Bullying

Teachers Without Borders
Bullying.org

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AUTHORS
Teachers Without Borders
Bullying.org
SOURCE
Busting up Bullying

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Printed: November 11, 2015

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Contents

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Contents
1

Course Description

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2

Checklist

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Busting Up Bullying

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Bullying Infographics

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5

Action Plan Model 1

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Action Plan Model 2

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Testimonials

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Bullying Resources

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Concept 1. Course Description

1

Course Description

• Orientation to new research on bullying and cyberbullying
• Practical applications in the classroom
Description: Bullying Prevention for Educators

This certificate program is offered by Teachers Without Borders in partnership with Bullying.org , the world’s most
visited online resource devoted to bullying and cyberbullying prevention.
Bullying is one of the most important issues facing our families, schools, communities and society today, yet teacher
professional development opportunities and resources on this timely topic are very limited. This program is designed
to address this gap.
In Article 29, the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child specifies that education shall be directed to:
The preparation of the child for responsible life in a free society, in the spirit of understanding, peace, tolerance,
equality of the sexes, and friendship among all peoples, ethnic, national and religious groups and persons of
indigenous origin.
The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child also addresses the rights of children to be free from
bullying and harassment. Article 19 of the Convention states:
Parties shall take all appropriate legislative, administrative, social and educational measures to protect the child
from all forms of physical or mental violence, injury or abuse, neglect or negligent treatment, maltreatment or
exploitation, including sexual abuse, while in the care of parent(s), legal guardian(s) or any other person who has
the care of the child.
As professional educators, we have the responsibility to educate children to ensure they develop positive attitudes
and behaviours and avoid using their power to bully or keep others from achieving their potential as learners and as
citizens of our society.
Introduction to Bullying Prevention for Educators will help educators, administrators, and community leaders better
understand the issue of bullying and develop strategies to address and stop bullying in their schools and communities.
The course is based on the premise that an educator’s primary professional duty is to help students learn, and students
who are scared cannot reach their potential as learners.
This program will provide participants with an introduction to some of the world’s best research, information, helpful
resources, and practical strategies about bullying. Specifically, the program offers the following:
• A deep understanding of bullying behaviours and how they can manifest themselves
• Access to some of the world’s best academic research about bullying that educators will find relevant to their
schools
• Review of research findings related to the problem of bullying
• Opportunities to develop an awareness of the consequences of bullying, both personal and social
• Practical ideas and helpful resources that can be used to prevent bullying behaviours
• Effective strategies for preventing and eliminating bullying in classrooms and schools
• An introduction to successful research-supported anti-bullying programs and resources
• Practical course assignments that can be used by educators to address bullying in their schools
• Access to rich and engaging multimedia resources
• Access to experienced e-mentors who provide ongoing support and effective feedback
• An opportunity to join an international professional community of educators who can continue to support one
another after the course has been completed
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• All participants will maintain a professional portfolio and a blog to share reflections, ideas, and resources on
bullying prevention.
Time Commitment Required:
Participants will be given a total of 60 days from the day of their registration and fee payment to complete the
program. The program requires an average of 30 hours.
Course Requirements:
• Complete Learning Tasks for each unit
• Post one introduction activity and complete one reflection assignment for each unit
• Develop an Anti-Bullying Action Plan to address the issue of bullying (in the participant’s school and/or community) that can be implemented immediately after finishing the course. Action Plan development guidelines
and one-on-one mentor support are provided as part of the course.
Certificate in Bullying Prevention
Upon successful completion of the program, graduates will receive a Teachers Without Borders / Bullying.org
Certificate in Bullying Prevention.

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Concept 2. Checklist

2

Checklist

Course Completion Checklist

1. Introduction
Personal Introduction and Self-Reflection
2. Unit Reflections
Unit 1: Developing Awareness, Empathy, and Understanding
Unit 2: The Facts on Bullying
Unit 3: The Facts on Cyberbullying
Unit 4: What Can Be Done Now?
Units 5 and 6: Prevention and Intervention: What Works? Parts 1 and 2
Unit 7: Expanding Thinking and Action: Bullying as a Community Health and Wellness Issue
Unit 8: Looking Ahead
3. Anti-Bullying Action Plan
In order to successfully complete the Action Plan requirement of this course, participants must include the following:
An example of a letter addressed to your school and/or school board administration asking for their support to
implement your school-community anti-bullying action plan (1 page, 250 words approximately)
A copy of your school’s current policy regarding bullying (1 page) * *Note that policies tend to be reactive and
outline what a school will do if and when bullying happens. The anti-bullying plan you are creating as the major
assignment for this course will focus on what your school and community can do in positive, proactive ways to help
raise awareness and prevent bullying.
A example of anonymous school survey about bullying that can help assess the amount and nature of bullying in
your school and will also help to establish baseline data that you can use to assess the effectiveness of your plan after
six months, one year, two years etc. (2 pages)
An outline of information, practical approaches, strategies and resources that you can share at an upcoming Professional Development day in your school devoted to bullying prevention (1 page)
A checklist of at least ten practical action items that your school can implement in the short-term to provide more
effective supervision (1 page)
A checklist of short-term action items and long-term programs that your school and/or community can undertake to
raise awareness about bullying and encourage and support healthy interactions and relationships (1 page)
The creation of (or an update of) your school’s Internet Acceptable Use Policy and School Code of Conduct to
address the issue of cyberbullying (1 page)
A list of formative consequences (consequences that teach and encourage positive relationship choices, rather than
punitive reactions) that can be used by all staff at your school when they are working with students who bully others
(1 page)
A timeline that outlines when and how your proposed plan may be implemented that includes a timeline of short
term actions, long-term goals, and initial and follow-up school survey dates to establish baseline data and evaluate
the plan’s effectiveness (1 page)

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Busting Up Bullying

Skills to Succeed
• Describe the interrelationships of emotional, intellectual, physical, and social health when bullied
• Adapt health messages and communication techniques about bullying to a specific target audience
YOU will learn...
How to advocate for a bully free school by learning how to make a change, take a stand and advocate for what you
believe.
Agenda



What Would School Be Like?
Bullying Effects on the Wellness Wheel
Bullying Bust! Advocating Against Bullying
STOP and Review: 3-2-1

Key Terms
• Advocacy: Taking a stand on an issue and trying to influence others to show support
• Bullying: The deliberate, repetitive, harming or threatening by an individual or group with more power.
Bullies target victims who don’t fit in because of how they look or behave, their race, religion or sexual
orientation. Bullying is physical, psychological, and verbal. (The Nemours Foundation, 2010)
• Communication techniques include but are not limited to video, public service announcements, posters,
public presentations, a song, a poem, specialty messages such as a valentine heart with an anti-bullying
message, a fall colored leaf with an anti-bullying message, a spring flower with an anti-bullying message
on it
• Perspective Taking: the ability to see situations and events from the viewpoint of another person.
What Would School Be Like?
• In a Think-Pair-Share, ask students to write down 5 ways a school without bullying would look and 5 ways a
school without bullying would feel.
• Share out general answers with the class.
Bullying Effects on the Wellness Wheel
• Split the students into three groups. Distribute one Personal Bullying story to each group.
• Students read the selected story and use the graphic organizer or newsprint to describe how the student
responded to the bullying emotionally, intellectually, physically, socially, spiritually, and environmentally
when bullied.

