilates, are also
popular among young women. Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey
revealed that 43% of under 30s females take part in intensive physical activities, versus just
38% of all respondents.
Participation in intensive physical activities was strongest in India and the US, where 66% and
51% of under 30s females said they did these at least once a month. This is partly due to the
popularity of yoga in both countries.
Yoga has become big business the world over, being seen as something of a panacea for the
ailments of modern society, from insomnia, stress and anxiety to addiction, lower back pain
and diabetes. This has spawned a lucrative market for yoga gear.
Female gym membership in the UK is reported to have risen substantially in 2014. The Global
Consumer Trends survey found that as many as a quarter of UK under 30s females exercise
at the gym once or twice a week in 2013.

Eating Habits and Nutrition


There is an enormous amount of pressure on young women to conform to media ideals of
beauty. Bombarded with images of skinny models and celebrities from an early age, girls are
conditioned to believe that thin is beautiful, and are on a constant mission to lose weight.
At the same time, overweight and obesity have become a major public health issue in many
countries. This increases the risk of problems such as diabetes, heart disease, high blood
pressure, arthritis, gallstones, certain cancers, sleep apnoea, infertility and depression.
Euromonitor International data show that female obesity is particularly high in the US and
Mexico (almost 43% and 40%, respectively, in 2014) and lowest in Japan and India, at 3%.

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Weight loss can be achieved in a number of ways, from eating more healthily and increasing
exercise to joining slimming clubs, such as Weight Watchers, taking meal replacements,
embarking on drastic diets or even undertaking surgery.
Over the years, different fad diets have come and gone. Current trends include Intermittent
Fasting (or the 5:2 diet), whereby calorie intake is restricted on certain days, and the Paleo
Diet, in which consumers attempt to mimic the diet of Stone Age hunters and gatherers.
The Global Consumer Trends survey found that almost a quarter (24%) of under 30s females
were on a weight loss diet, while a lower than average 40% said they simply monitor what
they eat in order to manage weight.
Dieting among under 30s females seems to be most common in the US, which reflects the
high obesity rate in that country. According to the survey, as many as 31% of American under
30s females said they were on a weight loss diet.
Driven by young women in particular, there has been a strong trend in recent years towards
foods that are fresher, more natural and more wholesome, involving less processing and
fewer artificial ingredients.
The Global Consumer Trends survey found that under 30s females were more likely to look
for products with limited or no artificial ingredients than the general population (40% versus
36%, respectively). This was higher among teenage women (41%).
Avoidance of artificial ingredients was found to vary considerably from market to market,
ranging from 67% of Indian women to a mere 4% of Japanese women.
Young women were more likely than average to check for foods with limited or no added salt
(21%) and limited or no trans fats or hydrogenated oils (29%). However, they scored lower
than average with regard to seeking out organic foods (9%) and natural foods (37%).
Russian women, in particular, were interested in looking for organic labels (22%) and all
natural labels (67%).
Sugar has been in the spotlight lately, due to a growing amount of scientific research linking
sugar with obesity. The survey found that 35% of under 30s females check foods for limited or
no added sugar (lower than the average of 42% for all consumers).
Young women were also less likely than the general population to seek out foods with limited
or no added fat (36%), or reduced or low calorie foods (30%. Reduced or low calorie
attributes are sought mostly by the Chinese (59%).
The survey showed that just over a quarter (26%) of all women aged 15-29 years looked for
products without corn syrup. However, this was as high as 42% for Brazilian women.
The survey revealed that the percentage of young women who look for added vitamins or
fibre in their foods was highest in China, at a substantial 71%. Over half of those in Brazil and
India also look for added vitamins or fibre (55% and 56%, respectively).
Brazilian and Indian women were most concerned about the fat content on labels (49% and
42%, respectively), while Indian and Chinese women were most likely to look for the absence
of added salt (44% and 42%, respectively).
The survey found that as many as 15% of under 30s females have food allergies or
intolerances. This was even higher among the teenage contingent, at 17%, and compared
with just 13% of all respondents.
The incidence of food allergies or intolerances among young women was found to be
particularly high in China, at 30%, while in Japan, France and the UK, only 7%, 8% and 9% of
under 30s females said they were allergic or intolerant to certain foods.
A significant number of young women are eschewing meat in favour of a vegetarian, vegan or
pescetarian diet. There are various reasons behind this trend, including ethical and
sustainability issues, health, religion and culture, and high meat prices.

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The survey found that 12% of under 30s females do not eat red meat (versus an average of
10%). This group was also more likely than the general population to be vegetarian (8%) and
vegan (3%).
For cultural and religious reasons, vegetarianism among under 30s females is at its highest
level in India, where as many as 41% of respondents claimed not to consume red meat, 36%
said they were vegetarian and 12% vegan.
Among the developed markets, the UK registered the highest percentage of vegetarians and
vegans among women aged under 30 (5% and 2%, respectively), while Germany had the
highest share of non-red meat eaters (11%).

Market Trends
Vitamins and dietary supplements
Global sales of dietary supplements amounted to US$51.9 billion in 2014, having jumped by
21% in constant value terms since 2009. The vitamins sector grew at a lower rate of 12% over
that period, to US$25.0 billion.
With increased market segmentation, there are a number of multivitamins brands formulated
specifically for women especially pregnancy and beauty supplements. In the UK, some 23%
of multivitamins are targeted at women.
Probiotic supplements are also popular, as studies have shown they can help treat ailments
such as vaginal yeast infections, UTIs and IBS. Overall, sales in the probiotics category rose
by 61% in constant value terms between 2009 and 2014, to US$3.9 billion.
Vitamin D also experienced a boom, amid concerns that consumers are not getting enough
natural sunlight. Overall, sales rose by 76%, to US$1.2 billion. Vitamin D is also said to help
protect women against breast cancer, ovarian cancer, osteoporosis and diabetes.
Other vitamins and dietary supplements that are thought to be especially beneficial to young
women include iron tablets, vitamin C, folic acid (if preparing for pregnancy) and other B
vitamins; and plant extracts such as evening primrose oil, cranberry and grapeseed oil.
Spas
Spas and beauty parlours are benefiting from the growing focus on wellbeing, as they provide
young women with a way to relax or spend time with friends. Global spa revenues grew by
7% in constant value terms over the 2009-2014 period, to reach US$59.7 billion.
Spas are going beyond relaxation, beauty and leisure services to offer products such as
cosmeceuticals, functional ingredients that have an effect on the body (including anti-ageing
ingredients), injectables and detox treatments.
Spa revenues were highest in Japan, at US$19.0 billion in 2014, although the market appears
to have reached maturity. In Japan, traditional public baths have been gradually pushed out of
business by health centres offering saunas, sports facilities, spas and hotel spa services.
In China, spa revenues soared by 45% in constant value terms over the review period,
reaching US$2.9 billion in 2014. Spas are mostly concentrated in large cities such as Beijing
and Shanghai, where wealth levels have surged the most.
Due to the growing number of young female drinkers, women are becoming more influential
within the alcoholic drinks market. Many new brands are emerging that target this consumer
group specifically, such as wines with feminine names, and flavoured, low calorie vodkas.

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Sports clothing and wearable tech


Womens increased interest in sports and fitness activities, combined with a fashion for
wearing athletic gear on an everyday basis, has significantly boosted the market for womens
sportswear. The US womens sports apparel market grew by 8% in 2014 alone to reach a
value of US$19.4 billion.
Nike was a key driver in the US market in 2015, directing its marketing efforts specifically
towards women with its Better for It initiative. Women now account for a fifth of Nikes sales,
and the company has opened female-specific stores in the US, China and the UK.
Under Armour also launched its US$15 million I Will What I Want campaign in 2014, as part
of a rebranding exercise to engage female customers. (Currently, only around 30% of Under
Armours US$2 billion in revenue comes from sales to women.)
Several other retailers have also taken advantage of the boom in womens athletic wear,
including Canadas Lululemon, Australias Lorna Jane, the Gaps Athleta, VF Corps Lucy and
rapidly growing online competitors such as Fabletics and UK-based Sweaty Betty.
At the lower end of the market, fashion retailers such as H&M and the UKs Topshop are also
entering the athleisure sector by collaborating with designers and celebrities to launch
exclusive collections.
Another sector that has benefited from the female health boom is that of fitness apps and
wearable tech. An explosion of gadgets and apps has allowed consumers to track their
progress and share workouts, fitness goals and race results.
Many of these apps and devices can monitor heart rate, caloric intake or blood pressure and
track distances during running, cycling or swimming. In some cases, this information can then
be instantly shared via social media platforms such as Facebook or Twitter.
Sports nutrition
Sports nutrition is a fast-growing area, with global sales rising by 52% in constant value terms
between 2009 and 2014. Nevertheless, very few sports nutrition products cater to womens
specific nutritional needs.
This is changing, as sports nutrition continues to push further into the mainstream and
manufacturers are looking to increase their appeal among non-core users, such as wellnessand fitness-minded women.
Studies show that women who visit gyms are increasingly using supplements, such as protein
shakes, to maximise the effectiveness of their workout. These are often endorsed by fitnessminded celebrities, such as the UKs Active Woman brand, advertised by Melanie Sykes.
Young women are a prime target audience for weight management products, which grew by
15% in constant value terms over the review period to reach a value of US$14.6 billion.
There has been a growing preference for meal replacement slimming products over other
weight management options, as they are seen as one of the most natural ways to manage
weight, as well as being nutritious and effective. The global market is led by Herbalife.
South Korea has seen a significant boom in meal replacement slimming products, due to a
fashion for tiny waists and a general speeding up of lifestyles. Young women are finding it
more convenient to consume meal replacements than to cook fresh food from scratch.
Although there is a certain amount of scepticism surrounding weight loss supplements, the
market is frequently boosted by the launch of new ingredients touted as the next big thing in
weight loss. Recently, these have included garcinia cambogia, African mango and goji
berries.

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Health foods and drinks


An increased interest in nutrition and food origin among younger women has driven the global
market for health and wellness products. This trend is apparent mainly in developed markets
but also among urban consumers in emerging markets, such as China and India.
With consumers thinking about food in the context of healthy eating rather, than just reducing
calories, fortified and functional (FF) products and organic products have performed far better
than BFY (better for you) products in recent years.
Other types of fresh food have benefited from the trend towards natural ingredients. The
popular Paleo Diet requires followers to eat only naturally occurring food, such as grass
produced meat, fish, and fresh fruits and vegetables.
Young women are also said to be behind the growth in organic products, as they seek out
more natural food and avoid chemicals and pesticides. As a result, organic packaged food
has become more mainstream and retailers have increased their portfolio of organic products.
There has also been a strong trend towards healthier drinks, including bottled water, green
tea and 100% juices, largely at the expense of sugary drinks and carbonates. Global sales of
bottled water rose by 27% in constant value over the review period, to US$118.1 billion.
Although sales of 100% juice as a whole remained flat in real value terms over the review
period, certain niche categories continued to make progress, such as organic juice, coconut
water and other superfruit juices.
With consumers looking to cut down on their sugar intake and losing faith in artificial
sweeteners, manufacturers have developed a range of stevia enhanced drinks to capture
attention. These tend to have around 30% less sugar than regular versions.
The increasing number of people diagnosed with food intolerances, in addition to a trend
towards healthier foods in general, has given rise to a growing market for free from products,
which are mainly products that are formulated without gluten, lactose or sugar.
The global market for food intolerance products was worth US$12.3 billion in 2014, having
risen by 36% in constant value since 2009. Growth was driven by their growing presence on
the shelves of mainstream outlets, such as supermarkets.

Outlook
Young women will continue to take a growing interest in their personal health over the
forecast period, influenced partly by the increasing amount of health messages and nutritional
information targeting them via the media and internet.
The rising number of women delaying motherhood and going into higher education and
employment means they will have greater disposable incomes to spend on health and fitness,
as well as a growing need to achieve a work-life balance.
Under pressure to conform to media ideals of beauty, young women will avidly follow all kinds
of diets, with some even falling prey to eating disorders. Despite this, female obesity rates are
expected to rise in most countries over the forecast period.
Many women will adopt a more holistic view of healthy weight and body image as they realise
the need for total nutrition and exercise regime change, rather than relying on miracle cures.
In line with the focus on healthiness and nutrition, young women will pay closer attention to
food labels and eat more naturally healthy foods.
The future may see more vitamins and dietary supplements formulations developed to appeal
to young women, such as those containing B vitamins, vitamin D, calcium, iron, probiotics or
female-friendly plant extracts such as evening primrose oil or grapeseed oil.

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Young women the world over will continue to embrace the fitness trend, whether by joining
gyms, taking part in fun runs, cycling and obstacle events, joining sports teams or undertaking
more holistic activities, such as yoga and Pilates.
Fitness apps and social media will play a greater role in encouraging exercise. The internet
has opened up an online global fitness community for women to engage with, from simply
being inspired by others to work harder to posting about personal achievements on
Instagram.
The next wave of wearable tech could add wellbeing to the equation. Devices are already
being developed that sync with a phone app to alert users when they become overstressed,
reminding them to take a deep breath or a break.
Developers are also said to be experimenting with emotion-detecting wearables, such as a
pullover that changes colours based on the wearers excitement and even a bra that alerts
women when they might be tempted to overeat due to personal triggers like stress.
The womens sportswear market is expected to experience buoyant growth over the forecast
period, thanks to increasing female participation in sporting and fitness activities, combined
with a trend towards incorporating athletic wear into the daily wardrobe.
While female-specific sports nutrition is still in its infancy, the category offers strong potential,
as a growing number of women take to working out regularly, influenced by fitness-orientated
celebrities such as Kim Kardashian, who are often seen holding protein shakes.
Summary 1
Young Womens Health: Opportunities For Marketers
The trend towards later motherhood is expected to continue throughout the rest of the decade,
leaving many younger women free to dedicate more time and effort to looking and feeling good.
As the pressure continues on young women to conform to media ideals of beauty, they will
continue to follow all kinds of diets, boosting the weight management market.
In line with the current focus on healthfulness and nutrition, young women will demand fewer
artificial ingredients and more corporate transparency with regard to the origins of their foods.
The continuing backlash against sugar opens up opportunities for manufacturers to target young
women with low-sugar foods and products that incorporate more natural sweeteners, such as
stevia.
Healthy drinks, such as coconut water and superfruit juices, hold good growth potential among
this consumer segment.
The growing incidence of food intolerances will help maintain strong demand for free from
products, which will also benefit from wider availability through mainstream retailers.
Young women will drive the trend towards meat-free foods, due to concerns about animal
welfare, environmental sustainability and personal health.
There is potential to further segment both the vitamins and dietary supplements and sports
nutrition markets with products tailored specifically to young womens needs.
Young women will continue to embrace the fitness trend, whether by joining gyms, taking part in
running, cycling and obstacle events, joining sports teams or undertaking more holistic activities,
such as yoga and Pilates. This will fuel a strong market for female-specific sportswear.
There is still a huge amount of potential to target young women with wearable tech products and
their associated apps, as well as an opportunity to create social networks dedicated to female
fitness enthusiasts.
Source:

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INTRODUCTION
Demographics
Women aged under 30 years constitute a slow-rising demographic globally, their total number
increasing by just 2% over the 2009-2014 period to reach almost 855 million. Only in a handful
of countries is this demographic on the rise, including India (+5%), Philippines (+9%), Australia
(+6%), Denmark (+8%) and Norway (+10%).
Moreover, in some markets, including Russia, Poland, Spain, the Czech Republic and
Greece, their number dwindled by more than 12% over the review period.
Nonetheless, young women represent a growing market force. They are becoming more
economically empowered the world over, due to their increasing tendency to further their
education, gain employment and delay marriage and starting a family, often until their 30s or
40s.
Table 1

Number of Women Aged 15-29 by Country 2009/2014

000

India
China
US
Indonesia
Brazil
Mexico
Russia
Philippines
Turkey
Japan
South Africa
Thailand
Germany
UK
France
Argentina
South Korea
Italy
Malaysia
Venezuela
Poland
Spain
Canada
Australia
Taiwan
Netherlands
Belgium
Sweden
Greece
Austria
Switzerland
Denmark
Norway
Finland
World
Source:

Euromonitor International

Euromonitor International

2009

2014

% growth

156,637
135,818
31,731
32,189
25,521
14,988
16,744
12,659
9,301
10,046
7,533
7,592
6,972
6,160
5,830
4,895
5,036
4,610
4,051
3,839
4,395
4,195
3,382
2,255
2,551
1,480
990
870
1,024
777
700
479
449
488
835,397

164,851
129,576
32,184
31,562
25,067
15,314
14,508
13,789
9,296
9,192
7,433
7,390
6,708
6,233
5,696
4,948
4,727
4,541
4,176
3,989
3,811
3,617
3,460
2,393
2,331
1,533
1,017
899
881
771
721
518
493
486
854,677

5.2
-4.6
1.4
-1.9
-1.8
2.2
-13.4
8.9
-0.1
-8.5
-1.3
-2.7
-3.8
1.2
-2.3
1.1
-6.1
-1.5
3.1
3.9
-13.3
-13.8
2.3
6.1
-8.6
3.5
2.7
3.4
-13.9
-0.7
3.0
8.3
9.9
-0.4
2.3

