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Produced by the Office of Safety and Security

March 2014

CONSOLIDATED INCIDENT REPORTING GUIDE


HOW TO USE THE CONSOLIDATED INCIDENT REPORTING GUIDE .................................................... 1
REPORTING AN INCIDENT ......................................................................................................................... 2
PART 1: CRIME INCIDENT CLASSIFICATION .......................................................................................... 3
VOLUNTEER DEATH ............................................................................................................................... 4
KIDNAPPING ............................................................................................................................................ 6
RAPE ........................................................................................................................................................ 8
AGGRAVATED SEXUAL ASSAULT....................................................................................................... 10
ROBBERY .............................................................................................................................................. 12
AGGRAVATED ASSAULT ...................................................................................................................... 14
SEXUAL ASSAULT ................................................................................................................................ 17
PHYSICAL ASSAULT ............................................................................................................................. 19
BURGLARY ............................................................................................................................................ 21
THREAT.................................................................................................................................................. 23
THEFT .................................................................................................................................................... 25
VANDALISM ........................................................................................................................................... 27
PART 2: STALKING .................................................................................................................................... 29
DEFINITION OF STALKING ................................................................................................................... 29
HOW TO REPORT A STALKING............................................................................................................ 30
PART 3: OTHER SECURITY INCIDENT .................................................................................................... 31
PART 4: VEHICULAR ACCIDENT INVOLVING A VOLUNTEER/TRAINEE ............................................. 33
PEDESTRIAN VOLUNTEER/TRAINEE STRUCK BY VEHICLE ............................................................ 33
VOLUNTEER/TRAINEE IN VEHICLE COLLIDING WITH ANOTHER VEHICLE ................................... 33
VOLUNTEER/TRAINEE IN VEHICLE COLLIDING WITH AN OBJECT (NOT ANOTHER VEHICLE ..... 33
OVERTURNED VEHICLE HOLDING A VOLUNTEER/TRAINIEE (NO COLLISION) ............................ 33
OTHER VEHICULAR ACCIDENT INVOLVING A VOLUNTEER/TRAINEE ........................................... 33
PART 5: CRIME COMMITTED AGAINST PEACE CORPS STAFF OR PROPERTY ............................... 34
KIDNAPPING .......................................................................................................................................... 35
RAPE ...................................................................................................................................................... 36
AGGRAVATED SEXUAL ASSAULT....................................................................................................... 38
ROBBERY .............................................................................................................................................. 40
AGGRAVATED ASSAULT ...................................................................................................................... 42
SEXUAL ASSAULT ................................................................................................................................ 44
PHYSICAL ASSAULT ............................................................................................................................. 45
BURGLARY ............................................................................................................................................ 46
THREAT.................................................................................................................................................. 48
THEFT .................................................................................................................................................... 49
VANDALISM ........................................................................................................................................... 51

HOW TO USE THE CONSOLIDATED INCIDENT REPORTING GUIDE


THE CONSOLIDATED INCIDENT REPORTING GUIDE PROVIDES INSTRUCTION
ON HOW TO REPORT CRIMES AND SECURITY OR SAFETY INCIDENTS
INVOLVING PEACE CORPS VOLUNTEERS AND TRAINEES (PCV/TS) AND STAFF
TO PEACE CORPS/WASHINGTON.
The Consolidated Incident Reporting Guide is set up in five parts:
Part 1 provides the official Peace Corps definitions of crimes against PCV/Ts and
serves as an aid to properly determining the classification of an incident;
Part 2 provides the official Peace Corps definitions of stalking and how to report a
stalking incident;
Part 3 provides an explanation of the other security incidents that can be reported using
the CIRS;
Part 4 provides an explanation of vehicular accidents that can be reported using the
CIRS;
Part 5 provides the official Peace Corps definitions of crimes against staff and serves as
an aid to properly determining the classification of an incident.
The Consolidated Incident Reporting System (CIRS) will be used for all formal reports of
Volunteer deaths, crimes and other security incidents against PCV/Ts. For specific
information about how to use the CIRS application and complete the incident report
form, please refer to the CIRS User Guide.

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March 2014

REPORTING AN INCIDENT
How Are Incidents Reported?
ALL PCV/T deaths, crimes, stalkings, and other security incidents are reported using
the CIRS. For specific information about how to use the CIRS application and complete
the CIRS report, please see the CIRS User Guide.
When Must A CIRS Report Be Filed?
A complete and accurate CIRS report must be filed not later than 3 business days after
post first learns of the incident.
Do You Still Need A CIRS Report If PC/Washington Has Been Notified By
Telephone?
Yes. The CIRS report is the official documentation of the incident; the telephone
notification is just to mobilize the response and support systems.
Do You Still Need To Notify PC/Washington If A CIRS Report Has Been
Submitted?
If the incident requires a telephone notification, then it should have been made before
the CIRS report was filed. If the incident does not require telephone notification, then
the CIRS report is the only report required.
Should Any Incidents Be Reported To The Office Of Inspector General?
If the incident is a PCV-on-PCV or Staff-on-PCV crime, post must notify the OIG using
the Reporting Hotline (202-692-2915). The only exception is for restricted reports,
which are only shared with Designated Staff.
Is CIRS Used To Report When A Volunteer Has Committed A Crime?
ONLY if the victim of the crime is another PCV/T. Otherwise, notify the Office of
Inspector General, your Regional Director and the Office of General Counsel.

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PART 1: CRIME INCIDENT CLASSIFICATION


This section will help you determine the proper classification for a crime involving a
PCV/T. The same definitions should be used to classify crimes occurring against Peace
Corps staff (except for Death).
For each type of incident the information is divided into a series of sections that answer
specific questions. These sections are:
"OFFICIAL DEFINITION" presents the official Peace Corps definition for the
incident.
"WHAT IS A...?" describes the specific conditions that must be met in order for an
incident to meet the definition. This section also includes examples of situations
that fit that category.
"HOW IS IT DIFFERENT FROM..." helps you differentiate this incident from other
types of incidents that may appear similar, such as distinguishing between burglary
and theft.
"WHERE DOES IT RANK ON THE SEVERITY HIERARCHY?" is a chart showing
where this incident ranks on the severity hierarchy. This lets you know what to
report if more than one type of incident occurred at the same time. (Remember, if
more than one type of incident occurs during the same event, the whole event is
reported based on the classification of the most serious incident that occurred.)
"SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS" provides guidance on when immediate notification to
PC/Washington may be required.
As always, if you are unsure about how to classify an incident, please do not hesitate to
contact your PCSSO or the Crime Statistics and Analysis Unit.

NOTE REGARDING SERIOUS INCIDENTS: It is essential that Headquarters be


notified immediately about all serious incidents against PCV/Ts. For rapes or
aggravated sexual assaults that happened in the last five days or when there is a
perceived serious or imminent threat, you must immediately notify the Assigned
Security Specialist at (+1-202-437-5159). For all other serious incidents such as a
Volunteer death, kidnapping, when a Volunteer has suffered life threatening injuries,
when the incident is believed to garner significant public attention or affect relations
with the host country, or when the CD requires immediate advice or assistance,
notification must be made by telephone to the Peace Corps Duty Officer at (+1-202692-1470)

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VOLUNTEER DEATH
OFFICIAL DEFINITIONS:
DEATH BY HOMICIDE:
The willful (non-negligent) killing of a Volunteer by another person.
Deaths caused by negligence, suicides and accidental deaths are excluded.
DEATH BY SUICIDE:
The act of a Volunteer killing him/herself intentionally.
DEATH BY ACCIDENT:
Death of a Volunteer due to unintentional injury.
DEATH BY NATURAL CAUSE:
Death of a Volunteer due to illness or natural cause.
DEATH BY INDETERMINATE CAUSE:
Death of a Volunteer pending further investigation to establish cause of death.
Deaths categorized as this type will be revisited after 6 months and recategorized as death due to homicide, suicide, accident or illness, if the
information is available.
WHAT ARE THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN TYPES OF VOLUNTEER DEATHS?
The incident is reported as...
HOMICIDE if someone intentionally killed the PCV/T or if the PCV/T died during the
commission of any crime.
SUICIDE if the PCV/T intentionally killed himself or herself.
ACCIDENT if the PCV/T died as a result of an accident or unintentional act by the
PCV/T or other person (such as a car crash, drowning or a fall).
NATURAL CAUSE if the PCV/T died as a result of sickness or natural causes (such
as malaria or old age).
INDETERMINATE CAUSE if the legal and medical investigative authorities cannot
immediately determine the circumstances under which the PCV/T died.

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WHERE DOES VOLUNTEER DEATH RANK ON THE SEVERITY HIERARCHY?


MOST SERIOUS

LEAST SERIOUS

VOLUNTEER DEATH
Kidnapping
Rape
Aggravated Sexual Assault
Robbery
Aggravated Assault
Sexual Assault
Physical Assault
Burglary
Threat
Theft
Vandalism

If a Volunteer Death occurs


during ANY other crime incident,
classify the incident as DEATH
BY HOMICIDE.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
Immediate notification to PC/Washington is required anytime a PCV/T dies, regardless
of the circumstances. Call the Peace Corps Duty Officer at 202-692-1470 any time, day
or night.

