You are on page 1of 22
Flee 709th Railway Grand Division Dave Kaufinan With the outbreak of WW I, the War Department was faced with the serious problem of moving vast amounts of per- sonnel, equipment, supplies, and vehicles over great distances in the shortest time possible. Their solution was to utilize the U.S. railroad system. The strength of ‘America’s railroad system lay in its man- ‘agement, corporate direction, personnel, and equipment. The U.S. Amy Military Railway Service (MRS) was formed. Over 351,000 railroad personnel eventually served in the armed forces during the war, sand some 25,000 ended up in the MRS. Railroads “sponsored” MRS units, putting railroad personnel into the same rilitary railway unit, Former railway em- ployees in civilian life became military en- gineers, military brakemen, military yard- ‘men, and military office workers. Sponsored ‘units included railway operating battalions (ROBs), railway shop battalions (RSBs), and railway grand divisions (RGDs). The ROBs actually were the engineers, firemen and brakemen; the RSBs conducted major overhauls and repairs to equipment, and the RGDs performed administrative duties similar to that ofthe administrative offices of railroad. The RGDs were to coordinat the functions of two or more ROBs and RSBs. They too had personnel with previe ‘ous civilian railway experience, from cleri- cal to stationmaster, and those with spe- cific railway civil engineering skills. In many eases, each RGD had 25% to 35% of | its personnel with railroad experience. Each RGD had an HQ & HQ Co, com- rmanded by a "General Superintendent” (@ Tieutenant colonel) and his staff (25 off cers; 56 EM). The HQ & HQ Co had an administrative section, and four technical sections: Equipment, Engineering, Stores, and Transportation, ‘The Equipment Section was respon- sible for supervision over all RSBs, for proper maintenance of locomotives and cars, for maintenance of shop machinery, and related reports. Proper maintenance of locomotives and cars inereased dramatically with the recapture of eiviian track and re- lated rolling stock. ‘The Engineering Section was respon sible for the physical aspect of railroad op- eration, including track repair and mainte- nance, coaling and watering stations, in- cluding the quality of water, and mainte- nance of all signals. They also submitted reports related to these duties, This sec- TRADING POST 709th RGD insigne On white cloth dsc, it hat standard US shield with blue stripes and a red border to the shield; the unit designation #709 RGD" In red a the top of the shied, with 2 smal SOS insigne in proper colors athe base of the shel. An attached tab with red eters Services of Supply SSIs. tion worked closely with engineer construc- tion battalions in the rehabilitation of bridges, track, rail beds, and culverts. Again, these duties expanded dramatically with the recapture of civilian railways. ‘Those sections also had EM water chem- ists to ensure the clarity and purity of local water supplies to ensure proper operation of locomotives. The Stores Sections was responsible for coordination of all supply requirements tothe ROBs and local civilian railroad com- Panies, when necessary. Fuel reserves were the main concerns. As the railroads in Europe expanded in various directions with the success of Allied operations, truck traffic was reduced. ‘The Transportation Section was sponsible for the duties related to handl cars (assembling and classifying), tracing ‘of car movements related to supplies and retum of empty cars, and supervision over telograph and tlephone lines. This became leven more important as civilian railways ‘came back on line. It should be noted that French civilian railroads subsequently be- ceame responsible for the transportation of US. and Allied troops as the war pro= agressed eastward into Germany. Casu ties who had been recuperating received free ail travel while on the mond. [Near the end of the war, wo new sec= tions were activated, but not all RGDs em- ployed them. The first new seetion was Provost Marshal. ‘Their duties were related to coordinating the railway MP battalions ‘and companies, establishing railway {guards to combat theft, handling theft re- Ports, and conducting court martials, The theft rate was reduced remarkably follow- ing the activation of these new sections. ‘The second new section was the Fiscal Seotion, which essentially functioned as an on-the-spot accounting section, It had bbeen learned (the hard way) that the U.S. government had been overcharged oF even bilked for payments in foreign countries Manifests and bills of lading were soon na ‘The 709: RGD was activated at Camp Millard at Bucyrus, OH on March 15, 1944, under the leadership of Lt. Col. Frank E. Cheshire. ‘The American Association of Railroads “sponsored” the division. The initial cadre was subsequently transferred to the Specialized Training Center located nearby at Mifflin, OH. ARer this training was completed, they rejoined the division and the entire unit underwent infantry rine ing. Upon completion ofthe infantry train- ing, several men were transferred out as cadre forthe 774th RGD. ‘The unit let the NY POE on Septem- ber 20, 1944 and arrived in Liverpool, En- sland eleven days late. For some unusual ‘reason, the 709th RGD spent only four days in England on directed hikes before being shipped to France. The division was an ‘organic element of the 2nd Military Rail- way Service. On Oct 14, they finally re- cvived their frst assignment ~ damaged and dormant Port of Le Havre. The division also began directing traffic that included processing tremendous numbers of German POWs. There were no intact ral lines or standing bridges within the immediate area, and the transshipment of supplies was hopelessly bottlenecked Coordinating activities with engineer construction battalions and engineer gen- cral service regiments, the 70%th RGD be- ‘gan improving the flow of supplies over Tocal non-rail corridors. Supplies were offloaded from ships onto trucks, trucked across town on specifically designated roads, ofMloaded from the trucks to DUKWs to cross the multitude of waterways in the immediate area, and then transferred to freight cars on good existing tracks. From there, the supplies moved with rapidity across France. What was once a trickle became a flood. The 709th RGD controlled the 722nd ROB, 724th ROB and 743rd ROB a this time. However, on November 9, the division was transferred to Malines, Belgium, near the Port of Antwerp. There arrival was timed with the unleashing of the V-1 