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FINAL REPORT

DECEMBER 2005

TABLE OF CONTENTS
ITEM

CHAPTER

1
1.1
1.2
2
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.4.1
2.4.2
2.4.3
2.4.4
2.4.5
2.4.6
2.4.7
2.4.8
2.4.9
2.4.10
2.4.11
2.4.12
2.4.12
2.5
2.5.1
2.5.2
2.5.3
2.5.4
2.5.5
2.6
2.6.1
2.6.2
2.6.3
2.6.4
2.6.5
3
3.1
3.2
4

INTRODUCTION
Background
Gist Of Environmental Acts, Rules And Notifications
LEGAL AND REGULATORY FRAMEWORK
Fundamental Rights And Duties Of A Citizen
State Policy
Legislative Authority
Relevant Legislations
The Mines Act, 1952
The Mines Rule, 1955
The Mines And Minerals (Development And Regulation)
Act, 1957
Mineral Concessions Rules, 1960 And Mineral
Conservation And Development Rules 1988.
Environment Protection Act 1986.
The Water (Prevention And Control Of Pollution) Act, 1974
And Rules
The Water (Prevention And Control Of Pollution) Cess Act,
1977 And Rules
The Air (Prevention And Control Of Pollution) Act, 1981
And Rules
The Environment Impact Assessment Notification 1994 &
1997
The Noise Pollution (Regulation And Control) Rules, 2000
The Municipal Solid Waste (Management & Handling
Rules), 2000
Forest Conservation Act 1980.
The Biological Diversity Act 2003.
Relevant Policies
The National Mineral Policy
The National Forest Policy
The National Environmental Policy
The National Industrial Policy
Draft National Rehabilitation & Resettlement Policy
Relevant Institutions
Department Of Mines And Geology, Government Of
Karnataka
Indian Bureau Of Mines, Department Of Mines,
Government Of India
Ministry Of Environment And Forest, Government Of India
Department Of Ecology And Environment, Government Of
Karnataka
Karnataka State Pollution Control Board
RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE MINING AUTHORITIES IN
CONTEXT WITH MINING OPERATIONS
Approvals
Responsibilities
WATER AND AIR (PREVENTION & CONTROL OF
POLLUTION) ACTS

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ITEM
4.1
5
6
6.1
6.2
7
7.1
8
8.1
8.2
9

CHAPTER
Consent Procedure
WATER (PREVENTION & CONTROL OF POLLUTION) CESS
ACT
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT NOTIFICATION
Requirements And Procedure For Seeking Site Clearance
For Prospecting And Exploration Projects
Requirements And Procedure For Seeking Environmental
Clearance Of Projects
ENVIRONMENTAL STATEMENT PROCEDURES
Contents Of Environmental Statement
ENVIRONMENTAL AUDITING
Features Of A Good Environmental Audit
Audit Procedure
ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE VERIFICATION EXERCISE
Appendix I
Appendix II
Appendix III
Appendix IV
Appendix V
Annexure Maintaining Log Books
Verification Guidelines

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This document also puts forth the linkages between the Environmental Impact Assessment document which is prepared at the initialisation of the project and the Environmental Statement to be provided by the project proponent. In the Mining Sector the following Acts. Acid mine drainage may affect water quality and aquatic life. Some of the environmental hazards include: The tailings from mining can produce an acidic leachate when exposed to moisture and air. However. the existing mechanism does not provide for rigorous analysis of Environmental Statement by the industries.e. rules.2 GIST OF ENVIRONMENTAL ACTS. 1961 1 . Dust levels are also very high especially during the blasting in open cast mines and while transporting the ores Though the mine owners. it was felt that an effective institutional arrangement for implementing the Environmental Audit is necessary. 1986. as per Rule 14 of the Environment Protection Rules. The Metalliferous Mines Regulations. the industry can be equally disastrous to the environment if proper care in not taken while mining. Presently. procedures for taking appropriate consents for establishing and operation of industries.1 BACKGROUND The mining industry in Karnataka is one of the major revenue generating sectors of the state. The actions within the mines are regulated by the mining legislations while those outside the mines are governed by environmental and other legislations. 1952 and The Mines Rules. 1. 1974 or Air Act.. Rules and Notifications are applicable: Mining Legislations: i. The Mines Act. Thus. 1955 ii. the precautionary measures to the taken. i. it has been noticed that most to times they have to grope through various acts. Also the document defines the responsibilities of the project proponent (internal auditor) and external and regulators. This document is a reference guide which provides for guidelines to mining operators. etc. Noise levels during the mining process are usually very high which are a threat to humans and animals. documents to understand the various details of environmental compliances. RULES AND NOTIFICATIONS Mining of various major and minor minerals is regulated by various legislations related to mining and environment. the method to be followed and records to be maintained by the project proponent. regulators and auditors to standard procedures for environmental clearances. Hence. 1989. it was felt necessary to bring out a booklet which gives all the relevant information for the mining sector. to submit every year an Environmental Statement to the concerned State Pollution Control Board. work place environment. are governed by the mining legislation.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries 1 INTRODUCTION 1. The environmental aspects of the mining areas. Also. regulators and auditors have been addressing the issues of environmental safeguards. 1981 or authorization under the Hazardous Waste Rules. the compliance standards set for the mining sector ensuring the consent conditions for discharges of effluent are met. a phenomenon known as acid mine drainage. best practices for cleaner production. it is mandatory for persons carrying out an industry or operation or process which require consent under Water Act.

Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries iii. 2000 The Municipal Solid Waste (Management & Handling Rules). 4. 1977 and Rules 3. 1960. The Mines and Minerals (Development and Regulation) (MMRD) Act. Environmental Legislations: 1. iv. 1988. ♦ ♦ ♦ The Air (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act. v. The Mineral Conservation and Development Rules (MCDR). The Water (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Cess Act. The Water (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act. 1957. 1986 The Environment Impact Assessment Notification 1994 & 1997 The Noise Pollution (Regulation and Control) Rules. 2000 2 . 1974 and Rules 2. 1981 and Rules Relevant provisions under Environmental Protection Act and Rules. The Mineral Concession Rules (MCR).

rivers and wildlife and to have compassion for living creatures”. lakes. 52 subjects]. 2.1 FUNDAMENTAL RIGHTS AND DUTIES OF A CITIZEN 1. This Article was inserted by the Constitutional (42nd Amendment) Act. the Article 245 of the Constitution gives the extent of the laws made by the Parliament and the State Legislatures. The Article 48 –A concerns the Environmental responsibility of the State and was inserted by the Constitutional (42nd Amendment) Act. 1976. State Legislatures [List II or State List in 7th Schedule. Under this Part. The subjects related to environment in the 7th Schedule under the three lists are summarized below: LIST NO. Part III [Fundamental Rights] Article 21 states the fundamental right of protection of life and personal liberty of an individual. 2. The Parliament has the power to legislate for the whole country while the State legislatures are empowered to make laws for their respective states.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries 2 LEGAL AND REGULATORY FRAMEWORK To put the whole regulatory framework of India in perspective. It should be noted that though this Article does not explicitly mention the term ‘environment’. Under the Indian Constitution. 1976 2. it is a fundamental norm recognized by the court that every person enjoys the right to a wholesome environment. The Article states that “The State shall endeavour to protect and improve the environment and to safe guard the forests and wild life of the country”. IN LIST 52 53 54 55 56 SUBJECT Industries Regulation and development of oil fields and mineral oil resources Regulation of mines and mineral development Regulation and development of Inter-State rivers and river valleys Fishing and fisheries beyond territorial waters 3 .2 STATE POLICY The State’s responsibility has been laid down in the Part IV – ‘Directive Principle of State Policy’ of the Constitution. “No person shall be deprived of his life or personal liberty except according to procedure established by law”.3 LEGISLATIVE AUTHORITY The Part XI of Constitution states the relationship between the Union and the States for sharing the legislative and administrative powers. I NAME Union List SUBJECT NO. 97 subjects]. 66 subjects] and both Parliament and State Legislatures [List III or Concurrent List in 7th Schedule. which is a facet of right to life under the above-mentioned Article. 2. a gist of constitutional provisions that relate to the environment is given below. Part IV – A [Fundamental Duties] Article 51 – A (g) states that “It shall be the duty of every citizen of India to protect and improve the natural environment including forests. The Article 246 of the Part XI of Constitution divides the areas of legislation (subject wise) between the Union [List 1 or Union List in 7th Schedule.

Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries

LIST
NO.
II

NAME
State
List

SUBJECT
NO. IN LIST
6
14
18
21
23
24

III

Concurrent
List

17 A
17 B
20
20 A

SUBJECT
Public health and sanitation
Agriculture, protection against
pest and prevention of plant
diseases
Land, colonization, etc.
Fisheries
Regulation of mines and mineral
development subject to the
provision of List –I
Industries subject to the
provision of List – I
Forests
Protection of wild animals and
birds
Economic and social planning
Population control and family
planning

♦ The Parliament has powers to legislate on subjects not covered by the three Lists
[Article 248].
♦ The Parliament is also empowered to legislate in the ‘national interest’ on matters
enumerated in the State List [Article 249].
♦ In event of a conflict between the Central law and State law on a concurrent subject the
former prevails [Article 254 (1)].
♦ In case of a State law passed subsequent to the Central law, the State law shall prevail in
that State only if it has received Presidential Assent under Article 254 (2) of Part XI of
Constitution.
From an environmental standpoint, the allocation of legislative authority is an
important one as some environmental problems such as sanitation and waste disposal are
best tackled at local level, while others like water pollution and wildlife protection are better
regulated by uniform national laws.
2.4 RELEVANT LEGISLATIONS
As stated earlier, the working environment within the mines are regulated by the mining
legislations while the environment (air & water emissions, noise, waste) outside the mines
are governed by environmental legislations.
2.4.1 The Mines Act, 1952
As per the Act the owner, agents and managers should provide
wholesome drinking water and latrines and urinals in clean sanitary
conditions for all the workers
2.4.2 The Mines Rule, 1955
Rule 30 specifies the quantity of drinking water while Rule 31 outlines the storage of
drinking water. Rule 33 and 37 making provisions for latrines on surface and underground,
respectively and Rule 38 provides for maintaining sanitation in the mines. Rule 39 defines