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March 2014

KIDNAPPING
OFFICIAL DEFINITION OF KIDNAPPING: The unlawful seizure and/or detention of a
Volunteer against his/her will. This category includes hostage-taking.
WHAT IS KIDNAPPING?
Kidnapping involves taking a PCV/T away or illegally holding the PCV/T, against the
PCV/T's will. There is NO requirement that demands of any kind be made as a
condition of the PCV/T's release.
NOTE: It is essential that the detention be illegal - if police or other authorities legally
detain or hold a PCV/T, it is not kidnapping.
An incident is Kidnapping if:
Someone forces the PCV/T to go with him/her, against the PCV/T's will.

Someone drugs the PCV/T and takes the PCV/T away.

Someone prevents a PCV/T from leaving a location, either by locking him/her in


or through force or threat of force.

A rebel, terrorist or insurgent group holds a PCV/T against the PCV/T's will and
makes demands of a political nature

SPECIAL RULE FOR "EXPRESS KIDNAPPINGS" INVOLVING VEHICLES


If the PCV/T is detained for a short period of time in a vehicle, deprived of his/her
possessions and then released, the incident should be classified as a robbery. If the
detention is for an extended period of time, the incident should be classified as a
kidnapping.
HOW IS IT DIFFERENT FROM...
Robbery If the PCV/T is detained briefly and deprived of money or possessions,
this is a robbery. Kidnapping requires detaining the PCV/T for an extended period
of time.

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March 2014

WHERE DOES KIDNAPPING RANK ON THE SEVERITY HIERARCHY?


MOST SERIOUS

LEAST SERIOUS

Volunteer Death
KIDNAPPING
Rape
Aggravated Sexual Assault
Robbery
Aggravated Assault
Sexual Assault
Physical Assault
Burglary
Threat
Theft
Vandalism

If a PCV/T dies during a kidnapping,


report the entire incident as a
Volunteer Death (Homicide).

If any of these incidents also occurs


during a kidnapping, classify the
overall incident a KIDNAPPING as
it is the most serious incident type.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
A kidnapping incident requires immediate notification to PC/Washington.
the Peace Corps Duty Officer at 202-692-1470 any time, day or night.

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RAPE

OFFICIAL DEFINITION OF RAPE: The penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina
or anus with any body part or object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another
person, without the consent of the Volunteer.
WHAT IS RAPE?
Rape can be committed by either male or female offenders, against either male or
female PCV/Ts. Penetration must have occurred. Force or violence is not required, nor
is it a requirement that the PCV/T actively resist. The incident is rape anytime the
PCV/T does not give consent to the act, including when the PCV/T is asleep or
incapacitated due to drugs or alcohol. It is also rape if the PCV/T cannot remember
giving consent. Rape can be committed by the PCV/T's spouse or boyfriend/girlfriend
and it does not matter if the PCV/T has previously consented to sexual intercourse with
the offender.
Consent means words or actions that show a knowing and voluntary agreement to
engage in mutually agreed-upon activity. Consent is absent if force has been used
against the PCV/T, the PCV/T has been threatened or placed in fear, or the PCV/T is
incapable of appraising the nature of the conduct or is physically incapable of declining
participation in, or communicating unwillingness to engage in, that conduct.
An incident is Rape if:
Someone has sexual intercourse with the PCV/T while the PCV/T is asleep.

Someone uses violence or the threat of violence to force the PCV/T to have
sexual intercourse.

The PCV/T says he/she does not want to have sexual intercourse, but the other
person persists and penetrates the PCV/T's anus or vagina.

Someone has sexual relations after getting the PCV/T drunk (or giving the PCV/T
drugs) so that the PCV/T is not capable of saying "yes" or "no" or doesn't
remember giving consent.

Someone inserts a finger or other object into the vagina or anus of the PCV/T
without his/her consent.

Someone forces the PCV/T to perform oral sex against the PCV/T's will.

Someone performs oral sex on a PCV/T while the PCV/T is asleep, unconscious
or otherwise unable to give consent.

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HOW IS IT DIFFERENT FROM...


Aggravated Sexual Assault Rape occurs when there is penetration of the anus
or vagina or forced oral sex; if the offender does not penetrate the PCV/T's anus or
vagina or there is no forced oral sex, then the crime is aggravated sexual assault.
WHERE DOES RAPE RANK ON THE SEVERITY HIERARCHY?
MOST SERIOUS

LEAST SERIOUS

Volunteer Death
Kidnapping
RAPE
Aggravated Sexual Assault
Robbery
Aggravated Assault
Sexual Assault
Physical Assault
Burglary
Threat
Theft
Vandalism

If a rape also occurs during either of


these incidents, classify the overall
incident according to the most
serious incident type.
If a rape also occurs during any of
these incidents, classify the overall
incident a RAPE because it is the
most serious incident type.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
Immediate notification to the Assigned Security Specialist at (+1-202-437-5159) is
required if the rape is reported to post within 5 days of the attack or there is a perceived
serious or imminent threat against the Volunteer or others.
Immediate notification is also required if the incident is expected to garner much public
attention or to have implications on relations with the host country.
Post should also call anytime they require immediate advice or assistance to deal with
the incident.

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March 2014

AGGRAVATED SEXUAL ASSAULT


OFFICIAL DEFINITION OF AGGRAVATED SEXUAL ASSAULT: Another person,
without the consent of the Volunteer, intentionally or knowingly:

touches or contacts, either directly or through clothing, the Volunteers genitalia,


anus, groin, breast, inner thigh, or buttocks; OR
kisses the Volunteer; OR
disrobes the Volunteer; OR
causes the Volunteer to touch or contact, either directly or through clothing,
another persons genitalia, anus, groin, breast, inner thigh, or buttocks, OR
attempts to carry out any of those acts,

AND:

The offender uses, or threatens to use, a weapon, OR


The offender uses, or threatens to use, force or other intimidating actions, OR
The Volunteer is incapacitated or otherwise incapable of giving consent.

WHAT IS AGGRAVATED SEXUAL ASSAULT?


Aggravated Sexual Assaults can be committed by either male or female offenders,
against either male or female PCV/Ts. It requires that the contact be intentional and
without the consent of the PCV/T. Aggravated Sexual Assault can be committed by the
PCV/T's spouse or boyfriend/girlfriend and it does not matter if the PCV/T has
previously consented to sexual interactions with the offender.
Consent means words or actions that show a knowing and voluntary agreement to
engage in mutually agreed-upon activity. Consent is absent if force has been used
against the PCV/T, the PCV/T has been threatened or placed in fear, or the PCV/T is
incapable of appraising the nature of the conduct or is physically incapable of declining
participation in, or communicating unwillingness to engage in, that conduct.
NOTE: If during the course of a crime the offender accidentally contacts the PCV/T's
genitalia, anus, groin, breast, or inner thigh, it would not be considered an Aggravated
Sexual Assault. Instead, classify the incident based on the most appropriate definition.
An incident is Aggravated Sexual Assault if:
Someone uses violence or the threat of violence to try to force the PCV/T to have
oral, vaginal, or anal intercourse, but does not penetrate the PCV/T's mouth,
vagina or anus.

Someone tries to have oral, vaginal, or anal intercourse with the PCV/T while the
PCV/T is asleep, but does not penetrate the PCV/T's mouth, vagina or anus.

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Someone touches the PCV/T's genitalia, anus, groin, breast, inner thigh, or
buttocks AND has a weapon.

Someone corners the PCV/T on a bus and kisses the PCV/T.

Someone forces the PCV/T to touch his/her genitalia, anus, groin, breast, inner
thigh, or buttocks.

HOW IS IT DIFFERENT FROM...


Rape Rape occurs when there is penetration of the anus or vagina or forced oral
sex. If no penetration or forced oral sex occurs, then the incident is aggravated
sexual assault.
Aggravated Assault Aggravated Assault does not involve contact with the
PCV/Ts genitalia, anus, groin, breast, inner thigh, or buttocks.
Sexual Assault Sexual Assault would not involve a weapon, force, or intimidating
actions by the offender.

WHERE DOES AGGRAVATED SEXUAL ASSAULT RANK ON THE SEVERITY


HIERARCHY?
MOST SERIOUS

LEAST SERIOUS

Volunteer Death
Kidnapping
Rape
AGGRAVATED SEXUAL ASSAULT
Robbery
Aggravated Assault
Sexual Assault
Physical Assault
Burglary
Threat
Theft
Vandalism

If an Aggravated Sexual Assault


also occurs during any of these
incidents, classify the overall
incident according to the most
serious incident type.
If an Aggravated Sexual Assault
also occurs during any of these
incidents, classify the overall
incident an AGGRAVATED
SEXUAL ASSAULT because it is
the most serious incident type.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
Immediate notification to the Assigned Security Specialist at (+1-202-437-5159) is
required if the aggravated sexual assault is reported to post within 5 days of the attack
or there is a perceived serious or imminent threat against the Volunteer or others.
Immediate notification is also required if the incident is expected to garner much public
attention or to have implications on relations with the host country.
Post should also call anytime they require immediate advice or assistance to deal with
the incident.