rock: ‘ets into Antwerp. Occasionally, the V-Is fell short and struck Malines. The 709th «id not suffer any casualties, but many men ff the unit spent hours rescuing injured and removing bodies from the debris of What had once been a structure. While the 709th was stationed in Malines, a liaison team consisting of two officers and three EM was assigned to ‘Antwerp to coordinate railway traffic. Vari- ‘ous other liaison teams were sent out to differet locations within the operating area to inspect and direct the activities of the ROBs and RSB in the division's chain of ‘command, Not quite a month later, the 709th moved up to Brussels and had @ change of (COs. Lt Col. Cheshire was replaced by Lt Col. Merle M. Shappell With the German breakout leading to the Bulge and the goal of recapturing Antwerp, the 709th fell back on its infantry traning and posted guards and checkpoints inthe vicinity of Brussels. New Year's day brought an attack by the Luftwaffe on nearby airfields. In the hi and-run attack, two British planes were downed and AA fire knocked down two attackers. Infantry replacements were taken from the 709th, leaving the division shorthanded during the crisis ofthe Bulge. Lines oftrans- portation and communication belonging to the 709th were being cut by the German offensive. Evacuated equipment was jam- ‘ming traffie ways of supplies coming down from Antwerp. The under strength divi- sion managed to correct the traffic way problems before the Bulge salient was Pushed back, The 709th had the responsi- bility of maintaining all the rail lines, boch military and eivilian, in Belgium during the offensive, and ensuring that supplies met the increasing demand. For thei efforts, the 708th was awarded a Merterius Unit Commendation, the highest award for a service unit. The 709th was the first RGD 10 do so. ‘The risk of enemy attack was not the only danger faced by this administrative unit, In February 1945, a major fire erupted among more than 75 ears, some containing ‘white phosphorus, in the switching yards at Soissons, France. The fires caused nu- ‘merous explosions, and two officers of the 709th managed to clear the yard at great personal risk, with a loss of only four cars. Replacements for those men sent to the infantry eventually arrived, and the “709th was given new operating territory ~ Holland and Germany. As it moved in newly acquired territory, the mission was sub- jected to the vagaries of destruction. Some railroad facilities were not damaged at all, others were completely destroyed, and the remainder were somewhere in between, The 5th successfully directed the repair and rehabilitation of the rail racks, culverts and bridges as needed in their new teeitry By the end of the war, the 709th ROD had the largest span of control in the ETO. It supervised the 734th, 74lst, 43rd, 744th ‘52nd ROBs, and the 755th and 763rd RSB. The demobilization of ground forces rap- idly occurred in the 705th's span of con- trol, such that only the 722nd, 744th and 752nd ROBs were under its command in Jane 1945, The 709th was soon transfered to Calais, France in anticipation ofa trans- fer to the SWPTO, but the end of the war with Japan caused a change in deploy- ment. The administrative unit instead docked at Boston POE and personnel fur- Toughed or otherwise discharged. A small cadre (nine officers, one EM) was trans- ferred to Ft. Eustice, VA in January 1946 and inactivated in 1950. Bibliography Gray, Carl R., Je, Railroading in Eighteen Countries, Schribner and Sons, NY 1955 Gregory, A.G. Maj, TC Saga of the 708th Railway Grand Division, The B & O Rail- road Co, Baltimore, MD 1947 Spratley, Albert W., Ist Sgt, Highlights of History of the 709th Railway Grand Divie sion, Brussels, Belgium 1945 ‘The 709th RGD poses in Brussles in 1945. SOS SSIs can plainly be seen on several of the men. JANUARY-MARCH 2002 OFFICIAL STATEMENT OF LINEAGE AND BATTLE HONORS. Active Constituted 21 February 1941 in the Organized Reserves as 29th Engineer Head— quarters, Railway Grand Division, and concur- rently redesignated 703th Engineer Headquarter, Railway Grand Division Redesignated Headquarters and Headquarter; Company, 709th Railway Grand Division, Trans— portation Corps, 1 December 1942 Ordered into the active military service 13 March 1944 and organized 15 March 1944 at Canp Millard Bucyrus, Ohio Redesignated Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 709th Transportation Corps Railway Grand Division, 19 December 1945 Redesignated Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 709th Transportation Railway Grand Division, 10 way 1947 Inactivated 26 August 1950 at Pusan, Korea Activated 25 August 1951 at anchorage, Alaska Affiliated with The Alaska Railroad, jAnchorage, Alaska, 6 October 1951 HOME AREA: Alaska CAMPAIGN STREAMERS: World War IT Rhineland DECORATIONS: Meritorious Unit streamer embroidered EUROPEAN THEATER |_orOBESSoennneN RANT iS stony | cme AG 320.2 (8 Feb 41) M (Ret) M~c, 21 Feb 1941 AG 320.2 (25 Nov 42) OB-I-SPf, 1 Dec 1942 (R) AG 322 (9 Mar 44) OB-I-SPMOUS, 11 Mar 1944 (R); CO15, ASF, Ha, 7th Sv Cnd, Qnaha, Neb., 11 Mar 1944 (R)3 GO 35, ASF, Ha, 5th Sv Gnd, Ft Hayes, Ohio, 17 Mar 1944 AG 322 (28 Nov 45) OR-I-SRIOU-f, 8 Dec 19453 GO 66, ASF, New Orleans Port of nb, New Orleans, Las, 16 Dec 1945 AGAO-I 322 (10 Apr 47) WDGOT-+1, 30 Apr 1947; GO 28, Hq, Ft Bustis, Va., 7 Hay 1947 AGAO~T 322 (16 Aug 50) Glai, 22 Aug 19503 G0 226, Eighth Army, 20 Aug 1950'as anonded by co 60, Eighth US Army Korea, 8 Sep 1950 AGAO-I 322 Org Res(29 Jun 51) G3-1, 6 Aug 1951; GO 59, US Army, Alaska, 20 Aug 1951 as lanended by G0 30, 0S Army, Alaska, 3 Apr 1952 AGAO-I 522 Org Res (29 Jun 51) G3-x%, 30 Oct 19513 GO 96, US Amay, Alaska, 16 Nov 1951 GO 118, WD, 1945 GO 88, Comm Zone, ETO, 1945 FRA/rIm/25 Apr 52 (cs FoRr M10 01 War Department Washington 25, D. C. 29 April 19hhe AG 314.7 OB-I SUBJECT: Organization History. ‘TO: Chief, Historical Section, Ayny War College. 