* No More
* I Lost Hope
* Stop!!!
– Select groups to share.
– Explain that today we are going to learn how to advocate for victims of bullying.

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Concept 3. Busting Up Bullying

Bullying Bust! Advocating Against Bullying
• Ask students if they know what it means to advocate for something
• Explain advocacy: Taking a stand on an issue and trying to influence others to show support
• Read the story, The Table, to students: My older sister was bullied growing up. She had virtually no friends
up until high school and used to get in the car after school and cry nearly every day. It was beyond painful for
me to see her deal with that and I would never wish it on anyone.
I went to the same school my sister did and my best friend, Bekah, and I decided that we were going to
eliminate bullying in our grade. We started by finding the kids in our class that were tortured the most by our
classmates and ate with them every lunch

I went to the same school my sister did and my best friend, Bekah, and I decided that we were going to
eliminate bullying in our grade. We started by finding the kids in our class that were tortured the most by our
classmates and ate with them every lunch
Then we started to partner with them on projects, talk to them outside of class, and hang out with them after
school. Some upper classmen saw what we were doing and joined in with us.

Then we started to partner with them on projects, talk to them outside of class, and hang out with them after
school. Some upper classmen saw what we were doing and joined in with us.
Together we formed The Table, a group made up of a mix of the most popular and most bullied kids from 7th
grade to Seniors. The people I met by forming this group are some of the best people I have ever met and are
all still my friends today.

Together we formed The Table, a group made up of a mix of the most popular and most bullied kids from 7th
grade to Seniors. The people I met by forming this group are some of the best people I have ever met and are
all still my friends today.
The youngest of the original group all graduated last year, but my sister, Bekah, and I passed on the legacy
to our younger brother and to this day bullying in our school has all but disappeared. I want to encourage
everyone on this site that it can be done.

The youngest of the original group all graduated last year, but my sister, Bekah, and I passed on the legacy
to our younger brother and to this day bullying in our school has all but disappeared. I want to encourage
everyone on this site that it can be done.
We can stop bullying in schools. Take a stand, and never give up. You are more brave than you give yourself
credit for.
We can stop bullying in schools. Take a stand, and never give up. You are more brave than you give yourself
credit for.
• In groups, ask students to answer the following questions:
– How did Rachel advocate against bullying?
* She found victims of bullying and ate lunch with them
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* Partnered with victims when school projects were assigned
* Talked to the victims outside of class
* Hung out with the victims after school
* Upper classmen joined the effort
* The group formed The Table
* Advocacy continued after they left the school
– Was the advocacy effective? Why?
* Yes, bullying has almost disappeared in the school.
• Explain that today we are going to adapt healthy messages and communication techniques that would help the
teens in the first three stories.
• Refer to the Student Support Materials for an explanation of communication techniques and examples. Other
holiday and seasonal messages are also appropriate.
• Each group design a health message to advocate for the victim in their story. Ask students to include one
strategy to stop bullying on their poster. Examples of a health message could be:
– More bullying, more problems.
– Being cruel is not cool.
• Share.
STOP and Review: 3-2-1 Exit Ticket
• On an index card:
– Explain how bullying affects 3 different wellness aspects.
– Write 2 anti-bullying strategies that can be used in your school.
– Write 1 slogan for an anti-bullying campaign.
• Share out and submit cards

Toolkit








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Markers
Construction Paper
Index Cards
Bullying Stories
Graphic organizer
Flip Chart paper
Tulip graphic
Maple leaf graphic

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Concept 3. Busting Up Bullying

Painting the Whole Picture

• SPED
– Use language skills to speak the advocacy message
– Use graphics for drawing the advocacy message
• ELL
– Use graphics for drawing the advocacy message
– Use plants indigenous to the country of the student to advocate.
– Advocate through the native tongue and follow with an English translation
• Technology
– http://www.pacer.org/bullying/stories/?offset=30
– http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/?CTT=97
• Students from Diverse Backgrounds
– To advocate, use graphics representative of a person’s background.

Bibliography
Bronson, P. M. (2009). Glencoe Health. Woodland Hills: McGraw-Hill.
Microsoft Corporation. (2013). Maple leaf. Retrieved from Clip art: http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/res
ults.aspx?qu=maple+leaf&ex=1#ai:MC900238927|
Microsoft Corporation. (2013). Tulip. Retrieved from Clip art: http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/results.asp
x?qu=tulip&ex=2#pg:6|
Pacer Center Incorporated. (2012). Stories. Retrieved from Pacer’s Bullying Prevention Center: http://www.pacer
.org/bullying/stories/
Meeks, L., Heit, P., & Page, R. (2011). Comprehensive School Health Education, 7th edition. New York: McGrawHill.
TeenHealth by Nemours. (2010, August). Stress. Retrieved from TeenHealth by Nemours: http://kidshealth.org/te
en/your_mind/emotions/stress.html
TeenHealth by Nemours. (2012, November). Yoga for Stress Relief. Retrieved from TeenHealth by Nemours: http
://kidshealth.org/teen/your_mind/emotions/yoga_stress.html?tracking=T_RelatedArticle
UCLA/RAND Prevention Research Center. (2011, September). Teens and Stress. Retrieved from UCLA/RAND
Prevention Research Center: http://www.ph.ucla.edu/prc/downloads/Carson_Teen_Stress.pdf

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4

Infographics on Bullying
Curated by Teachers Without Borders

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Bullying Infographics

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Concept 5. Action Plan Model 1