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Later Motherhood
Women wait longer to have families
Naturally, a sizeable proportion of younger women are already mothers especially in
emerging markets, where women tend to marry at a younger age. However, given the long-term
trend towards having babies later in life, many women in the developed world are likely still to be
childless by the age of 29. This means they have more time and disposable income to spend on
health-related product and activities.
Today, starting a family is viewed more as a lifestyle choice than as a marker of adulthood.
Young women can afford interests and lifestyles that are not compatible with large families, and
they often choose to postpone childbirth and have fewer or no children. More women are going
into higher education and following careers that allow them the financial stability to live by
themselves. This is more often the case in the big urban centres, where a singles lifestyle has
evolved and is attracting more and more young people.
In developing countries too, the growing tendency for young adults to relocate from rural to
urban areas, and even to work abroad for a number of years, has created a higher degree of
mobility among younger generations, which again means that parenthood is often postponed
and family sizes reduced.
Improved access to contraception
Young people around the world are better informed about contraception and have easier
access to it, while the recent over-the-counter availability of emergency contraception (ie the
morning after pill) has helped reduce levels of teenage pregnancy in developed markets.
In the US, Tevas levonorgestrel-based emergency contraceptive, Plan B, has been available
OTC since 2006. In 2013, levonorgestrel was made available to women of all ages. According to
a 2013 survey of 12,000 women carried out for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
in 2013, 11% of American women aged 15-44 who had had intercourse said they had used
emergency contraception (up from just 4% in 2002), and women in their early 20s were most
likely to have used it. Of those who had taken the pill, 59% said they had done so only once,
24% said twice and 17% said three or more times.
In January 2015, HRA Pharmas Ellaone emergency contraceptive (ulipristal acetate 30mg)
received approval to be sold without a prescription in pharmacies throughout the EU.
While the UK still has among the highest teenage pregnancy rates in the developed world,
figures released by the Office of National Statistics (ONS) in early 2015 found that teenage
pregnancy rates in England and Wales had fallen to their lowest rate in 46 years, at fewer than
25 per thousand girls aged 15 to 17. The percentage of pregnancies resulting in abortions
among the under-18s in 2013 was 51% in England and Wales, up from 49% in 2012. The ONS
attributed this largely to more effective government sex education programmes in schools.
However, it is likely that the wider availability of emergency contraception also played a part,
since it is available OTC to all women aged over 16.
India and Latin America have the youngest mothers
Reflecting their ageing populations and low birth rates, the developed markets of the UK,
Japan, Italy, Switzerland, South Korea and Spain had the oldest average first-time mothers (30
years). The latest ONS statistics from early 2015 show that there was a rise in the conception
rate for women in England and Wales aged 35 and over. The ONS attributed this to factors such
as higher participation in further education, increased female participation in the labour force,
the increasing importance of a career, the rising costs of childbearing, labour market
uncertainty, housing factors and instability of partnerships.

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At the other end of the scale, the youngest first-time mothers were to be found in Latin
America (Venezuela, Brazil, Argentina and Mexico), as well as India. The average age of firsttime mothers in India and Argentina was just under 21 years in 2014.
In the US, the average age of first time mothers was relatively young in 2012, at just over 26
years. This is partly because of the growing ethnic populations, who tend to have children
younger. Nevertheless, the motherhood market is greying in the US. A report by the Pew
Research Center found that in the past two decades, the broad trend in the US towards delaying
motherhood has stretched across all ethnic and income groups. At the same time, more women
are remaining childless, either by choice or circumstance. It is estimated that around a fifth of
US women in their 40s do not have children.
Chart 1

Age of Women at First Childbirth in Selected Markets 2014

Average age of women at first childbirth

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Source:

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Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends Survey


This report focuses on the Health & Wellness section of Euromonitor Internationals Global
Consumer Trends survey of 2013. It specifically analyses the results provided by young women
in the 15-29 year-old age bracket, further analysed by 15-19s and 20-29s as relevant, and
compares these with the total sample. The survey questions are detailed in the Appendix
section of this report.
The survey was designed to provide a unique perspective on the minds of todays global
consumers. The online survey probes the motivations, perceptions and habits of around 16,000
consumers in nine countries (Brazil, China, France, Germany, Japan, India, the UK and the US).
The strategic analysis in this report enriches the survey results with extensive desk research
and market background, further illustrated with Euromonitor International market data.
Readers should note that, since the survey methodology chosen reached only consumers
who were online, this potentially skewed the survey, as respondents in developing countries
without much internet infrastructure tend to be more educated, higher income individuals. These
consumers are likely to be more technologically advanced and live in areas where internet
penetration is higher especially in the developing markets of China, Brazil and India. This
factor should be born in mind when examining results from these markets.

GENERAL HEALTH
Perception of Personal Health
Most consider themselves to be healthy
Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey of 2013 found that, on the whole,
young women (ie those aged 15-29 years) perceive themselves to be in fairly good health. The
surveys results were drawn from online consumers ranging in age from 15 to 65+, and covered
between 1,800 and 2,000 consumers in each of nine major markets: Brazil, China, France,
Germany, India, Japan, Russia, the UK and the US.
According to the survey, as many as 71% of under 30s females said they considered
themselves to be either healthy or very healthy (ie, they rated their health as 8, 9, 10 or 11 on a
scale of 1-11). The percentage was slightly higher for teenaged women (aged 15-19), at 72%.
This compared with just 66% of all survey respondents.
Just over a fifth (22%) of under 30s females considered themselves to be somewhat healthy
(ie 5, 6 or 7 on the scale of 1-11), while just 6% thought they were unhealthy or very unhealthy
(1, 2, 3 or 4 on the scale). This compared with a larger 9% of all respondents.
Chart 2

Young Women: Perception of Personal Health by Age Group 2013

% respondents selecting:

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Source:

Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey, 2013

French and Brazilian women score highest


Perceptions of health vary by country, with under 30s females in France and Brazil being the
most likely to consider themselves to be very healthy (41% and 40%, respectively). This is not
particularly surprising, given that French women are renowned for their slim physiques and
strong health awareness. Various articles attribute French womens ability to remain thin to
factors such as portion control, drinking plenty of water and not snacking between meals.
In Brazil, rising educational levels and easier access to medical and nutritional information
through articles and the media are starting to help consumers better understand the relationship
between diet and health, especially among the growing middle classes.
Japanese women have negative attitude
Despite having the lowest female obesity rate, the longest life expectancies and one of the
healthiest diets in the world, Japan scored lowest in terms of the number of women perceiving
themselves to be very healthy or healthy (15% and 32%, respectively). Moreover, the
percentage of young Japanese women considering themselves to be unhealthy or very
unhealthy was 20%, compared to an average of just 6% for all countries.
Women in the UK and Germany were also among the least likely to say they were very
healthy (18% and 19%, respectively). This may be related to the high levels of overweight and
obesity in these two countries.
Chart 3

Young Women: Perception of Personal Health by Country 2013

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% women 15-29

Source:

Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey, 2013

Health Prevention
71% of young women take dietary supplements
The survey revealed that taking health supplements is very common among under 30s
females. As many as 71% of this group said they take health supplements or vitamins.
However, only 15% of them take supplements on a daily basis, which was some way behind the
average of all respondents (21%). This suggests that there is still plenty of opportunity to target
this segment with tailored products.
Consumption of health supplements seems to increase with age, as only 67% of females in
the younger segment (aged 15-19) take them at all, and only 12% of this younger age group
takes them daily.
Chart 4

Young Women: Frequency of Taking Health Supplements/Vitamins by Age


Group 2013

% respondents selecting:

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Source:

Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey, 2013

US women are the largest supplements consumers


The survey showed that the frequency of taking health supplements and vitamins among
under 30s females varies significantly from country to country. American women are especially
keen on supplements, with 36% taking them almost daily. Health supplements are also popular
in the UK, where 24% of women in this age group take them almost every day.
At the other end of the spectrum, a mere 6% of French women said they take health
supplements or vitamins almost every day. Indeed, as many as 45% of French women never
take them. This is perhaps linked to the fact that French consumers generally have a highly
balanced diet and do not feel the need to supplement it with extra vitamins.
There is also some scepticism in France regarding the efficacy of such products and the
claims by dietary supplement manufacturers. This was expected to improve as a result of the
implementation in 2013/2014 of the EFSA regulation, which is a harmonised list of 222
approved health and nutritional claims. This should help restore consumers trust in dietary
supplements. The niche segment of fig leaf-based products for varicose veins, such as
veinotonics, reportedly boomed in France in 2014, due to the impressive recovery of the
Antistax brand and Sant Vertes Circulymphe.
Chart 5

Young Women: Frequency of Taking Health Supplements/Vitamins by


Country 2013

% women 15-29

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Source:

Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey, 2013

Popular womens supplements


Health supplements are purchased by consumers of all ages, and many are aimed at older
consumers looking to protect their bones, heart health, brain function, eyesight, etc. However,
certain vitamins and supplements are known to have a particularly beneficial effect on younger
women. For example, iron tablets are frequently taken by young women of childbearing-age,
who are sometimes at risk of developing iron-deficiency anaemia (especially if they have heavy
periods). Vitamin C also helps absorb iron from plant foods and supplements. According to the
USs Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine, a person in their 20s needs 75mg of
vitamin C per day, which can be taken through foods or vitamin supplements.
Young women preparing for pregnancy are these days advised to take folic acid supplements.
According to the New York State Department of Health, taking folic acid reduces neural tube
defects in babies by over 70%. Experts also say that folic acid is important for women in their
20s due to its role in regular cell growth and cell formation, the recommendation being 400g
per day. Studies have shown that other B vitamins, such as riboflavin and thiamine, may also
significantly reduce the incidence of PMS symptoms in women.
It has been found that women begin losing bone density as early as their 20s. Vitamin D
preserves bones by promoting calcium absorption, which may reduce the risk of osteoporosis
later in life. Studies also suggest that vitamin D may lessen the risk of breast cancer by 50%.
Therefore, many younger women are encouraged to take supplements of this type as a
preventative measure.

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Summary 2
Supplement

Passport

Vitamins and Dietary Supplements Beneficial to Women


Purpose

Vitamin A

Improves vision, cuts risk of heart disease and


may slow skin ageing.

B vitamins

B vitamins help maintain metabolism, muscle


tone and a sharp mind. B9 (folic acid) keeps
red blood cells healthy and protects against
cancer and birth defects. Vitamin B6
contributes to the regulation of hormonal
activity.

Vitamin C

Boosts immune system and helps prevent


heart disease, prenatal problems, eye
conditions and skin ageing.

Vitamin D

Helps protect against breast cancer, ovarian


cancer and diabetes. Helps calcium
absorption and plays a central role in muscle
function.

Calcium

Helps keep bones and teeth strong.

Iron

Helps prevent anaemia in those susceptible to


the condition.

Probiotics

Aid digestion and help treat ailments including


diarrhoea, vaginal yeast and urinary tract
infections (UTIs), irritable bowel syndrome
(IBS) and certain intestinal infections; also
prevents or reduces severity of colds and flu

Evening Primrose oil

Provides gamma linolenic acid (GLA), an


omega-6 fatty acid, and may help support skin
and hormonal health.

Cranberry

Helps reduce the risk of recurrent UTIs by


maintaining a healthy yeast and bacteria
balance in the urinary tract.

Grapeseed oil

Beneficial in the treatment of a number of


health issues that affect women, including
acne, stretch marks, varicose veins,
premature ageing, PMS, weight loss, stress,
high cholesterol levels and diabetes.

Source:

Euromonitor

VMS market trends


According to Euromonitor International data, global sales of dietary supplements amounted to
US$51.9 billion in 2014, having increased by a robust 21% in constant value terms since 2009.
The vitamins category grew at a lower rate of 12% over that period to reach sales of US$25.0
billion.
Multivitamins represent the largest individual category, with sales worth US$14.9 billion in
2014. Although multivitamins are aimed at all consumers, there are many brands formulated
specifically for women. Marketing messages often emphasise womens likelihood of suffering
from a deficiency of vitamins, which ultimately leads to fatigue and tiredness.
In the US, multivitamin brands formulated for women include Total Balance Womens (XtendLife Natural Products), Vitalizer Women (Shaklee), Wellness Essentials Womens Prime

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(Metagenics), Vitamin Code Women (Garden of Life) and Every Womans One Daily (New
Chapter). Multivitamins may also be positioned for pregnancy, such as Bayers Elevit With
Iodine, which contains iron, folic acid and iodine.
In the UK, Euromonitor Internationals research shows that women are the largest consumers
of multivitamins, with 23% of products targeted at them in 2014. In addition, 17% of
multivitamins are positioned for pregnancy, with Vitabioticss Pregnacare being one of the most
popular brands.
Beauty from within
Other womens combination supplements are marketed with an emphasis on beauty. For
example, Swisses popular supplement, Ultiboost Hair, Skin and Nails, is a best-seller in
Australia. The product contains ingredients such as silica and vitamin C to support the
production of collagen and provide essential nutrients. In Japan, AEON Groups Topvalu line
recently saw the addition of Collagen + Placenta for Women.
Beauty is also a growing positioning for dietary supplements in China, mainly aimed at women
wanting a younger and fairer appearance. New combination formulas, such as Herbalife Active
Fiber Complex, made from herbal ingredients like apple fibre, citrus fibre and sophora flower,
target figure- and weight-conscious consumers with claims to help control calorie intake and
burn body fat.
Probiotics on the up
Probiotic supplements are popular among women, as studies have shown they can help treat
ailments such as vaginal yeast infections, UTIs and IBS. Overall, sales in the probiotics category
rose by 61% in constant value terms between 2009 and 2014, to US$3.9 billion.
Fish oils and omega fatty acids, which are purchased by both genders and all age groups,
saw constant value growth of 30% over the review period. In some markets, such as Australia
and the UK, there has recently been a considerable interest in krill oil, which contains a more
concentrated quantity of omega-3.
Within the vitamins category, vitamin D experienced a boom amid concerns that consumers
are not getting enough natural sunlight. Sales in this category rose by 76%, to US$1.2 billion.
Table 2

Global Sales of Health Supplements 2009/2014

US$ million

Dietary Supplements
- Minerals
- Probiotic Supplements
- Fish Oils/Omega Fatty Acids
- Protein Supplements
- Ginseng
- Glucosamine
- Eye Health Supplements
- Co-Enzyme Q10
- Ginkgo Biloba
- Garlic
- Echinacea
- Evening Primrose Oil
Vitamins
- Multivitamins
- Vitamin C
- Vitamin B

Euromonitor International

2009

2014

% growth
current

% growth
constant

38,121
7,606
2,259
2,456
1,210
1,686
1,958
903
896
670
595
460
264
19,730
12,019
2,889
2,424

51,945
9,258
3,929
3,656
2,422
2,331
1,912
1,203
1,097
775
677
481
300
25,046
14,946
3,558
3,266

36.3
21.7
73.9
48.9
100.1
38.2
-2.3
33.3
22.4
15.7
13.8
4.5
13.5
26.9
24.4
23.2
34.7

21.2
6.8
61.3
29.8
65.0
9.6
-12.4
28.5
15.7
2.3
3.7
-2.5
3.2
12.0
10.0
7.0
19.2

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- Vitamin D
- Vitamin E
- Vitamin A
- Other Single Vitamins
Source:

Passport

591
947
473
386

1,168
1,042
554
511

97.6
10.0
17.1
32.3

Euromonitor International

Wellbeing
The pressures of modern life
Stress, depression, anxiety and mental fatigue are problems that are becoming increasingly
common among young women, due to the ever faster pace of modern lifestyles. Factors such
as growing urbanisation, an increase in the number of women holding professional positions
sometimes with young children and the always on mentality, are making it increasingly
difficult for the under 30s to achieve a satisfying work-life balance, leading to all-round higher
stress levels.
The fact that women are facing increased stress has been backed up by various studies. For
example, the long-term Australian Longitudinal Study on Womens Health by the University of
Newcastle, found that in 2014, 55% of women aged 18-20 years had experienced high
psychological stress in the past year, while 45% had engaged in self-harming behaviour. This
was higher than the level seen in 1996.
Furthermore, a growing number of women are developing back and shoulder pain with the
spread of computer use in the workplace, which is also creating higher demand for massage
treatments.
70% of 20-something women engage in stress-lowering activities
Young women cope with stress in various ways, with some turning to alcohol, tobacco, yoga
or even meditation to help them relax, while others visit spas or beauty salons for some down
time.
Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey of 2013 found that women in
their 20s were more likely than all respondents to say they engage in stress-busting activities
such as meditation or massage. As many as 70% of 20-29 year-olds said they do this at least
once a month, compared with 65% of all respondents. However, women in the younger age
segment (15-19) are less likely to participate in stress-lowering activities, with just 64% saying
they do this regularly.
Chart 6

Young Women: Frequency of Participating in Stress-Lowering Activities by


Age Group 2013

% respondents selecting:

Euromonitor International

76.2
-4.1
4.2
19.4

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YOUNG W OMENS HEALTH: GLOBAL ATTITUDES TOW ARDS HEALTH, FITNESS AND W ELLBEING AMONG THE UNDER
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Source:
Note:

Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey, 2013


Refers to activities such as meditation or massage

Indian women most likely to seek relaxation


A breakdown of the Global Consumer Trends survey statistics by country shows that under
30s females in China were most likely to say they participate in stress-reduction activities at
least occasionally, with only 12% saying they never do so. This corresponds to findings that an
ever increasing number of Chinese women are visiting spas, as the country experiences strong
economic growth and demand for luxury goods and services continues to rise.
Indian women are the most likely to engage in stress-reduction activities on a regular basis.
As many as 12% of them said they did this almost every day.
Chart 7

Young Women: Frequency of Participating in Stress-Reduction Activities by


Country 2013

% women 15-29

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Source:
Note:

Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey, 2013


Refers to activities such as meditation or massage

SpA Trends
A focus on wellness and beauty
Spas and beauty parlours are most likely to benefit from the growing consumer focus on
wellness. Health spas are especially popular among young women, providing a way for them to
relax or spend time with friends. These include day spas, overnight stays in retreats or spa
holidays.
Spas are now launching services that go well beyond relaxation, beauty and leisure services,
offering cosmeceuticals, functional ingredients that have an effect on the body (including antiageing ingredients such as hydroxyl acid, retinol and vitamins), injectables and detox
treatments.
Although spa treatments are no longer seen as the luxury they once were, expenditure on
spas is still strongly correlated with income, and affluent working women are most likely to
spend on such services. According to Euromonitor Internationals travel and tourism database,

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global spa revenues grew by 7% in constant value terms over the 2009-2014 period, to reach
US$59.7 billion.
Spas play a big part in Japanese culture
Revenues were highest in Japan, at US$19.0 billion in 2014, although the market showed
very little growth over the review period. In Japan, traditional public baths have been gradually
pushed out of business by health centres offering saunas, sports facilities, spas and hotel spa
services. The most successful business models are hot springs and Japanese inn facilities, but
increasingly popular are quick massage and reflexology outlets in stores, of which there are
several national chains. These attract mainly young female clientele.
The US ranked second, with revenues of US$6.2 billion, while Germany had revenues of
US$3.5 billion. Spas are also big business in Austria, where per capita revenues are particularly
high and grew by a substantial 22% in constant value terms over the review period.
Like Japan, Germany and Austria both have a strong spa culture. German patients may be
eligible to request a prescribed medical cure in order to minimise or delay the development of
certain conditions. The most popular treatment among Germans is the sauna/steam bath,
followed by whole-body massage and facial treatments. Eco-friendly spas are becoming
increasingly popular, as are spas with a natural ambience, natural made products and food, and
creams and lotions produced with only natural botanicals.
Chinese market thrives
In China, spa revenues soared by 45% in constant value terms over the review period,
reaching US$2.9 billion in 2014. Spas are mostly concentrated in large cities such as Beijing
and Shanghai, where wealth levels have surged the most. Some offer slimming services, such
as Marie France Bodyline, which operates more than 50 slimming centres in mainland China.
Some spas offer open air hot spring facilities, while others are beauty-orientated.
Spas also performed well in France, where sales rose by 20% in constant value terms over
the review period. Thermal centres and thalassotherapy enjoy a long tradition in France, and
such spas are well recognised for offering medical benefits.
By contrast, the Russian market for spas fell by 11% over the review period, to US$2.8 billion.
Russian consumers increasingly prefer cosmetic products and beauty treatments providing an
immediate effect, such as injection or mesotherapy, to spa centres. Moreover, spas are usually
valued as more of a luxury than beauty salons, and thus in general target more affluent
customers. It is reported that among the most demanded spa services in Moscow are
aromatherapy, balneotherapy, hydrotherapy, mud therapy, krenotherapy, cryotherapy,
lithotherapy, arenation, thalassotherapy and fitohydrotherapy.
Table 3

Revenues from Spas in Key Markets 2009/2014

US$ million

Japan
US
Germany
Austria
China
Russia
Switzerland
France
Thailand
UK

Euromonitor International

2009

2014

% growth
current

% growth
constant

18,317
5,515
3,204
2,290
1,714
2,245
2,235
1,701
1,446
1,319

18,999
6,241
3,513
3,181
2,915
2,789
2,452
2,193
1,718
1,391

3.7
13.2
9.6
38.9
70.1
24.2
9.7
28.9
18.8
5.4

1.6
2.3
1.5
24.4
45.2
-10.9
9.7
20.2
3.1
-8.8

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Mexico
Italy
Taiwan
Canada
Malaysia
Australia
Philippines
South Korea
Spain
India
Poland
Argentina
Brazil
Indonesia
Belgium
World
Source:

Passport

951
1,053
524
555
456
422
353
412
488
209
208
56
67
79
99
50,936

1,232
999
841
741
657
581
521
495
490
472
285
206
123
120
110
59,689

29.5
-5.1
60.7
33.7
44.1
37.6
47.9
20.3
0.4
125.8
36.8
265.6
84.4
51.7
10.7
17.2

Euromonitor International

Smoking
Smoking levels lower among young women
According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the tobacco industry has long sought to
attract the female market by promoting cigarettes to women using seductive images of slimness,
emancipation, sophistication and sexual allure, and by developing women-only brands, which
tend to be long, extra-slim, low-tar, light-coloured or menthol.
The American Lung Association reports that while fewer women smoke than men, the
percentage difference between the two has continued to decrease, and women have therefore
begun to share a much larger burden of smoking-related diseases. A study by the US
Department of Health and Human Services found that female smokers are nearly 13 times more
likely to die from COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease emphysema and chronic
bronchitis) compared to women who have never smoked.
Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey of 2013 confirmed that young
women who smoke are in the minority. As many as 71% of under 30s females said they never
smoke, compared to 66% of all respondents. The percentage was much higher among the
teenage contingent (80%). Furthermore, just 11% of under 30s females reported that they
smoke two or more times a day, compared to the average of 16% among all respondents.
Chart 8

Young Women: Frequency of Smoking Cigarettes by Age Group 2013

% respondents selecting:

Euromonitor International

7.0
-13.1
50.6
22.1
28.3
20.9
22.8
6.9
-8.0
42.9
22.1
102.0
38.3
16.3
0.1
7.1

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Source:

Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey, 2013

French and German women smoke the most


The survey revealed that smoking among under 30s females was most prevalent in Germany
and France. In these two markets, only 55% and 57% of respondents, respectively, said they
never smoke, while 25% in Germany and 24% in France said they smoke two or more times a
day.
By contrast, levels of smoking were found to be lowest in Japan and Brazil, where 88% and
86% of under 30s females reported that they never smoke. In India, a mere 2% of women in this
age group said that they smoked two or more times a day.
Chinese women rank highest when it comes to occasional smoking, with 19% of them saying
they do smoke, but less than once a month.
Chart 9

Young Women: Frequency of Smoking Cigarettes by Country 2013

% women 15-29

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Source:

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French women favour flavoured cigarettes


Looking at Euromonitor Internationals smoking prevalence data for 2014, France ranked
highest, at 28%, reflecting the Global Consumer Trends survey findings. Moreover, France is
one of the few countries in the world in which the number of women smokers continues to rise,
as prevalence was up from 27% in 2009. The decline in social acceptance of smoking overall in
France had the effect of pushing the trend of slim, superslim and flavoured cigarettes, such as
lilac or rose flavours, which are considered lighter, more discreet and feminine cigarettes.
Other countries in which more than a fifth of women smoke include Austria, Russia, the
Netherlands (where prevalence has also increased slightly), Greece, Poland, Switzerland,
Argentina, Czech Republic and Denmark.
In several markets, female smoking prevalence declined significantly over the review period.
In Norway, just 13% of the female population smoked in 2014, down from 20% in 2009. Russia,
the US, Canada and Japan saw smoking prevalence fall by more than three percentage points.
As a further reflection of the Global Consumer Trends survey results, India ranked lowest in
terms of female smoking prevalence, at just 1% in 2014. Nevertheless, according to a 2014

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article in The Times of India, the number of female smokers has doubled in the past three
decades from 5.3 million to 12.2 million, while the smoking rate among men has reduced.
The vaping boom
Vaping (or e-cigarettes) is becoming increasingly popular among young women all over the
world, and is frequently used as a way to quit smoking. Preliminary Euromonitor International
figures estimate 2014 retail value sales of vapour devices to be US$5 billion globally, with the
US, the UK and France being the largest markets.
Electronic cigarettes are non-flammable atomising devices that contain a nicotine charger and
an atomiser. When the user takes a drag, the nicotine solution is heated into a vapour, which is
inhaled. E-cigarettes do not contain tobacco, and do not produce smoke. A recent study by the
American Journal of Preventive Medicine found that young women are the most likely to try ecigarettes.
Table 4

Female Smoking Prevalence by Country 2009/2014

% female adult population

France
Austria
Russia
Netherlands
Greece
Poland
Switzerland
Argentina
Czech Republic
Denmark
Germany
Spain
Belgium
UK
Italy
Australia
US
Finland
Turkey
Canada
Sweden
Norway
Venezuela
South Africa
Mexico
Brazil
Japan
Philippines
South Korea
Indonesia
Taiwan
Thailand
China
Malaysia
India
Source:

Euromonitor International

Euromonitor International

2009

2014

% point change

27.1
25.5
29.0
23.1
26.5
24.1
23.2
22.4
20.7
21.5
20.1
19.5
18.5
19.5
19.4
17.3
18.1
15.8
16.0
17.7
15.5
20.2
12.9
12.0
11.8
9.9
12.9
9.2
7.1
5.5
4.2
3.8
2.5
1.7
1.0

28.3
25.6
25.1
24.4
24.0
22.9
22.5
21.1
20.6
20.5
19.7
18.4
17.0
17.0
16.7
15.2
14.9
14.9
14.6
13.6
13.4
13.0
12.7
11.9
11.0
9.9
9.8
8.8
5.5
4.6
4.4
4.4
2.6
1.6
1.1

1.2
0.1
-3.9
1.3
-2.5
-1.2
-0.7
-1.3
-0.1
-1.0
-0.4
-1.1
-1.5
-2.5
-2.7
-2.1
-3.2
-0.9
-1.4
-4.1
-2.1
-7.2
-0.2
-0.1
-0.8
0.0
-3.1
-0.4
-1.6
-0.9
0.2
0.6
0.1
-0.1
0.1

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Alcohol
A drink to unwind
Alcohol consumption is common among young women, especially students and those with
professional jobs, as they increasingly delay marriage and children in order to live life to the full.
Many women, especially city dwellers, regularly go out with friends or partners or have dinner
parties at home, at which alcohol is invariably consumed.
Nevertheless, Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey of 2013 found that
although the majority of under 30s females consume alcohol at least once a month, they are
more likely than the average consumer to be teetotal. 38% of under 30s females reported that
they never drink alcohol at home and 33% never drink outside of the home, compared with 27%
and 26% of all respondents, respectively. This is partly due to the inclusion of underage women
in the survey sample. Among those aged 15-19 only, as many as 55% reported that never drink
alcohol at home and 50% never drink when away from home.
The percentage of women in their 20s who drink away from home once or twice a month, and
once or twice a week, was higher than for all respondents, at 22% and 15%, respectively.
Chart 10

Young Women: Frequency of Consuming Alcohol at Home by Age Group


2013

% respondents selecting:

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Source:

Chart 11

Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey, 2013

Young Women: Frequency of Consuming Alcohol Away From Home by Age


Group 2013

% respondents selecting:

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Source:

Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey, 2013

German women consume most alcohol


The survey results found that under 30s females in Germany were the most frequent
consumers of alcohol, with only 18% of them saying they never consume alcohol at home and
14% never consuming it outside the home. 26% and 30% of German women reported that they
drink alcohol in the home or away, respectively, once or twice a month.
Alcohol is also consumed frequently at home by women in China, the UK, Russia and France,
with just 26% or less of women under 30 in these countries saying they never drink. China also
counted the lowest proportion of under 30s females saying they never drink alcohol when away
from home.
The share of young women who said they drink once or twice a week was highest in the UK
both at home (24%) and away from home (23%). The UK has a long-standing binge-drinking
culture among young people, although this is reportedly declining due to a trend towards
healthier living.

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An OECD report published in May 2015 claimed that highly educated professional British
women drink more than any other similar group in the Western world, dubbing this the dark side
of equality. This has been exacerbated by the increasing number of women moving into
traditionally male industries, such as finance, which have a heavy drinking culture.
Binge drinking on the rise in France
A fifth of French women also reported drinking away from home once or twice a week. This
ties in with recent press reports that binge drinking (ie, drinking copious amounts of alcohol in a
short period of time) is becoming more common among young French women. Figures
published by the National Institute of Prevention and Health Education (INPES) in April 2015
found that around 46% of French people in the 18-25 age group (men and women) had
participated in binge drinking at least once in the previous year, compared to just 33% a decade
earlier. Those in that age group who had done it three times in the last year had almost doubled
from 15% to 29%. The statistics showed that there was a noticeable increase in binge drinking
among young French women, with the proportion admitting to doing it at least three times in the
past year rising to 28%, from 19% in 2010 and just 8% in 2005. In the same week, Health
Minister Marisol Touraine had presented a new health bill including reforms to crack down on
Frances binge drinking culture.
Indian women abstain
At the other end of the scale, as many as 78% of Indian women of this age group reported
that never drink alcohol at home and 72% of them say they do not drink alcohol outside the
home. India is still a conservative society where women rarely go to bars, while for its large
Muslim population, alcohol is forbidden.
Alcohol is also less frequently consumed by women in Japan and Brazil, where 47% and 44%
of this group report that they never drink alcohol at home.
Chart 12

Young Women: Frequency of Consuming Alcohol at Home by Country 2013

% women 15-29

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Chart 13

Young Women: Frequency of Consuming Alcohol Away From Home by


Country 2013

% women 15-29

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Source:

Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey, 2013

Opportunities for drinks manufacturers


Due to the growing number of young female drinkers, women are becoming increasingly
influential within the alcoholic drinks market, and many new brands are emerging that target this
consumer group specifically.
According to a US study by Technomic, women were more likely than the general population
to spend more on alcoholic drinks in 2014 than in 2013 (30% versus 19%) and were more likely
than the general population to try out new drinks at home (42% versus 35%). The study found
that among women aged 21 to 34, the most popular drinks consumed outside the home were
domestic regular beer (71%), imported beer (66%), domestic light beer (64%), flavoured malt
(62%), craft beer (58%) and strong cider (54%).
In the US, female-orientated alcoholic drinks include wines with names like Girls Night Out,
MommyJuice and Cupcake Vineyards, as well as flavoured vodkas with a more healthy stance,
such as Skinnygirl Vodka and Voli Light Vodka (which boasts the presence of electrolytes and
no more than 81 calories a serving). Little Black Dress Vodka is available in unusual flavours
like blueberry pomegranate and black cherry vanilla, while Diva Vodka includes a wand of

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Swarovski crystals inside each bottle. Budweiser has even launched a female-orientated
flavoured beer, called Bud Light Lime-A-Rita.

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY
Women become more active
Women still lag some way behind men in terms of sports participation, a factor that has been
blamed partly on the lack of womens sports coverage in the media, and partly on the stigma
attached to female sports participation in some societies.
In the US, research by the Tucker Center found that, although 40% of all sports participants
are female, womens sports receive only 4% of all sport media coverage. According to the UKs
Womens Sport and Fitness Foundation (WSFF), only 7% of sports media coverage is devoted
to womens sport, and just 0.4% of commercial investment goes to women-only sport. The
situation is similar in Australia, where research in 2015 found that women feature in only 7% of
sports programming.
Nevertheless, there is evidence to suggest that more women than ever are taking up fitness
activities, inspired by social media sites, energetic celebrities, the proliferation of fitness devices
and apps, and government and sports companies efforts to engage women in sport.
The celebrity influence
Celebrity and the media are a driving influence on young women and their attitudes towards
health and fitness. There has been a notable rise in health-conscious female role models, such
as Miranda Kerr, Kelly Brook, Kim Kardashian and Millie Mackintosh, who regularly post socalled fitspiration images on social media websites, which display themselves mid-workout and
wearing skimpy gym gear. For example, in a recent Instagram post, singer Beyonc Knowles
performed a series of fitness drills to celebrate the fifth anniversary of Michelle Obamas Move
More campaign, which clocked up 829,000 likes.
Furthermore, celebrities such as Beyonc and Kate Hudson have launched their own
activewear brands, while US model Karlie Kloss and British singer Ellie Goulding have been
named ambassadors for Nike. US Vogue recently featured Serena Williams on its cover, as well
as dedicating an entire spread to the fitness secrets of models such as Joan Smalls and
Adrianna Lima.
The internet is even creating its own celebrities from inspirational fitness fanatics. Several
female instructors have cult-like followings, such as Jen Selter, who has amassed six million
Instagram followers, and Rachel Brathen, a yoga instructor with 1.3 million followers.
Meanwhile, a myriad health gurus are teaching women about how to live better through their
bestselling books, popular blogs and loyal social media followings.
Functional fitness
Unlike men, the main motivations of female fitness fanatics are not to build muscle but to burn
fat and get the toned and lean bodies typified by their favourite celebrities. Female fitness is
reported to have taken on an increasingly anaerobic tilt recently. Young women are increasingly
taking up resistance training, often incorporated in functional fitness/strength programmes like
CrossFit.
Simultaneously, there has been a rise in competitive fitness events, such as the Tough
Mudder obstacle races, distance running and triathlons, which are attracting greater numbers of
casual female fitness consumers. Tough Mudder has burgeoned into an international
phenomenon and has seen its female participation nearly double to 30% since it started in 2010.