1. Report 1s made of the authority for ordering into active military Sei the Headquarters and Headquarters Comp: ansportation Corps, on 13 March 1944, per AG 322 (9 Mar 44) OB-I-SPMOU-H, dated 11 M 2, It is desired that any additional historical date be trensmitted @trect to The Quarterueeter Generel at the earliest practicable gate, end 8 copy of action taken be furnished this office. By order of the Secretary of Wart AVE 2u-5318088 28M é 4) DAPARTMENT OF TER AR The Adjutant Ge: ts Office Weshington 25, D.C, i 82? Gon Ros a Army Ghief of Fransportn Poryraph 1 of letter, 332 Gen Res (14 Fob 49) OSS0T-H, 25 February 1949, ‘subject as above, us mented, is further ionded as follove: Units B/o ana 55-202 1 Rot 081 45 12 031 45 «12 2 Ret C85 56 13 ous 58 (13 om 75 18 55-237 Laat m1z04 13 1 Lt 1s 2 3et mis 2 4 S258 1 ak ut 415 ite 15 S20 12eik 1004 13 ine 49514 15 Porsonnel & Adninistrntion, GS.S4 Chief, Kistorical Div, ssusa The Guartersneter General ‘crnldic Branch) Generals SUDJECT: Shange in Statue of Certain Transportation Units Te bo Reor- Auth Strength Units ganized by: Station n/oae ort wo “mH (each) Trans Tre Cost 55-17, 31 Aug 48 41 i 739th core Canp Stonenan, calif. core 56-202, 18 Mar 34, BONASTINN w/C 1,2; Cir 298, DA, 1948, as anondod Iss: No. Grade SS¥__Line _Coln 1. Capt 0709s 1 Capt/it 5310 21 13 4 ut 079 25S 5. Ret 055 S41. 2 Ret = 405571. 1 Ret 59 60S 5 Ret 59 62 18 .1 Pee 83565 B 1 iiot teas 66s - 1 Pe 35 AB 1. Ret 3452 Cort 55-225, 10 Sep 45, —ZONINISIGOO Cir-298 DA, 1948, as amended lass: You. Grade Fron 9/083 2) Ret ° (05 41 a! 7 pl - 060 43 ag 7 Pio 060444 ll Ret = 590 5d 12 Ret ws 8d 2 Ret 835 52d 5 Pro 235 55 14 3 Ret... 309 66 14 3 Ret B45 58d 7 Ret | Sal 604 TC Flashes TRAINING PROGRAM Persona of he TOD Reva Grand tis, are receiving ng on the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad as the result of an agreement worked out by R. M. Markland, .As- sistant General Man: er of the C&O Starting with 36 operating person- nol who were apprenticed four days a week at Newport News under the supervision of engineers, brakemen, dispatchers, and shop foremen, the program is expected to be expanded to 170 men who will receive training in a variety of jobs including bridge building, telegraphy, train dispatch: ing, and in such technical positions as machinists, blacksmiths and ear me. chanies The training, scheduled to continue for about six months, was inaugurated because of limitations on type of traf- fic and mileage on the Ft. Eustis railroad. By working on the eivilian ond, officials say, the men are af. forded a more thorough knowledge of civilian railroading which in time of emergency would enable them to efi- ciently operate a division ary railroad GENERAL LEAVEY RETIRES Major General Edmond H. Leavey, USA, well-known to members of the Association as former Chief of Trans. portation has retired from the Army after more than 31 years of service, General Leavey has heen serving as Army Comptroller since last July. He was made Chief of ‘Transportation following service in the European ‘Theater and the Pacific in World War a “The Blue Fleet” Century Transportation Co., Inc. GENERAL TRUCKING AND WAREHOUSING 113-115 BROAD STREET, NEW YORK 4, N. Y. Telephone: BOwling Green 9-7375-6-7 THE GREEK Govesnment he jo. group of office at fer, Mal "for New York Col. she TI and was active in support of the Association during his term as Chief of Transportation, SAFETY AID A unique sound-and-movie truck hhas recently been devised by two young officers at the San Francisco Port as an aid to the current safety program in the Water Division there, Noting how crowds watched tele vision screens through store windows, Capt. Winfield Wiliams, safety officer of the Water Division, conecived the motion pictures to his means of a truck. tenant Hoyt Wilson, of Port Signal Supply Division, mounted 16 mm. projector near the rear of a LY4ston panel truck, facing front. A mirror was placed hehind the cab so that the picture image could bounes back from it, by reverse projection, to a screen of translucent cloth hang ing in the open rear of the vehicle Watchers behind the truck then see the picture through the sereen, ‘The vehicle, painted with the big’ green “safely first cross” has already per formed lefore an estimated 3,000 spectators, sens if high honor, the ‘York ert of Embark have played in the Grock Aid progratm From eft we Service fo. Grosk Conslate Fount ce (accept ing for Ls. Col, W. D, Lland A. Burton ‘Van Eck LOGISTICAL DIVISION TC personnel from Ft. played a prominent part in the dem onstration of the experimental logisti- cal division which combined for the first time administrative and techni- cal services into an integrated team at Camp Lee, Va. Marking the first time that the Amy's technical schools have worked fs a team on a field problem, more han 600 officers—advanced students the Army's technical schools—par. ticipated, Designated as “Exercise Log Lee,” the problem was based generally on the invasion of Southern France by the Seventh Army in the summer of DELBERT. GREEN, ah the Seattle oct "alle the 2b ‘Army tug, LT 373, $9 within 20 ST toma pint iy velbinawn ground contal is beeved t0 be th. fat neh Conducted inthe county. Un F.'D. Dodenbot, Supt of Wa - Fornanden, King and Kutta: Hammer of the Reich, Chapter 10. destroyed; twenty berths damaged; a canal lock damaged; a 150 ton floating erane sunk by a direct hit from a V-2; and 150 ships either sunk or damaged by V-weapons. One of the warehouses took a direct hit that caused 148 casualties. Personnel were constantly diverted from discharge duties by and endless stream of warnings to take cover and by rescue and repair details. ‘The damage did not have to be extensive to use up valuable labor and repairs to buildings and facilities was an on-going process. One report from the 13th and Sth Major Ports near the end of the war stated, “The rehabilitation of sheds and structures was carried out, and badly damaged buildings were repaired where possible, Because of the damage done by German V-1 and V-2 bombs, as well as by jet planes, it was necessary to keep crews at work repairing structures, roofs, doors, windows, and walls. About 90 percent of all glass in port installations was shattered and had to be replaced with plywood blinds of a temporary nature.” Close calls were frequent. One ABC driver stated, “We can really put out the stuff and the only difficulty we have is the with the buzz. bombs. They hardly ever enterfere (sic) with our operations but they area a constant nervous strain (authors’ italics).The closest bomb I ever came to was when driving from the [Antwerp] marshaling yard to the port area. A buzz bomb hit an old factory along the route about a hundred yards in front of me. It caved in the whole roof and walls of the factory and littered the streets with debris. Some civilians were killed and other (sic) were injured but none of our drivers were injured and we had to reroute temporarily until the street was cleared off with abulldozer.”