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Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries

the obligations of work persons in not misusing or damages latrines provided and polluting
the underground workings of mine with excreta.
2.4.3 The Mines and Minerals (Development and Regulation) Act, 1957
The Act regulates the development of minerals in the country and was amended in 1986,
1994 and 1999 to incorporate the provisions of environmental protection and management in
the mines and to bring about the concept scientific mining.
Section 4 A(1) and 4 A(2) provide for termination of PL/ML by the Central
Government and under sub-para 2 of para 4A by the State Governments, if in their opinion it
is expedient in the interest of preservation of natural environment, prevention of pollution,
conservation of mineral resources, safety in mines, and other reasons given in the Act.
Sub-section 2 of Section 13 lists the matters that are covered by rules framed by the
Central Government. These matters include the manner in which rehabilitation of flora and
other vegetation shall be made in the same area or in any other area selected by the Central
Government. Section 15(1)A(i) includes the manner in which the rehabilitation of flora and
other vegetation shall be made in the same area or in any other area selected by the State
Government.
Section 18(1) delegates the powers to the Central Government to frame rules for
major minerals for conservation and systematic development of minerals and for the
protection of environment by preventing or controlling any pollution which may be caused
by prospecting and mining operations. Section 18(2) states that the rules may provide for all
or any of the matters including the disposal or discharge of waste slime or tailing arising
from any mining or metallurgical operation carried out in a mine, and the manner in which
and the authority by which directions may be issued to the owners of any mine to do or
refrain from doing certain things in the interest of conservation or systematic development of
minerals or for the protection of environment by preventing or controlling pollution which
may be caused by prospecting or mining operations.
2.4.4 Mineral Concessions Rules, 1960 and Mineral Conservation and Development
Rules 1988.
These Rules and guidelines have been framed under MMDR Acts 1957 and provides
guidelines with regard to pollution control and environment protection for mining of major
minerals. The GCDR 1999 lays down the guidelines with respect to pollution control for
quarrying of granites on systematic and scientific way as well as environment protection. In
the rules the standards and permissible limits of discharge and emissions are not indicated
and state that the concerned regulatory authority will stipulate the necessary standards.
2.4.5 Environment Protection Act 1986.
The Environment protection Act 1986 section 3 provides for fixing
standards for emission or discharge of environmental pollutants. The standards
of emissions or discharge of environmental pollutants from the industries,
operations or processes shall be as specified in (schedules 1 to IV). Since the
KSPCB is not insisting on any of the provisions while issuing the consent only
the EIA needs to be done to get the licenses.
2.4.6 The Water (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act, 1974 and Rules
As per this Act the occupier or the operator of a mining activity has to fulfil the
following obligations and duties to protect the environment and to prevent any
environmental damage or pollution.
Section 25 The Water (Prevention and Control of Pollution) dealing with Trade
effluent (Domestic sewage only) and it is expected that there is no generation of trade
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Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries

effluent in the mining activity due to digging, over burden or any other such processing.
However in case of slurry or pelletisation of mine ore there is a possibility of trade effluent
generation which is to be discharged as per the water Act applicable.
Act makes it mandatory the occupier to discharge any trade effluent to the land or
water body by treating it to the level of the standards prescribed by the Regulatory authority.
(the standards are given in the chapter xxx). Any violation of this section attracts legal
action under the section 41 to of the Water Act.
Section 28 The Water (Prevention and control of pollution) dealing with Trade effluent
treatment and discharge regulations.
2.4.7 The Water (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Cess Act, 1977 and Rules
The purpose of Water (Prevention & Control of Pollution) Cess Act is levy and collect cess
on water consumed by 16 categories of industries specified in the act and also by local
bodies with a view to augment the resources of the Central and State Pollution Control
Boards. Water cess is levied based on the water consumed for domestic and specified
industry.
2.4.8 The Air (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act, 1981 and Rules
The objective of this Act is to provide for the prevention, control and abatement of
air pollution, for the establishment, with a view to carrying out the afore said purposes, of
boards, for conferring on and assigning to such boards powers and functions relating thereto
and for matters connected therewith. Decisions were taken at the United Nations
Conference on the Human Environment held in Stockholm in June 1972, in which India
participated, to take appropriate steps for the preservation of the natural resources of the
earth which among other things, includes the preservation of the quality of air and control of
air pollution.
The Central and State Pollution Control Boards are entrusted to perform the
functions under the Act. As per the Act, Air Pollution is defined means the presence in the
atmosphere of any air pollutant. Air pollutant means any solid, liquid or gaseous substance
(including noise) present in the atmosphere in such concentration as may be or tend to be
injurious to human beings or other living creatures or plants or property or environment.
The primary responsibility of controlling air pollution is on the Board. The very first
measure to be adopted in this respect is the declaration of any area or areas within the State
as air pollution control area. In respect the Sate government has declared entire State as air
pollution control area. The air pollution from industrial plants is controlled through consent
mechanism by stipulating standards in respect of air pollutants. In case of non compliance,
the act has made provisions for issuing directions to any person, officer or authority, and
such person, officer or authority shall bound to comply with such directions. Power to issue
direction includes the power to direct:
♦ Closure, prohibition or regulation of any industry, operation or process or
♦ The stoppage or regulation of supply of electricity, water or any other service
In addition to this, Provisions exist to make application to courts for restring persons from
causing air pollution and punish the offender with imprisonment and fine.
2.4.9 The Environment Impact Assessment Notification 1994 & 1997
The Mining Industry requires environmental clearance from the Central Government.
The Central and/or the State Government, with the following objectives for environment
clearance of polluting or degrading development activities:

6

2. The noise levels in any area/zone shall not exceed the ambient air quality standards in respect of noise as specified in the Schedule. According to this Act all the mining projects existing or old sanctioned before the enactment of the Act are to be reviewed before renewing the lease. storage. However the forest areas having rich mineral wealth and do not have high bio-diversity are diverted for the mining lease. The old mining lease like Kuduremukh still having rich bio-diversity are still allowed to mine with strict environmental safeguards.4. segregation. 2003. The Forest Conservation Act prohibits diversion any forestland to the non-forestry activities including mining. 2003 The Biological Diversity Act. III and IV. 2. apply to every municipal authority responsible for collection. leachate quality and the compost quality including incineration standards as specified under Schedules II. standards for different area. sustainable use and equitable sharing of benefits of India’s biodiversity resources. residential or silence area/zones for the purpose of implementation of noise. State Biodiversity Boards and Biodiversity Management Committees at the level of Panchayats and Municipalities. ambient air.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries - Optimal utilization of finite natural resources through use of better technologies and management packages. Incorporating suitable remedial measures at the project formulation stage.13 The Biological Diversity Act. 2.4. The State Board or the Committee shall monitor the compliance of the standards regarding groundwater. The municipal authority shall comply with these rules as per the implementation schedule laid down in Schedule I. commercial. With this in view it provides for the establishment of a National Biodiversity Authority. transportation. processing and disposal of municipal solid wastes. 2000 These rules shall. However with the permission of the Government of India the diversion is permitted only if the area approved for the mining does not contain any bio-diversity and do not harm the ecosystem.11 The Municipal Solid Waste (Management & Handling Rules).10 The Noise Pollution (Regulation and Control) Rules. The authority shall be responsible for the enforcement of noise pollution control measures and the due compliance of the ambient air quality standards in respect of noise. 7 . The municipal authority or an operator of a facility shall make an application in Form I.4.12 Forest Conservation Act 1980.4. for grant of authorization for setting up waste processing and disposal facility including landfills from the State Board or the Committee in order to comply with the implementation programme laid down in Schedule I. aims to promote conservation. The ambient air quality standards in respect of noise for different areas/zones shall be such as specified in the Schedule annexed to these rules. 2. 2000 The State Government shall categorize the area into industrial.

The National Mineral Policy presently embodies these and directs the mineral mining industry accordingly.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries The overall objectives of the act are to devise strategies. 1948 3. plans and programmes for conservation. sustainable use and equitable sharing of benefits of India’s biodiversity resources (including preservation of habitats. nickel. National Forest Policy. 1991 7. privatization of public sector and globalization of the economy to achieve economic liberalization. 1952 4. etc. The National Mineral Policy. namely. 1997 It is evident that the Policies being pursued presently have been evolved with experience and with the considerations of various national and international developments and the country's requirements for development. namely. promotion of foreign investment/technology. Taluk and Gram Panchayats). lead. and local bodies (Municipalities and City Corporations. sulfur. zinc. manganese. The Export-Import Policy.1 The National Mineral Policy Minerals are non-renewable natural resources and are exploited at the place of their existence. copper. The National Policies directly related with the mining sector and some of the Environmental Policies of the mineral industry are outlined below in brief. National Forest Policy. folk varieties and cultivars. 1956 5. iron ore. and platinum. Keeping in view the requirement of the minerals for the growth of the nation in the wake of liberalization as a result of the Industrial Policy of 1991 a new look Industrial Policy was framed and adapted in 1993 incorporating the following major features making a radical departure from the earlier Mineral Policy: 8 . The Industrial Policy. 1988 6. 2. diamond. Therefore. The National Mineral Policy was first announced in 1990 through which 13 minerals of basic and strategic importance. The Policy Statement for Abatement of Pollution. conservation of land races. molybdenum. With the adaptation of the new Industrial Policy in 1991 radical changes were brought about in the fiscal regime with deregulation of the industry. Zilla. Industrial Policy Resolution. Industrial Policy. 1993 9. The Policies outline the guiding principles for the various developmental and industrial activities. tungsten. rapid industrial growth. national. state. gold. were reserved exclusively for state exploitation. liberalization of trade system. domesticated stocks and breeds of animals and micro-organisms) at a whole hierarchy of levels. the guidelines for the exploitation of the minerals and the fossil fuels take into account the overall development strategies of the country. In addition to the National Policies some of the mining companies have formulated their own policies. 2. 1992 8. 1894 2. For this purpose promotion at all levels of good documentation of biological diversity. its uses and associated knowledge is envisaged. Forest Policy.5 RELEVANT POLICIES The following list of the policies related to environment and mining have been formed since 1894: 1. reduction in compulsory licensing. chrome ore.5.