5

Action Plan Model 1

An Anti-Bullying Action Plan
- Exemplar 1 Dear Principal,
We are writing to inform you that we have recently completed an online bullying course for educators offered by
Teachers Without Borders in partnership with Bullying.org. In this professional development course we have learned
how to identify bullying, prevention strategies and different courses of action to take when a bullying situation arises
in a schooling environment. While completing our bachelor of education degree at university bullying was an area
of study that was overlooked, yet is imperative to understand, as it is a common issue facing all schools.
For our final assignment we have created an anti-bullying action plan that is specifically designed for our school,
but can be modified for other schools. We ask that you support us in our efforts and implement our anti-bullying
action plan. We would like to take a preventative and proactive school-wide, classroom and individual approach that
involve all staff members and students.
We have attached a copy of our action plan for you to review. Please contact us if you would like more information
or to discuss this further. I hope that you will take every action possible to stand up to bullying as a respected leader
and raise awareness in our school.
Sincerely,
******** and ********
Enc.
Current Bullying Code of Conduct
HARASSMENT AND BULLYING
Although each case is judged on its own circumstances, OUR SCHOOL has adopted a systematic process for dealing
with harassment and bullying. Information pamphlets are available at the school. The four- step process is used for
students found to be harassing or bullying their classmates:
Incident One: Verbal warning, documentation and possible conflict resolution.
Incident Two: A warning letter is issued. School Child Development Advisor becomes involved.
Incident Three: A 1-2 day suspension maybe given.
Incident Four: A 3-5 day suspension maybe given with a requirement to attend a mini course on the issue of Student
Bullying and Harassment.
Suspension and possible reinstatement occurs after an administrator meets with the parents and student. Support to
victims of harassment and bullying is given through the office of the Child Development Advisor. Guidance is given
as to how to deal with and report this behaviour. A critical element that assists the school in dealing with harassment
and bullying is the students’ willingness to report it. Everyone and each person has a responsibility to stop it.
WHAT TO DO IF YOU ARE BEING HARASSED
In a firm voice without shouting or showing your anger tell the other person to STOP. Describe exactly what you
want the person to stop. Example: “Stop calling me names”. DO NOT RETALIATE.
If the person does not stop, you need to warn the person that you will tell someone!!!
Look around for other people who saw or heard what happened and ask them if they saw. Example, “Did you see
that?” These people can be used as witnesses.
Write down what happened, who was involved, who witnessed, where and when the events happened.
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Get help from an adult. Take the statement of harassment to an adult.
Use mediation where possible to try to resolve the problem!!
Current Electronic Devices and Mobile Learning Technology Code of Conduct
Electronic Devices and Mobile Learning Technologies
There is a growing use of mobile technologies having a positive impact on our classrooms at SMS. For example, we
are fortunate to have a number of laptop carts for classroom use. We are also a completely wireless building.
With this in mind, the use of personal laptop computers and other forms of Mobile Technologies will be considered
within the parameters established by the school and under the direction of classroom teachers guided by the school
Administration.
The use of electronic devices should not interfere with learning or infringe upon the privacy or safety of other
individuals in the classroom. These devices include but may not be limited to MP3 players and variations thereof,
cellular phones, handheld games, portable DVD’s, PSPs, personal digital assistants, pagers, cameras and recorders.
The use of a student cell phone is prohibited in instructional spaces and should remain in the student’s locker during
the day.
Electronic devices for the purpose of Mobile Learning Technology should be used in the context of a learning
opportunity in the classroom and under the supervision of the classroom teacher. The purpose for using a MLT
device should fit within a curricular context. Students must be directed in using the devices. Students using devices
such as an iPod Touch or a personal laptop must access the school’s wireless network through the filters offered
by RVS. Outside the classroom, inappropriate use of such equipment is forbidden. At no time should any photos,
voice recordings or transmission of personal information be completed without the express written permission of all
persons potentially involved as per the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act.
All students will be required to complete an educational module regarding on-line technology use and safe
Internet protocols. This will be a prerequisite to school network access.
For the purpose of safety and communication, teachers’ use of MLT’s is different. Teachers will often need access to
their cellular phones as a means for contact with the school office or in the context of presenting curricular concepts.
Loss or theft of these sought after items have been frequent. Students risk loss and damage of their equipment when
brought to school. OUR SCHOOL accepts no responsibility for the loss or theft of personal electronic devices.
Bullying Consequences – Positive Action versus Punishment
Punitive action to deal with bullying issues often does not get to the root of the problem and does little to prevent the
situation from reoccurring. Below is a list of positive ways of dealing with bullying in the school setting.








Have students take the Anti-Bullying Pledge
Involve students in the Peer Power Youth Presenters Program
Using the Peer Support Approach to solve issues between students
Employ the method of Shared Concern pioneered by Anatol Pikas
Encourage students to wear blue “Stand Up” bands so that students being bullied know that they are a safe
person to approach


• Teach empathy to students, by having bullies and bystanders think about their actions and the feelings of the
victim, writing letters of apology to the victim

• Ensure that both the parents of the bully and the victim are aware of the situation and are kept informed about
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Concept 5. Action Plan Model 1

any changes or progress on a regular basis

• Encourage both the victim and the bully to explore the www.bullying.org website. The victim will feel less
alone and the bully will gain a better understanding of the impact of bullying

• Develop a school culture where being a bystander is discouraged and standing up is encouraged.

• Have students who have been in bullying situations get involved in the activities and planning of Bullying
Awareness Week

• Include bullying awareness into classroom lessons, developing awareness and classroom community

• Continue to monitor the relationship between the bully and the victim after any intervention to ensure the
interactions are of a positive nature

• Keep administration informed of any bullying situations, should the situation escalate the administration will
have knowledge of the events

• In the case of cyber bullying encourage the student to keep record of any bullying that takes place so that there
is evidence if it is required in the future

• Involve bystanders in the discussion about bullying, so that they understand that being a bystander is often just
as bad as being a bully
Student Bullying Survey

Please answer these questions to the best of your ability. Feel free to skip any questions you are unsure of. Your
answers and anonymous, nobody will know who wrote them.
• Bullying is a problem at OUR SCHOOL.

Strongly Disagree
Disagree
Neither Agree nor Disagree
Agree
Strongly Agree
• Teachers at OUR SCHOOL are good at stopping bullying.

Strongly Disagree
Disagree
Neither Agree nor Disagree
Agree
Strongly Agree
• During my time at OUR SCHOOL I have been affected by bullying in the following ways (you can choose
multiple answers)...
I have bullied someone
I have been bullied by someone else
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I have seen bullying take place
I have reported bullying to a teacher
I have been part of a group that was bullying someone
I stood by in silence while someone was being bullied
• If I saw someone being bullied I would do something about it.

Strongly Disagree
Disagree
Neither Agree nor Disagree
Agree
Strongly Agree
• How often do you witness bullying on average?

A few times a day
Once a day
A few times a week
Once a week
A few times a month
Once a month
• Where do you most commonly observe bullying? Select as many options as you want.

Classroom
Cafeteria
Hallways
Playground
Bus loop
Gymnasium
Other
• Bullying happens all the time in middle schools everywhere and is not a big deal.

Strongly Disagree
Disagree
Neither Agree nor Disagree
Agree Strongly Agree
• What grade are you in?
• 5
6
7
8
• Complete this sentence: Bullying at OUR SCHOOL is...