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ROBBERY
OFFICIAL DEFINITION OF ROBBERY: The taking or attempting to take anything of
value under confrontational circumstances from the control, custody or care of the
Volunteer by force or threat of force or violence and/or by putting the Volunteer in fear of
immediate harm. Also includes when a robber threatens, displays, or uses a weapon or
transports the Volunteer to obtain his/her money or possessions.
WHAT IS A ROBBERY?
A robbery always involves taking or attempting to take property from a PCV/T through
the use of force or the threat of force. A robbery can involve the use of a weapon or just
the use of the suspect's hands or feet. If a suspect threatens to harm a PCV/T unless
the PCV/T surrenders his or her property, that is also robbery. If a PCV/T is injured
while someone is taking his property by force, the incident is still reported as a robbery.
An incident is a robbery if:
Someone threatens the PCV/T with a weapon (such as a gun, knife or big stick)
and takes their property.

Someone pushes or hits a PCV/T and takes their property.

Someone threatens to harm the PCV/T unless the PCV/T gives them his/her
property.

Someone tries to steal the PCV/T's backpack off of the PCV/T's shoulder and in
the process knocks the PCV/T to the ground.

Someone confronts the PCV/T with a weapon and demands the PCV/T give
them money, but then runs away when the PCV/T screams for help.

Someone offers the PCV/T a ride, then drives the PCV/T to multiple ATMs and
forces him/her to give the them money.

SPECIAL RULE FOR "EXPRESS KIDNAPPINGS" INVOLVING VEHICLES


If the PCV/T is detained for a short period of time in a vehicle, deprived of his/her
possessions and then released, the incident should be classified as a robbery. If the
detention is for an extended period of time, the incident should be classified as a
Kidnapping.
HOW IS IT DIFFERENT FROM...
Kidnapping - Kidnapping requires detaining the PCV/T for an extended period of
time.
Aggravated Assault Aggravated assault does not involve taking of
property. Based on the ranking of incidents by level of severity, robbery is a more
serious classification than physical assault. Anytime a PCV/T is assaulted AND

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property is taken, the incident is classified as a robbery - even if the PCV/T is


injured.

Burglary Burglaries happen to houses or hotel rooms; robberies happen to


people. A burglary does not involve a direct confrontation between the suspect and
the PCV/T. However, if a suspect enters the PCV/T's house while the PCV/T is
present AND the suspect takes property by threatening or striking the PCV/T, the
incident type is robbery (because of the use or threat of force).
Theft Theft does not involve direct confrontation between the suspect and the
PCV/T and force is never used in theft. If property (such as a wallet, watch or cell
phone) is taken from a PCV/T without the PCV/T knowing it, that is a theft. If a cell
phone is snatched from a PCV/T's hand, that is a theft. However, if the suspect
strikes or injures the PCV/T or if the PCV/T resists, then the incident type is a
robbery (because of the use of force by the suspect).
WHERE DOES ROBBERY RANK ON THE SEVERITY HIERARCHY?
MOST SERIOUS

LEAST SERIOUS

Volunteer Death
Kidnapping
Rape
Aggravated Sexual Assault
ROBBERY
Aggravated Assault
Sexual Assault
Physical Assault
Burglary
Threat
Theft
Vandalism

If a robbery also occurs during any


of these incidents, classify the
overall incident according to the
most serious incident type.

If a robbery also occurs during any


of these incidents, classify the
overall incident a ROBBERY
because it is the most serious
incident type.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
Immediate notification to PC/Washington at (+1-202-692-1470) is ONLY required if the
Robbery:

results in life-threatening injuries; OR

is expected to garner much public attention or to have implications on relations


with the host country.

The Country Director should also call anytime he or she requires immediate advice or
assistance to deal with the incident.

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AGGRAVATED ASSAULT
OFFICIAL DEFINITION OF AGGRAVATED ASSAULT: Attack or threat of attack with
a weapon in a manner capable of inflicting major or severe bodily injury or
death. Attack without a weapon or object when major or severe bodily injury results.
Major or severe bodily injury includes:

diagnostic x-rays for broken bones,


surgical intervention,
broken bones,
lost teeth,
internal injuries,
severe laceration,
loss of consciousness, OR
any injury requiring hospitalization.

Attempted murder should be reported as aggravated assault.


WHAT IS AN AGGRAVATED ASSAULT?
Aggravated assault involves an attack or threat against a PCV/T that causes or could
cause major or severe bodily injury. A major or severe bodily injury would be broken
bones, lost teeth, internal injuries, severe laceration, loss of consciousness or any injury
requiring hospitalization or surgical intervention. The attack can involve a weapon,
object or the suspect's hands or feet. If a PCV/T is threatened with a weapon or an
object in a manner that could lead to major or severe bodily injury or death, it is an
aggravated assault even if the PCV/T is not injured.
NOTE: If property is taken from the PCV/T during the assault, it is considered a
robbery.
When considering whether or not an incident should be classified as aggravated
assault, carefully consider the following:
Whether or not a weapon was used;

The type of object used as a weapon (and how it was used);

The seriousness of the injury;

The intent of the suspect to cause serious injury.

An incident is an aggravated assault if:


Someone threatens the PCV/T with a weapon (such as a gun, knife or big stick)
but does not take or attempt to take the PCV/T's property. (threat of attack with a
weapon)

Someone attacks the PCV/T with a weapon but does not take or attempt to take
the PCV/T's property. (attack with a weapon)

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Someone attacks the PCV/T with an object (such as a stick, rock or tool) in such
a manner that causes or could cause major or severe injury but does not take or
attempt to take the PCV/T's property. (attack with a weapon)

Someone beats and kicks the PCV/T, causing major or severe injury (such as
broken bones, lost teeth or hospitalization) but does not take or attempt to take
the PCV/T's property. (attack without a weapon when severe injury results)

Someone intentionally hits (or tries to hit) the PCV/T with an automobile or other
motor vehicle. (attack with a weapon)

Someone tries to kill the PCV/T. (attempted murder)

HOW IS IT DIFFERENT FROM...


Robbery Robbery involves the taking of property through force or threat of
force. Based on the ranking of incidents by level of severity, robbery is a more
serious classification than physical assault. So anytime a PCV/T is assaulted AND
property is taken, the incident is classified as a robbery - even if the PCV/T is
injured.
Aggravated Sexual Assault If during the course of an aggravated assault there
is intentional contact between the offender and the PCV/T involving the breasts,
genitals, mouth, buttocks, or anus, then the incident is classified as an aggravated
Sexual Assault.
Physical Assault Physical assault includes aggressive contact that results in no
injury or only minor injury and that does not require the PCV/T to use substantial
force to disengage the offender. It also includes incidents where an object that it
not capable of causing severe bodily injury is used against the PCV/T, such as
small stones, sticks, or empty plastic bottles.
WHERE DOES AGGRAVATED ASSAULT RANK ON THE SEVERITY HIERARCHY?

MOST SERIOUS

LEAST SERIOUS

Volunteer Death
Kidnapping
Rape
Aggravated Sexual Assault
Robbery
AGGRAVATED ASSAULT
Sexual Assault
Physical Assault
Burglary
Threat
Theft
Vandalism

Consolidated Incident Reporting Guide

If an aggravated assault also occurs


during any of these incidents,
classify the overall incident
according to the most serious
incident type.

If an aggravated assault also occurs


during any of these incidents,
classify the overall incident an
AGGRAVATED ASSAULT because
it is the most serious incident type.

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SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
Immediate notification to PC/Washington at (+1-202-692-1470) is ONLY required if the
Aggravated Assault:

results in life-threatening injuries; OR

is expected to garner much public attention or to have implications on relations


with the host country.

The Country Director should also call anytime he or she requires immediate advice or
assistance to deal with the incident.

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SEXUAL ASSAULT
OFFICIAL DEFINITION OF SEXUAL ASSAULT: Another person, without the consent
of the Volunteer, intentionally or knowingly:

touches or contacts, either directly or through clothing, the Volunteers genitalia,


anus, groin, breast, inner thigh, or buttocks; OR
kisses the Volunteer on the mouth;

OR attempts to carry out any of those acts.

WHAT IS SEXUAL ASSAULT?


Sexual Assault involves unwanted kisses on the mouth or touching or contact by the
offender, involving the genitals, anus, groin, breasts, inner thigh or buttocks, without the
use of a weapon or injury to the PCV/T. Sexual Assault also includes any attempts to
carry out these acts. Sexual Assault can be committed by either male or female
offenders, against either male or female PCV/Ts. Sexual Assault can be committed by
the PCV/T's spouse or boyfriend/girlfriend and it does not matter if the PCV/T has
previously consented to sexual interactions with the offender.
An incident is a Sexual Assault if:
Someone touches the PCV/T's breasts, buttocks or genitals but the PCV/T is not
injured.

Someone kisses the PCV/T on the mouth without the PCV/T's permission or
consent.

HOW IS IT DIFFERENT FROM...


Aggravated Sexual Assault Aggravated sexual assault requires intentional
contact between the offender and the PCV/T, involving the genitalia, anus, groin,
breast, inner thigh, or buttocks and the use of a weapon, physical injury or
substantial force by the PCV/T to disengage. If the incident does not involve
intentional contact AND at least one of the other circumstances, the incident is
classified as sexual assault.
Physical assault Physical assault would not involve intentional contact with the
genitalia, anus, groin, breast, inner thigh, or buttocks.

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WHERE DOES SEXUAL ASSAULT RANK ON THE SEVERITY HIERARCHY?