environment and ecology. There shall be adequate and effective legal and institutional framework and commitment to prevent sub-optimum and unscientific mining. undertake the development of any mineral or mineral deposit in public interest to ensure unhindered availability of the mineral as raw material for the realization of the national goal. environment and ecology through appropriate protective measures. 4. which can also be considered the directives for the development of mining and mineral industry in the country. disposition with reference to geological boundaries and other mining conditions shall be such as to favourably predispose the leased areas to systematic and complete extraction of the minerals.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries Thirteen minerals which were exclusively reserved for exploitation by the Public Sector were opened to the national and international private sector. It is necessary to take comprehensive view to facilitate the choice or order of land uses keeping in view the needs of the development as well as the needs of protecting forests. With the above salient features. 3. 2. Efforts will be made to promote small-scale mining in a scientific and efficient manner while safeguarding vital environmental and ecological imperatives. size. Prevention and mitigation of adverse environmental effects of mining and processing of the minerals and repairing and revegetation of the affected forest areas and land covered with trees in accordance with the prescribed norms and established forestry practices shall form integral part of mine development strategy in every instance. The Policy recognized the environmental concern and laid down that mining shall not be taken up in the identified ecological fragile areas and the areas having rich biodiversity. however. The National Mineral Policy also focuses on promotion of research and developmental activities on the minerals and establishing appropriate educational and training facilities for human resource development. Conditions of mining lease regarding tenure. 6. To ensure that the mining operations are carried out with due regard to safety and health of all concerned. Mining operations shall ordinarily not be taken up in identified ecologically fragile and biologically rich areas. Both aspects have to be properly co-ordinated to facilitate and ensure sustainable development of the mineral resources in harmony with the environment. The Policy intended to promote small scale mining and mining of the isolated deposits with due regard to safety. 1. The guiding principle in the strategy for the development of any mineral or mineral deposit at any location shall ordinarily be the economic cost. The Policy emphasized export of value added minerals and recycling of the metallic scrap and mineral wastes. 5. conservation and environmental management. This is in confirmation with the guidelines contained in the National Forest and Environment Policies. Foreign equity in the non-captive mines was allowed up to 50% and the enhanced equity holding was allowed to be considered on case to case basis. 1993 are as follows: To minimize adverse effects of mineral development/exploitation on forests. The State may. For achieving the above objectives the Policy outlines the following aspects as strategy. 7. some of the environmental objectives of the National Mineral Policy. Strip (opencast) mining in forest should as far as possible be 9 .

without a proper mining plan including the Environmental Management Plan (EMP) approved and enforced by statutory authorities. reservoirs. Checking the extension of sand dunes in the desert areas of Rajasthan and along coastal tracts. private or public. 9. Checking soil erosion and denudation in the catchment areas of rivers. 1988 was formulated and issued on 7th December 1988. degraded and unproductive land areas (including the mining areas).5. environmental protection. Research and development thrust shall be directed specially in the areas of rock mechanics. 3. The Policy also addresses the issue of old mines and directs that such sites should be converted into forest areas and for appropriate forms of land use. No mining lease would be granted to any party. The National Forest Policy. 2. concurrently. which represent the remarkable biological diversity and genetic resources of the country. if necessary. etc. 4. It is evident from the above that the National Mineral Policy 1993 adequately addresses the issue of environmental protection and management in the mining areas besides directing attention on the protection of the ecologically fragile and biologically rich areas. 11. Efforts would be made to convert old used mining sites into forests and other appropriate forms of land use. equipment deployment and maintenance. In addition the Policy directs that mine closure should be an integral part of mine plan. 1. safety of human operations and human engineering. restoration of ecological balance that had been adversely affected by serious depletion of the forests in the country. 1952. energy conservation. engineering.2 The National Forest Policy The concern for the conservation and management of the forest wealth in the country is almost 150 years old and the first effort on this account was made in the year 1855 with the issuance of the 'Charter of Indian Forestry' and then the first Forest Policy in 1894. it would be orderly and systematic and so planned as to help the workers and dependent community to rehabilitate themselves without undue hardship.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries avoided and it should be permitted only when accompanied with comprehensive time bound reclamation program. Conserving the natural heritage of the country by preserving the remaining natural forests having a vast variety of flora and fauna. lakes. The first Forest Policy of the independent country was formulated as the National Forest Policy. Whenever mine closure becomes necessary. and for the retardation of siltation of the reservoirs. The various guiding principles and objectives of the Policy are reflected in the various legislation being enforced in the mining complexes not only from the standpoint of mining but also from the concern of environmental management. As far as possible reclamation and afforestation will proceed. ground control. Increasing substantially the forest/tree cover in the country through massive afforestation and social forestry programs. This Policy laid stress on the following. 10. for mitigating floods and draughts. 2. especially on all denuded. mine design. Maintenance of environmental stability through preservation and. 8. 10 . with the mineral extraction. in the interest of soil and water conservation. 5.

Prevent pollution at source. 9. minor forest produce and small timber of the rural and tribal population. 1. Since a sizable portion of coal and minerals deposits in the country are in the forest land the directives of the Policy are applicable to mining also. Encourage. The Eighth Plan on the basis of the overview of the environmental and forest scenario identified the eight major tasks to meet the challenge of environmental degradation. 8. outlines earlier. Ensure that polluter pays for the pollution control arrangements. Meeting the requirements of fuel wood.3 The National Environmental Policy Although since long there was a concern for the environmental management in the country as evident from the various Policies and Legislation the lead was given in the Sixth Plan when a Chapter on 'Environment and Development' was included in the Plan document. Increasing the productivity of the forests to meet the essential national needs. administration and protection. 7. Although there is no direct mention of mining in the Policy. 3. It is noted from the outlines of the National Forest Policy 1988 that there is now a greater emphasis on the expansion. 5. 4. fodder. A Mining Plan shall accompany every mining project. educational programs and information campaigns for preventing. conservation and preservation of the forests and ecology. there is a need to maintain a balance between mining and the protection of the forests. The Ministry in 2000 issued guidelines for mining in sedimentary deposits.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries 6.5. The overall objective of the Policy was to integrate environmental considerations into decision making at all levels and to achieve this. MoEF in 1992 brought out a Policy Statement for Abatement of Pollution and the National Conservation Strategy and Policy Statement on Environment and Development which provides instruments in the form of legislation and regulation. Mining operations will not ordinarily be taken up in ecologically fragile areas. 1. Involve public in decision making. To complement the Constitutional sanctions. 11 . controlling and reducing environmental pollution. The Chapter laying emphasis on the problems of environmental degradation provided guidelines to the administrators for formulating and implementing the development programs incorporating environmental concerns and laying down the institutional arrangements for environmental management. Encouraging efficient utilization of forest produce and maximizing substitution of wood. the following specific steps were identified. develop and apply the best available practical solutions. fiscal incentives. The Mining Plan shall include an Environmental Management Plan. The Forest Wing of MoEF debated the issue of mining in forest areas through a High Level Committee and the first step in this connection suggested was the preparation of the forest maps overlain by the locations of the mineral land coal deposits. 6. 2. The salient features for environmental protection and management in mining projects were as given below. Increase the safety of industrial operations. 2. 2. Focus protection on heavily polluted areas and river stretches. voluntary agreements. Creating a massive people's movement with the involvement of women for achieving the above objectives and to minimize pressure on the existing forests. 3.

bridging of large gaps in supply and demand as well as controlling and monitoring of the natural resources. Compulsory prior environmental clearance of all projects above a certain size and for those proposed to be constructed in ecologically sensitive and fragile areas. The MoEF issued the Environmental Action Program in 1993 with the objective of integrating the environmental concerns into the process of development. 6. Taking steps for restoration of ecologically degraded areas and for environmental improvement in the rural and urban settlements. choice of technology and implementation of the developmental projects. and public participation. site selection. i. 7. The various issues addressed were reducing pollution at source.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries 4. and to promote application of the modern tools of science and technology for conservation. Conserving and protecting the coastal areas and marine eco-systems. heritage sites/structures and areas of cultural heritage/importance. Encouraging research and developmental activities. 1. 2. 4. Protecting the scenic landscapes. adaptation of environmentally compatible technologies. 12 . Ensuring sustainable and equitable use of the resources for meeting the basic needs of the present and future generations without causing damage to the environment. Environmental impact assessment of all the developmental projects right from the planning stage and integrating it with their cost-benefit considerations. 1992 formulated with a view to reinforcing traditional ethos and to building up a conservation society living in harmony with nature and making efficient use of the resources guided by the best available scientific and technical knowledge aimed at the following. areas of geomorphological significance. Aiming at the modernization of the process of demand unleashed by the development process itself by taking measures to recycle waste materials and natural resources.e. unique and representative bio-mass and eco-systems and wild life habitats. Preventing and controlling the future deterioration of the life support systems. 3. mining and mineral processing. 5.. conserving energy and the use of the natural resources in the industrial products by measures like wood substitution and generally trying to reach moderation in life style consistent with the sustainable development and the human dignity. Creating environmental consciousness through education and mass awareness programs. 5. industries. Ensuring that the developmental projects are correctly cited with least adverse environmental consequences. 2. 3. Encouraging public participation in environmental improvement programs and integrating the environmental concerns in planning and implementation of the developmental programs. environmental audit. fiscal measures. 4. For achieving the above the following actions were envisaged in the Policy. assistance for adaptation of the best available and practicable technologies. The National Conservation Strategy and Policy Statement on Environment and Development. 1. 6. The Mining Plan shall also include a time bound reclamation program for controlling the environmental damages and for restoration of mined out areas. planning. forestry and human settlements. mass based standards. Incorporation of environmental safeguards and protection measures in policies. environmental statistics.

Reforms in the Monopoly and Restrictive Trade Practices Act. including coal. Thus. occupation. Reduction of the areas reserved exclusively for the public sector. 1. 1991 was formulated to provide an impetus to the pace of industrialization in the country. Disinvestment of selected public sector enterprises. share croppers.5 Draft National Rehabilitation & Resettlement Policy The Government of India is in the process of developing a rehabilitation and resettlement policy and for this a draft has been prepared. maintain sustained growth in productivity and gainful employment and attain international competitiveness. which is much wider than the loss of land. 9. 3. Efficiently implementing the various environmental laws and regulations for environmental protection through creation or strengthening of requisite enforcement machinery. Extension of the scope of modified value added tax (MODVAT).5. 13 . The pursuit of these objectives will be tempered by the need to preserve the environment and ensure the efficient use of available resources. 2. Developing appropriate organizational structure and a pool of professional manpower to serve as the cadre for environmental management services. Since mining of minerals and fossil fuels is an important industrial activity essential for the development of the society and invariably mining is considered to be an environmentally unfriendly activity the directives of the Policy are to be taken into consideration not only in planning the mining and associated activities but also during and after the completion of the mining activities.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries 8. 5. 7. 9. due to acquisition of land. the extent of displacement covers an entire system. 6. It is evident that the Policy directives mean effective protection and management of environment in all the developmental and industrial activities while keeping the goal of sustainable development in view. and those carrying on any trade.5. Liberalization of trade and exchange rate policies. 2. landless labourers. 8. It is expected that there will be large-scale requirement for land for setting up developmental projects in these regions. Majority of our mineral resources. not only those who hold land in their possession and have dwelling houses are displaced. correct the distortions or weaknesses that my have crept in. 4. and iron ore reserves are located in remote and backward regions. calling or working for any gain within such area. This resulted in abolition of all industrial licensing for all the industries except some specified industrial sectors. The Policy addresses the environmental concerns along with objectives of sustainable development and states: “The major objectives of the new industrial policy package will be to build on the gains already made. 2. Simplification of procedures. mostly inhabited by tribal. When a project is set-up in any area. rules and regulations. Substantial reduction in the scope of industrial licensing. reflected through the process of acquisition. Enhancing limits of foreign equity participation in domestic industrial undertakings. but the displacement extends equally to the co-dependents including tenants.” The New Industrial Policy lays stress on the following for the sustained development and growth of the industry in the country. Rationalization and reduction of customs and excise duties.4 The National Industrial Policy The New Industrial Policy.