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Most women exercise at least once a week


Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey of 2013 found that under 30s
females are more likely than the general population to take part in regular physical exercise.
63% of this group claimed to exercise at least once a week, compared with 59% of all
respondents. The percentage was even higher among the 15-19s contingent, at 65%.
Chart 14

Young Women: Frequency of Taking Part in Physical Exercise by Age Group


2013

% respondents selecting:

Source:

Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey, 2013

Indian women are the most active


Exercise among under 30s females was most frequent in India, where 39% said they take
part in physical exercise almost every day. Levels were also high in Brazil and the US, each with
35% of this group exercising almost every day.

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It has been reported that young women and girls in India have been hugely inspired by recent
national sporting role models. For example, hundreds of fans turned up at the airport to greet
badminton player Saina Nehwal on her return from the 2012 London Olympics, and Nehwal
reported a significant upsurge in membership at the academy at which she trains. Another
strong role model for Indian girls is tennis player Sania Mirza, who became the first Indian
woman to win a Womens Tennis Association (WTA) title, in 2005, and went on to win two mixed
doubles grand slams, in the 2009 Australian Open and the 2012 French Open.
French and British women were found to be most likely to exercise once or twice a week
(40% each). Indeed, according to the UKs Womens Sport and Fitness Foundation (WSFF),
there has been a significant rise in female participation in sport in the UK over the past few
years, with almost 500,000 more women taking part in sport and active recreation at least once
a week in 2012, compared to 2006.
This girl can
Early in 2015, Sport England launched an initiative to encourage more women to engage in
sport and exercise, following findings that 2 million fewer women than men in the 14-40 age
group play sport regularly. When the women were asked why they did not exercise, many stated
a fear of being judged on their appearance while they sweated. The This Girl Can campaign
thus aimed to inspire women to challenge the cultural assumptions about femininity that may
prevent them engaging in sport and exercise. The campaign, which has reportedly been very
successful to date, includes TV clips that show real womens bodies of different shapes and
sizes as they take part in a range of activities, including swimming, kickboxing, football, dance
and cycling. The footage, which is accompanied by Missy Elliotts song, Get Ur Freak On, aims
to challenge the conventional representations of the female body as an object of beauty.
Other more local initiatives have also been launched in the UK to help improve the health and
wellbeing of women. For example, in 2015, the Sheffield City Trust (SCT) organised a host of
free activity sessions for women of all abilities, including female weekends at iceSheffield for ice
skating, swimming pools and leisure centres and Beauchief Golf Course. SCT also hosted a
cross-company Womens Workplace Challenge competition at newly-revamped high ropes
adventure course Altitude. SCTs Fitness Unlimited gym membership scheme has the highest
level of female participation in the UK, with 8,650 women signed up.
Chinese women become more empowered
A 2014 article in Advertising Age described how womens sports is a growing trend in China,
partly due to a desire for personal empowerment. As women gain economic and social status,
they are trying activities such as running, yoga, tai chi, Zumba, dancing, swimming, archery and
golf, and team sports like table tennis, tennis, badminton and volleyball. Interest is also said to
be rising in winter sports, such as skiing.
In 2013, Nike sponsored the 2013 Shanghai International Marathon with a campaign that had
the tagline Let the Run Tell You Why. The campaign, which focused on a group of runners and
their various reasons for running, featured three college girls running together, shrugging off
other women who thought they were too non-conformist and boys who saw them as too strong
and therefore unattractive. The message was that women should run not just to lose weight but
to discover their true potential, to feel confident and to be with like-minded women. Similarly,
Adidas, building upon its global all in campaign, launched all in for #mygirls in China, which
portrayed girls helping each other reach their true potential.
Japanese women buck the trend
Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey of 2013 showed that as many as
13% of Japanese women under 30 report that do not ever exercise, while only 14% of them

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exercise almost every day. This is mainly attributable to cultural reasons: it is generally not
deemed appropriate for Japanese women to undertake such activities as running or going to the
gym, and young women tend to prefer to stay healthy by following a healthy diet and eating
small portions, or walking.
Chart 15

Young Women: Frequency of Taking Part in Physical Exercise by Country


2013

% women 15-29

Source:

Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey, 2013

Womens team sports become more popular


When asked how frequently younger women took part in a variety of sporting activities, they
scored higher than the general population on all counts except walking or hiking for exercise,
which is an activity that tends to be associated with older consumers.
Most notably, under 30s females were significantly more likely than all respondents to take
part in team sports at least once a month (39% versus 26%). This type of activity is especially

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popular among the younger contingent aged 15-19, of whom 46% participate in team sports at
least once a month and 10% almost every day. Many young women of this age group are still at
school and belong to college sports teams, including such activities as netball, womens football
(soccer) or hockey.
Running takes off
Individual sports, such as running and cycling, are more popular than ever among women.
Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey of 2013 found that 62% of under
30s females take part in individual sports at least once a month, compared with 56% of all
respondents. A lower percentage exercise at the gym (40%), although this is still substantially
higher than the average of all respondents (34%).
According to the organisation Running USA, over the last five years there has been a notable
increase in the number of women participating in half marathons and 5Ks in the US. Its 2015
survey found that women accounted for over 60% of half marathon finishers. Running USA also
noted a shift in womens running from a solitary to a social event, due to the rise in interactive
fun runs, such as The Color Run. The latter hosts around 300 5K runs throughout the world, in
which participants splatter each other with coloured powder.
Women-only races, such as the Nike Womens Half Marathon and the Divas Half Marathon &
5K Series, have transformed the concept of long-distance running from a competition to a
weekend girls getaway, where women can feel inspired, relaxed and comfortable, whatever
their size, age or body shape. Many have fun with these events, donning tutus and tiaras, and
finishing up with a glass of bubbly. The recent Nike Womens Half Marathon even had firefighters handing out necklaces at the end of a race.
In the UK, Womens Running 10K Race Series partnered with This Girl Can, Sport Englands
initiative celebrating active women, in 2015 to introduce a 5K option in order to attract more
casual runners to the events. The organisation also joined up with sponsors such as Send a
Cow, Wheyhey ice cream, Endomondo, Everything But The Cow, Saka Water, Bellum Active,
Skechers and Buff to provide fun, freebies and discounts at the events. The UK supermarket
chain Morrisons organises the UKs largest women-only running event, in which almost 10,000
women run through the streets of Glasgow to the sound of drummers and pipers.
Similar events take place in other parts of the world. In Australia, for example, Nike organised
the third She Runs the Night event in 2014, a nocturnal fun run for women, which attracted
over 6,000 participants.
Women also appear to be embracing the current trend for obstacle races, or mud runs.
Women reportedly make up half of all participants in the Warrior Dash events, as they seek
enticing new ways to get or stay active, have fun and feel empowered. This has led to the
establishment of women-only events, such as Dirty Girl, Pretty Muddy and Mudderella.
The yoga boom
Intensive physical activities, such as yoga, dance classes, workouts or Pilates, are also very
popular among young women, especially those looking to combine fitness with a social element.
A particularly popular activity in recent years has been Zumba, a dance fitness programme
combining aerobic elements with dance moves, including hip-hop, soca, samba, salsa,
merengue and mambo.
Yoga, an activity dominated by young women, has also become big business all over the
world. Yoga has been described as something of a panacea for the ailments of modern society,
from insomnia, stress and anxiety to addiction, lower back pain and diabetes.
Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey of revealed that 43% of under
30s females take part in intensive physical activities, compared with 38% of all respondents.

Euromonitor International

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Table 5

Passport

Young Women: Frequency of Sports Participation by Age Group 2013

% respondents selecting:
Women 15-19

Team sports:
Never
Less than once a month
1-2 times a month
1-2 times a week
Almost every day
Individual sports:
Never
Less than once a month
1-2 times a month
1-2 times a week
Almost every day
Exercise at the gym:
Never
Less than once a month
1-2 times a month
1-2 times a week
Almost every day
Walking/hiking for
exercise:
Never
Less than once a month
1-2 times a month
1-2 times a week
Almost every day
Intensive physical
activities:
Never
Less than once a month
1-2 times a month
1-2 times a week
Almost every day
Source:
Note:

Women 20-29

Women
All
15-29 responde
nts

20%
34%
13%
23%
10%

27%
38%
14%
16%
5%

25%
36%
14%
18%
7%

40%
33%
11%
12%
3%

10%
26%
17%
26%
21%

10%
30%
16%
28%
16%

10%
29%
17%
27%
18%

16%
28%
15%
26%
16%

35%
26%
9%
12%
17%

31%
28%
8%
20%
13%

32%
28%
8%
17%
14%

40%
26%
7%
17%
10%

6%
23%
15%
22%
34%

4%
20%
15%
27%
35%

4%
21%
15%
25%
35%

3%
17%
14%
28%
38%

22%
34%
13%
20%
12%

21%
36%
15%
19%
9%

21%
36%
14%
19%
10%

26%
36%
12%
18%
8%

Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey, 2013


Intensive physical activities include yoga, workouts and dancing

Brazilian and Indian women participate most in team sports


The Global Consumer Trends survey discovered that regular participation in team sports
among under 30s females was highest in Brazil and India, with 55% and 52%, respectively,
taking part in team sports at least once a month. Young women in these two countries were also
most likely to go to the gym at least once a month (52% and 51%, respectively).
Other studies have also confirmed that young Indian women are increasingly exercising at the
gym. Quoted in a 2014 report in the Financial Times India, which labelled the current generation
of young Indians as the Gym Generation, the director of Golds Gym India claimed that while
membership in India used to be predominantly male, today around 45% of gym members are
female. This he attributes largely to better education and access to the internet. The rise in
female gym-goers has positively impacted the gym industry, with the Federation of Indian
Chambers of Commerce and Industry (FICCI) estimating that the Indian fitness and slimming
industry grew from Rs60 billion in 2012 to nearly Rs100 billion in 2015.

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39

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Passport

Japanese women avoid sport though this may be changing


According to the Euromonitor International Global Consumer Trends survey results, Japanese
women exercise and undertake sporting activities less than the other countries say.
Nevertheless, the press reports a growing trend among young Japanese women for outdoor
activities, especially mountain climbing. Sportswear companies such as Goldwin Inc (which
operates The North Face 3 store in Harajuku) are taking advantage of this by launching outdoor
activities and clothing aimed at young women. Japans success in the FIFA Womens World
Cup in 2015, in addition to other sporting events around the world, might also spur more
Japanese women to take up team sports.
Chinese prefer individual activities
With regard to regular participation in individual sports, China ranked far higher than any other
country, with a significant 86% of women saying they undertake these activities at least once a
month, and 33% almost every day. Again, this contrasted with Japan, where as many as 43% of
respondents in the study group said they never participate in individual sports.
In the area of intensive physical activities like yoga and dance or exercise classes,
participation was strongest in India and the US, where 66% and 51% of under 30s females said
they undertook them at least once a month. This is partly due to the popularity of yoga in both
countries, which has spawned a lucrative market for yoga gear. Indeed, a survey from the US
Sports & Fitness Industry Association found that more than 24 million American adults practised
yoga in 2013, up from 17 million in 2008. Furthermore, it is estimated that consumers in the US
spend US$27 billion annually on yoga products.
The UKs protein princesses
In the UK, the hosting of the London 2012 Olympic Games did much to boost womens sports
participation. Inspired by the likes of gold medallists Jessica Ennis, Laura Trott, Victoria
Pendleton and Nicola Adams, many women joined sports clubs across the country, and the
number of people engaged in sport activities has remained relatively high.
Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey found that as many as a quarter
of UK under 30s females exercise at the gym once or twice a week. Another UK survey of over
2,000 gym-goers, carried out by Bodybuilding Warehouse in 2014, revealed that the number of
British women working out (ie, taking part in exercise classes, gym sessions, running, etc) had
grown by 62% over the last year. Although gyms are still dominated by men, the proportion of
women had risen significantly, from 9% to 15%. Dubbed the Protein Princesses, the
Bodybuilding Wearehouse survey found that women working out between four and five times a
week are typically in their mid-20s, with an average age of 24.
Table 6

Young Women: Frequency of Sports Participation by Country 2013

% women 15-29
Never

Team sports:
Brazil
China
France
Germany
India
Japan
Russia
UK

Euromonitor International

12%
16%
36%
41%
9%
55%
20%
26%

Less than once a month

1-2
times
a month

1-2
times
a week

Almost
every
day

33%
40%
34%
26%
39%
25%
47%
39%

15%
23%
6%
9%
16%
9%
17%
11%

24%
20%
19%
20%
24%
7%
12%
19%

16%
1%
5%
3%
12%
4%
4%
4%

40

YOUNG W OMENS HEALTH: GLOBAL ATTITUDES TOW ARDS HEALTH, FITNESS AND W ELLBEING AMONG THE UNDER
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US
Individual sports:
Brazil
China
France
Germany
India
Japan
Russia
UK
US
Exercise at the gym:
Brazil
China
France
Germany
India
Japan
Russia
UK
US
Walking/hiking for
exercise:
Brazil
China
France
Germany
India
Japan
Russia
UK
US
Intensive physical
activities:
Brazil
China
France
Germany
India
Japan
Russia
UK
US
Source:
Note:

Passport

30%

39%

15%

12%

5%

9%
1%
10%
7%
5%
43%
6%
8%
13%

30%
13%
33%
28%
32%
22%
36%
33%
28%

17%
16%
17%
20%
13%
14%
20%
19%
16%

24%
36%
33%
28%
27%
16%
24%
28%
26%

20%
33%
8%
18%
24%
5%
14%
13%
17%

25%
23%
43%
44%
26%
74%
28%
28%
24%

22%
41%
33%
22%
23%
18%
34%
27%
29%

5%
17%
6%
5%
5%
2%
11%
10%
12%

19%
17%
15%
21%
13%
5%
19%
25%
19%

29%
2%
3%
8%
32%
0%
8%
10%
17%

2%
1%
7%
5%
2%
19%
4%
5%
3%

22%
17%
36%
26%
13%
23%
16%
21%
19%

12%
17%
13%
18%
9%
20%
11%
17%
19%

34%
30%
17%
24%
20%
23%
21%
24%
33%

30%
35%
26%
28%
56%
15%
47%
33%
26%

18%
11%
35%
28%
5%
62%
22%
19%
13%

40%
46%
36%
36%
29%
24%
39%
33%
35%

14%
22%
8%
14%
16%
5%
12%
17%
13%

18%
18%
16%
17%
25%
5%
18%
23%
26%

9%
3%
5%
5%
25%
4%
9%
8%
12%

Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey, 2013


Intensive physical activities include yoga, workouts and dancing

Womens Sportswear
A burgeoning sector
The increasing participation of women in a range of sports, from team sports to running to
yoga, has led to a growing market for female-targeted sportswear and footwear. The US market
for womens sports apparel was estimated by Euromonitor International to be worth US$19.4
billion in 2014, up by 8% in current value terms since 2013. The sector has burgeoned on the
back of two core trends: the booming interest in health and fitness, and the fashion for wearing
sports clothing on an everyday basis.