*” The constant “nervous strain” is a common theme among first person accounts of life in Antwerp and Liege during the period. Many G.l.s simply referred to Antwerp as the “city of sudden death.” * Units outside of Antwerp found themselves the targets of V-Is that overshot the city. On November 11, the headquarters ofthe ie Ray Grad Dison arrived in Malines to discover their quarters had been destroyed by a V-I. It took them two days to find another place which had been damaged by V-1s exploding nearby. The first ship hit by fragments from a V-2 was the Timothy Bloodworth, operated by the Lykes Brothers Steamship Company. On December 24, 1944 a V-2 disintegrated in an air burst overhead causing no damage whatsoever. A second V-weapon, probably a V-1 hit nearby and caused sight splinter damage on the hull near the number one hold. No one was hurt ” ‘The bombardment made conditions in the port so dangerous that concems about bringing ammunition into the port was raised by Supreme Headquarters as early as November. SHAEF requested the headquarters involved to present their views regarding the subject. The ‘Communications Zone (COMZ or ComZ) “recommended that ammunition be excluded entirely, ‘an proposed that all Class V [ammunition and explosives] continue to be handled at Cherbourg and Le Havre.” *” The Allied naval command and the British 21st Army Group felt that ammunition ships could be brought into the port if their numbers were strictly limited and they were adequately dispersed. The policy laid down by the chief administrative officer of the port a few days later did not forbid ammunition ships in the port but restricted the quantity to operational requirements “at the discretion of Communications Zone and 21st Army Group, and specified that it be handled in a separate and remote section of the port, that no dumps be permitted even for sorting, and that special fire fighting preparations be made.”*! However, shortly after the port opened the port Executive Committee asked that all ammunition ships be 13 m-m-e@comeast.net To George Mr CIV , Tim 97/02/2009 .09:42 AM Moriarty/TA Staff/Internal/Tax Analysts/US@Tax Analysts bee Subject Fwd: 117th Hospital Train Maintenance Section -Camp Millard Gentlemen: Forwarded Message From: "Crawford County POST" ‘To: m-m-e@comcast.net Sent: Thursday, July 2, 2009 2:10:58 AM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern Subject: Re: 117th Hospital Train Maintenance Section -Camp Millard Mark: ‘Thanks for your e-mail. I forwarded this e-mail to Tim Dobos, the President of the 753rd RSB, in Battle Creek, Michigan. He was the only member able to return to Bucyrus this year, and has the remaining members left of the 753rd. I have the article from the 753rd Historian, Ralph W, Bailey, who lives in Sylvania, Ohio that appeared in thecal Headhgh Vd, NG 2 Second Quarter, #002 ase Raiph went Into great detall on the 753rd’s history and deployment, for the New York Central magazine. The 117th is ae pas; to find information on. The one MP member of the aay knew who had lived in Galion, Ohio, just pasted away less than a couple of month ago. He was one who come back to the 753rd's Reunions, because he was at Camp Millard, and they welcomed him in with open arms. I think he was at Camp Millard the same time that the 753rd was there, and was deployed at the same time the 753rd was deployed. Ihave been wondering about the 117th plus the other nine Hospital Train Maintenance Section, plus the Railway Guard Detachment. I did receive some info on the 754th RSB from one of their members who lives in Norwalk, Ohio. Our Camp Millard historical webpage http://www.crawfordcountypost.com/CampMillard-Revisited.html needs additional information on any and all of these different Battalions. The 753rd has beed very instrumental in getting me info that they had, from when they were there. Visit our webpage htto://www,crawfordcountypost.com/NEWS-HoboDay. html which shows you the progression of the T & OC passenger train station during the Bucyrus Preservation Society's Hobo Day on 23 May 2009. You may want to visit the Bucyrus Preservation Society's webpage on the T & OC at http://www. bueyrus-preservation.org/station/history%20extention%201.htm Some more useful info on Camp Millard, If you could help me, would it be possible for you to e-mail me any information and photos that I can use to expand onto our webpage, to preserve the history of Camp Millard. Iam amazed at just how many people in Crawford County today, have no knowledge of this vital military base at the Fairgrounds during WW II. I am trying to re-educate today's generation of this very important piece of Crawford County history. During the Crawford County Fair's 150th Anniversary Celebration, the Fair Board asked me to speak about 10-15 minutes to educate folks about Camp Millard, during it’s four years on the fairgrounds. I visited Ft. Eustis when my wife and I went to visit her Aunt and Uncle in Newport News, Virginia. Her uncle retired out of the US Navy as "Chief of the Boat” for the submarine he was on. I had already enlisted into the US Army Reserve, and was waiting to head to Ft. Leonard Wood, Missouri, Good ole Fort Lost-In-The-Woods, Misery, out in the middle of the Mark Twain National Forest. Icome from a long line of Army men who have served this great nation. I have my Great-Grandfather's Cavalry Hat that he wore from WW I in my office. My Grandfather Saned in the US Army during WW I and Korea, My Dad was in the aa8th Combat Engineers ofthe iat Infnty bison, ana went on Omaha Seach. My Great-Uncle retired out of the US Army. He was captured by the Germans during the D-Day invasion, and was later freed by Gen. Patton. He was also a member of the "Brotherhood of the Mushroom Cloud". Tam a Persian Gulf War Veteran of the 192d QM Co (PS), and we operated PSP Buckeye with 1.5 million gallons of fuel on the ground. 