educational. Therefore. justice and equality before the law in the matter of distribution of benefits and burdens. social disorientation. loss in dignity and often getting cheated of the compensation amount which serve to make the experience a trauma. mining 14 . 2. occupational and cultural aspects. including the Department of Mines and Geology. Government of Karnataka The primary activities of Department of Mines and Geology (DMG) in Mineral Exploration and Administration are: (a) Survey & investigation and exploratory mining. It is thus imperative that a comprehensive national policy. The administrative and regulatory functions include inspection of mining and quarrying operations. Department of Mines. of India.6. communication and social infrastructure. The application for site clearances for prospecting and exploration of major minerals in areas above 500 hectares from the Central Government in the Ministry of Environment and Forests should be routed through Department of Mines and Geology for consideration. environmental. It should also include social. This has given rise to protest movements marked by a growing militancy. Department of Mines.2 Indian Bureau of Mines. Government of India The primary activities of IBM are (a) approval of mine plan with Environment Management Program (EMP) and review of mine scheme (b) inspection of mines towards protection of environment and control of pollution while undertaking prospecting. (e) Laboratory investigation of minerals and (f) Publication of Mineral investigation. Resettlement must provide for an improved resource base so that those displaced in their new place can have access to not only shelter but also food and income generating systems. The rehabilitation should be synchronized with the project implementation. of Karnataka. The policy of rehabilitation should be governed by the principle of "Total Rehabilitation". pauperization. not inferior to that of their original habitat within a reasonable period of time. The total project cost must include the cost of rehabilitation. to ensure equitable development of all the communities it is necessary to have an uniform rehabilitation and resettlement policy for the entire nation. The Department of Forests.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries The developmental projects raise questions of equity. and Karnataka State Pollution Control Board 2. Ecology and Environment. of India. Rehabilitation should not only extend to financial compensation or providing means of livelihood but it should be multidimensional. control of illegal movement of minerals and levying of penalty. maps and library services. is evolved. (b) Administration of Major Minerals (Granting mining leases and administering mining activity). Today the project affected people (PAPs) are no longer in a mood to suffer displacement along with its concomitant attributes like occupational degeneration. economic. The governing Act and Rules are: Mines and Minerals (Development and Regulations) Act -1957 (MMDR-1957) and Mineral Concession Rules -1960 (MCR1960) & Karnataka Minor Mineral Concession Rules -1994 (KMMCR-1994). Ministry of Environment and Forest. displaced as a consequence of acquisition of land. (c) Administration of Minor Minerals (Sanction of quarry leases for building materials and other minerals).6 RELEVANT INSTITUTIONS Five departments are directly involved in the protection of environment due to mining and quarrying activity in the state. on rehabilitation of persons. Govt. fairness. Indian Bureau of Mines. 2. say not more than 3 years. physical. of Karnataka. Govt.6. Govt. Govt.1 Department of Mines and Geology. (d) collection of royalty and dead rents for both major and minor minerals.

vi. i. 1988. precaution against ground vibration. The fines rejects or tailings from mine beneficiations or metallurgical plants shall be deposited in a specially prepared tailings disposal area such that they are not allowed to flow away and cause land degradation or damage to agricultural field pollution of surface water bodies and ground water or cause floods. Wherever the top soil cannot be utilized concurrently it shall be stored separately for future use. 1. The top soil so removed shall be utilized for restoration or rehabilitation of the land which no longer required for prospecting or mining operations or for stabilizing or landscaping the external dumps. Slimes and fines produced during sizing sorting and benefactions or metallurgical operations shall be stored in separate dumps. Mineral Conservation and Development Rules 1988 (MCDR-1988). Every holder of a prospecting license or a mining lease shall take steps so that the overburden waste rock rejects and fines generated during prospecting and mining operations or tailings. Inspection of the mines towards the protection of the environment and control of pollution while undertaking prospecting. Every holder of a prospecting license or a mining lease shall take all possible precautions for the protection of the environment and control of pollution while conducting prospecting. mining beneficiation or metallurgical operations in the area. rock. The site for dumps tailings or slimes shall be selected as far as possible on impervious ground to ensure minimum leaching effects due to precipitations. 2. reclamation and rehabilitation of land. control of ground subsidence. abatement measures against air and water pollution control measures. The environment management program has the following guidelines for removal and utilization of top soil. The Indian Bureau of Mines (IBM) is responsible for enforcement of provisions with respect to environment protection as per MCDR. The IBM is provides approvals for the mine plan with Environment Management Program (EMP) and reviews the mine scheme. 32 Removal and utilization of top soil. the waste dumps shall be suitably terraced and stabilised through vegetation or otherwise. etc. The dumps shall be properly secured to prevent escape of material there from in harmful quantities which may cause degradation of environment and to prevent causation floods. mining and related operations in the area is also done by IBM. etc. 15 . relevant provisions of the Mineral Concession Rules 1960 (MCR-1960) and Environmental Protection Act 1986. restoration of flora. 31 Protection of environment. Wherever possible the waste rock overburden etc shall be backfilled into the mine excavations with a view to restoring the land to its original use as far as possible. storage of over burden waste rock. iv. waste. iii. v. 3. ii.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries and related operations in the area. The governing Acts and rules are: Mines and Minerals (Development and Regulation) Act 1957. Wherever backfilling of waste rock in the area excavated during mining operations is not feasible. Every holder of a prospecting license or a mining lease shall wherever top soil exists and is to be excavated for the prospecting or mining operations remove it separately. (c) enforcement of guidelines provided in the mine plan and EMP and (d) provide consultancy services towards systematic and scientific development of mines including protection of environment. 33 Storage of overburden.

Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries 34 Reclamation and rehabilitation of lands. ground water aquifer and useable lands to a minimum. 36 Control of surface subsidence. 40 Permissible limits and standards.3 Ministry of Environment and Forest. 35 Precaution against ground vibrations. 39 Precaution against noise. Every holder of prospecting licence or a mining lease shall carry out prospecting or mining operations as the case may be in such a manner so as to cause least damage to the flora of the area held under prospecting licence or mining lease and the nearby areas.6. Air pollution due to fines dust smoke or gaseous emissions during prospecting mining beneficiations or metallurgical operations and related activities shall be controlled and kept within permissible limits specified under various environmental laws of the country including the Air (Prevention and Control of Pollution Act) 1981 (14 of 1981) and the Environmental (Protection) Act. Every holder of prospecting license or mining lease shall undertake the phased restoration reclamation and rehabilitation of lands affected by prospecting or mining operations and shall complete this work before the conclusion of such operations and abandonment of prospect or mine. These effluents shall be suitably treated if required to conform to the standards laid down in this regard. 2. 38 Discharge of toxic liquid. in the administrative structure for environmental protection and forest conservation. Stoping in underground mines shall be so carried out as to keep surface subsidence under control. 37 Precaution against air pollution. 1986 (29 of 1986) by the holder of prospecting license or a mining lease. Every holder of prospecting license or a mining lease shall take all possible precaution to prevent or reduce the discharge of toxic and objectionable liquid effluents from mine workshops beneficiations or metallurgical plants tailings ponds into surface water bodies. The standards and permissible limits of all pollutants toxins and noise referred in rules 37. Government of India Ministry of Environment and Forest (MoEF) is the nodal agency at national level. MoEF is assisted by the Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB). b) Look after them during the subsistence of the licence /lease after which these shall be handed over to the state Forest department or any other authority as may be nominated by the Controller General or the authorized officer and c) restore to the extent possible other flora destroyed by prospecting or mining operations. 1. Implementation of 16 . 38 and 9 shall be those notified by the concerned authorities under the provisions of the relevant statutes from time to time. 2. 41 Restoration of flora. Every holder of prospecting licence or a mining lease shall a) take immediate measures for planting in the same area or any other area selected by the controller General or the authorized officer not less than twice the number of trees destroyed by reason of any prospecting or mining operations. Noise arising out of prospecting mining beneficiations or metallurgical operations shall be abated or controlled by the holder of prospecting licence or a mining lease at the source so as to keep it within the permissible limit. Whenever any damage to public buildings or monuments is apprehended due to their proximity to the mining lease so as to keep the ground vibrations caused by blasting operations within safe limit. a statutory authority at the central level in executing responsibilities of prevention and control of pollution.

Government of Karnataka. Forest Conservation Act1980 and rules there under. 17 .6. 1980. Amended 1997. as there is no generation of any trade effluent from any mining activity.6.5 ha.6. State Government clearance shall be obtained. 2.6. However the following Acts that are still valid and applicable are discussed here as they are relevant to the sector. The governing Acts and Rules are: Environment Protection Act-1986. from the Ministry of Environment & Forests. The MoEF gives Environmental Clearances for mining activities. prior consent from the KSPCB should be taken and in such cases consent conditions for the disposal of trade effluents will be specified by the Board. The Standards of Service of Karnataka State Pollution Control Board are given in Annexure I. Water and Environment Protection and Forest Conservation Acts. the Air (Prevention & Control of Pollution) Act. The applications seeking environmental clearances as per the EIA notifications are routed through DEE. 1974. If it is below 5 Hectares. 1989 & amendments rules 2000. in case where purification and beneficiation of the ore is to be taken up at the mining area.1 General ♦ Shall obtain prior approval of the mining plan from the Indian Bureau of Mines. if the mining area exceed more than 5 Hectares. 1981 and rules there under. The department also houses the State Environmental Clearance Committee (SECC) which gives clearances to mining projects (major minerals) with lease area less than 5 ha and mining projects (minor minerals) above 0.1.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries relevant Acts and Rules and policy issues at the State level is overseen by the State Pollution Control Boards (SPCB) and the State Department of Environment and Forest (DOEF). water pollution control and hazardous waste management in mines under the Water (Prevention & Control of Pollution) Act. Under The Air (Prevention and Pollution Control) Act. at present no compliance provision are indicated in the consent letter. 1994 & 1997 and Hazardous Waste (Management & Handling) Rules. Government of Karnataka Department of Ecology and Environment (DEE) is the state nodal regulating agency responsible for environmental management of the state and can exercise promotional and regulatory functions in mining sector under the Air. 2. prior permission and Land Conversion from the Revenue Department shall be obtained prior to the Notification ♦ Shall obtain the Environmental Clearance Certificate as per Environmental Impact Assessment Notification 1994. KSPCB is responsible for conducting public hearing under Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) notification for any developmental or new projects. ♦ Shall obtain the forest clearance if the mining activity coming under the forest area under the Forest Conservation Act.1 Condition prescribed in the Consent to Establish and Operate by the KSPCB 2. At present the Karnataka State Pollution Control Board is issuing consent to the mining industries with only the stipulations for treating domestic wastewaters.4 Department of Ecology and Environment. the Environment Impact Assessment Notification. However.5. including the mining sector. 2. ♦ Shall obtain the valid mining lease from Department of Mines & Geology.5 Karnataka State Pollution Control Board KSPCB has regulatory and enforcement responsibilities with respect to air.5. If the mining area is coming under Revenue Land.