Much worse than at other middle schools
Worse than at other middle schools
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Concept 5. Action Plan Model 1

About the same as at other middle schools
Better than at other middle schools
Much better than at other middle schools
• I have experienced or witnessed bullying in the following ways:
• I have never witnessed bullying or been bullied
Verbal bullying (taunting, name calling, put downs)
Physical bullying (hitting, pushing, tripping)
Cyber bullying (bullied on computer, cell phone etc.)
Social bullying (gossiping, exclusion, spreading rumours)
Short-term Effective Supervision Ideas
Implement Student Hall Monitors from the grade eight leadership team
Sign up sheet for parent volunteers for additional lunch/recess supervision
One teacher per grade team provides supervision each day during Locker Break. This involves roaming the hallways,
bathrooms and other common areas.
Paid supervision on the bus ride home for students.
Before school supervision in hallways and bus loop provided by administration.
Evaluate the school budget to inquire about adding additional paid lunchroom supervision.
Have teaching, administration and support staff take the Bullying Prevention Certificate Program offered by Teachers
Without Borders in partnership with Bullying.org so that they know how to identify and respond to bullying.
Train leadership students how to mentor victims, bullies and bystanders. This supervisory role will benefit students
because they may feel more comfortable reporting to somebody their own age. This will also empower youth.
Set up an anonymous reporting box so that supervisors know what areas they need to monitor more effectively.
Create more clubs that are supervised by adults.
Provide each supervisor with a communication device.
Professional Development Day – Bullying Awareness
A great introduction to a PD day on bullying awareness and prevention would be to watch the webinar available from
www.bullyingcourse.com entitled “Bullying, What Teachers Should Know, What Can Be Done.” by Bill Belsey.
This is a great way to start the dialogue about bullying and the role of teachers in prevention and dealing with it
when it occurs.
A next great step would be to really understand what bullying is, often teachers don’t intervene when bullying
happens right in front of them. Recognizing bullying when it happens is a first step to getting the teacher to step up.
The teachers could read the bullying myths and facts sheet. Next, teachers can read “What is bullying? Defining
bullying: a new look at an old concept” by Dr. Ken Rigby. These two things will really help teachers understand
what bullying is, and how to recognize it.
Once teachers are aware of what bullying is, the next challenge is to understand what to do once they’ve witnessed
it happening. A good resource for basic information is the “Steps for intervening in Bullying Situations” sheet,
available from www.bullyingcourse.com . Teachers should also become familiar with “The Peer Support Approach”
by Barbara Mains and George Robinson. This approach has been shown to be very successful. Perhaps teachers
might break into small groups and practice role-playing of this method. Acting out scenarios such as this will help
teachers become more familiar with what to say in the situation making dealing with the bullying scenario a more
comfortable situation.
For the second part of the professional development day teachers could attend smaller group sessions based around
the specific area of bullying that interests them the most. These groups could create action plans for their specific
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focus. Group focuses might include:
Cyberbullying
National Bullying Awareness Week
Supervision strategies to prevent bullying
Bullying in the workplace
Creating/updating a school bullying action plan
Raising Bullying Awareness and Supporting Healthy Relationships
Promote National Bullying Awareness Week November 16-20, 2009.
Caring Kids Awards presented to at least two students per grade by school principal. These students were nominated
by school staff and students and were selected based on the content of the nominations, number of nominations per
students and knowledge of the students’ contributions by child developmental specialist, ***** ***** and student
teacher ********.
Anti-bullying pop songs were played on the morning announcements daily. Artists included Bon Jovi, Billy Talent
and new artists displayed on Bullying.org.
Sale of Stand Up to Bullying Wristbands during the lunch and recess hour in the forum and cafeteria for $2.00 by
leadership students.
All classes participated in a poster homeroom challenge, where art teacher ***** ***** evaluated them on colour,
design and class pledge or slogan. Share poster contest on Bulying.org.
A package was sent out to teachers, which included lesson plan ideas that could be used in the classroom, wristbands
for teachers, descriptions and timeline of the week’s events and homeroom challenge materials.
Famous quotes were displayed on lockers in both French and English during the week.
Celebrity anti-bullying video clips were played in Forum during the sale of the wristbands.
Assembly with presenter ***** ***** and drama skits by grade seven students to wrap-up the week.
Peaceful Blue Shirt Homeroom Challenge for solidarity against bullying.
Have Holocaust survivor, Eva Olsson speak to the school about bullying and hatred.
DEVIN Foundation presentation to grade eight students on bullying and violence.
Host a Professional Development Day on Bullying Awareness
Have the staff and students take part in the Family Channel pledge
Follow-up assembly with local band Seventh Rain performance and anti-bullying presentation.
Peer mentorship program and support through the leadership class
Openly discuss bullying during class meetings
Role play scenarios during health class
Encourage and support students who demonstrate leadership qualities by helping them become involved with the
Peer Power Youth Presenters Program.
PSA contest (digital, electronic, hard copy, skits, raps, poetry, stories, poems, interviews, animations, songs, illustrations, cartons, etc.)
A description of Bullying Awareness Week was included in the School Newsletter
Bullying presentation to Parent Council
School Newspaper article: Teachers Perspective piece on bullying

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Concept 5. Action Plan Model 1

Footprints Initiative to share awareness with others: http://www.leavingfootprints.ca/
Student Name: ________________________________ Home Room: ____________
Updated Network, Internet and E-mail Acceptable Use Policy
At OUR SCHOOL the network is provided for students to conduct research and communicate with others for
educational purposes. Access to network services is given to students who agree to act in a considerate and
responsible manner. Individual users of the school computer network are responsible for their behaviour and for
communications over those networks. Internet usage is a privilege and inappropriate usage may result in suspension
or revocation of the privilege.
The Internet is used as an integral part of our daily teaching and learning. The Internet is available throughout our
school and provides access to a broad range of opportunities to select, share and explore information and media. Our
intent is to make Internet access available to support and enrich student learning.
Rocky View Schools has installed a software filtering program to limit access to inappropriate material on the
Internet, however, it may still be possible that your child may find material that you would consider objectionable.
Although staff will supervise your child’s use of the Internet, we cannot guarantee that your child will not gain access
to inappropriate material. Please discuss with your child your expectations regarding Internet usage. Items discussed
should include not accessing alternative browsers, not downloading unapproved software and not reconfiguring
computer settings. Students are given a specific ID on the network where their files are stored and are responsible
for the material that is saved there.
Our school encourages the use of email for homework purposes. Students must ask permission to use an email
program. The transmission of electronic files is also acceptable but these files must be virus checked before being
used in the school computers. We also require that students have their own flash drives, in which they can save and
transfer files.
During the month of September, students will be thoroughly briefed as to the school’s rules and expectations
regarding computer use. Students will also be required to attend a presentation on “social and moral” responsibility
in the “electronic” world. Parents are asked to view a video clip on the school website. All students will receive a
brochure on Internet safety, which will be reviewed with the classes by homeroom teachers.
Students will be taught that although they are not communicating face-to-face with individuals online, these interactions are real and must be respectful. Similar to social etiquette in the real world, students must agree to practice
proper computer etiquette, or “netiquette” by being polite, civil, respectful and mindful of other’s feelings online.
Offensive language communicated online is unacceptable, offending and attacking people online is unacceptable,
and harassing people online is prohibited. Students are also educated about plagiarism, cyberbullying and media
awareness and the risks associated with giving out personal information online. It is inappropriate for students to
access social networking sites and to disclose information such as last name or contact information while accessing
the Internet at school.
This signed consent form will remain valid for the 2009-2010 school year.
As a user of the OUR SCHOOL computer network and Internet, I hereby agree to comply with the rules and policies.
I understand that any violation of these conditions or rules may result in a suspension of privileges and/or any other
disciplinary consequences deemed necessary by the school. Our school reserves the right to review your child’s
Internet account and to remove any materials that the school deems unacceptable. Our school reserves the right to
terminate your child’s access to any or all Internet services at any time, without notice, for any reason.
As the parent or legal guardian to the minor student signing above, I grant permission for my son or daughter to
access the Internet.
_________________________ __________________________ ________________
Parent/Guardian Name Parent/Guardian Signature Date
_________________________ ___________________________ ________________