1am the current Past Commander of the Colonel Crawford American Legion Post #181 in Bucyrus, Ohio. I was their first Commander who was a Persian Gulf War veteran. ‘Thanks for your e-mail. T hope that we can help one another with more information. Repectfully, Douglas A Foreman, Owner/Publisher Crawford County POST www.crawfordcountypost.com Office (419) 284-0061 FAX (419) 284-0057 ~*Your local newspaper with an old fashioned commitment to local news*~Locally owned, locally operated*~ From: "m-m-e@comcast.net" To: crawfordcountypost@yahoo.com Ce: Tim Moriarty ; George Mr CIV Sent: Saturday, June 27, 2009 5:44:36 PM Subject: 117th Hospital Train Maintenance Section -Camp Millard Mr. Doug Foreman: Additional surfing located the following Camp Millard TC unit. Can your files shed any light on this unit and its training at Camp Millard? Mark Metz 584th TRANSPORTATION DETACHMENT Lineage and Honors Information as of 8 August 2002 9e92-26s (ct2) ZW LEW -vonewoju! jeuonIppe apinoid ued 1 JI 40 SuoNISaNb Aue BAeY NOA J! |Jews-9 40 {12> 0} ‘2a4j [994 aSea|g “SOWU JIayy aw BUIpIAOId 40 WotR 03 YOeULIOJU! BUIMOI}O} a4) BUIPIEMUOS Jayyie Nok sye_Daidde pinom | “payepaidde Aneas6 aq pinom suesaIEA GSU PAESZ 2220] sn Buidjay u} Boueysisse sno, “suesaI@A PESZ Aue aYe20} 03 aIqe UB—Aq JOU BAeY aM aIEP OL a’ SJUAWYSI|GEISE SNOWeA 1194) Ul JUBWLIEROB ug Jo seypuedg 19430 pue si8@u!6u3 Jo sdi05 aun Aq paziiian s4e2 pue amod aAnow! Buytedas se jjom Se BulUle.y leap! ue BuLinoas snyy ‘yuawUJardD SayeIS Par!UN au JO 7201S Buljjos Jo uoHeWT!Geyea1 pue eoUEUAIUIEW 243 182A 4002 SnuAong Ie “G"S"Y PIESZ UL “wleay quara4ye Ue awueI9q UOOs Ady pue aouariadxe peouyes Bud} Jo UB ue S1BD4Yo Jo pasodwoD a1am SY!UN IS1Y ASAYL “OUD ‘snikong 32 12s]UaD OA MAN BLN Jo dOUS P2/00} 3g SIP! Ue JaA0 4003 G'S"Y ESZ MUL, “TE abed uo snasong 3e Bulle SYWi 2042/9421 S3RLINNOD N3LHDIa NI ONIGVOUTIVY IY U! edd [es8Ua9 “UOP |jam aE ue uo suoneinjesBu0D “ASU PIES aU) PUe PAeij dwue> Uo 2}217e INCA sso.De ewe T GAM ‘au BUYINS UT *e2Oy PUR TTMM JO SUIAIEA 21S Ate AUA OUOY 03 AAA UE P|OY 0) winasny UoReyodsue) AULY au YIM BUD}OM Uaag BneU | PUR ZIOW WeW S| eUEU AW ruewaioy 6n0g “IW, uorjeneg doys Aempey passé :palqns usayse3 epeued/SN 00:50- LW Wd »S:8T:S 6007 '2z aunc ‘Aepames :1UaS o> oyeA@3sodAqunoopioymeid ‘\O>‘0oyek@3sodAyUNoDPIO}MeLD :0, Yu'ySeoUOdOa-tW-y :WO14 aBessaw [2UI6UO ~ Puejauiy :3WV3 - IT 28M PHOM pau uonedionied ubredwed siouo} quawiysejeq uoRevodsued. Yipes 810) U! 6G6T 484090 OT pareAnry Puej6u3 u! £66T Jequisdad T parennzeut pue|6ua ul p86T Aine T parennoy ealoy U} Z26T Jaqwa29q ST PayeAnseUt e810} U! 096T Jaquiardas sz Parennov euoseD yAnos ‘uoIsa}eYD Ye 9¢6q SuNE T PareAndeuy eIUIGIIA ‘siISNa UOs Ie PSST AINC ST PAIEALOY quawyseiag uoReyodsuel UipEes at Se SET AUNC TT pareUuBisepay ‘Auuiy seinbay ayy 03 panolle pue qwaWYDe19q ‘soueUaIUIeW UIedL [erIdsoH UONeHodsUeLL WApES OUI Se TSET U4eW ZT pareuBlsepey ‘OURsd Ul Sh6T JAQWAAON ZT paIeAgDeUT quawy>ered anueuaquIeW Ule1) [edsoH sdioD UoNeLOdsueLL WILT au Se SPET dy TZ PareUBISapeY ©1UO ‘Pueiiin dweD 3e pyET YEW T Panto ‘sdi09 uoneyodsuedy ‘YoRDas aoueUaIUIeW ures, feudson UAZTT au) se SaIeIS paruN ayA Jo AuUy aun UI PYET Avenigey $z PaINIASUCD aBeour juawypeyeq uonevodsuedL WPBS Zoominfo Web Summary: Joe Ray hup:/www.zoominfo.com/directory/Ray_Toe_316139462.him 2of2 (Commander of the 98th Transportation Port Company. This unit was engaged in offshore discharge exercises spending sic weeks inthe fel at atime. His unit operated the Ralheads and Airheads in the shipment of trop supplies to all US. Forces in France and Germany. The supplies were off loaded from cargo ships anchored offshore and transported to‘ beach by Army Landing Craft and DURWS. It was then loaded on trucks for movement to the railheads or aiheads. Joe remained inthis assignment until Api 1958, when he was, reassigned as Port Transportation Officer forthe three Army Water Ports in France. He ‘served in this assignment with the 11th Transportation Port Command, La Rochelle, France, ntl uly 1959, when he rotated back to the States. His next assignment was as Adjutant ofa Transportation Truck Battalion in Fort Benning, GA, supporting the Infantry School and Infantry Center. In September 1960, he was transferred to the Army Transportation School to attend the “Transportation Officers Advanced Course. Upon graduation in December 1960, he was assigned as Port Transportation Officer of the Pacific Port Command, Oakland Army Base, California. He remained inthis assignment unt he retired as a Major on 31 Jly 1962. Upon retirement, he was immediately employed by the U.S. Air Force 2s a Civilian ‘Transportation Specialist withthe assignment as their West Coast Ar Force Liaison Officer with the Army and Navy, supervising the ooszn movement ofA Force cargo. ‘Athough retired from the mitary, Joe volunteers one day each week at the Miltary Retiree ‘Activites Office at a local Air Force Base, counseling other Mary Retirees and thei families. He is also a member of an Army Casualty Assistance Council working withthe families of deceased Army Miltary Retirees, Known as 308, he received traning in Massachusetts and Florida and transfered tothe ‘South Pacific Theater. As a Fist Sergeant he participated inthe Leyte and Luzon campaign. Returning home in December 1945, he re-enlsted and was sent to a base in Virginia and assigned as a Regimental Sergeant Major. During ths assignment he received a Reserve ‘Commission as a Lieutenant in the Transportation Corps. He retired as a Major in July 1962 with 20 years of service. Upon retirement, he was immediately employed by the U.S. [Air Force as a Transportation Specialist. After Service in the vlan poston for 23 years, he retired in 1986. Joel David Howerton Glen, Wiliam, Jr, and Joe Howerton William Ray & Jewel Howerton ‘The Zoom Uist: information about companies, products and services. 6/23/2006 3:19 PM Zoominfo Web Summary: Joe Ray 1 of 2 hutp:/www.zoominfo.com/directory/Ray_Joe_316139462.htm Five SEZOOMINFO ——sesrenon, ( [ MetanSta Usa eg at ta? AboutUs) Joe Howerton Ray cto mor pege raed 0 Tiss pti ama {8 2 fr er pene ae ence Het irr area atc a ‘How did ZoomInfo get this info? | Varlations of the name Joe Ray e ee ae Suomen a beara Se ce oe cee Howerton Heritage Fall 1997 wiv howertonhertage.con/HowertonHertageFall1997.ntm Last Viste: 1/29/2006 In Api! 1943, Joe was given the assignment as Supply Sergeant and promoted to Staff Sergeant. On Api 6, 1943, he marred Fem Adele Day, @ young lady he met in South Dakota when a member ofthe Clvllan Conservation Corps. In September 1943, he and a small group from the Weapons Detachment was sent to “Martha's Vineyard, MA to work with the Corps of Engineers to test the possibilty of laying a Pipeline on the bottom ofthe ocean. This mission was to determine the possbity of laying a Pipeline across the Engish Channel. He was in hopes of going to England to lay the pipeline, but the mission was given tothe British Engineers. Upon completion of the project Joe was transferred to Camp Gordon Johnston, Florida Upon arrival at the new station, he was Dromoted to First Sergeant ofa Basic Training Company of draftees from several shipyards ‘on the East Coast. Upon completion of ther training, the unit was designated as the 112:1th Port Marine Maintenance Company with the mission of repar and maintenance of Army Water cra under