cover the crusher and rotary screen completely with semi-circular sheets and to adopt continuously water sprinkling measures to suppress the dust.6. 2.3 Afforestation Measures ♦ Shall take up tree plantation continuously year after year during rainy seasons either under compensatory afforestation scheme or on their own to preserve the environment and natures status quo in the mining area ♦ Shall take up intensive afforestation measures after stabilization of the dumps to prevent soil erosion. ♦ Shall obtain the prior approval from the competent authorities for carrying out blasting activity in the mining area. The dumps shall be properly stabilized for taking afforestation measures.6. This will prevent the rush of storm water carrying the loose soil down below either to the reservoir or to the fields.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries ♦ Shall obtain the prior approval from the Board for establishment of ore crushers and shall take adequate measures viz. ♦ Shall dump the overburden/tailings in the designated area as in the approved mining plan.1.4 Stormwater Management and Erosion Prevention ♦ The mining authorities shall protect the seasonal nallas is flowing in the mine lease areas by providing adequate number of check dams and gulley plugs. Gully plugs. ♦ Shall adopt continuous water sprinkling system to suppress the dust particles in the mining area and also while transporting the Iron Ore through trucks. ♦ The lessees shall have no right to up-root the trees and plants except with expressed permission from the competent authorities. 1974.1.5. ♦ Shall construct trenches to prevent the speedy rush of water as well as the disturbance on the settled earth wherever it is-necessary shall-be provided. ♦ Shall carryout reclamation of the mines area and shall take intensive afforestation measures 2. 2. Government of Karnataka the Karnataka State Pollution Control Board and the Department of Mines and Geology ♦ Shall protect the environment and natural growth in the area proposed for lease. ♦ Shall carryout soil and water conservation measures as suggested by the Department of Ecology & Environment. ♦ Shall construct sufficient check dams.5.1..5. There shall not be any disturbances in the follow of seasonal nalla in valleys 18 .2 Protection of soil and its conservation measures ♦ Bunds of sufficient height and length shall be constructed to stop the storm water flowing through the sloppy hills from the mining areas. ♦ Shall carryout the mining activity in accordance with the mining plan approved by the Indian Bureau of Mines. retaining wall and contour trenches to control soil erosion from the top of the hills to the valley wherever it is necessary shall be provided. ♦ Shall carryout the transportation of Iron ore is strictly as per Transit Rules. ♦ Shall obtain the prior consent of the Board if intends to carryout purification and beneficiation of the ore in the mining area and the disposal of effluent is in accordance with the standards imposed under the provisions of the Water (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act.6.

19 . Also. ♦ The mining authorities shall not dump the overburden near the seasonal nalla or valleys. The dump shall be periodically stabilised to take up plantation. Continuous water sprinkling system shall be adopted to suppress dust nuisance.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries ♦ The mining company should carryout soil and water conservation measures as suggested by the Ministry of Environment and Forests. ♦ The mining authorities shall dump the over burden in designated area as per the approval from IBM. the Karnataka State Pollution Control Board and the Department of Mines and Geology. ♦ The mining authorities shall ensure that the top soil from the mining operation shall carefully be removed with causing soil erosion and siltation in the area/valleys. water harvesting and groundwater recharge facilities shall be provided in the mining area as enumerated in the industry letter dated 19th June 2003 and all other control measures shall be implemented. Adequate numbers of retaining wall shall be provided to arrest run-off. Government of India.

Should obtain the prior approval from the State Pollution Control Board if it intends to carryout purification and beneficiation of the ore in the mining area and the disposal of effluent in accordance with the standards imposed under the Water (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act. However. no prior site clearance is required for projects involving prospecting and exploration of major minerals in areas above 500 hectares provided it is for test drilling on a scale not exceeding 5 boreholes / 100 Km2. hazardous and solid waste generated. Environmental Clearance should be obtained for mining projects (major minerals) with lease area less than 5 hectares and mining projects (minor minerals) with lease area above 0. 5. 1994 and its amendments from the Ministry of Environment and Forests. However.1 APPROVALS Approval for setting up Mining Industries include: 1. air emissions. Government of Karnataka 3. Should obtain the forest clearance if the mining activity coming under the forest area under the Forest Conservation Act. The application seeking site clearance should be routed through Department of Mines and Geology for consideration. raw material used and products manufactured. mining projects (major minerals) where the lease area is less that 25 hectares are exempt from public hearing. 6. Should obtain prior approval from the competent authorities for carrying out blasting activity in the mining area.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries 3 RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE MINING AUTHORITIES IN CONTEXT WITH MINING OPERATIONS 3. 1974 8. Should obtain the valid mining lease from Department of Mines & Geology. If the mining area is coming under revenue land. 1980. 3. Ecology and Environment for consideration after mandatory public hearing.2 RESPONSIBILITIES Should comply with the consent conditions laid down by State Pollution Control Board Should maintain relevant log books for daily water consumption. The application seeking environmental clearance (Schedule II of EIA Notification) should be routed through Department of Forest. Should obtain the prior approval from the State Pollution Control Board for establishment of ore crushers and shall take adequate preventive measures 7. waste water generated. if mining area exceeds 5 hectares. prior permission and land conversion from the Revenue Department should be obtained prior to the notification 4. Should obtain the Environmental Clearance Certificate as per Environmental Impact Assessment Notification. GoI. etc. Public hearing is not required for obtaining site clearance. 20 . Should obtain Site Clearance for prospecting and exploration of major minerals in areas above 500 hectares from the Central Government in the Ministry of Environment and Forests while initiating any investigation and surveys. Should obtain prior approval of the mining plan from the Indian Bureau of Mines 2. energy use and consumption.5 hectares from the State Environmental Clearance Committee (SECC).

soil conservation measures. air pollution control devices and noise pollution abatement measures. water sprinkling units.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries Should submit yearly “Environmental Statement” to the concerned State Pollution Control Board Should submit yearly “Water Cess Returns” to the concerned State Pollution Control Board Should provide for all the conditions laid down by the Indian Bureau of Mines like maintaining green cover. etc. Should provide for waste water treatment facility. Should provide for safe drinking water and proper sanitation amenities for the workers and also take into considerations the health and safety of the workers 21 .

water and wastewater treatment systems. ♦ The industries under large scale and medium scale RED category are required to obtain consent every year.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries 4 WATER AND AIR (PREVENTION & CONTROL OF POLLUTION) ACTS The Water (Prevention & Control of Pollution) Act is an act to provide for prevention of control of water pollution and maintaining or restoring of wholesomeness of water while. control and abatement of air pollution. and large scale) the consent fees varies. frequency of consent application and the periodicity of monitoring based on the classification of industries 22 . See Annexure II for Consent fee. to be filled by the applicant along with the consent fee and relevant documents. ♦ Medium scale ORANGE and GREEN category industries are required to obtain consent every year with an option for once in two years by paying two years fee.1 CONSENT PROCEDURE All new establishments like industries. respectively. 4. the Air (Prevention & Control of Pollution) Act provides for the prevention. and green) and capital investment (small scale. All the consent applications received will be subject to technical evaluation and conditions imposed to protect the environment. Application Form I and Form XIII under the Air and Water Act. Under these two acts any new industry prior to commissioning should obtain consent of the concerned State Pollution Control Board to establish and to operate. Depending upon the industries varying in pollution potential (red. Tiny industries have to renew consent once in ten years by paying one year consent fee. medium scale. sewage treatment systems are required to obtain “Consent for Establishment” and subsequently obtain “Consent for Operation” under the Air and Water Acts. ♦ Small scale RED ORANGE and GREEN category have to obtain consent every year with an option of once in three years by paying three year fee. orange. Pass Book system has been introduced for renewal of consents.

The industry consuming water shall furnish the cess returns in the prescribed form on or before 5th of every month to the Member Secretary of the State Pollution Control Board. Water cess is levied based on the water consumed for domestic and specified industry.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries 5 WATER (PREVENTION & CONTROL OF POLLUTION) CESS ACT The purpose of Water (Prevention & Control of Pollution) Cess Act is levy and collect cess on water consumed by 16 categories of industries specified in the schedule I of the act and also by local bodies with a view to augment the resources of the Central and State Pollution Control Boards. As per section 4 of the act the concerned industries are required to install standard water meters at such places as may be required by the concerned authority for measuring and recording the quantity of water consumed by the industry. 23 . which should be paid by demand draft by the user. it is entitled to a rebate of 25%. Cess is calculated on rate specified in Schedule II of the Act for different water users. The returns filed are assessed by the authority after due verification and amount payable is intimated to the user. If the industry complies with the regulation by providing effluent treatment plant which meets the standards prescribed in terms of quantity and quality.

6. supplemented by data collected during visits to sites or factories if undertaken. Ministry of Environment and Forests. However. an Environment Management Plan and details of public hearing. 1986 (29 of 1986) read with clause (d) of sub-rule (3) of rule 5 of the Environment (Protection) Rules.2 REQUIREMENTS AND PROCEDURE FOR SEEKING ENVIRONMENTAL CLEARANCE OF PROJECTS Submit an application (proforma specified in Schedule-II) to the Secretary. and details of public hearing. The Impact Assessment Agency shall prepare a set of recommendations based on technical assessment of documents and data. factory premises at any time prior to. Public hearing is not required for obtaining site clearance. Public hearing guidelines are specified in Schedule-IV of the EIA Notification. 1986. GoK for prospecting and exploration of major minerals in areas above 500 hectares while initiating any investigation and surveys. All Mining projects *(major minerals)* with leases more than 5 hectares require environmental clearance from the central government 6. the IAA shall consult a committee of Experts.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries 6 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT NOTIFICATION Under the Environmental Impact Assessment Notification of 27/1/1994 and subsequent amendments made on 04/05/1994. Any expansion or modernization of any activity (if pollution load is to exceed the existing one). New Delhi through the Department of Mines and Geology. as the case may be. during or after the commencement of the operations relating to the project. furnished by the project authorities. having a composition as specified in Schedule-III of this Notification. no prior site clearance is required for projects involving prospecting and exploration of major minerals in areas above 500 hectares provided it is for test drilling on a scale not exceeding 5 boreholes /100 Km2.1 REQUIREMENTS AND PROCEDURE FOR SEEKING SITE CLEARANCE FOR PROSPECTING AND EXPLORATION PROJECTS Submit an application (proforma specified in Schedule-II) to the Secretary. The Central Government in the Ministry of Environment and Forests will convey a decision regarding suitability or otherwise of the proposed site within a maximum period of thirty days. 10/04/1997. Ministry of Environment and Forests. The reports submitted with the application shall be evaluated and assessed by the Impact Assessment Agency (IAA). GoK. The said Committee of Experts shall have full right of entry and inspection of the site or. 01/08/2001 and 21/11/2001. Public Hearing is not required in respect of mining projects (major minerals) with lease area up to 25 hectares. 13/12/2000. The assessment shall be completed within a period of ninety days from receipt of the requisite documents and data from the project 24 . or new project listed in Schedule I to this notification. New Delhi through the Department of Ecology and Environment. 27/1/2000. The project authorities will intimate the location of the project site to the Central Government in the Ministry of Environment and Forests while initiating any investigation and surveys. should be accorded environmental clearance by the Central Government in accordance with the procedure specified in this notification. The said site clearance shall be granted for a sanctioned capacity and shall be valid for a period of five years for commencing the construction. powers are conferred on the Central Government by sub-section (1) and clause (v) of sub-section (2) of section 3 of the Environment (Protection) Act. operation or mining. If deemed necessary. The application should be accompanied by a project report which should include an Environmental Impact Assessment Report.