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Nike was a key driver in the US market in 2015, directing its marketing efforts specifically
towards women with its Better for It initiative. The campaign was designed to encourage all
female athletes to push themselves to be their best by interacting with Nike and each other.
Women have come to account for a fifth of Nikes sales, and the company has now opened its
own high-profile stores for women in the US, China and the UK. Sales from its womens
sportswear division rose by 20% for the 2015 fiscal year, to US$6 billion. Nike also continued to
add premium services aimed at women, including bra fitting, pants hemming and gait analysis.
Not to be outdone, Under Armour launched its US$15 million I Will What I Want campaign in
2014, as part of a rebranding exercise to engage female customers (currently, only around 30%
of Under Armours US$2 billion in revenue comes from sales to women). The campaign
launched with a feel-good ad featuring muscular ballerina Misty Copeland, who was originally
rejected by the industry for not having the ideal ballet body. The ad went viral and racked up 4
million views in just one week. Subsequent advertisements featuring the brands other Women
of Will, including Olympic skier Lindsey Vonn, tennis player Sloane Stephens, soccer player
Kelley OHara, and Gisele Bndchen, have the same inspiring message about smashing body
image stereotypes. In July 2015, the next step in the I Will What I Want campaign was
launched at an experiential event at Body by Simone in Los Angeles, with Lindsey Vonn. The
campaign advertised the new Armour Bra Collection, which is designed to support women
undertaking various fitness activities.
Fusing fitness with fashion
Womens athletic wear appears to be undergoing a global movement towards premiumisation,
with interest escalating in the uppermost price tiers. Young women have played a key role in
pushing this trend. Womens activewear-focused e-boutiques include LA-based Carbon38,
Australia-based StyleRunner and a new entrant, luxury internet retailer Yoox.
Several other retailers have also taken advantage of the boom in womens athletic wear,
including Canadas Lululemon, Australias Lorna Jane, the Gaps Athleta, VF Corps Lucy and
rapidly growing online competitors such as Fabletics and UK-based Sweaty Betty. Both Sweaty
Betty and Lululemon have benefited from the increasing popularity of yoga and have attracted
cult followings. Lululemon sells US$100 yoga pants, while even more expensive brands are
emerging, such as Lucas Hugh, where a pair of leggings can cost 225.
In the US, Gap Inc opened 100 Athleta stores in 2014 and planned 30 more openings for
2015. According to the president of Athleta, fitness and fashion are converging, with Athleta
offering a rather edgy line of clothing in bright colours, muted neutrals and prints.
Net-a-Porter launches new activewear concept
In 2014, the luxury clothing internet retailer Net-a-Porter entered the womens activewear
sector by unveiling its athletic shop-in-shop, Net-a-Sporter. The concept clearly targets women
who are serious about fitness but are also greatly concerned about aesthetic appeal. At the
same time, the shop has the potential to attract a new type of clientele that does not normally
buy designer clothing but is willing to invest in premium sportswear for its functional qualities.
Net-a-Sporter is organised around 11 activities, including popular ones such as running and
yoga/dance, as well as more niche pursuits, such as golf and equestrian events. Running and
gym/crossfit were found to be the most popular exercise areas among Net-a-Porter customers,
and the company expects the range to expand alongside the emergence of new fitness
movements, such as barre and spin class variations.
Brands carried by Net-a-Sporter include a mix of household names, such as Nike, and startups such as LEtoile Sport and Monreal London, which focus on tenniswear. The retailer has
also partnered with swimwear brands Lisa Marie Fernandez and Zimmermann on exclusive
capsule collections. The more fashion-orientated brands are categorised as aprs sport, which

Euromonitor International

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features clothing that allows consumers go straight from yoga to brunching with friends without
changing. These brands also addresses the growing trend of incorporating casual, comfortable
sports-inspired clothing in daily wardrobes. The category includes hoodies and sweatpants from
contemporary casual brands like Zoe Karrsen, Splendid and T by Alexander Wang.
The increasing popularity of luxury fitness concepts, such as SoulCycle and Equinox gyms,
which have spread across North America and are now emerging in the UK, has coincided with
the premiumisation of womens activewear. As exercise regimes have become a style statement
in themselves, the associated attire has become an essential part of the wardrobe for these
consumers.
Fast fashion retailers enter the fray
At the lower end of the market, fashion retailers are also entering the athleisure sector. For
example, in 2014, Swedish fast fashion giant H&M launched a global collection in Australia with
the designer Alexander Wang, which included sports bras, sweatshirts and neoprene
eveningwear. The range reportedly sold out on the first day of launch.
Singer Beyonc Knowles and London-based fashion retailer Topshop have also formed a
joint venture company, Parkwood Topshop Athletic Ltd, with the aim of designing and
manufacturing an athletic streetwear brand to be launched during autumn 2015.
Chinese market remains dynamic
Young Chinese women are also reported to be taking an increasing interest in fashionable
activewear, with the richest prepared to spend significant sums on gear, classes, coaching and
athletic events. Euromonitor International estimates that the womens sports apparel market in
China was worth US$3.6 billion in 2014, having grown by 6% by current value since the
previous year.
Sports brands are noticing the trend and ramping up efforts to target Chinese women with
messages regarding independence, self-challenging, self-expression and above all, fun. Adidas
is targeting young women with brightly coloured and comfortable designs made for everyday
use, thus transforming itself into a fast-fashion casual wear brand through Chinese pop icons
including Fan Bingbing and Angelababy.
In March 2014, adidas launched a new advertising campaign in China for its womens product
lines under the TGIF (Thank God Its Friday) concept. The campaign, which aimed to
communicate the necessity of sports for women at the weekends, was an advanced version of
its previous All in for My Girls campaign in 2013, which encouraged women to exercise with
their friends. The campaign advertised varied sports products with a focus on running, training
and dancing, which strongly boosted sales in 2014.
Nike has also focused on catering to the emerging female segment in China. In 2014, the
company promoted a women-specific sports training smart phone app, Nike+TC, and set up the
second global womens product experience centre in Shanghai. Meanwhile, Lululemon Athletica
took advantage of the rising popularity of yoga studios by launching in China with a creative
yoga event that addressed women who practice yoga for their own sake and invest in their
health and appearance.
Euromonitor International data show that Russian women spend a large amount of money on
sportswear, even though wearing sports clothing as part of daily wardrobe is not as common in
Russia as it is in other countries. The wearing of sportswear is largely restricted to fitness clubs,
where women want to be seen to be wearing designer items. Sales are estimated to have grown
by 11% in current value terms in 2014 alone, to US$2.0 billion.

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Passport

Trainers with skirts are the fashion in Japan


Despite Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey revealing that fewer
Japanese women take part in regular sporting activities, the market for sportswear in Japan
performed well in 2014, rising 6% in value to US$1.8 billion. This is partly due to a trend towards
wearing fitness clothing on a daily basis, driven by launches from the likes of Mizuno and its
+me brand of fashionable activewear. The footwear brand New Balance also recorded a
massive 40% increase in sales in 2013, which it attributed to the growing popularity of trainers
worn with a skirt among young women in their teens and 20s.
Sales of Womens Sports Apparel in Key Markets 2013/2014

Table 7
US$ million

US
China
Germany
Russia
South Korea
Italy
Japan
UK
France
Brazil
Spain
Canada
Australia
South Africa
Poland
Sweden
Turkey
Netherlands
Mexico
India
Norway
Thailand
Austria
Malaysia
Denmark
Source:

2013

2014

% growth

17,922
3,362
2,099
1,830
1,770
1,848
1,700
1,603
1,658
1,135
1,172
1,040
909
823
711
690
543
584
476
418
333
278
269
240
176

19,413
3,569
2,166
2,028
1,884
1,804
1,804
1,772
1,712
1,283
1,208
1,105
993
894
768
716
614
583
531
521
345
311
276
257
184

8.3
6.2
3.2
10.8
6.4
-2.4
6.1
10.5
3.2
13.1
3.0
6.3
9.3
8.6
7.9
3.7
13.0
-0.3
11.7
24.6
3.5
11.9
2.5
7.0
4.2

Euromonitor International

Fitness Apps and Wearable Tech


Digital coaches
In recent years, an explosion of fitness-related technology gadgets and applications has
allowed women all over the world to track their progress and share workouts, fitness goals and
race results with friends. For some who previously led sedentary lifestyles, the connection
between fitness and technology has renewed their motivation to exercise regularly and maintain
a healthier regime. Many of these fitness apps and devices can monitor heart rate, caloric intake
or blood pressure, or track distances during running, cycling or swimming. In some cases, this
information can then be instantly shared via social media platforms such as Facebook or
Twitter.
The usage of fitness and health apps on smartphones has also been growing strongly over
the past few years. Nielsens recent Connected Life Report found that almost a third of US

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smartphone owners (some 46 million unique users) accessed apps in the fitness and health
category in January 2014, an 18% increase in users compared with January 2013.
Young women are key users of fitness bands
Many apps connect consumers with their wearables. These include FitBit (with 3.3 million
users in January 2014), Nike+Running (0.8 million users) and Samsungs S Health app (3.0
million users, prior to the launch of its own fitness bands). Other fitness and health apps include
diet apps such as Calorie Counter & Diet Tracker by MyFitnessPal (8.7 million users in January
2014) and exercise apps like Nexercise (3.0 million users) and Runkeeper (2.1 million users).
Nielsens research found that most fitness band wearers were young, with men and women
aged 18-34 years making up 49% of all owners, while women made up over half of all fitness
band wearers (52%, compared with 48% for men). Women were also more likely to use
mHealth devices (mobile health devices used to monitor specialised health needs) than men.
Furthermore, the research found that women used Fitbits smartphone app nearly twice as often
as men (29 times a month versus 16 times a month) and accessed the app nearly every day.
Sportswear companies develop their offerings
In response to this trend, sportswear manufacturers have invested heavily in developing their
fitness app offerings. Nike and adidas have a long-established presence in the mobile apps
market adidas with adidas Go and miCoach, and Nike with Nike Running, Nike Training Club,
Nike Fuel and Nike Move. Nike Training Club is aimed particularly at women, and offers a wide
range of workout routines tailored to various fitness goals.
Recently, Under Armour has also been building up its share in the category. In February
2015, the company purchased both the MyFitnessPal and Endomondo apps, following its
acquisition of MapMyFitness in 2013. According to Under Armour, these acquisitions have
brought the company a total digital customer base of more than 130 million.
For the consumer, sportswear apps cost a great deal less than a personal trainer, while still
offering a personalised experience. For sportswear companies, they offer substantial
commercial opportunities and a way to connect directly with consumers. Fitness apps are seen
as personal coaches, helping to motivate consumers, track their results and often rewarding
them with the likes of fresh content.
Furthermore, brand loyalty is fostered as consumers who train with a brand-endorsed app are
more likely to have that brand front of mind when the need for new gear arises. For example,
Under Armours MapMyFitness app includes a feature that monitors users shoe use and alerts
them when it is time for a new pair, sending a link to where new shoes can be bought online.
Fitness apps are becoming popular in emerging markets too. For example, in China, Gudong
Yundong, developed by codoon.com, helps track exercise routine and weight changes, while
Chihuo Jianfei, developed by Boohee Technology, is able to record consumers daily diet and
provide information about calories to help control weight.
The future is wearables
Wearable technology is in its early stages of development but provides a key opportunity for
sportswear innovation. In 2014, a Euromonitor International Analyst Pulse survey questioned
Euromonitor International analysts in over 80 countries about their use of activity trackers and
fitness gadgets, and found that, of those analysts who reported using fitness tracking devices,
the majority said they wear a device during physical activity that tracks distance, calories and
heart rate. Many of these products include heart rate monitors and sensors that contain a GPS
chip to track distance more accurately. A smaller number said they wear a device that not only
tracks exercise data, but also daily activity, including quality of sleep. These lifestyle-tracking
devices include the Nike+ FuelBand, Fitbit Flex and Jawbone UP, among others.

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Nielsens recent Connected Life Report found that in the US, around one in six consumers
who have heard about wearables are using them and, among these, 61% are wearing fitness
bands. The report found that wearable tech was most common among young people aged 1834, who accounted for 49% of owners of fitness bands. While men and women were found to
wear fitness bands in nearly equal numbers, women are more likely to use mHealth devices
(mobile health devices used to monitor specialised health needs) than men.
Sportswear manufacturers are also investing in wearable technology. Nike discontinued its
Fuelband in order to pursue a partnership with Apple, while adidas owns both the Smart Run
and Fit Smart watch brands. The fitness apps belonging to these brands offer extra tracking
functionality when synced with the associated wearables. For example, adidass miCoach Train
and Run app, which allows users to devise personalised training plans to work towards their
goals, works best if used in conjunction with the Fit Smart watch.
Fitness trackers are currently in phones, watches and wristbands, but it is likely that in future,
more of this functionality will be incorporated into garments themselves.

Sports Nutrition
Celebrity influence
Sports nutrition is a very fast growing area, with global sales rising by 52% in constant value
terms between 2009 and 2014. However, despite the growing trend for female fitness, very few
sports nutrition products cater to womens specific nutritional needs. Indeed, unlike the related
vitamins and dietary supplements category, gender-based formulating and marketing is still
underdeveloped in sports nutrition.
A UK survey of over 2,000 gym-goers carried out by Bodybuilding Warehouse in 2014 found
that women who visit gyms are increasingly using supplements, such as protein shakes, to
maximise the effectiveness of their workout. Many young women are motivated by the increase
in celebrity-endorsed fitness supplements. The fitspiration images posted by the likes of Kim
Kardashian and Millie Mackintosh on social media websites often show them holding protein
shakes.
The Bodybuilding Warehouse survey found that the most popular supplements consumed by
women were whey-protein products, such as protein shakes, on-the-go protein snacks and
vitamin and mineral supplements. It also revealed that women were most attracted to a
particular brand for its flavour.
Expanding the target audience
As sports nutrition continues to push further into the mainstream, manufacturers are looking to
increase their appeal among non-core users, such as wellness- and fitness-minded women.
One successful example is Bio Synergy Ltds Active Woman in the UK. The brand partnered
with popular daytime television host and fitness personality Melanie Sykes to launch the line,
which includes a pre-workout supplement, a post-workout recovery shake, a concentrated
sports drink and several weight loss supplements. The formulations emphasise their folic acid
and calcium content, and the packaging design is more subtle than the bright and bold colour
schemes typical of sports nutrition brands. Launched in 2012, Active Woman is distributed both
online and in mainstream chains such as Holland & Barrett and Boots.
Similarly, in the US, fast-growing Muscle Pharm Corp whose very masculine Assault and
Combat Powder brands are popular among both hardcore and casual users launched the
stand-alone FitMiss line in 2013. Centred around Delight, a hybrid meal replacement
slimming/post-workout protein powder, the line features a sachet format pre-workout
supplement, a probiotic multivitamin and several weight loss supplements featuring popular
ingredients such as conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). The brand was initially launched online but

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became available in Walgreens drugstores in 2014. It is also available in several international


markets, including Australia and Germany.
Table 8

Global Sports Nutrition Sales 2009/2014

US$ million

Sports Nutrition
Source:

2009

2014

% growth
current

% growth
constant

5,920

10,096

70.6

51.6

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Eating Habits and Nutrition

Obesity
The world is getting bigger
Overweight and obesity have become a major public health issue in many countries, to the
extent that obesity has been described by the WHO as reaching epidemic proportions. This is
placing an increasingly heavy burden on healthcare authorities, as being significantly overweight
is linked to a wide range of health problems, including diabetes, heart disease, high blood
pressure, arthritis, gallstones, cancers such as breast and prostate, sleep apnoea, infertility and
depression.
A study conducted by UK-based think tank The Overseas Development Institute in 2013
found that more than a third of all adults worldwide (just under 1.5 billion people) were either
overweight or obese (defined as having a body mass index or BMI of 25-30 and over 30,
respectively). It attributed growing obesity rates to a noticeable shift from cereals and tubers to
meat, fats and sugar.
The obesity issue is attracting much media attention and is a major focus of governments
wishing to relieve the national health burden by encouraging citizens to lose weight. In some
countries, campaigns to promote exercise are as important as those to curb smoking and
excessive consumption of alcohol.
US has highest levels of female obesity
Among the key consumer markets shown in the table below, female obesity was at its highest
level in the US, at 42.5% in 2014. This represented an alarming jump of 5.7 percentage points
since 2009.
Latin America also has a growing obesity problem, with female obesity rates reaching 39.9%
in Mexico and 37.8% in Venezuela by 2014. The Mexican government has recently taken a
number of measures to help reduce national obesity levels, including placing a tax on sugary
drinks from January 2014, and restricting TV advertising of high-calorie food and soft drinks.
While obesity levels are still relatively low throughout Asia, they are beginning to rise sharply
in many areas of the region, as richer consumers switch to more refined foods and Westernstyle diets. In China, the proportion of women classed as obese rose from 6.0% in 2009 to 8.3%
in 2014, while in South Korea, the share increased from 4.8% to 6.0% over the same period.
Japan and India ranked lowest among the key markets, with female obesity rates of less than
3%. However, Indias population is becoming increasingly overweight as a result of rising
affluence.

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Chart 16

Female Obesity by Country 2009/2014

Female Obese population (BMI 30kg/sq m or more)

Source:

Euromonitor International

Weight Management
Women aspire to be thin
There is an enormous amount of pressure on young women to conform to the ideal body
shape as portrayed by the media. Bombarded with images of skinny and usually airbrushed
models and celebrities from an early age, girls are conditioned to believe that thin is beautiful
and are on a constant mission to lose weight.
Added to this, rising obesity rates bring an increased risk of a range of health issues, and
many women are keen to manage their weight while young as a preventative measure.
Weight loss can be achieved in a number of ways, from eating more healthily and increasing
exercise to joining slimming clubs, taking meal replacements, embarking on drastic diets or
even undertaking surgery.