combat conditions. The unt was assigned to the South Pacfic and engaged In the Leyte and Luzon campaigns in the Philipines. On August 15, 1945 when the Japanese surrendered, the unit was inthe process of getting new equipment in preparation for lancing ‘on the beaches in Japan. Joe was transferred back tothe United States in December 1945. He re-eniisted for futher service. ‘Upon completion ofa 80 day leave, he was assigned to Fort Eustis, Virgin, as @ Reglmental Sergeant Major with the 708th Transportation Ralway Grand Din, During is tour at Fort Eustis he received a Reseve Commission as a itera inthe Transportation Corps. He served in his assignment uni the summer of 1948 when he was assigned as NCOIC ofthe Recruiting and Induction Center in Omaha, Nebraska. In Novernber 1950, he was called to active duty as a Leatenant and transfered tothe San Francisco Por of Embarkation with the duty of Adjutant of Ookand Army Base, Califor, He served inthis assignment unt Sune 1952, wien he receive orersto Korea. When he reported tothe Replacement Depot in Jopan, his orders were changed and he was set to Okinawa. He served as Adjutant of the RYCOM Port Command an later asa Port Operations Office. His wife and two sons joined him in Okrawa in une 1953. In Jue 1954, he was assigned tothe AMY ‘Transportation Center, Fort Eustis, Virginia a Assistant Ac)tant General. He remained in this assignment unt September 1955, when he sent to the Tansperttion Company Ofcers ‘Course. Upon completion of the curs in une 1956, he was transferred to Base Secon, US. Amy Communications Zoe, Pots, France, s Transporation Movements Ofer. His family acompanid him on histor He served as Movements Officer untl November 1956, when he was assigned as Unit (6/23/2006 3:19 PM OFFICIAL STATEMENT OF LINEAGE AND BATTLE HONORS Constituted 21 February 1941 in the Organized Reserves as 29th Engineer Head- quarters, Railway Grand Division, and concur- rently redesignated 709th Engineer Headquarters Railway Grand Division Company, 709th Railway Grand Division, Trans= portation Corps, 1 December 1942 Ordered into the active military service 13 March 1944 and organized 15 March 1944 at Camp Millard Bucyrus, Ohio Company, 709th Transportation Corps Railway Grand Division, 19 Decenber 1945 Company, 709th Transportation Railway Grand Division, 10 way 1947 Inactivated 26 August 1950 at Pusan, Korea Activated 25 August 1951 at anchorage, Alaska Affiliated with The Alaska Railroad, j Anchorage, Alaska, 6 October 1951 HOME AREA: Alaska CAMPAIGN STREAUERS: World War IT Rhineland DECORATIONS: Meritorious Unit Streamer enbroidered EUROPEAN THEATER Redesignated Headquarters and Headquarters Redesignated Headquarters and Headquarter$ Redesignated Headquarters and Headquarters NY. AG 320.2 (8 Feb 41) M (Ret) M-C, 21 Feb 1941 AG 320.2 (25 Nov 42) OP-I-SP-+, 1 Dec 1942 (R) AG 322 (9 Mar 44) OB-I-SPKOU-N, 11 Mar 1944 (R); GO 15, ASF, Hq, 7th Sv Cmd, Omaha, Neb., 11 Mar 1944 (R)s CO 35, ASF, Ha, Sth Sv Gnd, Ft Hayes, Ohio, 17 Mar 1944 AG 322 (28 Nov 45) OF-I-SHIOU-=, 8 Dec 19453 GO 66, ASF, New Orleans Port of Bub, New orleans, Las, 16 Dec 1945 AGAO-I 322 (10 Apr 47) WDGOT-+1, 30 Apr 1947; GO 28, Ha, Ft Bustis, va., 7 May 1947 AGAQ-I 322 (16 Aug 50) Glut, 22 Aug 19503 }c0 226, Eighth Amy, 20 Aug 1950'as mended by GO 60, Eighth U S Army Korea, 8 Sep 1950 AGAQ-I 322 Org Res (29 Jun 51) 3-#, 6 Aug 1951; GO 59, US Army, Alaska, 20 Aug 1951 as amended by GO 30, US Army, Alaska, 3 Apr 1952 AGAO=I 322 Org Res (29 Jun 51) G3, 30 Oct 19513 G0 96, US Aray, Alaska, 16 Nov 1951 Go 118, wp, 1945 GO 88, Comm Zone, ETO, 1945 FRA/r1m/25 Apr 52 OCs FORM 1.Q 584th Transportation Detachment Lineage Constituted 25 February 1944 in the Army of the United States as the 117th Hospital Train Maintenance Section, Transportation Corps Activated 1 March 1944 at Camp Millard, Ohio Redesignated 21 April 1945 as the 117th Transportation Corps Hospital Train Maintenance Detachment Inactivated 12 November 1945 in France Redesignated 12 March 1951 as the 584th Transportation Hospital Train Maintenance Detachment and allotted to the Regular Army Redesignated 11 June 1954 as the 584th Transportation Detachment Activated 15 July 1954 at Fort Eustis, Virginia Inactivated 1 June 1956 at Charleston, South Carolina Activated 25 September 1960 in Korea Inactivated 15 December 1972 in Korea Activated 1 July 1984 in England Inactivated 1 December 1993 in England Activated 16 October 1999 in Korea 584th Transportation Detachment Honors Campaign Participation Credit World War II - EAME: Rhineland Original Message - From: m-m-e@comeast.net To: crawfordcountypost@ yahoo.com, crawfordcountypost@yahoo.com Sent: Saturday, June 27, 2009 5:18:54 PM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern Subject: 753rd Railway Shop Battalion Mr. Doug Foreman: My name is Mark Metz and I have been working with the Army Transportation Museum to hold an event to honor the Military Service Veterans of WWII and Korea. In surfing the WEB I came across your article on Camp Millard and the 753rd RSB. Congratulations on an article well done, General Gray in his RAILROADING IN EIGHTEEN COUNTRIES references MRS training at Bucyrus on page 31. “The 753 R.S.B took over an idle but tooled shop of the New York Central at Bucyrus, Ohio. These first units were composed of officers and men of long railroad experience and they soon became an efficient team. The 753rd R.S.B. at Bucyrus took over the maintenance and rehabilitation of rolling stock of the United States Government, thus securing an ideal training as well as repairing motive power and cars utilized by the Corps of Engineers and other branches of the government in their various establishments.” To date we have not been able to locate any 753rd Veterans. Your assistance in helping us locate 753rd RSB Veterans would be greatly appreciated. I would appreciate you either forwarding the following information to them or providing me their names. Please feel free to call or e-mail if you have any questions or if I can provide additional information. Mark Metz (717) 597-2636 Iam trying to re-educate today's generation Crawford County history. During the Crawford County Fair's ‘the Fair Board asked me to speak about 10-15 minutes to rd, during it's four years on the fairgrounds. military base at the Fairgrounds during WW II. of this very important piece of 150th Anniversary Celebration, educate folks about Camp Millar L visited Ft. Eustis when my wife and I went to visit her Aunt and Uncle in Newport Hews, Virginia. Her uncle retired out of the US Navy as "Chief of the Boat” for the submarine he Wcginie ad already enlisted into the US Army Reserve, and was waiting to head to Ft 2s om, Wood, Missouri, Good ole Fort Lost-In-The-Woods, Misery, out in the middle of the Mark Twain National Forest. Icome from a long line of Army men who have served this great nation. I have my Great-Grandfather's Cavalry Hat that he wore from WW I in my office. My Grandfather Served in the US Army during WW II and Korea. My Dad was in the 298th Combat Engineers of the 1st Infantry Division, and went in on Omaha Beach. My Great-Uncle retired out of the US Army. He was captured by the Germans during the D-Day invasion, and was later freed by Gen, Patton, He was also a member of the "Brotherhood of the Mushroom Cloud". lam a Persian Gulf War Veteran of the 192d QM Co (PS), and we operated PSP Buckeye with 1.5 million gallons of fuel on the ground. 