Approval. the Impact Assessment Agency shall make compliance reports publicly available. false data. 25 . the project authorities concerned shall submit a half yearly report to the Impact Assessment Agency. the project would be deemed to have been approved as proposed by project authorities. 416 (E) dated 20th June. false recommendations or decisions.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries authorities and completion of public hearing and decision conveyed within thirty days thereafter. Misleading and wrong information will cover the following: ·false information. For Mining projects (major minerals) with leases more than 5 hectares. concealing of factual data. decisions or recommendations would lead to the project being rejected.O. Concealing factual data or submission of false.102 (E) dated 1st February. preliminary or otherwise. engineered reports. If no comments from the Impact Assessment Agency are received within the time limit. No construction work. would also be revoked. No. misleading data/reports. No. The clearance granted shall be valid for a period of five years for commencement of the construction or operation of the project. In order to enable the Impact Assessment Agency to monitor effectively the implementation of the recommendations and conditions subject to which the environmental clearance has been given. Subject to the public interest. *S. nothing contained in this Notification shall apply to. 1992. 1991* and S. 1989. No.319 (E) dated 7th May.O.O. S.O. relating to the setting up of the project may be undertaken till the environmental and site clearance is obtained. 1991. if it is to be located or proposed to be located in the areas covered by the Notifications S. 114 (E) dated 20th February. if granted earlier on the basis of false data.

Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries Obtaining Environmental Clearance Investor Scoping by investor Submits Project questionnaire to concerned SPCB Submission of the project to the Min. of Env. of Env. &. Forests along with Stipulations 26 .&. of Env. &. of Env. & Forests in prescribed questionnaire Public hearing arranged No Can Issues be resolved? Is the project acceptable Recommended by EAC Yes Reject Environmental Clearance issued by Min. Yes Is there a public outcry against the project Investors advised to look for alternate site Prepare comprehensive EIA or any specific study suggested by the committee No Yes Yes Apply to Union Min. of Env. Forests No Can Issues be resolved Yes SPCB issues NOC Does the Project fall under scheduleI of EIA notification Apply to state DOEn for Environmental Clearance No Is the project site acceptable No EAC Members undertake site visits Reject Is site acceptable No Is the information provided adequate Apply also to CCF in case of forest land is involved. &.Forests Is the Environmental Management Plan satisfactory Yes Review by Environmental Appraisal Committee of the Min. Forests along with all documents listed at Part I of the handbook Review by SPCB Initial scrutiny by staff of Min.

A sample log book is provided in Annexure ………. Raw Material log book 3. the operational problems associated with the process and the areas requiring improvement. GSR 386 (E) dtd.04. 1989 and the Environment (Protection) Act. 1986. 22. pollutant emissions. if possible. 1986. i. Pollutant log book 5. one needs to examine the production processes. 1986 are required to submit the environmental statement for every financial year ending 31st March in the prescribed form [Form V] to the concerned State Pollution Control Boards on or before 30th day of September every year beginning 1993. Hazardous log book The day to day summary from the log book can be summarised on monthly basis. to identify the origins of wastes. 1974 and / or under section 21 of the Air (Prevention & Control of Pollution) Act. 27 . The industry’s environmental policy objectives and targets v. Environmental Statement is to be prepared by every industry by filling up one “Environmental Statement Form V (enclosed vide Annexure) supplied by Pollution Control Board.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries 7 ENVIRONMENTAL STATEMENT PROCEDURES Environmental Management in industries hitherto based on and off pipe waste treatment. log book need to be maintained by the mining authorities in their premises which would make the statement summarising easier. Government of India on 13th March.1993) under the Environment (Protection) Act. The log book list is provide below 1. understanding of material flows and focus on areas where waste reduction and consequently saving input costs. 7. raw materials consumption. As per the notification issued by the Ministry of Environment & Forest. In order to prevent or reduce waste generation. water consumption. Non-compliance with this mandatory requirement amounts to violation of the Environment (Protection) Act.1 CONTENTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL STATEMENT A statement prepared by the industry shall include the following. waste generation and other significant environmental aspects. Environmental Statement helps industry to take a comprehensive role at their industrial operations and facilities. all those carrying on an industry. Details of the programme to be followed and the environmental management system. 1981 and/ or authorization issued under the Hazardous Waste (Management & Handling) Rules. 1992 (amended vide notification no. Water log book 2. Energy log book 4. A description of the company’s activities at site considered ii. iv. A summary of the figures on energy consumption. An assessment of all the significant environmental issues relevant to there activities iii. For the preparation of Environmental Statement. operation or process requiring consent to operate under section 25 of the Water (Prevention & Control of Pollution) Act. is now based on the emerging philosophy of waste prevention and reduction.

This technique is basically a part of industry’s internal procedures to meet their responsibilities towards better environment. management and equipment are performing with the aim of helping to safe guard the environment by: ♦ Facilitating management control of environmental practices. ICC defines Environmental Audit is “It is a management tool comprising a systematic. 8. “Environmental Audit” is a technique being introduced for integrating the interest of the industry and the environment so that there could be mutually supportive. water usage and wastes and increases knowledge of the process. ♦ ‘Environmental Statement’ which is a part of the Environmental Audit. internal polices and accepted practices. 8. Environmental Audit in India is different from that in developed countries and the definition of International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) is accepted.2 AUDIT PROCEDURE 28 . documented. ♦ Highlights process and poor management ♦ Helps to set targets for waste reduction ♦ Permits the development of effective waste management strategies. products. ♦ Rises awareness in the workforce regarding the benefits of waste reduction ♦ Helps to improve process efficiency ♦ Enables legislative compliance & avoids litigation. which would include meeting. tests and confirmation of local procedures and practices whose goal is verify whether they comply with legal requirements.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries 8 ENVIRONMENTAL AUDITING Environmental Audit has become a step to comply with the requirement to furnish the Environmental Statement. “Environment Policy” means a statement of a company’s overall aims and principles of action with respect to the environment. and • Placing environmental information in the public domain. Environment Auditing is a management tool comprising a systematic documented periodic and objective evaluation of how well the management systems are performing with the aim of: • Waste preventive and reduction • Assessing compliance with regulatory requirements • Facilitating control of environmental practices by a company’s management.1 FEATURES OF A GOOD ENVIRONMENTAL AUDIT A good Environmental Audit ♦ defines sources. Auditing differs from assessment in that it requires collection and documentation of competent and sufficient evidence rather than an opinion based primarily on professional judgement. quantities & types of waste generation ♦ Collates information on unit operations. though the importance of Environmental audit lies in achieving increased productivity and reduced waste generation. periodic and objective evaluation of how well environmental organization. regulatory requirement. ♦ Assessing compliance with company policies. raw materials. ‘Auditing’ in general is a methodical examination involving analysis.

Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries A step-by-step methodology for Environmental Audit as recommended by the United Nations Environment Programme and the United Nations Industrial Development Organisation (UNIDO) is illustrated in figure 1. list viable options Phase 3: Synthesis WASTE REDUCTION ACTION PLAN Step 20 Design and implement a waste reduction action plan to achieve improved process efficiency Quick Reference Audit Guide 29 . Phase 1: Pre-Assessment AUDIT PREPARATION Step 1 Prepare and organise audit team and resources. Step 2 Divide Process into unit operation Step 3 Construct process flow diagram linking unit operation Phase 2: Material Balance PROCESS INPUTS PROCESS OUTPUTS Step 4 Determine inputs Step 7 quantify products / by-products Step 5 Record water usage Step 8 Account for waste water Step 6 Measure current levels of waste reuse/recycling Step 9 Account for gaseous emissions Step 10 Account for offsite wastes DESERVE A MATERIAL BALANCE Step 11 Assemble input and output Information Step 12 Derive a preliminary material balance Step 13 and 14 evaluate and refine material balance IDENTIFY WASTE REDUCTION OPTIONS Step 15 Identify obvious waste reduction measures Step 16 target and characterize problem wastes Step 17 Investigate the possibility of waste segregation Step 18 Identify the long term waste reduction measures EVALUATE WASTE REDUCTION OPTIONS Step 19 Undertake environmental and economic evaluations of waste reduction options.

Verification of Environmental Audit by the Mining Authorities 2. In this chapter we are suggesting the following activities that would provide a rigorous analysis of environmental statement submitted by the mining authorities and develop an effective institutional arrangement for implementing Environmental Audit in the state. there is no provision to link the EIA report with the ‘Environmental Statement’ which is submitted yearly. though the ‘Environmental Impact Assessment report’ is submitted through the State Pollution Control Board. Verification of Environmental Audit by the Third Party For the verification process the following steps are suggested: Step 1: Verification of maintenance of Log Books Step 2: Verification of maintenance of Yearly Resource Auditing Books Step 3: Verification of compliance of Mining Plan and Consent Aspects Step 4: Verification of Environmental Aspects Step 5: Verification of Environmental Statement in line with the data provided with the data submitted with Environmental Impact Assessment report. for a new or proposed expansion / modernisation and submit Environmental Impact Assessment report while applying for Environmental Clearance.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries 9 ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE VERIFICATION EXERCISE The mining authority is required to seek Environmental Clearance from the Ministry of Environment and Forest. The authorities are also required to submit yearly ‘Water Cess Returns’ and ‘Environmental Statement’ to the concerned State Pollution Control Boards. GoI. 1. Verification of Environmental Audit by the Regulatory Authorities 3. As of now. this is an important step which would not only give the yearly compliance but also the status of the environment over a period of time. 30 . However.