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Student Na me Student Signature Date
Bullying Action Plan Timeline – School Year Plan
SeptemberTeachers complete bullying awareness PD day
OctoberHave students’ complete survey to assess level of bullying in schoolIntegrate bullying awareness into lesson
plans
November
National Bullying Awareness Week (November 16-20th ) activitiesPresentation by Eva Olsson, Holocaust survivorPresentation by DEVIN foundation, one act of violence
Caring Kids nominations and awards
DecemberRecruit students to be in the Peer Power Youth Presenters ProgramReport on Bullying Awareness Week
in school newsletter
JanuaryBullying awareness presentation to parent councilStaff meeting to check in how things are going with staff
and bullying situations
FebruaryEncourage parents and teachers to take course from bullyingcourse.com
School newspaper article on bullying
MarchStudents take the Family Channel/Bullying.org Anti-Bullying Pledge
AprilHave students complete footprints projectNew start for spring, have students give someone in their class a
fresh chance
MayFollow-up assembly with Seventh Rain, local band and anti-bullying speakers
JuneHave students take the bullying survey for the second time to observe changes

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C ONCEPT

Concept 6. Action Plan Model 2

6

Action Plan Model 2

Anti-Bullying Action Plan
- Exemplar 2 Part 1: An example of a letter addressed to your school and/or school board administration asking for their
support to implement your school-community anti-bullying action plan (1 page, 250 words approximately)
******** School
Dear ******** staff members,
My name is ******** and I am a student teacher this semester at your school. I am writing this letter to ask for your
support in implementing my school-community anti-bullying action plan.
As many of you know, bullying is a very important issue that needs to be dealt with in schools. The impact of
bullying does not stop at the bully and the victim, but extends to the entire school and community. The entire school
atmosphere is affected by bullying, as even those who are not directly involved in bullying still suffer from fear, and
worry that they may become the next target. It is often difficult for the victims of bullying to come forward due to a
fear that adults cannot help them, or worry that telling an adult may make the situation worse.
We need to reverse this stigma, and ensure that are students are comfortable coming forward and talking to us when
there is a problem involving bullying. Bullying is a school-wide issue that occurs in the social environment as a
whole. Since many bullying incidents happen at school, we need to respond in a way that will positively affect the
school’s climate. We need to be proactive with this issue, and ensure that we are preventing bullying as well.
I am asking for us to work together as a team to eliminate/significantly reduce the bullying that goes on within our
school. We want the students to experience a safe and healthy learning environment while they are at school. I am
asking for your support to implement my anti-bullying action plan. If we work together we can help eliminate this
serious problem, and create a safe and healthy environment for all students.
Sincerely,
********
Part 2: A copy of your school’s current policy regarding bullying (1 page) *

*Note that policies tend to be reactive and outline what a school will do if and when bullying happens. The antbullying plan you are creating as the major assignment for this course will focus on what your school and community
can do in positive, proactive ways to help raise awareness and prevent bullying
***Found in the STUDENT/PARENT HANDBOOK***
EXPECTATIONS FOR STUDENT BEHAVIOUR
To ensure that the rights and safety of all individuals are maintained, we have specific expectations for student
behavior and attitudes. Our students will be expected to assume the responsibilities listed below:
1.Show consideration by
Treating others how you would like to be treated
Being friendly and thoughtful towards others
Thinking about how your actions may affect others and caring about how they feel
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Listening and respecting the point of view of others
2.Show respect by
Knowing and following the rules
Taking care of property and the environment
Using socially appropriate language
Valuing ourselves and others with dignity
Expressing even your strongest feelings in a peaceful way
3.Show safety by
Not harming others or yourself (be peaceful)
Participating in sports and play that do not involve body contact (play fair)
Avoiding horse-play and rough-housing
Not bringing unsafe items to school
Avoiding and reporting unsafe areas and conditions
Moving through the building in a safe manner
Using equipment as intended
Not leaving the school grounds without permission
Being traffic-safe
4.Show excellence by
Being the best you can be
Giving your best to every task you do and relationships you have
Setting personal learning goals and striving to achieve and surpass these goals
Being prompt and prepared - carry the tools you will need to assist you with your learning
Being organized, neat and accurate
Dress in a modest fashion by dressing
In a way that shows self-respect
In a manner that is neat, clean and will cause no embarrassment or discomfort to other students or staff members.
Please see dress code policy for further information
CODE OF CONDUCT
******** School staff is committed to making our school free of negative factors such as abuse, bullying, discrimination, intimidation, hateful words and actions and any form of physical violence. Our code of conduct encourages
problem prevention, peaceful problem-solving techniques and the creation of a safe and welcoming environment.
Anyone participating in a school activity including students, parents or guardians, volunteers, teachers and other
staff members, is expected to follow the Code of Conduct. The Code of Conduct applies even when the activity is
not on school property but is school related.
INAPPROPRIATE BEHAVIOUR AND SCHOOL DISCIPLINE
The school will discipline students who do not follow the code of conduct. Depending on the behavior, the discipline
may be verbal or written warnings, detentions, suspension from school or expulsion.
As per ***** ***** School policy IF, and Section 12, 24 and 25 of the ******* School Act, parents and students
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Concept 6. Action Plan Model 2

need to be aware that certain items and actions are forbidden and may result in suspension or severe discipline, which
can include a recommendation for expulsion as per ***** ***** Policy BDEA. Such actions/items include:
Use, possession of, or active contact with weapons
Threats which endanger others physically or emotionally
Theft
Assault causing bodily harm
Use or possession of laser pointers, lighters or matches
Vandalism
Use or possession of tobacco, drugs or alcohol
Personal or sexual harassment
Extortion
Other criminal activity
Open opposition to authority
Part 3: An example of anonymous school survey about bullying that can help assess the amount and nature of
bullying in your school and will also help to establish baseline data that you can use to assess the effectiveness
of your plan after six months, one year, two years etc. (2 pages)
Anonymous Survey About Bullying
~Thank you for taking time to honestly complete this survey~
~Please return to your teacher when completed~
Are you:Grade:
Male
Female
What is bullying?
Bullying is a conscious, willful, deliberate and hostile behavior by one or more people, which is intended to harm
others. It is repeated, intentional, and there is an imbalance of power between those involved. Bullying cam happen
anywhere; at home, school , in the park, at the store, etc.
Please answer the following questions by circling the answer that best fits for you:
1) Bullying is a problem in our school.
a) Strongly agreeb) Agreec) Don’t know d) Disagreee) Strongly disagree
2) Have you ever been bullied in this school?
Yes
No
3) How often have you been bullied in school?
a) onceb) twicec) more
4) The bullies were:
a) My ageb) Older than mec) Younger than med) My age
5) Where did the bullying happen?