MOST SERIOUS

LEAST SERIOUS

Volunteer Death
Kidnapping
Rape
Aggravated Sexual Assault
Robbery
Aggravated Assault
SEXUAL ASSAULT
Physical Assault
Burglary
Threat
Theft
Vandalism

If a Sexual Assault also occurs


during any of these incidents,
classify the overall incident
according to the most serious
incident type.
If a Sexual Assault also occurs
during any of these incidents,
classify the overall incident
SEXUAL ASSAULT because it is
the most serious incident type.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
Immediate notification to the Assigned Security Specialist at (+1-202-437-5159) is
ONLY required if the Sexual Assault poses a serious or imminent threat to the Volunteer
or others or is expected to garner much public attention or to have implications on
relations with the host country.
The Country Director should also call anytime he or she requires immediate advice or
assistance to deal with the incident.

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March 2014

PHYSICAL ASSAULT
OFFICIAL DEFINITION OF PHYSICAL ASSAULT: Aggressive contact that results in
no injury or only minor injury. Minor injury does not require hospitalization, x-ray or
surgical intervention (including stitches).
WHAT IS PHYSICAL ASSAULT?
Physical Assault occurs when aggressive contact with a PCV/T results in no injury or
only minor injury to the PCV/T (such as bruises, black eyes, cuts that do not require
stitches, scratches or swelling). This also includes instances when an object is used in
a manner capable of causing only minor injury (such as small sticks, stones, or an
empty plastic bottle).To be considered a Physical Assault, the PCV/T must not have
been hospitalized, undergone X-rays or had any kind of surgery, to include getting
stitches.
An incident is Physical Assault if:
Someone beats or kicks the PCV/T but does not take or attempt to take the
PCV/T's property and causes only minor injuries that do not require X-rays or
stitches.

Someone throws small pebbles at the PCV/T but does not cause any injury to the
PCV/T and does not take or attempt to take the PCV/T's property.

HOW IS IT DIFFERENT FROM?


Robbery Robbery involves the taking of property through force or threat of
force. Based on the ranking of incidents by level of severity, robbery is a more
serious classification than physical assault. Anytime a PCV/T is assaulted AND
property is taken, the incident is classified as a robbery.
Aggravated Assault If an object is used against the PCV/T in a manner capable
of causing severe bodily injury or death, but there is no attempt to take the PCV/T's
property, the incident is classified as an Aggravated Assault. Also, if the PCV/T
sustains broken bones, lost teeth, internal injuries, severe laceration or loss of
consciousness or was hospitalized for two or more days the incident is classified as
an aggravated assault.
Sexual Assault Sexual assault requires intentional contact with the genitalia,
anus, groin, breast, inner thigh, or buttocks. If contact is made unintentionally with
any of these areas during an attack, the incident is classified as a physical assault.

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March 2014

WHERE DOES PHYSICAL ASSAULT RANK ON THE SEVERITY HIERARCHY?


MOST SERIOUS

LEAST SERIOUS

Volunteer Death
Kidnapping
Rape
Aggravated Sexual Assault
Robbery
Aggravated Assault
Sexual Assault
PHYSICAL ASSAULT
Burglary
Threat
Theft
Vandalism

Consolidated Incident Reporting Guide

If a Physical Assault also occurs


during any of these incidents,
classify the overall incident
according to the most serious
incident type.

If a Physical Assault also occurs


during any of these incidents,
classify the overall incident
PHYSICAL ASSAULT because it is
the most serious incident type.

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March 2014

BURGLARY
OFFICIAL DEFINITION OF BURGLARY: Unlawful or forcible entry of a Volunteer's
residence. This incident type usually, but not always, involves theft. The illegal entry
may be forcible, such as breaking a window or slashing a screen, or may be without
force by entering through an unlocked door or an open window. As long as the person
entering has no legal right to be present in the residence, a burglary has occurred. Also
includes illegal entry of a hotel room.
WHAT IS A BURGLARY?
A Burglary occurs anytime there is unlawful or unauthorized entry into the PCV/T's
house or hotel room and the PCV/T is not assaulted. Unlawful entry does not have to
involve force or someone breaking in; unlawful entry occurs anytime someone who
does not have permission enters the PCV/T's house or hotel room. Unlawful entry can
occur through a window or door that is not locked or through a window or door that has
been left open. Also note that "forcible entry" does not require the door or window to be
damaged, only that some tool or key was used to gain unlawful entry through a closed
or locked door or window. The key element is that someone enters the house or hotel
room WITHOUT the PCV/T's permission. Attempts to enter the PCV/T's house or hotel
room must also be reported.
An incident is a Burglary if:
Someone enters the PCV/T's house or hotel room through an unlocked door
without the PCV/T giving permission for that person to enter. (unlawful entry)

Someone breaks through a closed or locked door and enters the PCV/T's house
or hotel room. (forcible entry)

Someone cuts the screen on the window of the PCV/T's house or hotel room and
reaches inside (either using the suspect's arm or a long stick or hook). (forcible
entry)

Someone reaches in through an open window of the PCV/T's house or hotel


room and removes or damages property. (unlawful entry)

Someone uses a duplicate key to enter the PCV/T's house or hotel room without
the PCV/T's permission. (forcible entry)

Someone attempts to break through a closed or locked door but does not
actually enter the PCV/T's house or hotel room. (attempted forcible entry)

SPECIAL RULE FOR HOTELS:


If the PCV/T suspects that the property was taken from a PCV/T's room by a hotel
worker, the incident is classified as a theft because hotel workers are considered to
have lawful permission to enter the room that the PCV/T is renting. Generally it would
only be considered a burglary if there was sign of forced entry to the PCV/T's room.

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HOW IS IT DIFFERENT FROM?


Robbery Robbery involves the taking of property through force or threat of
force. If someone breaks into the PCV/T's house or hotel room, confronts the
PCV/T and forces the PCV/T to surrender property, the incident is properly
classified as a robbery.
Theft Burglary involves the unlawful entry into the PCV/T's house or hotel
room. If the PCV/T's property is stolen by someone who has permission to be in
the PCV/T's house or hotel room, the incident is properly classified as a theft.
WHERE DOES BURGLARY RANK ON THE SEVERITY HIERARCHY?
MOST SERIOUS

LEAST SERIOUS

Volunteer Death
Kidnapping
Rape
Aggravated Sexual Assault
Robbery
Aggravated Assault
Sexual Assault
Physical Assault
BURGLARY
Threat
Theft
Vandalism

Consolidated Incident Reporting Guide

If a Burglary also occurs during any


of these incidents, classify the
overall incident according to the
most serious incident type.
If a Burglary also occurs during any
of these incidents, classify the
overall incident BURGLARY
because it is the most serious
incident type.

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March 2014

THREAT
OFFICIAL DEFINITION OF THREAT: A threat is made without physical contact or
injury to the Volunteer. Threat occurs when the Volunteer is placed in reasonable fear
of bodily harm through the use of threatening words and/or other conduct.
WHAT IS THREAT?
Threat occurs anytime someone says they are going to kill the PCV/T; threatens the
PCV/T's physical well-being; or causes the PCV/T to reasonably fear for his or her
safety, but the offender does not actually make physical contact with the
PCV/T. Threats can be made in person, in writing, by e-mail or by phone.
NOTE: If someone threatens the PCV/T with a weapon capable of causing severe
bodily injury, the incident is classified as an Aggravated Assault.
An incident is a Threat if:
Someone calls the PCV/T on the telephone and says that he or she is going to
kill the PCV/T.

Someone threatens to kill the PCV/T but does not actually point a weapon at
them or physically strike them.

Someone leaves a note on the PCV/T's house saying that he or she is going to
"kick the PCV/T's butt."

Someone acts in an aggressive manner against the PCV/T, causing the PCV/T
to be concerned for his or her safety.

HOW IS IT DIFFERENT FROM...


Aggravated Assault Threat does not involve a weapon or physical attack of the
PCV/T. If the offender threatens the PCV/T and is holding a weapon, the incident is
classified as an aggravated assault. Similarly, if the offender threatens to kill the
PCV/T and then physically attacks the PCV/T, causing severe injury, the incident is
classified as aggravated assault.
Physical Assault Threat does not involve physical contact between the offender
and the PCV/T.

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March 2014

WHERE DOES THREAT RANK ON THE SEVERITY HIERARCHY?


MOST SERIOUS

LEAST SERIOUS

Volunteer Death
Kidnapping
Rape
Aggravated Sexual Assault
Robbery
Aggravated Assault
Sexual Assault
Physical Assault
Burglary
THREAT
Theft
Vandalism

If a threat also occurs during any of


these incidents, classify the overall
incident according to the most
serious incident type.

If a threat also occurs during any of


these incidents, classify the overall
incident THREAT because it is the
most serious incident type.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
Immediate notification to PC/Washington is ONLY required if the Threat:

presents an immediate danger to the PCV/T's life; OR

is expected to garner much public attention or to have implications on relations


with the host country.

The Country Director should also call anytime he or she requires immediate advice or
assistance to deal with the incident.
Call the Peace Corps Duty Officer at 202-692-1470 any time, day or night.