Collection of 31 Responding to an application submitted by the stakeholder KSPCB’S STANDARDS A written response within 7 working days of receiving letter or e-mail including the information sought will be sent. 1977 and Rules KSPCB. Board issues consent to industry which emit air pollutants with emission limits Establishes an institutional structure for preventing and abating water pollution. NO 1 Standards of Service of Karnataka State Pollution Control Board The Karnataka State Pollution Control Board deals with Government. (Form No XIII ). community groups. 1981 2 Water (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act. individuals. CPCB Provides for the control and abatement of air pollution. local bodies. The Board has set its standards for various services NAME OF ACT OR RULES IMPLEMENTING AGENCIES OBJECTIVE OF ACTS OR RULES KSPCB’S SERVICE Responding to request for Information General Responding to complaints 1 Air (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act. In case of refusal of consent the reasons will be intimated Scrutinising the returns submitted and to issue assessment order Decision . CPCB KSPCB. CPCB KSPCB. industries and businesses. 1974 and Rules 3 Water (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Cess Act. . (Form No I ).Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries Appendix I: Continued . A written response within 15 working days of receipt of complaint Decisions will be made within 21 days of receiving a filled-in application and supporting information. Board issues consent to industry and local bodies which discharge effluent with effluent limits Provides for the levy and collection of cess on water consuming industries and local bodies. Appendix I: SR. . In cases which need more time to respond correspondence will be dispatched immediately followed by the information within 2 calendar months An immediate response where possible. In case of refusal of consent the reasons will be intimated Responding to an application submitted by the stakeholoder Decisions will be made within 21 days of receiving a filled-in application and supporting information. NGOs.

CPCB KSPCB. 2000 Environmental Protection Act. . . SR. 1986 IMPLEMENTING AGENCIES OBJECTIVE OF ACTS OR RULES cess enhances the funds of the Board for effective implementation of environmental legislation KSPCB.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries Appendix I: Continued . CPCB 32 KSPCB’S SERVICE to enable stakeholders to file cess returns KSPCB’S STANDARDS . NO 9 10 NAME OF ACT OR RULES The Noise Pollution (Regulation and Control Rules).

000 50.500 5.500 12. .000 3.000 1.75.000 90.000 40. Appendix II: Consent Fee to be paid by the Industries based on the capital investment.000 2.000 2. frequency of consent application and the periodicity of monitoring based on the classification of industries Sr.000 1.000 15.750 33 Consent Applicationiv Every Year Periodicity of Monitoring Once in a month Every Year Every Year (option of once in 3 years by paying 3 years fee) Once in two months Once in 3-4 months Every Year Once in two months Every Year (option of once in 2 years by paying 2 years fee) Every Year (option of once in 3 years by paying 3 years fee) Once in 3 months Once in 4-6 months . 1 Classificationi Redv Category Large Medium Small 2 Orangevi Large Medium Small Capital Investment by Industries in Rupeesii > 1000 Crores >500 < 1000 Crores >250 < 500 Crores >50 < 250 Crores >25 < 50 Crores >10 < 25 Crores >5 < 10 Crores >1 < 5 Crores >50 lakhs < 1 Crore >25 lakhs < 50 lakhs < >10 lakhs < 25 lakhs >5 lakhs < 10 lakhs >1 lakh < 5 lakhs < 1 lakh > 1000 Crores >500 < 1000 Crores >250 < 500 Crores >50 < 250 Crores >25 < 50 Crores >10 < 25 Crores >5 < 10 Crores >1 < 5 Crores >50 lakhs < 1 Crore >25 lakhs < 50 lakhs < >10 lakhs < 25 lakhs Consent Fee in Rupeesiii 2.000 1.000 25.00.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries Appendix II: Continued .000 1.00.500 500 200 1.000 60.000 30.50.000 6.000 17. . No.000 20.000 75.500 1.25.

00 Crores) or Regional Office (investment < Rs. respectively.000 1. Fees are the same for ‘Consent for Establishment’ and Consent for Operation iv Form I and Form XIII under the Air Act (1981) and Water Act (1974). Tiny industries have to renew consent once in ten year by paying one year consent fee.50. Sr. 1. MoEF. staff quarters.00.00 Crores). 1.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries Appendix II: Continued .000 2. building. No.000 4.00 to 20. v Consent for establishment and operation to be obtained from Head Office for large and medium category. .000 50. 1. However Consent for operation can be obtained either from Divisional or Regional Office for investments < Rs. However Consent for operation can be obtained either from Divisional (investment Rs.00 Crores) vii Consent for establishment and operation to be obtained from Head Office (investment > 20.000 20. 1.000 1. published in Karnataka Gazette dated 2nd April 1998.000 15. Fees shall be paid by Bank Draft in favour of KSPCB. Divisional (investment Rs.250 250 150 1. vi Consent for establishment and operation to be obtained from Head Office. .000 75. Official Memorandum No J20011 / 15/ IA/ dated 27th Sept 1988 read with amendment issued time to time Capital investment on land.00 to 20.000 30. 1.00 Crores.00 Crores) or Regional Office (investment < Rs. 3 i Classification Greenvii Category Large Medium Small Capital Investment by Industries in Rupeesii >5 lakhs < 10 lakhs >1 lakh < 5 lakhs < 1 lakh > 1000 Crores >500 < 1000 Crores >250 < 500 Crores >50 < 250 Crores >25 < 50 Crores >10 < 25 Crores >5 < 10 Crores >1 < 5 Crores >50 lakhs < 1 Crore >25 lakhs < 50 lakhs < >10 lakhs < 25 lakhs >5 lakhs < 10 lakhs >1 lakh < 5 lakhs < 1 lakh Consent Fee in Rupeesiii 1.000 10. Bangalore encashable at Bangalore.500 1. plant and machinery including all movable and immovable assets as detailed in the project report for new industry or audited report for existing industry or twenty times the annual lease value in case where land and/or buildings are taken on lease iii Notification No FEE 115 ENV 95 (P) dated 19th February 1998.000 200 100 i Consent Application iv Periodicity of Monitoring Every Year Once in 3 months Every Year (option of once in 2 years by paying 2 years fee) Every Year (option of once in 3 years by paying 3 years fee) Once in 6 months Once in 12 months Categories of industries is as per GOI.00 Crores) ii 34 .

if any. (a) Land Requirement: Agriculture Land: Forest land and Density of vegetation. CO2. Objectives of the project: 3. Lake.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries Appendix III: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT NOTIFICATION. Other (specify): (b) (i) Land use in the Catchment within 10 km radius of the proposed site: (ii)Topography of the area indicating gradient. (a) Number of villages and population to be displaced: 1. Water balance: 35 . with control measures: 8. CHn etc.) from the project: 5. Noise and Vibrations: (a)Sources of Noise and Vibrations: (b)Ambient noise level: (c)Noise and Vibration control measures proposed: (d)Subsidence problem. Peak labour force to be deployed giving details of: -Endemic health problems in the area due to waste water/air/soil borne diseases: -Health care system existing and proposed: 10. water and land: (d) Distance of the nearest National Park /Sanctuary/ Biosphere Reserve/ Monuments/ heritage site/ Reserve Forest: (e) Rehabilitation plan for quarries/borrow areas: (f) Green belt plan: (g) Compensatory afforestation plan: 4. if captive power unit proposed: 9. 1994 SCHEDULE-II: APPLICATION FORM (a)Water balance at site: (b)Lean season water availability. Climate and Air Quality: (a)Windrose at site: (b)Max/Min/Mean annual temperature: (c)Frequency of inversion: (d)Frequency of cyclones/ tornadoes/ cloud burst: (e)Ambient air quality data: (f)Nature & concentration of emission of SPM. Water Requirement: (c)Source to be tapped with competing users (River. Ground. aspects and altitude: (iii) Erodibility classification of the proposed land: (c) Pollution sources existing in 10 km radius and their impact on quality of air. Power requirement indicating source of supply: Complete environmental details to be furnished separately. NOx. Public supply): (d)Water quality: (e)Changes observed in quality and quantity of groundwater in the last years and present charging and extraction details: (f) (i) Quantum of waste water to be released with treatment details: (ii)Quantum of quality of water in the receiving body before and after disposal of solid wastes: (iii)Quantum of waste water to be released on land and type of land: (g) (i) Details of reservoir water quality with necessary Catchment Treatment Plan: (ii) Command Area Development Plan: 6. Gas (CO. Tehsil: Latitude/Longitude: Nearest Airport/Railway Station: (c) Alternate sites examined and the reasons for selecting the proposed site: (d) Does the site conform to stipulated land use as per local land use plan? 2. Solid wastes: (a)Nature and quantity of solid wastes generated (b)Solid waste disposal method: 7. (a) Name and Address of the project proposed: (b) Location of the project: Name of the Place: District.

Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries Appendix III: Continued . . : 36 . if any. Signature of the applicant With name and full address Given under the seal of Date: Organisation on behalf Place: Whom the applicant is signing. . 12. to the project is likely to be revoked at our risk and cost. (a) Environmental Impact Assessment (b)Environment Management Plan: (c)Detailed Feasibility Report: (d)Duly filled in questionnaire 13. Risk Assessment Report and Disaster Management Plan: Report prepared as per guidelines issued by the Central Government in the MOEF from time to time: I hereby give an undertaking that the data and information given above are due to the best of my knowledge and belief and I am aware that if any part of the data/information submitted is found to be false or misleading at any stage. the project be rejected and the clearance given. Details of Environmental Management Cell: (c)Rehabilitation Master Plan: 11.

3 mm (b) Settleable solids.0 - - 1.0 5 Temperature Shall not exceed 50C above the receiving water temperature 10 20 10 20 1.0 --- --- 37 (a) For process wastewater 100 (b) For cooling water effluent.5520 Partition Gravimetric method Extraction method for sludge samples No. 2550 Laboratory and field methods No. 2150 Threshold odour test No. 2130 Nephlometric Method No. NO I PARAMETER Colour and Odour INLAND SURFACE WATER See Note I PUBLIC SEWERS LAND FOR IRRIGATION See Note I MARINE COASTAL AREAS See Note I --2 Suspended Solids mg/l. 1986) STANDARDS SL .5 to 9. 600 200 5. 4500-Cl Iodometric method. Max.Amperotric titration method .0 5. 100 3 Particular size of Suspended Solids Shall pass 850 micron IS Sieve 4 pH value 5.5 to 9. 10% above total suspended matter of influent (a) Floatable solids max.0 Shall not exceed 50C above the receiving water temperature METHOD No.5 to 9.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries Appendix IV: GENERAL STANDARDS FOR DISCHARGE OF EFFLUENTS (Extracts From Environment Protection Rules. 4500. Max 7 Total Residual Chlorine mg/l. max 850 microns 5. Max.2120 Visual comparison Method Spectrophotometeric Method No.5 to 9.0 6 Oil and Grease mg/l.H+ Electrometric Method No.