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Weightwatchers retains a loyal following


Membership of slimming clubs, such as Weight Watchers and Jenny Craig, remains strong,
as these organisations offer various dieting products and services to assist weight loss and
maintenance. Founded in the US in 1963, Weight Watchers now operates in about 30 countries
around the world, using a science-driven approach to help participants lose weight by forming
helpful habits, eating smarter, getting more exercise and providing support. Research conducted
at Duke University in 2014 showed that the average Weight Watchers member paid US$377
and lost an average of five pounds (2.3kg) during the year.
Another popular method of slimming is meal replacement plans, such as Herbalife and
Unilevers Slim Fast. Adherents of these programmes typically consume a meal replacement
shake or bar for breakfast, lunch and dinner, or combine them with light meals.
Over the years, different fad diets have also come and gone. Most low-carb diets (including
Atkins) eschew foods made from refined carbohydrates, which includes sugar, but they tend to
be more permissive with regard to fat intake. A current trend, termed Intermittent Fasting (also
known under other names, such as the 5:2 diet), requires drastic calorie restriction on certain
days. Consumers often choose to eat regularly for five days a week, then only consume 600
calories for two days. Another popular diet at the moment is the Paleo Diet, in which consumers
attempt to mimic the diet of Stone Age hunters and gatherers.
Recent years have seen the emergence of cheap fitness apps or online dieting tools, such as
MyFitnessPal and MyNetDiarys Calorie Counter, which appeal to those on lower budgets or
with less time.
Almost a quarter of under 30s on a weight loss diet
Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey of 2013 found that a slightly
higher percentage of under 30s females said they were on a weight loss diet (24%) compared to
all respondents (23%). However, only 40% of women in this group said they simply monitor
what they eat in order to manage weight, versus 44% for all respondents.
Dieting among the under 30s seems to be most common in the US, which corresponds to the
high obesity rates in that country. According to the survey, as many as 31% of under 30s
females in the US said they were on a weight loss diet.
At the other end of the scale, this applied to just 17% of women in France and 19% in China.
Indeed, in what is known in the media as the French paradox, despite the nations preference
for sweet pastries, baguettes made from refined flour, rich sauces, cheese and wine, French
women somehow manage to remain slim, and the incidence of heart disease in the country is
relatively low. This is because they tend to eat wholesome food in moderation, often have salad
and fruit with meals, and avoid fatty and sugary foods. Sweet snacks and rich desserts are
restricted to special occasions, and portion control is important to French women.
Reports suggest that Chinese women tend to prefer a quick fix when it comes to losing
weight, such as diet pills, skipping meals or liposuction.
Over a quarter of under 30s females in India, Japan and the UK also claimed to be on a
weight loss diet, while 45% of those in India are monitoring their food intake. This is no doubt
because the survey is skewed towards the more affluent, urban consumer set, who are more
likely to consume processed foods and live a more sedentary lifestyle. Although obesity is a
growing problem in India, it is still at a very low level and for the vast majority of rural Indian
consumers on low incomes, dieting is not an issue.
Japanese women stay slim
In the UK, recent initiatives, such as Change4Life, have entered the publics consciousness
by way of television advertisements, whilst shows such as The Biggest Loser remain popular.

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The survey revealed that under 30s females in France and China were most likely to agree
that they watch their food intake in order to manage their weight, at 54% and 52%, respectively.
It is notable that only just over a fifth (21%) of young Japanese women said they monitor their
food intake to manage their weight the lowest level among all countries. Japanese consumers
are very health-conscious in general and tend to prefer foods that are low in fat and sugar.
Indeed, the culture in Japan is to control calories, nutrients and the amount of food naturally or
via functional foods (FOSHU), such as Kirin Mets Cola or Pepsi Special, rather than via diet
foods.
Underweight is reported to be a growing problem among young Japanese women in their
teens and 20s. The global media has had a significant effect on young womens image
awareness, and popular perceptions of underweight women tend to be positive. Ministry of
Health data show that the proportion of underweight adults in Japan was at an all-time high in
2012. As many as 29% of all considered too thin by international standards.
Chart 17

Young Women: Weight Management by Age Group 2013

% respondents agreeing:

Source:

Chart 18

Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey, 2013

Young Women: Weight Management by Country 2013

% respondents agreeing:

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the Weight Management Market


Under 30s a key market
As young women seemingly aspire to become slimmer and slimmer as a result of media and
peer pressure, the under 30s are a prime target audience for weight management products. The
market grew steadily over the review period, despite growing consumer cynicism regarding the
efficacy of products and miracle claims. Between 2009 and 2014, global weight management
sales increased by 15% in constant value terms, to US$14.6 billion.
The largest category is meal replacement slimming products, where sales reached US$7.9
billion in 2014, having grown by 28% in constant value terms since 2009. There has been a
growing preference for this type of product over other weight management options, as meal
replacements are considered by many to be the most natural way of managing weight, as well
as being nutritious and effective. The category has seen the development of ready-to-drink
(RTD) beverages and snack bars, and natural, satiety-boosting ingredients such as protein and
fibre. Nutrition clubs have proven effective, especially among women, as they can try
complimentary shakes, obtain advice on weight loss and nutrition and talk to likeminded people.
South Korea sees a boom in diet shakes
The US remains by far the largest market for meal replacement slimming products (with sales
there reaching US$2.6 billion in 2014). These products have become extremely popular in
South Korea, which ranked second globally in terms of value sales, at US$686 million. This is

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partly due to a combination of growing obesity rates and the speeding up of lifestyles in South
Korea, as well as a fashion for tiny waists. Young people, in particular, are finding it more
convenient to consume diet meal replacements than cook fresh food from scratch. Due to the
proliferation of internet and Wi-Fi zones in South Korea, the distributors of global direct selling
companies are able to provide instant consultant programmes with consumers online, in
addition to BMI or other health check-ups through smartphones and other devices.
Herbalife dominates in meal replacement slimming
The global leader in the meal replacement slimming category is direct seller Herbalife. Its
Formula 1 shakes, sold as bulk powder, are the worlds bestselling meal replacement slimming
product, although a number of new entrants have recently joined the market. Herbalife operates
in over 90 countries and has recently bolstered its presence in emerging markets. South Korea
has been a particularly dynamic market for Herbalife. In 2013, it became the companys single
most lucrative country.
Herbalife also operates 78,000 nutrition clubs worldwide. These are social gatherings hosted
by independent distributors, where Herbalife products are served to club members. These clubs
provide additional social support to help members achieve nutritional goals, as well as a means
to access Herbalifes products more easily, through lower price points.
Weight loss supplements continue to grow
Weight loss supplements represented the second largest category within weight management
and although the market continued to expand over the review period, growth was slower than
for meal replacement slimming products. Global sales increased by 12% in constant value, to
US$5.2 billion.
Although there is a certain amount of scepticism surrounding weight loss supplements, the
market is frequently boosted by the launch of new discoveries touted as the next big thing in
weight loss. For example, in Australia, garcinia cambogia, an Indonesian fruit which was
popularised by American television personality Dr Oz, benefited from high levels of media
publicity in 2013 and 2014. Garcinia cambogia took over from African mango as the most
popular weight loss supplement in Australia, and several manufacturers launched versions of
the supplement, including Healthy Care, Optipharm and Naturopathica.
In Brazil, the latest trend in weight management is goji berries. Many products have been
introduced that incorporate the so-called superfruit, from tea to shakes, in order to attract
consumers to this new trend in weight management.
The emergence of new formats
New product development has also centred on new formats for weight loss supplements. For
example, Malibu Pilates launched Malibu Body Weight-Loss Gum in the US in 2014, a product
designed to provide benefits similar to other weight loss supplements in a chewing gum delivery
form. The chewing gum includes weight loss-causing ingredients which are ingested while
chewing the gum. It is claimed that the simple act of chewing gum is also used to deter craving
food, adding to the potential efficacy of the format.
In Japan, weight loss supplements that claim to control the absorption of carbohydrates and
lipids after eating sweet or fatty foods are popular. An example of this is Fancls Fancl Calolimit,
one of the leading brands in weight loss supplements, which mainly targets younger women.
The brand is marketed as an easy weight loss supplement with an affordable unit price. In fact,
most customers do not expect a strong slimming effect. Rather, they take Fancl Calolimit to feel
more comfortable when they eat sweet or fatty foods.

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Slimming teas remain stable


The slimming teas category is thought to have reached maturity, with global sales up by just
2% in real value terms between 2009 and 2014, to US$1.0 billion. Although consumer
confidence in the effectiveness of slimming teas remains limited, the category has profited from
being perceived as a natural and healthy method with few side-effects.
In Russia, standard and green coffees for fighting weight problems are believed to be more
effective than slimming teas, and are widely purchased by consumers in this market. The
category of coffee has been added to the assortment of leading products in weight loss
supplements and meal replacement slimming, with potential for further double-digit growth.
OTC obesity suffers heavy losses
OTC obesity is a niche category that declined sharply over the review period, by 67% in
constant value terms. This is partly due to the supply problems encountered by the market
leader Alli (GlaxoSmithKline), which was recalled in the US in 2014 due to evidence of
tampering. The product is also available OTC throughout Europe.
Obalon a gastric balloon in pill form that can be swallowed to help overweight people to
achieve massive weight loss without invasive surgery has been approved for sale in parts of
Europe. The product was launched in the UK in 2014 to much media hype, although it is
currently only available privately.
In Japan, kampo remedies (Japanese traditional medicines that focus on improving physical
constitution) are popular in weight management. Based on established theories, kampo
products are made from various combinations of crude drugs from plants, fungi, minerals and
others. Kampo products are widely recognised and well-trusted among Japanese consumers
because of their class 2 OTC status and the positive image that they are made of natural
ingredients. Weight loss OTC products benefit from the fact that manufacturers may claim a
weight loss function for supplements. The most popular kampo ingredient for treating obesity is
Bofu Tsushosan.
Table 9

Global Sales of Weight Management by Type 2009/2014

US$ million

Meal Replacement Slimming


Weight Loss Supplements
Slimming Teas
OTC Obesity
Other Slimming Products
Total market
Source:

2009

2014

% growth
current

% growth
constant

5,502
4,093
819
396
373
11,182

7,932
5,151
1,022
149
376
14,630

44.2
25.9
24.9
-62.5
0.8
30.8

28.1
11.8
1.5
-66.6
-14.9
15.2

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Special Diets
Allergies and food intolerance on the rise
Food allergies or intolerances are becoming increasingly common, especially among the
younger generation. There are now believed to be over 300 million people managing special
diets worldwide as a result of food allergies or intolerances. The reasons for the rise are unclear,
although one theory is that the emphasis on hygiene and widespread use of antibiotics, which
protect the body from germs, has left immune systems more likely to attack innocent substances
such as food proteins. Others believe food allergies may be the result of changes in the modern

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diet and cooking methods, or of vitamin D deficiency, while another theory is that introducing
potentially allergenic foods into infants diets too late or too early may be causing problems.
Food intolerances are defined as temporary adverse reactions that do not involve the immune
system in the same way as allergies. In particular, intolerances of gluten (mainly wheat) and
lactose (dairy products) are growing problems in the Western world, or at least are being
increasingly recognised and detected.
Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey of 2013 revealed that only 2% of
under 30s females were diabetic, which is unsurprising, given that type 2 diabetes tends to hit
later in life. However, as many as 15% of women in this group were found to have food allergies
or intolerances. This compared with just 13% of all respondents, and was even higher among
the teenage contingent, at 17%.
The incidence of food allergies or intolerances among young women was found to be
particularly high in China, at 30%, while in Japan, France and the UK, only 7%, 8% and 9% of
under 30s said they were allergic or intolerant to certain foods.
Chart 19

Young Women: Food Intolerances by Age Group 2013

% respondents agreeing:

Source:

Chart 20

Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey, 2013

Young Women: Food Intolerances by Country 2013

% respondents aged 15-29 agreeing:

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The free from market


The increasing number of people diagnosed with food intolerances has given rise to a
growing market for free from products which are mainly products formulated without gluten,
lactose or sugar. According to Euromonitor Internationals health and wellness database,
between 2009 and 2014, the global market for food intolerance products increased by a
substantial 36% in constant value terms to US$12.3 billion.
In addition to attracting consumers with genuine intolerances, these products also appeal to
the mass market because they are considered to be healthier than their standard counterpart
products that contain gluten or lactose, and there is an assumption that they are easier for the
body to digest. Everyday gluten-rich products, such as pasta and bread, have been blamed for
preventing people from losing weight. Thus, gluten- or lactose-free products are seen by many
consumers as healthier options that work well with a diet.
Lactose- and gluten-free products go mainstream
Such attention has sparked a significant amount of activity in the packaged food and
beverage industry. Thus, many free from brands have become mainstream products in
supermarkets, and even many on-trade establishments are incorporating these products into
their regular offerings. Global sales of lactose-free and gluten-free products soared by 40% and
62%, respectively, in constant value terms over the review period reaching values of US$6.7
billion and US$2.6 billion.
The market has been driven by new product development, as well as the entry of mainstream
packaged food players into the category. For example, in the UK, the brand Eat Water

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introduced new gluten-free pasta, rice and noodle products, which stand out from other glutenfree products because of their exceedingly low calorie content and the ingredient konjac flour.
As the flour acts as a hunger suppressor, consumers feel full after eating as few as seven
calories per serving. Following strong demand, the company announced that it would launch a
range of ready meal products made from its gluten-free pasta, noodles and rice. In France,
global pasta leader Barilla entered the gluten-free sector with a gluten-free pasta in 2014.
US market benefits from tighter regulations surrounding gluten-free
The US market for gluten-free foods was boosted by a new standard introduced by the Food
and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2013. Previously, there had been no government verified
standard regarding what packaged food could be labelled as gluten-free, but the new definition
sets a clear limit of 20 parts per million of gluten. It is hoped that the FDA standard will help
reinforce consumers trust in gluten-free foods.
In addition, many packaged food products are naturally gluten-free, such as rice-based foods.
Therefore, several companies have begun to add the term gluten-free to their packaging in
order to boost sales. Similarly, the lactose-free dairy category faces stiff competition from up
and coming non-dairy alternatives, such as soy, coconut and oat dairy products. These products
are also benefiting from a trend towards lactose avoidance.
Table 10

Global Sales of Food Intolerance Products 2009/2014

US$ million

Lactose-free Food
Gluten-free Food
Diabetic Food
Other
Total
Source:

2009

2014

% growth
current

% growth
constant

4,205
1,385
799
1,496
7,884

6,717
2,581
834
2,172
12,304

59.7
86.3
4.4
45.2
56.1

40.2
61.6
-11.1
26.5
36.0

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Meat Avoidance
Ethical vegetarianism gains ground
A significant number of young women are eschewing meat in favour of a vegetarian, vegan or
pescetarian diet. There are various reasons for this trend, including ethical and sustainability
issues, health, religion and culture, and high meat prices.
Ethical vegetarianism has become popular in developed countries, due to the spread of
intensive farming methods. Many vegetarians believe that the current mass demand for meat
cannot be satisfied without a mass-production system that disregards the welfare of animals.
Furthermore, red meat, in particular, has got a bad press for being a prime source of
saturated fat, a high intake of which is closely associated with cardiovascular disease and some
cancers. Studies have linked higher consumption of red meat to increased risks of type 2
diabetes and bowel cancer, while recent research by the Harvard School of Public Health found
that eating three rashers of bacon per day raised the risk of breast cancer in women by more
than 20%.
Meat avoiders prefer to obtain essential nutrients, such as iron, from foods such as lentils,
beans, eggs, fish, chicken, turkey, nuts and breakfast cereals. The growth of vegetarianism is

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also offering greater opportunities for manufacturers of meat substitutes and other meat-free
dishes.
Young women more likely to be meat-avoiders
Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey of 2013 found that 12% of under
30s females do not eat red meat, compared with 10% of all respondents. The share was as high
as 14% for younger women aged 15-19 years. Women under 30 were also more likely than the
general population to be vegetarian (8%) and vegan (3%).
Vegetarianism among under 30s females is at its highest level in India, where as many as
41% of respondents claimed not to consume red meat, 36% said they were vegetarian and 12%
vegan. This is largely due to cultural reasons, as meat consumption is discouraged or banned in
several Indian religions, including Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism.
Among the developed markets, the UK registered the highest percentage of vegetarians and
vegans among women aged under 30 years (5% and 2%, respectively), while Germany had the
highest share of non-red meat eaters (11%).
Chart 21

Young Women: Dietary Preferences by Age Group 2013

% respondents agreeing:

Source:

Chart 22

Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey, 2013

Young Women: Dietary Preferences by Country 2013

% respondents aged 15-29 agreeing:

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Food Attributes
The young eat healthier
There is evidence to suggest that young women have healthier eating habits than their older
counterparts. There has been a strong trend among all consumers but driven overall by
younger women towards foods that are fresher, more natural and more wholesome, involving
less processing and fewer artificial ingredients.
This was confirmed by Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey of 2013,
which found that under 30s females were significantly more likely to look for products with
limited or no artificial ingredients than the general population (40% versus 36%, respectively).
This was even higher among teenage women (41%).
The dangers of salt
There is global concern about the amount of added salt in processed foods and its effect on
health. This has been fuelled by the actions of groups such as the UKs Consensus Action on
Salt and Health (CASH), which aims to reach a consensus with the food industry and
government over the harmful effects of a high salt diet and bring about a reduction in the
amount of salt in processed foods, as well as salt added to cooking and on meals. The target is
to reduce salt intake to an average of 6g a day from the current average of 8.1g a day, which
CASH believes will have a large impact, reducing strokes by around 22% and heart attacks by
16%.