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March 2014

THEFT
OFFICIAL DEFINITION OF THEFT: The taking away of or attempt to take away
property or cash without involving force or illegal entry. Includes pick pocketing, stolen
purses, and thefts from a residence that do not involve an illegal entry.
WHAT IS A THEFT?
A theft occurs when the PCV/T's property is stolen without a direct confrontation
between the PCV/T and the suspect and when there has not been illegal entry into the
PCV/T's residence (including hotel room). For example, if the PCV/T gives someone
permission to enter his house and that person steals the PCV/T's property, it is a
theft. (This also applies if the PCV/T gives permission for someone to regularly enter
the house when the PCV/T is not present, such as a housekeeper.) It is also a theft if
the PCV/T's purse, cell phone, backpack or similar property is "snatched" away by a
suspect but the PCV/T does not resist or is not assaulted in any other way.
NOTE: If the suspect uses more force than necessary just to take the property or if the
PCV/T resists, the incident type is considered a robbery.
An incident is a Theft if:
Someone "picks" the PCV/T's pocket and steals his or her wallet without the
PCV/T being aware. (taking without force)

Someone snatches the PCV/T's cell phone or purse but does not use any other
force, injure the PCV/T and the PCV/T does not resist. (taking without force)

Someone steals the PCV/T's property that was in a public area (such as a beach,
library or internet caf). (taking without force or illegal entry)

Someone who has been given permission by the PCV/T to enter the PCV/T's
house or hotel room (such as a friend, housekeeper or host-family member)
steals the PCV/T's property. (taking without force or illegal entry)

A PCV/T leaves his or her wallet at a store and returns within a reasonable
amount of time to reclaim the item but finds that someone has taken it.

SPECIAL RULE FOR HOTELS:


If the PCV/T suspects that the property was taken from the PCV/T's room by a hotel
worker, the incident is classified as a theft because hotel workers are considered to
have lawful permission to enter the room that the PCV/T is renting. Generally it would
only be considered a burglary if there was sign of forced entry to the PCV/T's room.

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HOW IS IT DIFFERENT FROM


Robbery Robbery involves the taking of property through force or threat of
force. In theft, there is no threat or use of force.
Burglary Burglary requires unlawful or unauthorized entry - that means someone
who does not have permission enters the PCV/T's house or hotel room.
Vandalism Vandalism involves the destruction or damage of property - NOT the
taking of property. If property is taken, the incident is theft.
WHERE DOES THEFT RANK ON THE SEVERITY HIERARCHY?
MOST SERIOUS

LEAST SERIOUS

Volunteer Death
Kidnapping
Rape
Aggravated Sexual Assault
Robbery
Aggravated Assault
Sexual Assault
Physical Assault
Burglary
Threat
THEFT
Vandalism

Consolidated Incident Reporting Guide

If a theft also occurs during any of


these incidents, classify the overall
incident according to the most
serious incident type.

If a theft also occurs during a


vandalism, classify the overall
incident THEFT because it is the
most serious incident type.

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March 2014

VANDALISM
OFFICIAL DEFINITION OF VANDALISM: Mischievous or malicious defacement,
destruction, or damage of property. If unlawful or forcible entry or attempted entry of a
residence is involved, the incident should be classified as burglary.
WHAT IS A VANDALISM?
Vandalism is the destruction or damage of a PCV/T's property or the PCV/T's house,
without signs of illegal entry or theft. The damage can be in the form of things being
broken, cut, torn or burned. Similarly, the damage can be from something that is
painted, drawn or marked on the PCV/T's house or property.
You must consider the intent of the offender when making the distinction between
Vandalism and Attempted Burglary. For example, if the PCV/T's window was broken by
a student who threw a rock at the PCV/T's house, that would be Vandalism. However, if
the window was broken in an attempt to enter the house without permission, that would
be burglary.
NOTE: Anytime Vandalism involves illegal or unlawful entry to the PCV/T's house or
hotel room, the incident is considered to be Burglary.
Vandalism can also be an element of other incidents, such as Threat. If the outside of
the PCV/T's house was vandalized and the offender painted a threat on the wall, the
incident would be classified as Threat.
An incident is a Vandalism if:
Someone cuts the tires on the PCV/T's bicycle. (damage of property)

Someone destroys the garden the PCV/T planted. (destruction of property)

Someone paints or writes slogans or pictures on the outside of the PCV/T's


house. (defacement of property)

Someone breaks the windows on the PCV/T's house but does not try to enter the
house. (damage of property)

Someone wipes feces on the door to the PCV/T's house. (defacement of


property)

HOW IS IT DIFFERENT FROM


Burglary Burglary requires unlawful or unauthorized entry - that means someone
who does not have permission enters the PCV/T's house or hotel room. If someone
enters the PCV/T's house or hotel room and commits vandalism (destroying
property), the entire incident is classified as a Burglary because that is the most
serious offense.
Theft Vandalism involves the destruction or damage of property - NOT the taking
of property. If property is taken, the incident is theft.

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March 2014

WHERE DOES VANDALISM RANK ON THE SEVERITY HIERARCHY?


MOST SERIOUS

LEAST SERIOUS

Volunteer Death
Kidnapping
Rape
Aggravated Sexual Assault
Robbery
Aggravated Assault
Sexual Assault
Physical Assault
Burglary
Threat
Theft
VANDALISM

Consolidated Incident Reporting Guide

If a vandalism also occurs during


any of these incidents, classify the
overall incident according to the
most serious incident type.

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March 2014

PART 2: STALKING
DEFINITION OF STALKING
OFFICIAL DEFINITION OF STALKING: Engaging a course of conduct directed at a
specific Volunteer that would cause a reasonable person to either:

Fear for his or her safety or the safety of others; OR


Suffer substantial emotional distress.

WHAT IS STALKING?
Unlike the other incident types explained in this guide, Stalking is a collection of
incidents and events rather than a single item. These events and incidents may not be
alarming or distressing when looked at individually, but when two or more occur to a
single Volunteer by a single offender or group of offenders, they should be looked at
together to see if the situation represents a threat to the Volunteers ongoing safety
and/or security.
A collection of incidents or events should be reported as a Stalking if the Volunteer
reports
feeling threatened;
concern for his/her ongoing safety and/or security; and/or
suffering from emotional distress about the incidents or events.
Incidents and Events that may be Stalking:

Targeting a PCV/T for multiple criminal incidents, including property crimes,


threats, and assaults;

Unwanted communication or contact, including but not limited to face-to-face,


phone calls, text messages, email, instant messages, postal mail, unwanted gifts
or items, and messages through a third party;

Harassment, even through a third party;

Pursuing, following, or appearing within sight of the target either in-person or


through electronic surveillance;

Trespassing on the PCV/Ts property or in the PCV/Ts workplace without


express permission (if needed);

Direct or indirect verbal or physical threats to harm the PCV/Ts host or


biological/marital family, colleagues, friends, or pets;

Defamation or spreading malicious rumors about the PCV/T;

Gathering or obtaining personal information about the PCV/T by accessing public


records, hiring a personal investigator, going through the PCV/Ts garbage, or

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March 2014

contacting the PCV/Ts colleagues, community members, host family, friends,


etc.;

Contacting witnesses or any other person involved in a crime incident to


intimidate them or get them to change their testimony;

Posting pictures, videos, or information in chat rooms, forums, or on websites


about the PCV/T without the PCV/Ts consent or knowledge;

Sending unwanted or unsolicited email, text messages, instant messages, or


social media messages;

Installing hardware or software on a PCV/Ts computer

WHERE DOES STALKING RANK ON THE SEVERITY HIERARCHY?


MOST SERIOUS

LEAST SERIOUS

Volunteer Death
Kidnapping
Rape
Aggravated Sexual Assault
Robbery
Aggravated Assault
Sexual Assault
Physical Assault
Burglary
Threat
Theft
Vandalism

Stalking is not part of the severity


hierarchy. Any combination of
incidents or other events can be
included in a report of stalking.

If two or more of any of these


incidents are reported by the same
victim involving the same offender,
consider whether a STALKING
report should also be created.

HOW TO REPORT A STALKING


In cases of Stalking, the CD should consult with their respective PCSSO once action to
safeguard the Volunteer has been taken.
If positive contact with the Volunteer is not made within 24 hours, the Volunteer must be
considered missing or endangered and the Country Director must immediately notify the
Office of Safety and Security at 202-437-5159.

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March 2014

PART 3: OTHER SECURITY INCIDENT


OFFICIAL DEFINITION OF OTHER SECURITY INCIDENT: Any situation that directly
impacts the security of a Volunteer but that does NOT meet any of the definitions of a
crime.
WHAT IS OTHER SECURITY INCIDENT?
Other Security Incident is any situation where a PCV/T's continued security is in
question, but in which the PCV/T has not been the victim of a crime. This includes any
serious incidents occurring in or near the PCV/T's site that cause the PCV/T to have
concerns for his/her own security, even if the PCV/T was not directly involved. Does
NOT include situations affecting the PCV/T's safety, such as transportation crashes,
natural disasters or other weather-related incidents. Also, do not report security
incidents that affected large groups of PCV/Ts and resulted in EAP activation.
An incident is an Other Security Incident if:
Someone exposes his/her genitalia to a PCV/T in public.

Someone makes harassing comments towards the PCV/T, but the PCV/T does
not feel threatened.