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a) In the classroomb) In the washroomc) The hallway d) The school bus
e) On the playground f) Other (explain) _________________________.
6) Did you report the bullying to a trusted adult?
a) Yesb) No
7) After you reported it, did the bullying stop?
a) Yesb) No
8) Do you know someone in our school who has been bullied in the last 12 months?
Yes (If yes, who? Circle all that apply)
FriendParentSiblingTeacherOther
No
9) If you circled yes for #3, where did the bullying take place?
a) At homeb) At a parkc) On the playgroundd) School
e) Other ________.
10) How do you think bullying should be dealt with in our school? Circle all that apply.
Teach victims how/where to get help.
Teach peers how to help stop others from bullying.
Teach the school signs of bullying and give ideas how to address them.
Other ideas: __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
11) I am interested in learning more about: (Circle all that apply).
Anti-bullying workshops.
Teaching victims how to stand up for themselves.
Teaching peers and bystanders to get involved in stopping bullies.
Identifying signs of bullying.
How to reach out for help.
Other: _________________________________________________________________________________________
12) How can the school staff, students and teachers work together to prevent bullying?
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________.
13) Any additional comments?
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________.
~Thank you for taking the time to fill out the survey ~

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Concept 6. Action Plan Model 2

Part 4: An outline of information, practical approaches, strategies and resources that you can share at an
upcoming Professional Development day in your school. (1 page)
Anti-Bullying Information, Strategies and Resources
KEY TERMS and DEFINITIONS
Bullying: his behavior has three key aspects; it is repeated, intentional, and there is an imbalance of power between
those involved.
Bystander: someone who watches bullying and does not act.
Physical: A form of bullying that can involve hitting, pushing, tripping etc.
Social: A form of bullying that can involve gossiping, spreading rumours and exclusion.
Verbal: taunting, name-calling and put-downs are examples of this form of bullying.
Cyberbulling: The use of information and communication technologies that supports deliberate, repeated, and
hostile behavior by an individual or group, that is intended to harm others.
There is a new emerging threat to our students in respect to bullying, as they have constant access to the Internet.
Bullying can now take place over social networking sites, text messages, and emails. We need to be aware of this
issue, and work to encourage our students to use technology in positive ways. We need to let them know that the
internet is an amazing tool, but there are also responsibilities they have while accessing it.
It is important to note that bullying is not normal aggression between young children. Bullying is not a normal part
of growing up. It is a problem that greatly affects the school environment, and if we ignore it, we give the bullies
power.
PRACTICAL APPROACHES and STRATEGIES
Incorporate Anti-Bullying aspects into lesson plans.
Give the students scenarios to act out that involve bullying. Get the class or actors to brainstorm how they can fix
the problem.
Read the students a poem or show them a clip about someone who is being bullied.
Get the class to talk about the bullying, the feelings involved, and solutions to the problem.
Share with your students, and encourage them to share with you as well. Let them know that they can come talk to
you if something is bothering them.
If you see someone being bullied, intervene immediately!
Talk to the victim and bully separately and briefly after the incident. Remind the bully of school policies and make
sure they know what repercussions will happen if they act this way again.
Make sure you separate the behavior from the students. The student is not the problem; the behavior is.
Contact the parents of the bully and victim. Let them know what is going on and encourage them to help you come
up with an action plan.
Monitor the bullying to ensure the behavior does not consider.
A great method to use is called the Peer Support Approach. This method is great as it brings in several students and
gives the victims peers a shared social responsibility to end/prevent future bullying.
Interview the victim, talk to he/she about his/her feelings.
Call a meeting and include all of those involved. Include bystanders/peers who did not initiate the bullying but
witnessed it.
Explain the problem. Talk about how the victim is feeling. Do not blame anyone in the group, just talk about the
problem.
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Tell the group that they are all responsible to fix the problem. Encourage them to help the victim feel better and
brainstorm ideas.
Meet the same group about a week later. Discuss how things are going, what things have been done to help the
victim feel happier at school.
RESOURCES
www.bullying.org
www.cyberbullying.ca
www.bullyingawarenessweek.org
Part 5: A checklist of at least ten practical action items that your school can implement in the short-term to
provide more effective supervision (1 page)
EFFECTIVE SUPERVISION CHECKLIST
Have extra supervisors watching the playground area at recess and lunch. Instead of standing in one place, encourage
supervisors to walk around and monitor the activity of as many students as possible.
Identify bullying ’hot spots’ (through anonymous surveys). Increase supervision in these areas.
Have hallway supervision during transition times between classes, when the halls are filled with students.
Appoint extra supervisors in the lunchroom. Have these supervisors walk around the room as the students are eating
and talking so they are aware of any problems. Ensure there are supervisors in each enclosed lunchroom.
During working periods at school, encourage teachers to walk around the classroom to monitor both the student’s
work and the conversations that are going on. Instead of sitting at his/her desk, the teacher could make his/her way
around the classroom to eliminate problems.
After students are dismissed at the end of the day, have supervisors outside the school, by the buses, and in the
hallways. This discourages bullying behavior.
Before school, have supervisors outside with the students. Have supervisors by the bus stops, the doors and by the
playground.
On field trips where the entire class takes a bus, have parent volunteers placed throughout the bus instead of all
sitting together in a clump. Having the adults spread out on the bus discourages bullying.
Encourage parent volunteers in your classroom. The more adult bodies you have in the class, they less likely students
are to pick on each other.
Have extra supervision in gym class when students are spread out and working in groups.
Try to avoid letting students go to the washroom in pairs or groups. This may help to eliminate some of the bullying
that goes on in the washroom.
Part 6: A checklist of short-term action items and long-term programs that your school can undertake to
raise awareness about bullying and encourage and support healthy relationships (1 page)
BULLYING AWARENESS CHECKLIST
Short T erm
Adapt the Peer Support Method to deal with bullying.
Raise awareness about bullying in your school/classroom. Celebrate anti-bullying week as a school.
Educate staff and students about what bullying really is and what can be done to prevent it.
Take the family channel and bullying.org anti-bullying pledge. Get your students to as well.
Teach your students the difference between tattling and telling. Let them know that if they need help they can come
to you for support.
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Concept 6. Action Plan Model 2