1am the current Past Commander of the Colonel Crawford American Legion Post #181 in Bucyrus, Ohio. I was their first Commander who was a Persian Gulf War veteran ‘Thanks for your e-mail. I hope that we can help one another with more information. Repectfully, Douglas A Foreman, Owner/Publisher Crawford County POST woww.crawfordcountypost. cof Office (419) 284-0061 FAX (419) 284-0057 ~*Your local newspaper with an old fashioned commitment to local news*~| Pediat tts local news*~Locally owned, From: “m-m-e@comcast.net" To: crawfordcountypost@yahoo.com Ce: Tim Moriarty ; George Mr CIV , Tim Moriarty/TA Staff/Internal/Tax Analysts/US@Tax 07/02/2009 09:42 AM Meblerpnige Setter us nalysts cc bee Subject Fwd: 117th Hospital Train Maintenance Section -Camp Millard - Forwarded Message ~ ‘Crawford County POST" To: m-m-e@comcast.net Sent: Thursday, July 2, 2009 2:10:58 AM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern Subject: Re: 117th Hospital Train Maintenance Section -Camp Millard Mark: Thanks for your e-mail. I forwarded this e-mail to Tim Dobos, the President of the 753rd RSB, in Battle Creek, Michigan. He was the only member able to return to Bucyrus this year, and has the remaining members left of the 753rd. I have the article from the 753rd Historian, Ralph W. Bailey, who lives in Sylvania, Ohio that appeared in the "Central Headlight” VOL. XXXII, NO 2 - Second Quarter, 2002 issue. Ralph went into great detail on the 753rd's history and deployment, for the New York Central magazine. ‘The 117th is even harder to find information on. The one MP member of the 709th Railway Guard Detachment that I knew who had lived in Galion, Ohio, just pasted away less than a couple of month ago. He was one who come back to the 753rd's Reunions, because he was at Camp Millard, and they welcomed him in with open arms. I think he was at Camp Millard the same time that the 753rd was there, and was deployed at the same time the 753rd was deployed Lhave been wondering about the 117th plus the other nine Hospital Train Maintenance Section, plus the Railway Guard Detachment. I did receive some info on the 754th RSB from one of their members who lives in Norwalk, Ohio. Our Camp Millard historical webpage http://www. crawfordcount m/CampMilllard-Revis needs additional information on any and all of these different Battalions. The 753rd has beed very instrumental in getting me info that they had, from when they were there. Visit our webpage http://www.crawfordcountypost.com/NEWS-HoboDay.htm! which shows you the progression of the T & OC passenger train station during the Bucyrus Preservation Society's Hobo Day on 23 May 2009. You may want to visit the Bucyrus Preservation Society's webpage on the T & OC at http://www. bucyrus-preservation.or i 1%201.htm Some more useful info on Camp Millard, If you could help me, would it be possible for you to e-mail me any information and photos that I can use to expand onto our webpage, to preserve the history of Camp Millard. I am ‘amazed at just how many people in Crawford County today, have no knowledge of this vital Puce King and Kutta: Hammer of the Reich, Chapter 10. destroyed; twenty berths damaged; a canal lock damaged; a 150 ton floating crane sunk by a direct hit from a V-2; and 150 ships either sunk or damaged by V-weapons. One of the warehouses took a direct hit that caused 148 casualties. Personnel were constantly diverted from discharge duties by and endless stream of warnings to take cover and by rescue and repair details. The damage did not have to be extensive to use up valuable labor and repairs to buildings and facilities was an on-going process. One report from the 13th and Sth Major Ports near the end of the war stated, “The rehabilitation of sheds and structures was carried out, and badly damaged buildings were repaired where possible. Because of the damage done by German V-I and V-2 bombs, as well as by jet planes, it was necessary to keep crews at work repairing structures, roofs, doors, windows, and walls. About 90 percent of all glass in port installations was shattered and had to be replaced with plywood blinds of a temporary nature.’”* Close calls were frequent. ‘One ABC driver stated, “We can really put out the stuff and the only difficulty we have is the with the buzz bombs. They hardly ever enterfere (sic) with our operations but they area a constant nervous strain (authors’ italics). The closest bomb I ever came to was when driving from the [Antwerp] marshaling yard to the port area. A buzz bomb hit an old factory along the route about a hundred yards in front of me. It caved in the whole roof and walls of the factory and littered the streets with debris. Some civilians were killed and other (sic) were injured but none of our drivers were injured and we had to reroute temporarily until the street was cleared off with a bulldozer.” ”” The constant “nervous strain” is a common theme among first person accounts of life in Antwerp and Liege during the period. Many G.Ls simply referred to Antwerp as the “city of sudden death.” * Units outside of Antwerp found themselves the targets of V-Is that overshot the city. On November 11, the headquarters of the 709th Railway Grand Division arrived in Malines to discover their quarters had been destroyed by a V-1. It took them two days to find another place which had been damaged by V-Is exploding nearby. The first ship hit by fragments from a V-2 was the Timothy Bloodworth, operated by the Lykes Brothers Steamship Company. On December 24, 1944 a V-2 disintegrated in an air burst overhead causing no damage whatsoever. A second V-weapon, probably a V-I hit nearby and caused sight splinter damage on the hull