Someone follows the PCV/T, but the PCV/T does not feel physically threatened
or that he/she is being stalked.

Someone displays or uses a weapon in the presence of a PCV/T, but the action
is not directed towards the PCV/T.

The PCV/T finds someone watching through the windows of his/her house, but
the person does not attempt to enter and the PCV/T does not feel threatened.

The PCV/T is detained by law enforcement and there is suspicion that the
detention is harassment and not due to a statutory violation.

The PCV/T reports an anti-American incident occurred at his/her site, but the
PCV/T was not targeted.

The PCV/T reports that a serious crime (i.e., rape or murder) occurred near
his/her site and that has created concerns for his/her own security.

HOW IS IT DIFFERENT FROM?


Sexual Assault Sexual assault requires intentional contact with the genitalia,
anus, groin, breast, inner thigh, or buttocks. If the offender exposes himself/herself
or makes sexually explicit comments but does not physically touch the PCV/T, the
incident is classified as other security incident.
Burglary Burglary requires illegal or attempted illegal trespass into a PCV/T's
house or hotel room. If the offender peeks through the PCV/T's window or doors
but makes no attempt to enter the house, the incident is classified as other security
incident.

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Threat Threat requires that the PCV/T feels in danger of being physically
harmed. If the PCV/T is annoyed but does not feel that he/she may be in physical
danger, it is classified as other security incident.

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March 2014

PART 4: VEHICULAR ACCIDENT INVOLVING A VOLUNTEER/TRAINEE


Vehicular accidents involving a Volunteer/Trainee are divided into five separate
categories. If an accident is caused in order to intentionally hurt the PCV/T, the incident
should be classified as a crime. At this time, the agency does not require that accidents
are reported via CIRS. Accidents involving staff and Peace Corps official vehicles are
only reported if a PCV/T was also involved in the accident. The report in CIRS does not
account for any official report of Peace Corps property damaged in an accident.
PEDESTRIAN VOLUNTEER/TRAINEE STRUCK BY VEHICLE
When the PCV/T is not riding in a vehicle but is struck by a vehicle, including a cart,
bicycle, truck, motorcycle, or bus.
VOLUNTEER/TRAINEE IN VEHICLE COLLIDING WITH ANOTHER VEHICLE
When the vehicle in which the PCV/T is riding strikes another vehicle, whether the other
vehicle is moving or stopped.
VOLUNTEER/TRAINEE IN VEHICLE COLLIDING WITH AN OBJECT (NOT
ANOTHER VEHICLE
When the vehicle in which the PCV/T is riding strikes another object, such as a tree,
building, rock, or animal (but not another person).
OVERTURNED VEHICLE HOLDING A VOLUNTEER/TRAINIEE (NO COLLISION)
When the vehicle in which the PCV/T is riding does not strike a vehicle or object, but
does end in a position in which the wheels of the vehicle are not the primary contact
with the ground. This could mean the vehicle is turned over onto its side or top.
OTHER VEHICULAR ACCIDENT INVOLVING A VOLUNTEER/TRAINEE
When the above definitions do not match the accident, use Other Vehicular Accident
Involving a Volunteer/Trainee to report the incident.
Examples of Other Vehicular Accidents:

The PCV/T is riding in a vehicle that strikes other pedestrians.

The PCV/T is in a vehicle that slides or skids on the road, but does not overturn.

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March 2014

PART 5: CRIME COMMITTED AGAINST PEACE CORPS STAFF OR PROPERTY


Crimes committed against Peace Corps staff or property are not required to be reported
via CIRS at this time; however reporting these incidents can help the Agency to
understand the overall security situation in-country.
The definitions and severity hierarchy are almost the same as those for crimes
committed against Volunteers.
If a crime is only committed against Peace Corps property, for example burglary of a
Peace Corps facility, the Country Director should be entered into the CIRS as a victim.
If a vehicle or other equipment was checked out to a staff member, that staff member
should be entered as the victim. If Peace Corps property such as computers or vehicles
is damaged or lost in an incident, the CIRS report does not replace any official report
needed to document the loss.

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March 2014

KIDNAPPING
OFFICIAL DEFINITION OF KIDNAPPING: The unlawful seizure and/or detention of a
staff member against his/her will. This category includes hostage-taking.
WHAT IS KIDNAPPING?
Kidnapping involves taking a staff member away or illegally holding the staff member,
against the staff members will. There is NO requirement that demands of any kind be
made as a condition of the staff members release.
NOTE: It is essential that the detention be illegal - if police or other authorities legally
detain or hold a staff member, it is not kidnapping.
An incident is Kidnapping if:
Someone forces the staff member to go with him/her, against the staff member's
will.

Someone drugs the staff member and takes the staff member away.

Someone prevents a staff member from leaving a location, either by locking


him/her in or through force or threat of force.

A rebel, terrorist or insurgent group holds a staff member against the staff
member's will and makes demands of a political nature

SPECIAL RULE FOR "EXPRESS KIDNAPPINGS" INVOLVING VEHICLES


If the staff member is detained for a short period of time in a vehicle, deprived of his/her
possessions and then released, the incident should be classified as a robbery. If the
detention is for an extended period of time, the incident should be classified as a
kidnapping.
HOW IS IT DIFFERENT FROM...
Robbery If the staff member is detained briefly and deprived of money or
possessions, this is a robbery. Kidnapping requires detaining the staff member for
an extended period of time.

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March 2014

RAPE

OFFICIAL DEFINITION OF RAPE: The penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina
or anus with any body part or object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another
person, without the consent of the staff member.
WHAT IS RAPE?
Rape can be committed by either male or female offenders, against either male or
female staff members. Penetration must have occurred. Force or violence is not
required, nor is it a requirement that the staff member actively resist. The incident is
rape anytime the staff member does not give consent to the act, including when the staff
member is asleep or incapacitated due to drugs or alcohol. It is also rape if the staff
member cannot remember giving consent. Rape can be committed by the staff
member's spouse or boyfriend/girlfriend and it does not matter if the staff member has
previously consented to sexual intercourse with the offender.
Consent means words or actions that show a knowing and voluntary agreement to
engage in mutually agreed-upon activity. Consent is absent if force has been used
against the staff member, the staff member has been threatened or placed in fear, or
the staff member is incapable of appraising the nature of the conduct or is physically
incapable of declining participation in, or communicating unwillingness to engage in,
that conduct.
An incident is Rape if:
Someone has sexual intercourse with the staff member while the staff member is
asleep.

Someone uses violence or the threat of violence to force the staff member to
have sexual intercourse.

The staff member says he/she does not want to have sexual intercourse, but the
other person persists and penetrates the staff member's anus or vagina.

Someone has sexual relations after getting the staff member drunk (or giving the
staff member drugs) so that the staff member is not capable of saying "yes" or
"no" or doesn't remember giving consent.

Someone inserts a finger or other object into the vagina or anus of the staff
member without his/her consent.

Someone forces the staff member to perform oral sex against the staff member's
will.

Someone performs oral sex on a staff member while the staff member is asleep,
unconscious or otherwise unable to give consent.

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HOW IS IT DIFFERENT FROM...


Aggravated Sexual Assault Rape occurs when there is penetration of the anus
or vagina or forced oral sex; if the offender does not penetrate the staff member's
anus or vagina or there is no forced oral sex, then the crime is aggravated sexual
assault.

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AGGRAVATED SEXUAL ASSAULT


OFFICIAL DEFINITION OF AGGRAVATED SEXUAL ASSAULT: Another person,
without the consent of the staff member, intentionally or knowingly:

touches or contacts, either directly or through clothing, the staff members


genitalia, anus, groin, breast, inner thigh, or buttocks; OR
kisses the staff member; OR
disrobes the staff member; OR
causes the staff members to touch or contact, either directly or through clothing,
another persons genitalia, anus, groin, breast, inner thigh, or buttocks, OR
attempts to carry out any of those acts,

AND:

The offender uses, or threatens to use, a weapon, OR


The offender uses, or threatens to use, force or other intimidating actions, OR
The staff member is incapacitated or otherwise incapable of giving consent.

WHAT IS AGGRAVATED SEXUAL ASSAULT?


Aggravated Sexual Assaults can be committed by either male or female offenders,
against either male or female staff members. It requires that the contact be intentional
and without the consent of the staff member. Aggravated Sexual Assault can be
committed by the staff member's spouse or boyfriend/girlfriend and it does not matter if
the staff member has previously consented to sexual interactions with the offender.
Consent means words or actions that show a knowing and voluntary agreement to
engage in mutually agreed-upon activity. Consent is absent if force has been used
against the staff member, the staff member has been threatened or placed in fear, or
the staff member is incapable of appraising the nature of the conduct or is physically
incapable of declining participation in, or communicating unwillingness to engage in,
that conduct.
NOTE: If during the course of a crime the offender accidentally contacts the staff
member's genitalia, anus, groin, breast, or inner thigh, it would not be considered an
Aggravated Sexual Assault. Instead, classify the incident based on the most
appropriate definition.
An incident is Aggravated Sexual Assault if:
Someone uses violence or the threat of violence to try to force the staff member
to have oral, vaginal, or anal intercourse, but does not penetrate the staff
member's mouth, vagina or anus.