Teachers can increase supervision. Students can be encourage to walk near adults or friends to avoid situations with
bullies.
Encourage students and staff to spend some time on bullying.org
Incorporate anti-bullying aspects into your lesson plans. Educate your students about the issue of bullying, the
damage it causes, and what can be done to help eliminate it.
Long T erm
Raise awareness about bullying in your community. Get students involved in projects that spread awareness about
the issue.
Approach local police force, town council, parents etc and invite them to be a part of the school’s anti-bullying
committee. It is important to get the entire community behind anti-bullying.
Try to administer an anonymous survey about bullying to the community. Find out the communities attitude towards
bullying, as well as the preconceptions and ideas surrounding it.
Build awareness about the issue of bullying in the community. Encourage others to visit bullying.org and visit the
stories, poems, music videos etc that have been shared all over the world.
Hold community events to raise awareness about anti-bullying (and gain support).
Have your town/city council sign and publicly proclaim the www.bullying.org Bullying-Free Community Proclamation.
Have various groups around the community sign the anti-bullying pledge.
Part 7: The creation of, or an update your school’s Internet Acceptable Use Policy and School Code of
Conduct to address the issue of cyberbullying (1 page)
*Found in ********’s Student/Parent Handbook
TECHNOLOGY USE AND RESPONSIBILITIES
At the beginning of the school year all students and parents will sign a Computer Services Acceptable Use Policy.
All students are expected to use computers responsibly and appropriately. Any inappropriate activity including noneducational use will not be tolerated and will result in referral to administration. (Remember, School Boards own
the computers and the school’s internet connections. Nothing you do on these computers is private; the board can
access any of your activities/messages at any time if they want to).
ELECTRONIC DEVICES
iPods, cell phones, & other devices capable of web browsing can be a great tool for school and students are
encouraged to use them appropriately. Remember, iPod and other device usage is a privilege, not a right. Electronic
devices for students in Gr. 1-6 will only be allowed with the permission of the classroom teachers.
Below is a general guideline for iPod use in grades 7 & 8.
Use as a calculator
Use as a dictionary/thesaurus (www.dictionary.com)
Use as an agenda to keep yourself organized
Use to research topic relevant information on the internet
Listen to music when cued by your teacher (no sharing)
Listen to topic appropriate podcasts
Listen to downloaded books, especially those being studied in class
If Grade 7 & 8 students choose to bring their iPods into the classroom, the device must be place on the corner of
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their desk and must be in clear view at all times.
Games, movies, texting, email, social networking are only to be done during free time (recess and lunch) and
even then students must remember that when they are at school, only school appropriate materials should be
viewed/played. Students should not permit images to be taking of themselves. Students cannot take photos of
other students without permission. These photos are not to be posted to social networking sites without the proper
safeguarding. In addition, students cannot post criticisms of their teachers or peers on social networking sites. They
also cannot share personal or confidential information on social networking sites. If students do not comply with
these rules, they risk having their ipod/phone privileges revoked. The principal, parents and records management
will become involved and a plan of action will be determined.
SCHOOL INTERNET USAGE AND SOCIAL NETWORKING SITES
It is the position of OUR SCHOOL that students should not have access to the internet or any social media site
without the explicit monitoring and control of all the students activities by the parent. It is therefore essential that
parents know their child’s passwords and have access to the various sites such as Facebook that are being used by
their children. Parents should regularly check their child’s activities and be aware of their discussions their child is
having with their “internet friends”. If you would like additional information or would like to discuss this matter
further please contact the administration at the school.
Students should not share their passwords with other students, or leave their computer on unattended at any time.
STUDENT CONDUCT IN THE DIGITAL WORLD
Electronic and digital communication has created new problems regarding student conduct. Parents and students
must sign an Appropriate Use Agreement for the use of all school-owned technology. The use of personal digital
devices at school, on school property or school sponsored activities is subject to the same standards of conduct and
consequences as any other behaviour. All use of digital recordings should be with honourable intent and with good
conscience.
(*Note is it not polite to write messages or emails in all capital letters. It comes across as shouting, and is poor
netiquette)
At no time should any photos, voice recordings or transmission of personal information be made without the clear
permission of all persons potentially involved or affected by such information. The school reserves the right to
confiscate digital devices if found to have been used in contravention of school rules and expectations. The school
discourages students from bringing electronic/digital devices to school and assumes no liability for lost, stolen or
broken devices.
Part 8: A list of formative consequences (consequences that teach and encourage positive relationship choices,
rather punitive reactions) that can be used by all staff at your school when they are working with students
who bully others (1 page).
FORMATIVE CONSEQUENCES FOR BULLYING
Get the student to talk about how he made the victim feel. Focus on feelings rather than actions.
Discuss with the student how they can make the situation right. Ask them to come up with some ideas to make the
victim feel happier.
Ask the student to write an apology note to the victim. Include how they made the victim feel and why they are
sorry they made them feel that way. This will help the student who bullied the other understand how he/she made
the victim feel.
Get the student to spend some time on bullying.org. Ask he/she to look around the site and pick one story/poem/song
that they would like to share with you or maybe the class. Talk as a class about the story/poem/song.
Get the student involved in anti-bullying week. Give him/her some extra jobs or let them choose something they
want to get involved in.
Talk to the student and ask him/her if they have ever been bullied. Ask them to explain how it made them feel. After
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Concept 6. Action Plan Model 2

talking with them, ask them if they want to say/write anything to the victim.
Use the peer support approach to help deal with bullying issues. This allows the student who bullied to help see the
problem and work to fix it.
Integrate bullying prevention into lesson plans. This reaches out and makes all students think about bullying and the
consequences.
Remind the bully of classroom rules. Reiterate the consequences if this behavior happens again. Separate the
behavior from the student. The behavior is the problem, not the student.
Part 9: A timeline that outlines when and how your proposed plan may be implemented that includes a
timeline of short term actions, long-term goals and initial and follow-up school survey dates to establish
baseline data and evaluated the plan’s effectiveness (1 page)
Short-term Actions Timeline
Adapt the Peer Support Method to deal with bullying (start educating other staff members immediately, and implementing it myself immediately)
Raise awareness about bullying in your school/classroom. (start immediately)
Celebrate anti-bullying week as a school. (Nov 13, 2011 be ready for start of anti-bullying week)
Educate staff and students about what bullying really is and what can be done to prevent it. (raise a significant
amount of awareness by Oct 15, 2011)
Take the family channel and bullying.org anti-bullying pledge. Get your students to as well. (Have students do this
by Sep 30, 2011)
Teach your students the difference between tattling and telling. Let them know that if they need help they can come
to you for support. (immediately)
Teachers can increase supervision. Students can be encourage to walk near adults or friends to avoid situations with
bullies. (Encourage students and teachers immediately, hopefully the increase of supervision is done by Sept 30,
2011)
Encourage students and staff to spend some time on bullying.org (Immediately/Over the next week)
Incorporate anti-bullying aspects into your lesson plans. Educate your students about the issue of bullying, the
damage it causes, and what can be done to help eliminate it. (Over the next few months. I will implement it
immediately, and continue to incorporate anti-bullying elements into my lesson plans throughout the year)
Long-term Actions Timeline
These are more long-term goals as I feel in order to spread awareness about anti-bullying to our community, we need
to have a strong anti-bullying ideology in our school. Once we have a strong sense of anti-bullying in our school, it
will be easier and more effective to spread the awareness to our community.
Raise awareness about bullying in your community. Get students involved in projects that spread awareness about
the issue. (Over the next school year. By June 2012, have the community more involved in anti-bullying)
Approach local police force, town council, parents etc and invite them to be a part of the school’s anti-bullying
committee. It is important to get the entire community behind anti-bullying. (Raise awareness and approach
community members by March 2012).
Try to administer an anonymous survey about bullying to the community. Find out the communities attitude towards
bullying, as well as the preconceptions and ideas surrounding it. (Have them complete the survey by Jan 30, 2012)
Build awareness about the issue of bullying in the community. Encourage others to visit bullying.org and visit the
stories, poems, music videos etc that have been shared all over the world. (Immediately encourage others to visit the
site.).
Hold community events to raise awareness about anti-bullying (and gain support). (Throughout the school year. . . Hopefully
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the first one by Dec 30 2011)
Have your town/city council sign and publicly proclaim the www.bullying.org Bullying-Free Community Proclamation. (Sept 1, 2012)
Have various groups around the community sign the anti-bullying pledge. (Start January 2012).
Initial and follow-up school survey dates
Initial anonymous survey date: Sept 30, 2011
1st Follow up survey: Nov 30, 2011
2nd Follow up survey: Jan 30, 2012
3rd Follow up survey: Mar 30, 2012
4th Follow up survey: May 30, 2012