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According to Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey of 2013 survey,


under 30s females were more likely than the average of all consumers to check that foods have
limited or no added salt (21% versus 20%, respectively). They were also found to be more
concerned about products with trans fat or hydrogenated oils, with 29% looking for these
ingredients versus 27% of all consumers.
Organic food: The jury is out
Advocates of organic foods believe they are healthier than their conventional counterparts,
since they do not come into contact with pesticides and fertilisers. However, others are sceptical
about the health benefits of organic foods, and many are deterred by their high prices. Under
30s females actually scored slightly lower than average with regard to organic foods, with 9%
seeking organic labels, versus 10% of all respondents. Women under 30 were also found to be
less likely to look for all natural foods (37% versus 44%).
Shunning sugar
Sugar has been in the spotlight lately, due to a growing amount of scientific research linking
sugar with obesity, and thus with illnesses such as type 2 diabetes and cancer, which have risen
alongside weight gain. The new attitude is driving changes in consumption trends, including a
conscious effort by consumers to either reduce their intake of sweet foods and drinks or eschew
sugar completely. Meanwhile, manufacturers and retailers are being forced to tackle the
problem in various ways, including gradually reducing the content of their products, using
alternative types of sweetener, or downsizing portions.
In the UK, both the Lidl and Tesco supermarket chains reduced the number of unhealthy
confectionery snacks available, replacing them with healthier snacks, such as dried fruits and
nuts. Coca-Cola opted to introduce front-of-packaging information about the amount of sugar
and other ingredients that are contained in its products in the UK. Within the health and wellness
industry, several product categories have benefited from the movement away from sugar,
including bottled water, fruit snacks and nuts.
Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey of 2013 found that 35% of under
30s females check foods for limited or no added sugar, although this was much lower than the
average of all consumers (42%).
Women in this age group were also found to be less likely than the general population to seek
out foods with limited or no added fat (36%, versus 41% of all consumers), or reduced or low
calorie foods (30%, versus 31%). Indeed, it seems that women are looking for products that
offer additional health benefits beyond serving as fuel. Reduced fat and calorie food is no longer
desirable if that is all that it does, especially if the taste is not good. In the US, these trends have
led to a decline in sales of reduced fat and low calorie frozen ready meals, with Weight
Watchers and Lean Cuisine being seen as less appealing options for dieters than they once
were.
The backlash against corn syrup
Many consumers are concerned about high levels of corn syrup in their foods. The survey
showed that just over a quarter (26%) of under 30s females looked for products without corn
syrup.
High fructose corn syrup (HFCS), a cheap form of corn syrup, is one of the most widely used
forms of sugar in processed foods, cereals and soft drinks, especially in the US. It gained
popularity after the price of imported sugar increased during the 1970s. In Europe, HFCS is also
known as isoglucose (or glucose-fructose syrup). In 2010, the US Corn Refiners Association
applied for permission to use the name corn sugar instead of high-fructose corn syrup on
food labels in order to dispel the ingredients reputation as a cheap, highly refined product and

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to emphasise its natural corn origin. The petition was rejected by the FDA in 2012, partly
because it defines sugar as a solid, and partly because the term corn sugar had already been
approved as another name for dextrose. Also cited were public health concerns that people with
fructose intolerance needed to be aware that the ingredient contains fructose.
When concerns about HFCS first came to the fore in the US in 2010, some companies
replaced it with real sugar to give their products a more wholesome image. For example,
PepsiCo launched Throwbacks a line of limited edition Pepsi and Mountain Dew drinks
containing real sugar in place of HFCS, while Dr Pepper Snapple Group launched limited edition
Dr Pepper Made with Real Sugar.
Chart 23

Young Women: Food Factors Sought by Age Group 2013

% respondents seeking:

Source:

Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey, 2013

Chinese women seek fortified foods


The Global Consumer Trends survey revealed that the percentage of young women who look
for added vitamins or fibre in their foods was highest in China, at a substantial 71%. Over half of
those in Brazil and India also look for added vitamins or fibre (55% and 56%, respectively).

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Japanese women were least likely to look for foods fortified with vitamins and fibre (17%)
perhaps because their general diet is already very healthy.
Organic products are particularly popular among under 30s females in Russia and the US
(22% and 18%, respectively). Again, respondents in Japan showed very little interest in this
aspect, with only 1% saying they look for organic labels.
All natural claims appeal most to Russian women (67%), with Japanese and Brazilian women
least likely to look for all natural labels (25% and 27%, respectively).
Reduced or low calorie attributes are sought mostly by the Chinese, with as many as 59% of
under 30s females seeking these products. This also applied to 44% of Indian women. Again,
very little interest was shown by Japanese women, with just 9% saying they look for reduced or
low calorie labels.
Chart 24

Young Women: Sought-For Food Attributes on Food Labels by Country 2013

% women aged 15-29 seeking:

Source:

Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey, 2013

Sugar backlash strongest in China and the UK


The anti-sugar movement seems to be having the most impact in China and the UK, where as
many as 44% and 43% of under 30s females look for products with limited or no added sugar.
There has been an enormous amount of publicity in the UK surrounding the potentially harmful

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effects of sugar, which has largely been driven by the campaign group Action on Sugar (AoS, an
offshoot of CASH). AoS wants the global food industry and governments to agree that a high
sugar diet is harmful and to bring about a reduction in the amount of hidden sugars in
processed foods.
In Japan, there was less concern about added sugars, with just 14% of women under 30
looking for these on food labels. In Russia, too, only 20% of young women were concerned
about added sugars.
Brazilians wary of corn syrup
Corn syrup is also avoided by under 30s females especially Brazilian women (42%) and
Chinese women (37%). The use of HFCS has reportedly grown rapidly in China since 2009, due
to rising prices of sucrose and increasing demand for processed foods. In contrast, under 30s
females in Germany and Russia are not too concerned with corn syrup (only 8% in each country
looked for the ingredient).
Brazilian and Indian women were most concerned about fat content, with 49% and 42% of
under 30s females in these markets looking for products with limited or no added fat. Again,
Japanese and Russian women were least concerned about this aspect of food labels (16% and
24%, respectively), although the absence of trans fat and hydrogenated oils was found to be
important to Russian women (41%).
Added salt unacceptable in India and China
Indian and Chinese women were most likely to eschew added salt (44% and 42%,
respectively), but this applied to 3% of Japanese women. French and German women also
showed little concern for added salt, with just 10% and 12%, respectively, looking for this on
labels.
Avoidance of artificial ingredients was found to vary considerably from market to market,
ranging from 67% of Indian women down to 4% of Japanese women. Over half of under 30s
females in Brazil, China and Russia said they look for limited or no artificial ingredients on
labels.
Chart 25

Young Women: Ingredients on Food Labels Sought by Country 2013

% women 15-29 looking for:

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Source:

Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey, 2013

Trends in Health and Wellness Products


Reduced claims no longer enough
An increased interest in nutrition and food origins among younger women has driven the
global market for health and wellness products. This trend is apparent mainly in developed
markets but also among urban consumers in emerging markets, such as China and India.
With consumers thinking about food in the context of healthy eating rather than just reducing
calories, fortified and functional (FF) products and organic products have performed far better
than BFY (better for you) products in recent years. BFY products recorded constant value
growth of just 1% over the 2009-2014, while sales of FF foods leapt by 24% and organic foods
by 21%, to US$276.1 billion and US$35.9 billion, respectively.
While consumers realise that they need to eat more healthily and reduce the amount of fat,
sugar and salt in their diet, there is a reluctance to embrace BFY packaged food fully, as many
associate lower levels of fat, sugar and salt with compromising the flavour of the food.

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Manufacturers have responded by using creative marketing to launch products that reduce the
fat, calorie or sugar content but remain appealing to US consumers. Terms such as sensible,
smart, guiltless and better for you are fast replacing low fat, low sugar and low calorie
claims.
Chinese seek to rebalance their diet
In China, the faster pace of life has led to problems such as low immunity and various
stomach complaints, as a result of unbalanced nutrition. FF products with added pro/prebiotics,
such as pro/pre biotic spoonable yoghurt, have performed particularly well. A new premium
brand, Hericium Biscuit (Jiangxi Jiangzhong Pharmaceutical Co) incorporates the traditional
stomach nourishing medicine ingredient hericium (a rare mushroom) into a biscuit, and although
expensive, has benefited from strong advertising conveying a high-end lifestyle.
Backlash against artificial ingredients benefits the NH category
Many consumers across the world are concerned about the amount of added preservatives
and artificial sweeteners in food and beverages, which they perceive as having a negative
impact on their overall wellbeing. Recently, many products that focused on simple ingredients
and transparent messaging enjoyed success by giving consumers the simple but tasty products
they seek. Naturally healthy (NH) products have benefited from this trend, growing by 17% in
constant value terms over the review period, to US$284.8 billion.
Other types of fresh food have also benefited from the trend towards natural ingredients. The
Paleo Diet, for example (also known as the Cave Man or Stone Age diet) requires followers
to eat only naturally occurring food, such as grass produced meats, fish, and fresh fruits and
vegetables. Therefore, followers of this diet, as well as the Raw Food Diet, are largely trading
packaged food for fresh food.
Organic food goes mainstream
Young women are also said to be behind the growth in organic products, as they seek out
more natural food, and avoid chemicals and pesticides. As a result, organic packaged food has
become more mainstream and retailers have increased their portfolio of organic products. In the
US, for example, retail giant Target increased its organic offer in 2014 with the launch of its new
Simply Balanced private label line. Simply Balanceds products are positioned as being free of
preservatives, high fructose corn syrup and genetically modified organisms (GMOs), while 40%
of the product portfolio is promoted as organic. The supermarket chain Kroger has also been
investing in its organic offer. Krogers portfolio of organic and natural products exceeds 35,000
SKUs and sales from its private label organic range were expected to exceed US$1 billion in
2014.
The trend towards healthier drinks
There has also been a strong trend towards healthier drinks, including bottled water and
green tea, largely at the expense of sugary drinks and carbonates.
Global sales of bottled water jumped by 27% in constant value terms over the review period,
to US$118.1 billion. In the US, carbonated natural mineral bottled water posted one of the
fastest growth rates of all drinks in 2014, having benefited significantly from the migration of
consumers from sugary soft drinks. In addition, similar offerings with little natural flavouring, like
LaCroix, performed very well due to demand for simple but tasty products.
Although value sales of 100% juice as a whole remained flat in real terms over the review
period, partly due to recent publicity highlighting their high sugar content, certain niche
categories continued to make progress. For example, demand for organic juice grew as
consumers sought out more super-premium products with simpler ingredients and fewer

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preservatives. Organic juices, especially cold-pressed varieties, became very popular due to
their low preservative content compared with most other juice products.
Surging demand for coconut water
Superfruit 100% juice products performed very well in several markets in 2014, thanks largely
to the boom in sales of coconut water. Consumers perceive coconut water as a nutritious, tasty,
all-natural product that provides electrolytes. Coconut waters low calorie content and celebrity
endorsements have made it popular with affluent, health conscious consumers.
Coconut water also benefits from strong advertising by the likes of Vita Coco, Coca-Colaowned Zico and PepsiCo-owned O.N.E. In France, all four of the major coconut water brands
Vava, Vita Coco, Zico and Dr Antonio Martins posted double-digit sales growth in 2013.
However, Brazil is still the worlds leading market for coconut water, where its leading brand,
Kero-Coco, is stocked in McDonalds and Pizza Hut.
Health benefits of green tea
Green tea has also been a hit with young women in recent years, due to its antioxidant
properties. Sales increased by 13% in real terms between 2009 and 2014, reaching US$11.2
billion by the latter year.
In RTD tea, there is a notable trend towards simpler products, like the US launch of Arizona
Oak Reserve tea in July 2014. The new tea is brewed with American oak chips and comes in
simple flavours, like unsweetened, lightly sweetened and lemon.
In Japan, FOSHU (Food for Special Health Uses) continues to be popular. Following the
success of Kirin Mets Cola, which is said to limit the absorption of fat from food, several
manufacturers introduced new FOSHU drinks, such as Ito Ens Stylee Sparkling, RTD coffee
Healthy Coffee by Kao Corp and RTD tea Iyemon Tokucha by Suntory.
The growing interest in health and wellness foods and drinks is opening up opportunities for
smaller, independent companies with high quality and innovative offerings. In the US, these
include companies such as Talking Rain Beverage Co and Kind LLC, which witnessed very
rapid growth during the review period. Growth has come partially from the overall expansion of
the distribution networks for these products but also the growing base of frequent product users.
Stevia drinks
With consumers looking to cut down on sugar intake and losing faith in artificial sweeteners,
manufacturers have been looking to stevia enhanced drinks to capture attention. These tend to
have around 30% less sugar than regular versions.
As of early 2014, Coca-Cola Co had incorporated stevia into more than 45 product globally. In
2013, it began marketing a stevia-containing mid-calorie cola called Coca-Cola Life in Argentina
and Chile. Coca-Cola Life was launched on a trial basis in the UK, the US, Mexico and Sweden
in 2014.
PepsiCos mid-calorie cola, Pepsi Next, is sweetened with stevia in certain markets, including
Finland, the Netherlands, France, Canada and Australia. In October 2014, PepsiCo announced
the launch of a new stevia-sweetened cola in the US, called Pepsi True. PepsiCo also
successfully launched Mountain Dew Kickstart in the US in 2013, a mid-calorie carbonate with
5% fruit juice and caffeine. Kickstart was developed as a morning beverage to compete with
coffee and orange juice. In 2014, the company launched a night-time version for younger
consumers to energise before going out, which combines citrus flavours, caffeine and fruit juice.
Table 11

The Global Market for Selected Healthy Food and Drinks 2009/2014

US$ million
2009

Euromonitor International

2014

% growth

% growth

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Fortified/functional products
Naturally healthy products
Better for you products
Bottled water
100% Juice
Organic products
Green tea
Source:

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192,910
211,286
142,828
81,743
36,116
26,561
8,885

276,055
284,847
166,582
118,149
39,685
35,929
11,229

current

constant

43.1
34.8
16.6
44.5
9.9
35.3
26.4

23.6
16.9
0.8
26.5
-0.9
21.4
13.3

Euromonitor International

OUTLOOK
Health and fitness will take priority
The under 30s will continue to take a growing interest in their personal health over the
forecast period, influenced by factors such as:
The increasing amount of health messages and nutritional information targeting young women
via the media and internet;
Changing attitudes towards women and sport;
Government measures to encourage healthy eating and exercise;
Smart marketing by health and wellness and sportswear companies;
The tendency to have children later in life;
A higher number of women going into higher education and careers;
A rise in female income levels.
The trend towards later motherhood is expected to continue throughout the rest of the
decade, leaving many younger women free to dedicate more time and effort to looking and
feeling good. Moreover, the rising number of women going into higher education and
employment means they will have higher disposable incomes to spend on health and fitness.
At the same time, greater work and social pressures may lead to higher stress levels. This
may spark greater demand for products such as female-orientated alcoholic drinks and stressbusting leisure activities, such as spas and yoga.
Continued trend towards later motherhood
Euromonitor Internationals forecasts show that the average age of women having their first
baby will increase slightly in almost all the selected countries in the six years to 2019 (with some
notable exceptions, such as Denmark, Malaysia and Russia).
In the UK, the average age of women at first childbirth is predicted to reach 31.1 years by
2019. Recent figures from the ONS also show that the number of babies born to women over
the age of 40, and even over the age of 50, is increasing rapidly in the UK. Between 2008 and
2012, the number of babies born to women over the age of 50 rose from 69 to 154. Similarly, in
the US, recent figures from the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention showed that the
percentage of children born to women over the age of 35 rose from just 1% in 1970 to 15% in
2012.
It will remain the case that many women in the developing markets of Latin America and
Southeast Asia have children from a younger age. However, even in these markets, women are
gaining more education and independence, and those in urban areas are delaying motherhood
and having fewer children.

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The fact that women are staying single for longer and are earning more will benefit sectors
such as spas, fitness centres, sports apparel, nutritional supplements, and health and wellness
foods in the coming years.
Chart 26

Forecast Age of Women at First Childbirth in Selected Markets 2014/2019

Average age of women at first childbirth

Source:

Euromonitor International

Obesity rates will keep edging up


Despite a renewed focus on health and fitness, obesity rates for women of all ages are
expected to rise over the forecast period. Euromonitor International predicts that the mean BMI
among females will creep up marginally in most major markets, reaching 30.4kg/sq m in the US
and 29.7kg/sq m in Mexico. The one notable exception will be Japan, where women remain very

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slim on average. The mean female BMI for Japanese women is predicted to drop marginally to
just 22.0kg/sq m by 2019.
Chart 27

Forecast Mean Female BMI in Selected Markets 2014/2019

Mean Female BMI(kg/sq m)

Source:

Euromonitor International

Diet shakes will continue to thrive


As the pressure on young women to conform to media ideals of beauty becomes every
greater, they will continue to follow all kinds of diets, with some even falling prey to eating
disorders. Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey of 2013 found that 24%
of under 30s females were on a weight loss diet, and this is unlikely to change in the future.