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Someone tries to have oral, vaginal, or anal intercourse with the staff member
while the staff member is asleep, but does not penetrate the staff member's
mouth, vagina or anus.

Someone touches the staff member's genitalia, anus, groin, breast, inner thigh,
or buttocks AND has a weapon.

Someone corners the staff member on a bus and kisses the staff member.

Someone forces the staff member to touch his/her genitalia, anus, groin, breast,
inner thigh, or buttocks.

HOW IS IT DIFFERENT FROM...


Rape Rape occurs when there is penetration of the anus or vagina or forced oral
sex. If no penetration or forced oral sex occurs, then the incident is aggravated
sexual assault.
Aggravated Assault Aggravated Assault does not involve contact with the staff
members genitalia, anus, groin, breast, inner thigh, or buttocks.
Sexual Assault Sexual Assault would not involve a weapon, force, or intimidating
actions by the offender.

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ROBBERY
OFFICIAL DEFINITION OF ROBBERY: The taking or attempting to take anything of
value under confrontational circumstances from the control, custody or care of the staff
member by force or threat of force or violence and/or by putting the staff member in fear
of immediate harm. Also includes when a robber threatens, displays, or uses a weapon
or transports the staff member to obtain his/her money or possessions.
WHAT IS A ROBBERY?
A robbery always involves taking or attempting to take property from a staff member
through the use of force or the threat of force. A robbery can involve the use of a
weapon or just the use of the suspect's hands or feet. If a suspect threatens to harm a
staff member unless the staff member surrenders his or her property, that is also
robbery. If a staff member is injured while someone is taking his property by force, the
incident is still reported as a robbery.
An incident is a robbery if:
Someone threatens the staff member with a weapon (such as a gun, knife or big
stick) and takes their property.

Someone pushes or hits a staff member and takes their property.

Someone threatens to harm the staff member unless the staff member gives
them his/her property.

Someone tries to steal the staff member's backpack off of the staff member's
shoulder and in the process knocks the staff member to the ground.

Someone confronts the staff member with a weapon and demands the staff
member give them money, but then runs away when the staff member screams
for help.

Someone offers the staff member a ride, then drives the staff member to multiple
ATMs and forces him/her to give them money.

SPECIAL RULE FOR "EXPRESS KIDNAPPINGS" INVOLVING VEHICLES


If the staff member is detained for a short period of time in a vehicle, deprived of his/her
possessions and then released, the incident should be classified as a robbery. If the
detention is for an extended period of time, the incident should be classified as a
Kidnapping.
HOW IS IT DIFFERENT FROM...
Kidnapping - Kidnapping requires detaining the staff member for an extended
period of time.
Aggravated Assault Aggravated assault does not involve taking of
property. Based on the ranking of incidents by level of severity, robbery is a more

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serious classification than physical assault. Anytime a staff member is assaulted


AND property is taken, the incident is classified as a robbery - even if the staff
member is injured.
Burglary Burglaries happen to houses or hotel rooms; robberies happen to
people. A burglary does not involve a direct confrontation between the suspect and
the staff member. However, if a suspect enters the staff member's house while the
staff member is present AND the suspect takes property by threatening or striking
the staff member, the incident type is robbery (because of the use or threat of
force).
Theft Theft does not involve direct confrontation between the suspect and the
staff member and force is never used in theft. If property (such as a wallet, watch or
cell phone) is taken from a staff member without the staff member knowing it, that is
a theft. If a cell phone is snatched from a staff member's hand, that is a
theft. However, if the suspect strikes or injures the staff member or if the staff
member resists, then the incident type is a robbery (because of the use of force by
the suspect).

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AGGRAVATED ASSAULT
OFFICIAL DEFINITION OF AGGRAVATED ASSAULT: Attack or threat of attack with
a weapon in a manner capable of inflicting major or severe bodily injury or
death. Attack without a weapon or object when major or severe bodily injury results.
Major or severe bodily injury includes:

diagnostic x-rays for broken bones,


surgical intervention,
broken bones,
lost teeth,
internal injuries,
severe laceration,
loss of consciousness, OR
any injury requiring hospitalization.

Attempted murder should be reported as aggravated assault.


WHAT IS AN AGGRAVATED ASSAULT?
Aggravated assault involves an attack or threat against a staff member that causes or
could cause major or severe bodily injury. A major or severe bodily injury would be
broken bones, lost teeth, internal injuries, severe laceration, loss of consciousness or
any injury requiring hospitalization or surgical intervention. The attack can involve a
weapon, object or the suspect's hands or feet. If a staff member is threatened with a
weapon or an object in a manner that could lead to major or severe bodily injury or
death, it is an aggravated assault even if the staff member is not injured.
NOTE: If property is taken from the staff member during the assault, it is considered a
robbery.
When considering whether or not an incident should be classified as aggravated
assault, carefully consider the following:
Whether or not a weapon was used;

The type of object used as a weapon (and how it was used);

The seriousness of the injury;

The intent of the suspect to cause serious injury.

An incident is an aggravated assault if:


Someone threatens the staff member with a weapon (such as a gun, knife or big
stick) but does not take or attempt to take the staff member's property. (threat of
attack with a weapon)

Someone attacks the staff member with a weapon but does not take or attempt
to take the staff member's property. (attack with a weapon)

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Someone attacks the staff member with an object (such as a stick, rock or tool) in
such a manner that causes or could cause major or severe injury but does not
take or attempt to take the staff member's property. (attack with a weapon)

Someone beats and kicks the staff member, causing major or severe injury (such
as broken bones, lost teeth or hospitalization) but does not take or attempt to
take the staff member's property. (attack without a weapon when severe injury
results)

Someone intentionally hits (or tries to hit) the staff member with an automobile or
other motor vehicle. (attack with a weapon)

Someone tries to kill the staff member. (attempted murder)

HOW IS IT DIFFERENT FROM...


Robbery Robbery involves the taking of property through force or threat of
force. Based on the ranking of incidents by level of severity, robbery is a more
serious classification than physical assault. So anytime a staff member is assaulted
AND property is taken, the incident is classified as a robbery - even if the staff
member is injured.
Aggravated Sexual Assault If during the course of an aggravated assault there
is intentional contact between the offender and the staff member involving the
breasts, genitals, mouth, buttocks, or anus for sexual gratification, then the incident
is classified as an Aggravated Sexual Assault.
Physical assault Physical assault includes aggressive contact that results in no
injury or only minor injury and that does not require the staff member to use
substantial force to disengage the offender. It also includes incidents where an
object that it not capable of causing severe bodily injury is used against the staff
member, such as small stones, sticks, or empty plastic bottles.

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SEXUAL ASSAULT
OFFICIAL DEFINITION OF SEXUAL ASSAULT: Another person, without the consent
of the staff member, intentionally or knowingly:

touches or contacts, either directly or through clothing, the staff members


genitalia, anus, groin, breast, inner thigh, or buttocks; OR
kisses the staff member on the mouth;

OR attempts to carry out any of those acts.

WHAT IS SEXUAL ASSAULT?


Sexual Assault involves unwanted kisses on the mouth or touching or contact by the
offender, involving the genitals, anus, groin, breasts, inner thigh or buttocks, without the
use of a weapon or injury to the staff member. Sexual Assault also includes any
attempts to carry out these acts. Sexual Assault can be committed by either male or
female offenders, against either male or female staff members. Sexual Assault can be
committed by the staff member's spouse or boyfriend/girlfriend and it does not matter if
the staff member has previously consented to sexual interactions with the offender.
An incident is a Sexual Assault if:
Someone touches the staff member's breasts, buttocks or genitals but the staff
member is not injured.

Someone kisses the staff member on the mouth without the staff member's
permission or consent.

HOW IS IT DIFFERENT FROM...


Aggravated Sexual Assault Aggravated sexual assault requires intentional
contact between the offender and the staff member, involving the breasts, genitals,
mouth, buttocks or anus for sexual gratification and the use of a weapon, physical
injury or substantial force by the staff member to disengage. If the incident does not
involve intentional contact AND at least one of the other circumstances, the incident
is classified as sexual assault.
Physical assault Physical assault would not involve intentional contact with the
genitalia, anus, groin, breast, inner thigh or buttocks.

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PHYSICAL ASSAULT
OFFICIAL DEFINITION OF PHYSICAL ASSAULT: Aggressive contact that results in
no injury or only minor injury. Minor injury does not require hospitalization, x-ray or
surgical intervention (including stitches).
WHAT IS PHYSICAL ASSAULT?
Physical Assault occurs when aggressive contact with a staff member results in no
injury or only minor injury to the staff member (such as bruises, black eyes, cuts that do
not require stitches, scratches or swelling). This also includes instances when an object
is used in a manner capable of causing only minor injury (such as small sticks, stones,
or an empty plastic bottle).To be considered a Physical Assault, the staff member must
not have been hospitalized, undergone X-rays or had any kind of surgery, to include
getting stitches.
An incident is Physical Assault if:
Someone beats or kicks the staff member but does not take or attempt to take
the staff member's property and causes only minor injuries that do not require Xrays or stitches.

Someone throws small pebbles at the staff member but does not cause any
injury to the staff member and does not take or attempt to take the staff
member's property.

HOW IS IT DIFFERENT FROM?