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C ONCEPT

Concept 7. Testimonials

7

Testimonials

Participant Testimonials

I am very impressed by this course. It seems comprehensive, accurate, and very needed in the schools and in
society. It is easily accessible to anyone who is interested in learning more about the area of bullying, cyberbullying,
harassment, and offers possible steps that can be taken to reduce these behaviors. [It includes] a wide assortment
of perspectives from youth, researchers, teachers, and practitioners, and diverse materials including videos, articles,
statistics, definitions, personal testimonials, and other types of resources.
Dr. Warren J. Blumenfeld, Associate Professor
Department of Curriculum and Instruction
Iowa State University
Iowa, USA
_________
[The course] is filled with practical information that teachers can relate to and use. Research has demonstrated a
need for teacher training in how to respond to bullying and cyberbullying. This course provides an accessible way
for teachers to get much-needed information. I think this course could be adopted by schools and used as the basis
for staff development.
Sheri Bauman, Ph.D., Associate Professor
Director, School Counseling Program
Editor, Journal for Specialists in Group Work
University of Arizona
Arizona, USA
_________

I recently completed the course and found this to be a very valuable learning, theoretical and practical experience. As
a student teacher I have found that this serious social issue has been overlooked in my teaching preparation courses.
I highly recommend that teachers, student teachers and other professionals working with children attend this course
[ . . . ] Most importantly, I found the course assignments to be practical and something that I can use as I begin
my teaching career. The assignment of creating my own Anti-Bullying Action Plan truly brought the course to life
for me. Having completed the assignment, I now understand how I can respond to, prevent and advocate against
bullying in the classroom, school, community, workplace and worldwide web environments.
Kimberly (Calgary, Alberta, Canada)
_________

Like many educators, I felt an uncertainty and discomfort when dealing with bullying. I was looking for a Professional Development opportunity that would increase my knowledge and understanding about what actually goes
on when bullying takes place and what I can effectively do about it. In my view, a worthwhile starting point is
taking the course, Introduction to Bullying Prevention for Educators. Completion of this course is empowering . . .
it lays a firm foundation from which to grow both personally and professionally. It has helped me develop a greater
understanding and confidence in addressing the everyday challenge of dealing with bullying in schools.
Jacqueline (Ottawa, Ontario, Canada)
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_________

I would strongly recommend this Anti-Bullying course to any educator. This course is filled with the most current
research available, practical approaches you can use, and when you are finished you have created a comprehensive
and custom action plan for dealing with bullying in your school. As a student about to graduate with my education
degree and begin my teaching career, I had very real concerns that I had not been adequately prepared to deal with
bullying [ . . . ] After finishing this course I feel much more comfortable and ready for the challenges I will face in
the upcoming years. Knowledge is power, and this course has left me feeling empowered. The online format allows
you to progress through the course when it is convenient for you and the Webinars allow you to have the experience
of a lecture from one of the world’s leading experts on bullying, Bill Belsey, all while in the comfort of your own
home. I cannot say enough positive things about this course. Whether you are a new graduate or an educator with
20 years experience I would wholeheartedly recommend this course to anyone.
Allison (Calgary, Alberta, Canada)

_________

The Introduction to Bullying Prevention for Educators course [ . . . ] was excellent. Educators can learn a lot about
bullying in a really easy, affordable and yet deep way. The research and supporting information and resources are
current and were very relevant to my professional learning needs. The Webinars about bullying and cyberbullying
are wonderful because [they provide] excellent insights into the “Always-on Generation” and the risks that they face,
with excellent practical ideas as to what educators and parents can do to deal with these issues.
Course participants have one major assignment, the creation of an Anti-Bullying Plan to address bullying in positive,
proactive ways. This assignment helps you to think about what you want to implement in your school to address the
issue of bullying. The assignment helps schools move beyond the typical “Bullying Policy” that most schools have
which focuses on punishment and often does little to change the behaviours of those hurting others or the culture of
school in a broader, more effective way.
I do strongly recommend the course to educators and parents. The first step to effectively addressing bullying is
knowing more about it.
Valeria, Brazil

_________

I was blown away by the Introduction to Bullying Prevention for Educators course [ ... ] I am currently in a postgraduate program called Youth Corrections and Interventions, so this was incorporated into our programming. [. . . ]
I enjoyed reading the articles on bullying and gaining a deeper understanding about what constitutes bullying and
how to confront it when having to work with youth who may be experiencing it. [. . . ] I wish to pursue a career in
policing and this online course will allow me to really understand the nature of violence and bullying and be able
to confront it head-on in a more productive and effective way when dealing with youth. [. . . ] This program really
needs to be incorporated into every school program.
Katie

_________

I feel very grateful to have been able to take the Introduction to Bullying Prevention for Educators course [ . . . ]
Working as a middle school counselor, the most repeated concern is bullying. This course has not only given me
in-depth knowledge about bullying, but I have also learned hands-on approaches and interventions to create a safe
and positive school environment.
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www.ck12.org

Concept 7. Testimonials

Nicki, School Counselor, Bangkok, Thailand
_________

Thanks so much for this wonderful course! I learned many practical strategies to carry with me through my final
year of student teaching and my teaching career!
Amanda (student teacher)

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www.ck12.org

C ONCEPT

8

Bullying Resources

Bullying Resources













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Bullying Resources - ThinkKindness.org
Bullying Resources & Help - aimhighma.org
Resources | StopBullying.gov
National Bullying Prevention Center
Stop School Bullying–Resources
Bullying and Cyberbullying Resources | SafeKids.com
Bullying | Center for Parent Information and Resources
Bully Free: It Starts with Me
Resources to Fight Bullying and Harassment at School...
Bullying: Resources and Reporting / Edutopia
Bullying Prevention Resources | Violence Prevention Works
Bullying Resource Center
Stomp Out Bullying - Get Involved With the Anit-Bullying