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Meal replacement slimming products will continue to dominate the weight management
market over the forecast period and are predicted to see strong growth of 23% by constant
value. While the US and South Korea will remain the largest country markets for meal
replacement slimming products, growth will largely be fuelled by emerging economies such as
China, Malaysia and Indonesia, as companies such as Herbalife continue to penetrate these
markets.
Weight loss supplements will also remain dynamic, with growth forecast at 14%, while the
much smaller OTC obesity category is expected to recover, driven by growth in the two most
developed markets the US and China.
Table 12

Forecast Global Sales of Weight Management Products 2014/2019

US$ million at constant 2014 prices

Meal Replacement Slimming


Weight Loss Supplements
Slimming Teas
Other Slimming Products
OTC Obesity
Total Weight Management
Source:

2014

2019

% growth

7,932
5,151
1,022
376
149
14,630

9,716
5,890
1,013
379
240
17,237

22.5
14.3
-0.9
0.7
61.2
17.8

Euromonitor International

A greater focus on the nutritional qualities of food and drink


Despite the continued growth of weight management products, many women will adopt a
more holistic view of healthy weight and body image, as they increasingly realise the need for
total nutrition and exercise regime change, rather than relying on miracle cures. This will
involve paying closer attention to food labels, eating more naturally healthy foods and cutting
down on products high in added sugars, such as sugary drinks.
In line with the new focus on health and nutrition, young women will demand fewer artificial
ingredients and more corporate transparency with regard to the origin of their foods.
Several of the major food companies have already pledged to remove chemical ingredients in
their foods, and this trend is likely to accelerate in future. For example, in February 2015, Nestl
announced plans to phase out artificial colours and flavours from all its confectionery products
sold in the US, including Butterfingers, Baby Ruths and Crunch bars.
Similarly, in July 2015, one of the worlds largest packaged food companies, Campbell Soup
Co, announced that it would abolish all artificial colours and flavours by 2018, and focus on
developing its new Campbell Fresh division. In June 2015, pizza chain Papa Johns announced
that it would be spending more than US$100 million per year to remove artificial ingredients
from its menu, including corn syrup, artificial colours and various preservatives, with changes
expected to go into effect by the beginning of 2016.
Anti-sugar movement to gain momentum
The sugar backlash is expected to continue over the forecast period, as sugar is increasingly
blamed for problems such as obesity, diabetes and tooth decay. Health campaigners will put
more pressure on manufacturers to reduce the levels of hidden sugars in products such as
bread, ready meals and dairy items, and to be more transparent about the levels of sugar
contained in these products and in others, such as alcoholic drinks, by providing more
information on nutrition labels.
AoS claims that if major manufacturers commit to gradually reducing the amount of sugar in
their products, adding up to a 20-30% decrease in sugar content within three to five years, the

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obesity epidemic could be halted or reversed. Its experts believe that consumers palates
would adjust to a less sweet taste in much the same way as salt reduction initiatives have
worked gradually to rehabilitate tastes to less salt.
Coca-Cola, PepsiCo and the Dr Pepper Snapple Group have already pledged to cut the
number of sugary drink calories that Americans consume by 20% by 2025,which they will
achieve via a combination of marketing, distribution and packaging. The companies intend to
expand their ranges of low- and zero-calorie drinks, as well as drinks sold in smaller portions,
while educating consumers and encouraging them to reduce their calorie intake. Snacks giant
Mondelez has also agreed to increase individually wrapped options of 200 calories or less by
25% before 2020, and to display front-of-pack calorie labels on all products globally by 2016.
With consumers craving sweetness but mistrustful of artificial ingredients, the search will
continue to discover the holy grail of sweeteners. Meanwhile, new product development will
focus on finding the right combination of stevia or other sweeteners with sugar and flavour
enhancers to manufacture products with the ideal taste and texture.
A bright future for health and wellness products
Euromonitor International forecasts that, globally, sales in the naturally healthy and
fortified/functional categories will grow by 24% and 26%, respectively, over the forecast period
to 2019. BFY products are expected to see much slower growth, of 6%, due to the ongoing
movement against processed reduced fat and low calorie foods in favour of all-natural products.
The sentiment among younger consumers against preservatives and artificial ingredients will
also benefit the organic sector, which is set to increase sales by 21%. With weight conscious
consumers migrating to diets like the Paleo Diet, which feature mostly fresh food, makers of
BFY packaged food will need to emphasise food plus attributes, such as the healthiness of
quinoa or a high-protein content.
While coconut water will remain popular among those seeking healthy but tasty alternatives to
carbonates and other sugary drinks, aloe vera-based drinks may emerge as the next big thing in
superfruit juices. Aloe vera is said to protect against infection, strengthen the metabolism and
stimulate the auto-immune system. It is also effective against some digestive problems, protects
the liver and allows better blood circulation. In addition, aloe vera fights cholesterol and controls
diabetes and provides better oxygenation of the cells. In France, Kingreen General Beverages
Aloe Drink for Life brand is already highly popular.
Special dietary requirements to become more common
Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey of 2013 found that young women
were more likely than the general population to have food allergies and intolerances. This trend
is likely to continue, given that more children are being diagnosed with food intolerances than
ever before and will take their special requirements into adulthood.
Furthermore, many young women believe that gluten-free or dairy-free foods are generally
better for their health, which offers plenty of opportunities for the development of the free from
market. Gluten-free food, in particular, offers good prospects for ingredients innovation, as
manufacturers substitute cereals with a high gluten content with other types, such as quinoa,
sorghum, corn, millet and teff. These so-called ancient grains provide some interesting product
development ideas for the future, which should help maintain the interest of consumers.
The wider availability of free from foods within general retailers will also drive future sales,
and Euromonitor International forecasts constant value growth of 31% in the food intolerance
category over the forecast period.
The survey also revealed that young women are more likely than the entire consumer base to
avoid red meat or to be fully vegetarian or vegan. This trend is also expected to continue over

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the forecast period for a variety of reasons, including concerns about animal welfare,
environmental sustainability and personal health.
Table 13

Forecast Global Sales of Selected Health Foods and Drinks 2014/2019

US$ million at constant 2014 prices

Naturally healthy products


Fortified/functional products
Better for you products
Bottled water
Organic products
100% juice
Food intolerance products
Green tea
Source:

2014

2019

% growth

284,847
276,055
166,582
118,149
35,929
39,685
12,304
11,229

351,875
346,806
176,689
150,794
43,486
42,557
16,054
12,996

23.5
25.6
6.1
27.6
21.0
7.2
30.5
15.7

Euromonitor International

The need for preventative self-care


With Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer Trends survey showing that as many as
71% of women age under 30 years take health supplements, this suggests that there is
significant potential to target this consumer group with tailored health supplements, in addition to
fortified foods. The future may see more formulations developed to appeal to young women,
such as those containing B vitamins, vitamin D, calcium, iron, probiotics or female-friendly plant
extracts, such as evening primrose oil or grapeseed oil.
As young women are made increasingly aware of the health dangers that can affect them,
they will become more interested in preventive self-care. For example, numerous campaigns by
the American Heart Association and other organisations have raised awareness among women
of the risks and symptoms associated with heart disease, which are typically far more subtle in
women than in men. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently reported that
heart disease is one of the top causes of death among women, affecting more females than all
forms of cancer combined.
Heart disease rates are said to be increasing among young women, in particular, as a result
of an increase in stress levels, especially when combined with factors such as smoking, obesity
and diabetes. This offers manufacturers the opportunity to target young women with health
supplements that are beneficial for the heart, including garlic, co-enzyme Q10 and fibre.
Potential for segmentation within sports nutrition
While female-specific sports nutrition is still in its infancy, the category shows strong potential,
as a growing number of women take to working out regularly, influenced by fitness-orientated
celebrities such as Kim Kardashian, who are often seen holding protein shakes.
Global sales of all sports nutrition are forecast to rise by a substantial 51% in constant value
terms between 2014 and 2019. While these products mainly target men, there will be an
opportunity to develop products that address the nutrition concerns of women, including toning
(as opposed to bulking up), bone health, joint health and skin health.
Ingredients like folic acid, calcium, vitamin D, collagen and co-enzyme Q 10 can address
multiple concerns, and provide true added value to protein products and non-protein products
(such as all-in-one pre-workout supplements) alike. Additionally, packaging particularly onpackage health claims should appeal to female fitness goals, which often emphasise weight
maintenance, body toning and sustained energy, avoiding the mass-building claims that most
mens brands emphasise.

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Table 14

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Forecast Global Sales of Selected Health Foods and Drinks 2014/2019

US$ million at 2014 constant prices

Dietary supplements
Vitamins
Sports nutrition
Source:

2014

2019

% growth

51,945
25,046
10,096

61,188
28,248
14,258

17.8
12.8
41.2

Euromonitor International

Growing participation in sport


Young women around the world will continue to embrace the fitness trend, whether by joining
gyms, taking part in fun runs, cycling and obstacle events, joining sports teams or undertaking
more holistic activities, such as yoga and Pilates. Sport England, which recently launched the
This Girl Can campaign, found that of the 9.4 million women aged 14 to 40 years in the UK, 75%
(7.1 million) would like to be more active.
Celebrities will continue to play a part in inspiring more young women to keep fit, while
exercise will be viewed as a trendy social activity among the young female consumer group.
Indeed, according to findings from the This Girl Can campaign, women are far more likely to
work out when they sign up to a class or go with a friend.
Spurred on by the online community
Social media will play an ever greater role in encouraging women to exercise. The internet
has opened up an online global fitness community for women to engage with, from simply being
inspired by others to work harder to posting about personal achievements on Instagram. Almost
67% of participants in Running USAs 2015 National Runner Survey said they went online to
network with other runners.
While sports coverage in the media is still very much dominated by men, there are signs that
this is changing. According to the WSFF, over 60% of UK sports fans say they would like to see
more womens sport on the TV. The BBC reported in 2014 that it was committed to covering a
wide range of womens sports, and that it broadcasts around 1,000 hours of womens sport per
year, equal to almost 20% of its coverage, covering such sports as womens football, cricket,
rugby, wheelchair basketball, football, golf and tennis.
Furthermore, it was reported in 2015 that more people watched the womens FIFA World Cup
on TV than ever before. It was estimated that over one billion viewers tuned in worldwide over
the course of the event. According to FIFA.com, US broadcaster Fox Sports 1 attracted 3.3
million viewers to the game between the US and Australia more than three times more than
Team USAs first group stage match in 2011.
Fitness is fashionable
Individual sports, such as running, cycling and gym-going, are expected to continue to gain
popularity among young women. Governments will introduce further measures to encourage
female participation in sport as part of their overall efforts to improve public health and reduce
the incidence of obesity-related diseases later in life, while companies will stage more events
aimed specifically at women and offering a fun and non-judgemental environment in which to
take part.
Boutique, class-focused gyms with innovative offerings and premium prices are
mushrooming. These gyms are often dominated by women and gain cult-like followings.
Female-only chains, such as Fernwood and Curves, will also see further growth, while an

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YOUNG W OMENS HEALTH: GLOBAL ATTITUDES TOW ARDS HEALTH, FITNESS AND W ELLBEING AMONG THE UNDER
30S AND MARKET IMPACT

increasing number of regular gyms will offer women-only sessions in order to cater to women
who feel intimidated by male gym-goers.
The expansion of wearable tech
There is still a huge amount of potential for development within the wearable tech sector. For
many of todays pressured women, the time, expense and motivation to maintain a regular
fitness routine can be hard to find, and the emergence of wearable fitness devices and apps,
such as FitBit and Nike+Running, has helped them find renewed inspiration to exercise. There
are currently almost 70 million women around the world who use Nikes two training apps, Nike+
Running and Nike+ Training Club (a women-only app), and the number continues to grow.
The increasing investment of sportswear manufacturers in wearable tech indicates their
confidence in its potential. For example, US-based sportswear manufacturer Under Armour,
which has recently turned its focus to the female market, purchased both MyFitnessPal and
Endomondo in February 2015 with the intention of expanding in the category.
Dedicated social networks will develop
As the use of tech gadgets and apps to track exercise expands, there is also a growing
opportunity to create separate social networks dedicated to fitness enthusiasts. Consumers who
use these fitness devices and apps but are uncomfortable sharing their goals and workouts with
their broader network may be happy to share with a group of like-minded exercisers who are
also sharing their own workouts and achievements. Indeed, many companies are already
tapping into this trend by providing social media platforms open only to those using a particular
fitness app or device. For example, Fitocracy combines the use of social media and sharing with
a game-like structure for fitness with rewards, while Spark People tracks diet and exercise
progress while connecting with other fitness and health minded individuals.
Mindfulness devices
The next wave of wearable tech could add wellbeing to the equation. A new device, Spire,
which was launched in the US in November 2014, focuses on the mind as much as the body.
The device, which is wireless, rechargeable and can be clipped onto a bra strap or waistband,
syncs with a phone app to alert users when they become overstressed, reminding them to take
a deep breath or a break. Another mindfulness device new to the market is Being, a watch-like
device from the Asian company Zensoriumin. The device tracks mood using a sensor that
measures heart rate variability and blood pressure.
Psychologists believe that the new devices will make users aware of unhealthy patterns and
help positively impact mood, stress levels and behaviour. An analysis of Spires user data found
that about 75% of the time it sends a notification, users breathe more deeply, lowering tension in
turn, within 90 seconds.
Developers are also said to be experimenting with emotion-detecting wearables, such as a
pullover that changes colours based on the wearers excitement, and even a bra that alerts
women when they might be tempted to overeat due to personal triggers like stress.
It is also reported that Microsoft Research is working on wearables that do not just give users
insight into their emotions but also allow them to share findings with others, such as a butterfly
pin called MoodWings that flutters when stress levels rise, or a scarf that can heat up when the
user is sad and play cheerful music when they are happy.
Opportunities in athleisure apparel
The womens sportswear market is showing no signs of slowing down, and is expected to
experience buoyant growth over the forecast period, thanks to increasing female participation in

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sporting and fitness activities, combined with a trend towards incorporating athletic wear into the
daily wardrobe.
The movement towards premiumisation within womens sportswear is also set to continue, as
many women see their expenditure on activewear as a reflection of their status. As a result,
competition is expected to intensify in the sector. For example, in 2015, US-based Dicks
Sporting Goods announced plans to target the female market with a new boutique concept
called Chelsea Collective. The first two outlets were set to open in August, selling workout wear,
shoes, equipment, accessories and beauty products. The stores will sell clothing from the likes
of Nike, as well as its own label Calia (which Dicks recently launched with country singer Carrie
Underwood) and niche brands like Lorna Jane, Spiritual Gangster and ALALA. Other offerings
will include brands like Brooks, Hunter Boots, Pure Vida, Le Sport Sac, Philosophy and Evian.
The online marketplace will also become more competitive. In July 2014, for example, Net-aPorter launched its sportswear specialist sister website Net-a-Sporter, offering an expanded
range of merchandise from its activewear collection.

APPENDIX
Questions Included the Euromonitor Internationals Global Consumer
Trends Survey of 2013:
Please rate your personal health level on the following scale, where 0 is extremely unhealthy
and 10 is extremely healthy. Take into account chronic conditions, overall fitness level, dietary
habits, and any other health-related factors. Do not take into account temporary illnesses, such
as a cold or the flu.
Which of the following factors or ingredients do you look for on food labels and food ingredient
labels?
Contains added vitamins or fibre
Has limited sugar or no added sugar
Has limited or no added fat
Has limited salt or no added salt
Reduced or low calorie
Does not contain trans fat or hydrogenated oils
Contains protein
Does not contain corn syrup
Has limited or no artificial ingredients
Is organic
Is all natural
On average, how often do you:
Participate in physical exercise
Take health supplements/vitamins
Participate in stress-reduction activities (eg meditation, massage)
On average, how often do you:
Participate in team sports (eg football)
Participate in individual sports (eg running, cycling)
Exercise at the gym
Walk or hike for exercise
Participate in intensive physical activities (eg yoga, dancing)

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YOUNG W OMENS HEALTH: GLOBAL ATTITUDES TOW ARDS HEALTH, FITNESS AND W ELLBEING AMONG THE UNDER
30S AND MARKET IMPACT

Please look at the following statements and tick all that apply:
I am on a diet trying to lose weight
I actively monitor what I eat in order to manage my weight
I am diabetic
I am allergic or intolerant to certain foods
I do not eat red meat
I do not eat red meat or poultry but I do eat fish
I am a vegetarian (I do not eat meat, poultry, or fish)
I am a vegan (in addition to a vegetarian diet, I do not eat dairy or eggs)
On average, how often do you:
Smoke cigarettes
Consume an alcoholic beverage at home
Consume an alcoholic beverage out of home

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