near the number one hold. No one was hurt ‘The bombardment made conditions in the port so dangerous that concems about bringing ammunition into the port was raised by Supreme Headquarters as early as November. SHAEF requested the headquarters involved to present their views regarding the subject. The ‘Communications Zone (COMZ or ComZ) “recommended that ammunition be excluded entirely, an proposed that all Class V [ammunition and explosives] continue to be handled at Cherbourg and Le Havre.” *° The Allied naval command and the British 21st Army Group felt that ammunition ships could be brought into the port if their numbers were strictly limited and they were adequately dispersed. The policy laid down by the chief administrative officer of the port a few days later did not forbid ammunition ships in the port but restricted the quantity to operational requirements “at the discretion of Communications Zone and 21st Army Group, and specified that it be handled in a separate and remote section of the port, that no dumps be permitted even for sorting, and that special fire fighting preparations be made.”*! However, shortly after the port opened the port Executive Committee asked that all ammunition ships be 13, TC Flashes TRAINING PROGRAM Personnel of the 700th Railway Grand Division of Ft. Eustis, are receiving training on the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad as the result of an agreement worked out by R. M. Markland, .As- sistant General Manager of the C & 0 and Brig. Gen, Walter J. Muller, com- manding Ft, Eustis, Starting with 36 operating person- nel who were apprenticed four days « week at Newport News under the supervision of engineers, brakemen, dispatchers, and shop foremen, the program is expected to be expanded to 170 men who will receive training in a variety of jobs including bridge building, telegraphy, train dispatch ing, and in such technical positions es machinists, blacksmiths and car me- chanics. The training, scheduled to continue for about six months, was inaugurated because of limitations on type of traf- fic_and mileage on the Ft. Eustis railroad. By working on the civilian road, officials say, the men are af forded a more thorough knowledge of n railroading which in time of emergency would enable them to eflic ciently operate a military railroad division, GENERAL LEAVEY RETIRES ‘Major General Edmond H. Leavey, USA, wellknown to members of the Association as former Chief of Trans: portation has retired from the Army after more than 31 years of service. General Leavey has heen serving as Army Comptroller since last July. He ‘was made Chief of Transportation following service in the European ‘Theater and the Pacific in World War THE GREEK Government hore presents it high honor, the Greek Distinguished Service Modal, ove group of offcu Bieler Marine Sericg fo, Great Con TL and was active in support of the Association during his term as Chief of Transportation. SAFETY AID ‘A unique sound-and-movie truck hhas recently been devised by two young officers at the San Francisco Port as an aid to the current safety program in the Water Division there Noting how crovds watched tele- ion screens through store windows, apt. Winfield Williams, safety officer of the Water Division, conceived the idea of taking motion pictures to his audiences by means of a truck. He and Lieutenant Hoyt Wilson, of Port Signal Supply Division, mounted 4.16 mi. projector near the rear of a 144+ton panel truck, facing front. A rmirror was placed behind the cab so that the picture image could bounce back from it, by reverse projection, to a sereen of translucent cloth hang- ing in the open rear of the vehicle. Watchers behind the truck then see the picture through the screen. The vehicle, painted with the big green safety first cross” has already per formed before an estimated 3,000 spectators, "The Blue Fleet” Century Transportation Co., Inc. GENERAL TRUCKING AND WAREHOUSING 113-115 BROAD STREET, NEW YORK 4, N. Y. Telephone: BOwling Green 9-7375-6-7 e eee iw York Port of Embs Fave played inthe Grack Ald. program. From left to right s iE. Lanteyo): Uh McGuire; and: Capt ion In recognition of the old Vinck (acco LOGISTICAL DIVISION TC. personnel from Ft. Eustis played a prominent part in the dem- ‘onstration of the experimental logisti- cal division which combined for the first time a cal services into an integrated team at Camp Lee, Va. Marking the first time that the Army's technical schools have worked as a team on a field problem, more than 600 officers—advanced students in the Army's technical schools—par. ticipated, Designated as “Exercise Log Lee,” the problem was based generally on the invasion of Southern France by th inistrative and techni nth Army in the summer of July-August, 1949 SUBJECT: Change in Stntus cf Certain Transportation Units To be Reor~ auth Strength Units ganized byi Station 2/088 off wo _™ (each) Trans Trk Cos 55-17, 31 Aug 46 4 1 17 *39th cof T Canp Stoneman, Galif. Cort 55-202, 18 Mar 44, een w/C 1,2; Cir 298, BA, 1948, as amended Lass: Ssi__Line Coin Yo. Grade SSN__Ine Coin 1. Gept 0709 18 13 1 Gapt/zt 5810 21 18 4 lt 0709 «25 «(13 5. Ret 055 5418 2 Ret 405 57S 1 Ret, 59-6013, 5 Ret 590 62 13 _1 Pre 635 6513 1 Ret e568 13 - 1 Pre a5 (1s 1. Ret us 72 18 Cort 55-225, 10 Sep 45, | 20) 5 600) Cir 298, DA, 1948, as amended Fron_?, i ad DOPARTNGT OF x The Adsutent Generel! Office Weshington 25, D.C Carpe a ashe: ea 20a | TO: Comanding General Third Arny Onicf of Transportation 8 office, AG:0-I 322 Gen Res (14 Zeb 49) cet as above, as mended, is further rxeraph 1 of letter, th Mii, 28 February 1949, suv God es follows: 0390: Ss1_tn Soln ee 55-202 TOept/Lt 5310 21 13 58-127 LRot Cal 45:12 5-228 BRot 08S BES. 99-287 1mLe 21204 15 2 Ret ile 74 13 5-283 L2ait 21204 15 55-239 L2dit also 13 ol 45 12 | oe 58 13 O77 75 «(13 BY ORIER OF THE ACTIN SEOADTARY OF THE ARG: Goplos furni & Adninistrction, GSvS4 Shicf, Historice! Div, ssusa | The qu: tor General dic Branch) War Departnent Washington 25, D. C. 29 April 194 AG 314.7 oB-I SUBJECT: Organization History. ‘70 Chief, Historical Section, Aruy War College. Report 1s made of the authority for ordering into active military Service, the Headquerters and Headquarters Comps rransportation Corps, on 13 March 1944, ae "per AG 322 (9 Mar 44) OB-I-SPMOU-H, dated 12 Mar — 2, It 16 desired that any additional historical data be transmitted direct to The Quartermeter Generel at the earliest practicable date, and @ copy of action taken be furnished this office. By order of the Secretary of War: Wokacte! AVE