Robbery Robbery involves the taking of property through force or threat of
force. Based on the ranking of incidents by level of severity, robbery is a more
serious classification than physical assault. Anytime a staff member is assaulted
AND property is taken, the incident is classified as a robbery.
Aggravated Assault If an object is used against the staff member in a manner
capable of causing severe bodily injury or death, but there is no attempt to take the
staff member's property, the incident is classified as an Aggravated Assault. Also, if
the staff member sustains broken bones, lost teeth, internal injuries, severe
laceration or loss of consciousness or was hospitalized for two or more days the
incident is classified as an aggravated assault.
Sexual Assault Sexual Assault requires contact with the genitalia, anus, groin,
breast, inner thigh, or buttocks. If contact is made unintentionally with any of these
areas during an attack, the incident is classified as a physical assault.

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BURGLARY
OFFICIAL DEFINITION OF BURGLARY: Unlawful or forcible entry of a staff member's
residence. This incident type usually, but not always, involves theft. The illegal entry
may be forcible, such as breaking a window or slashing a screen, or may be without
force by entering through an unlocked door or an open window. As long as the person
entering has no legal right to be present in the residence, a burglary has occurred. Also
includes illegal entry of a hotel room.
WHAT IS A BURGLARY?
A Burglary occurs anytime there is unlawful or unauthorized entry into the staff
member's house or hotel room and the staff member is not assaulted. Unlawful entry
does not have to involve force or someone breaking in; unlawful entry occurs anytime
someone who does not have permission enters the staff member's house or hotel
room. Unlawful entry can occur through a window or door that is not locked or through
a window or door that has been left open. Also note that "forcible entry" does not
require the door or window to be damaged, only that some tool or key was used to gain
unlawful entry through a closed or locked door or window. The key element is that
someone enters the house or hotel room WITHOUT the staff member's
permission. Attempts to enter the staff member's house or hotel room must also be
reported.
An incident is a Burglary if:
Someone enters the staff member's house or hotel room through an unlocked
door without the staff member giving permission for that person to
enter. (unlawful entry)

Someone breaks through a closed or locked door and enters the staff member's
house or hotel room. (forcible entry)

Someone cuts the screen on the window of the staff member's house or hotel
room and reaches inside (either using the suspect's arm or a long stick or hook).
(forcible entry)

Someone reaches in through an open window of the staff member's house or


hotel room and removes or damages property. (unlawful entry)

Someone uses a duplicate key to enter the staff member's house or hotel room
without the staff member's permission. (forcible entry)

Someone attempts to break through a closed or locked door but does not
actually enter the staff member's house or hotel room. (attempted forcible entry)

SPECIAL RULE FOR PEACE CORPS OFFICES:


Burglaries of Peace Corps offices can be recorded using CIRS, even if no single staff
member is targeted. Generally it would only be considered a burglary if there was sign
of forced entry to the Peace Corps office.

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SPECIAL RULE FOR HOTELS:


If the staff member suspects that the property was taken from a staff member's room by
a hotel worker, the incident is classified as a theft because hotel workers are considered
to have lawful permission to enter the room that the staff member is renting. Generally
it would only be considered a burglary if there was sign of forced entry to the staff
member's room.
HOW IS IT DIFFERENT FROM?
Robbery Robbery involves the taking of property through force or threat of
force. If someone breaks into the staff member's house or hotel room, confronts the
staff member and forces the staff member to surrender property, the incident is
properly classified as a robbery.
Theft Burglary involves the unlawful entry into the staff member's house or hotel
room. If the staff member's property is stolen by someone who has permission to
be in the staff member's house or hotel room, the incident is properly classified as a
theft.

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THREAT
OFFICIAL DEFINITION OF THREAT: A threat is made without physical contact or
injury to the staff member. Threat occurs when the staff member is placed in
reasonable fear of bodily harm through the use of threatening words and/or other
conduct.
WHAT IS THREAT?
Threat occurs anytime someone says they are going to kill the staff member; threatens
the staff member's physical well-being; or causes the staff member to reasonably fear
for his or her safety, but the offender does not actually make physical contact with the
staff member. Threats can be made in person, in writing, by e-mail or by phone.
NOTE: If someone threatens the staff member with a weapon capable of causing
severe bodily injury, the incident is classified as an Aggravated Assault.
An incident is a Threat if:
Someone calls the staff member on the telephone and says that he or she is
going to kill the staff member.

Someone threatens to kill the staff member but does not actually point a weapon
at them or physically strike them.

Someone leaves a note on the staff member's house saying that he or she is
going to "kick the staff member's butt."

Someone acts in an aggressive manner against the staff member, causing the
staff member to be concerned for his or her safety.

HOW IS IT DIFFERENT FROM...


Aggravated Assault Threat does not involve a weapon or physical attack of the
staff member. If the offender threatens the staff member and is holding a weapon,
the incident is classified as an aggravated assault. Similarly, if the offender
threatens to kill the staff member and then physically attacks the staff member,
causing severe injury, the incident is classified as aggravated assault.
Physical assault Threat does not involve physical contact between the offender
and the staff member.

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THEFT
OFFICIAL DEFINITION OF THEFT: The taking away of or attempt to take away
property or cash without involving force or illegal entry. Includes pick pocketing, stolen
purses, and thefts from a residence that do not involve an illegal entry.
WHAT IS A THEFT?
A theft occurs when the staff member's property is stolen without a direct confrontation
between the staff member and the suspect and when there has not been illegal entry
into the staff member's residence (including hotel room). For example, if the staff
member gives someone permission to enter his house and that person steals the staff
member's property, it is a theft. (This also applies if the staff member gives permission
for someone to regularly enter the house when the staff member is not present, such as
a housekeeper.) It is also a theft if the staff member's purse, cell phone, backpack or
similar property is "snatched" away by a suspect but the staff member does not resist or
is not assaulted in any other way.
NOTE: If the suspect uses more force than necessary just to take the property or if the
staff member resists, the incident type is considered a robbery.
An incident is a Theft if:
Someone "picks" the staff member's pocket and steals his or her wallet without
the staff member being aware. (taking without force)

Someone snatches the staff member's cell phone or purse but does not use any
other force, injure the staff member and the staff member does not resist. (taking
without force)

Someone steals the staff member's property that was in a public area (such as a
beach, library or internet caf). (taking without force or illegal entry)

Someone who has been given permission by the staff member to enter the staff
member's house or hotel room (such as a friend, housekeeper or host-family
member) steals the staff member's property. (taking without force or illegal entry)

A staff member leaves his or her wallet at a store and returns within a
reasonable amount of time to reclaim the item but finds that someone has taken
it.

SPECIAL RULE FOR PEACE CORPS OFFICES:


Thefts from Peace Corps offices can be recorded using CIRS, even if no single staff
member is targeted.
SPECIAL RULE FOR HOTELS:
If the staff member suspects that the property was taken from the staff member's room
by a hotel worker, the incident is classified as a theft because hotel workers are
considered to have lawful permission to enter the room that the staff member is

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renting. Generally it would only be considered a burglary if there was sign of forced
entry to the staff member's room.

HOW IS IT DIFFERENT FROM


Robbery Robbery involves the taking of property through force or threat of
force. In theft, there is no threat or use of force.
Burglary Burglary requires unlawful or unauthorized entry - that means someone
who does not have permission enters the staff member's house or hotel room.
Vandalism Vandalism involves the destruction or damage of property - NOT the
taking of property. If property is taken, the incident is theft.

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VANDALISM
OFFICIAL DEFINITION OF VANDALISM: Mischievous or malicious defacement,
destruction, or damage of property. If unlawful or forcible entry or attempted entry of a
residence is involved, the incident should be classified as burglary.
WHAT IS A VANDALISM?
Vandalism is the destruction or damage of a staff member's property or the staff
member's house, without signs of illegal entry or theft. The damage can be in the form
of things being broken, cut, torn or burned. Similarly, the damage can be from
something that is painted, drawn or marked on the staff member's house or property.
You must consider the intent of the offender when making the distinction between
Vandalism and Attempted Burglary. For example, if the staff member's window was
broken by a student who threw a rock at the staff member's house, that would be
Vandalism. However, if the window was broken in an attempt to enter the house
without permission, that would be burglary.
NOTE: Anytime Vandalism involves illegal or unlawful entry to the staff member's
house or hotel room, the incident is considered to be Burglary.
Vandalism can also be an element of other incidents, such as Threat. If the outside of
the staff member's house was vandalized and the offender painted a threat on the wall,
the incident would be classified as Threat.
An incident is a Vandalism if:
Someone cuts the tires on the staff member's bicycle. (damage of property)

Someone destroys the garden the staff member planted.


property)

Someone paints or writes slogans or pictures on the outside of the staff


member's house. (defacement of property)

Someone breaks the windows on the staff member's house but does not try to
enter the house. (damage of property)

Someone wipes feces on the door to the staff member's house. (defacement of
property)

(destruction of

HOW IS IT DIFFERENT FROM


Burglary Burglary requires unlawful or unauthorized entry - that means someone
who does not have permission enters the staff member's house or hotel room. If
someone enters the staff member's house or hotel room and commits vandalism
(destroying property), the entire incident is classified as a Burglary because that is
the most serious offense.

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Theft Vandalism involves the destruction or damage of property - NOT the taking
of property. If property is taken, the incident is theft.

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