STANDARDS SL .Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries Appendix IV: Continued .2 2. mg/l. . 5220 Titrimetric method. Lead (as Pb). 3500. 4500. Arsenic (as As).selective electrode method Ion Chromatographic method . Total Chromium (as Cr). Neo cuproine Method No. Max. Dithizone Method. mg/l.Se. mg/l. Max.0 - 3. 0.Hg.0 3. Fluoride (as F). Mercury (as Hg). 3550-Zn.1 2. mg/l. NO 8 INLAND SURFACE WATER PARAMETER PUBLIC SEWERS MARINE COASTAL AREAS LAND FOR IRRIGATION Ammonical Nitrogen (as N).0 15 - 15 9 10 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 23 24 Cyanide (as CN). Inductively coupled plasma method. Total Kjeldhal Nitrogen (as NH3). 3550-Pb AAS Method.0 250 - - 250 0. Copper (as Cu).NH3 Primary distillation steps Titrimetric method Phenate method No. Max.0 2.0 15 - 15 21 Selenium (as Se). 3550-Zn.0 2. AAS Method. Hexavalent Chromium (as Cr+6). Chemical Oxygen Demand.2 0. 3550-Cr. Max.0 - 5. Colorimetric method 4500.0 0. Dithizone Method No. mg/l. Max.0 20 Zinc (as Zn).01 0.Selective Electrode Method.2 0.0 1. 4500 N-org Macro kjeldhal Method Semimicro Kjeldhal Method No.2 0. 38 METHOD No4500. AAS Method. Titrimetric method. mg/l. mg/l. Max.05 0.2 0. Cyanide.0 - 2. 3550-Cu. 3500. AAS Method.01 - 0.05 - 0. Max.0 3.0 - 2. Zincon method No.0 - - 5. Max. mg/l. mg/l). AAS Method. 3550-Pb AAS Method. Max.0 - 2.0 2. Fluorometric method No. Ion.05 22 Nickel (as Ni). Dithizone Method No. 0. mg/l. Max.As Atomic absorption spectrometric method No.1 1.F-.0 0. Free Ammonia (as NH3). Inductively coupled plasma method No. mg/l. mg/l. Max. Colorimetric method No. 5. Max. 3. mg/l. Colorimetric method. mg/l. Cadmium (as Cd). 50 50 - 50 100 - - 100 5. mg/l.0 3. Ion Chromatographic method No. Colorimetric method. . Max. Cold Vapour Atomic absorption Method. 3500. Dithizone Method No. Max.0 0.2 0. Max.01 .2 2.0 - 1. mg/l. Max.

Mn AAS Method Inductively coupled plasma method Persulphate Method No.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries Appendix IV: Continued .2 mg/l - 0. 2. NO PARAMETER INLAND SURFACE WATER PUBLIC SEWERS MARINE COASTAL AREAS LAND FOR IRRIGATION 25 Dissolved Phosphates (as P).2 mg/l 0. 6420 Liquid –Liquid extraction gas Chromatographic method Mass Spectrometric method No. Max. 3550-V AAS Method Inductively coupled plasma method Gallic acid method 4500. Max. STANDARDS SL . 3500.2 mg/l 33 Nitrate Nitrogen 10 mg/l - - 20 mg/l 34 Dissolved Solids 2100 2100 2100 - 39 METHOD No. mg/l. 4500. Ion selective electrode method No.0 5.0 - - 5. 3550-Fe AAS Method Inductively coupled plasma method Phenanthroline method No.0 - 5.P Vandomolybdo phosphori acid Colorimetric method Stannous chloride method Ascorbic acid method No.0 27 Phenolic Compounds (as C6H5OH). 7110 Evaporation method for grass alpha. . . mg/l. . Max. beta No. mg/l. 1. 5.S2 Methylene blue method Iodometric method. 4500.NO2.Ion Chromatographic method Colorimetric Method .0 10-7 10-7 10-8 10-7 28 Radioactive materials: (a) Alpha emitter Micro curie/ml (b) Beta emitter Micro curie/ml 10-6 10-6 10-7 10-6 90% survival of fish after 96 hours in 100% effluent 90% survival of fish after 96 hours in 100% effluent 90% survival of fish after 96 hours in 100% effluent 29 Bio-assay test 90% survival of fish after 96 hours in 100% effluent 30 Manganese (as Mn) 2 mg/l 2 mg/l - 2 mg/l 31 Iron (as Fe) 3 mg/l 3 mg/l - 3 mg/l 32 Vanadium (as V) 0.0 - - - 26 Sulphide (as S).

Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries Appendix IV: Continued .NO2.).No. Max. STANDARDS SL . 1986.No. Hydraulic loading of effluent for application on land for different soils are as under: Sl.Ion Chromatographic method Gravimetric method with ignition of residues Turbidimetric method NOTE: 1. mg/l. . . All efforts should be made to remove colour and unpleasant odour as far as practicable. Sulphate (as SO. 2. Parameters at Sl. 3. NO 35 INLAND SURFACE WATER PARAMETER (Inorganic). mg/l. exercising Rule 3(2) of Environment (Protection) Rules.34 & 35 are retained by the State Board. 055 to 110 035 to 055 40 . Max. 1 2 3 4 5 Soil Texture Sandy Sandy Loam Loam Clay loam Clayey Loading Rate in m3/Ha/Day 225 to 280 170 to 225 110 to 170. 1000 PUBLIC SEWERS 1000 MARINE COASTAL AREAS LAND FOR IRRIGATION 1000 - METHOD 4500.

(iv) Year of establishment (v) Date of the last environmental statement submitted PART B WATER AND RAW MATERIAL CONSUMPTION: (i) Water consumption m3/d Process Cooling Domestic Name of products Process water consumption per unit of product output During the previous During the current financial year financial year (1) (2) (1) (2) (3) (ii) Raw material consumption Name of raw materials Name of products Consumption of raw material per unit of output during the previous during the current financial year financial year * Industry may use codes if disclosing details of raw material would violate contractual obligations. PART A (i) Name and address of the owner/ occupier of the industry.. otherwise all industries have to name the raw materials used.(SIC Code) (iii) Production Capacity.. (ii) Industry category primary. PART C Pollutants POLLUTION DISCHARGED TO ENVIRONMENT/ UNIT OF OUTPUT (Parameter as specified in the consent issued) Percentage of Concentrations of Quantity of variation from pollutants in pollutants prescribed discharges (mass/ discharged standards with volume) (mass/day) reasons 41 ..Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries Appendix IV: ENVIRONMENTAL STATEMENT (TO BE SUBMITTED AS PER ENVIRONMENT PROTECTION ACT. operation or process. 1986) FORM V Environmental Statement for the financial year ending the 31st March ………………..(STC Code) Secondary.Units.

PART H Additional measures/ investment proposal for environmental protection including abatement of pollution.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries Appendix V: Continued . prevention of pollution. 42 . 1989) Hazardous wastes Total quantity (kg. (a) Water (b) Air PART D HAZARDOUS WASTES (as specified under the Hazardous Wastes/ Management and Handling Rules.) during the previous during the current financial year financial year (a) From process (b) From Pollution control facilities PART E SOLID WASTES Total quantity during the previous financial year (a) (b) (c) during the current financial year From process From pollution control facilities (1) Quantity recycled or reutilized within the units (2) Solid (3) Disposed PART F Please specify the characterizations (in terms of composition and quantum) of hazardous as well as solid wastes and indicate disposal practice adopted for both these categories of wastes. . . PART G Impact of the pollution abatement measures taken on conservation of natural resources and on the cost of production. PART I Any other particulars for improving the quality of the environment.

it becomes necessary to discharge the effluent to sewer/land/stream then the effluent shall conform to the following standards at the final outlet of the coal washery: Sl. operations or processes.1 m3 per minute. heavy rainfall.0 100 mg/l 10 mg/l 30 mg/l 250 mg/l 1. Industry Parameter 11 Stone-crushing Suspended unit particulate matter Standards The suspended particulate matter measured between 3 metres and 10 metres from any process equipment of a stone-crushing unit shall not exceed 600 micro-grammes per cubic metre. The standards are specified in Schedules I to IV for various emissions or discharges of environmental pollutants from the industries. Those pertaining to the mining industry have been complied below Schedule I: Sl No 11 Sl. 1986 provides for the Standard for emission or discharge of environmental pollutants.5-9. measured between 25 and 30 metres from the enclosure of coal crushing plant in the downward and leeward wind direction shall not exceed 150 microgram per cubic metre. . 43 . Noise level standards: -Operational/working zone-not to exceed 85 dB (A) Leq for 8 hours exposure -The ambient air quality standards in respect of noise as notified under the Environmental (protection) Rules.0 mg/l 3. ENVIRONMENT PROTECTION RULES.. Method of measurement shall be High Volume sampling and Average flow rate. 1986. Effluent discharge standards: The coal washeries shall maintain the close circuit operation with zero effluent discharge.No. not less than 1. If in case due to some genuine problems like periodical cleaning of the system. shall be followed at the boundary line of the coal washery. Schedule I: Sl No 85 Environmental Standards for Coal Washeries 1.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries Appendix V: Continued . using upwind downwind method of measurement. etc.No. . 2. delta (A). 1 2 3 4 5 6 Parameter pH Total suspended solids Oil and Grease BOD (3 days at 27OC) COD Phenolics Limits 5. 1986 (Rule 3 (2)) Rule 3 of the Environment Protection Rules. Fugitive emission standards The difference in the value of suspended particulate matter.

residential complex. etc. coal transportation road. transfer points. office building and all around the boundary line of the coal washery. loading/ unloading points. rubber decks in chutes and centrifugal chutes shall be provided with proper rubber linings. briquette industry. -Storage bunkers. Haul road. High pressure horn shall be prohibited.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries Appendix V: Continued . Overburden dumps. nearby road.5 cubic meters per tonne of coal. Frequency of Sampling -Air quality monitoring at a frequency of once in a fortnight at the dust generating sources given in clause 1 shall be carried out. coal handling plants. -The crushers/pulverisers of the coal washeries shall be provided with enclosures. -Water sprinkling by using fine atomizer nozzles arrangement shall be provided on the coal heaps arid on around the crushers/pulverisers. or any other dust generating external sources like coke ovens (hard as well as soft). Blasting. -Green belt shall be developed along the roadside. . Schedule I: Sl No 90 Standards for coal mines 1. fitted with suitable air pollution control measures and finally emitted through a stack of minimum height of 30 m. shall be provided with enclosures. Code of practice for Coal Washery. -The efficiency of the settling ponds of the wastewater treatment system of the coal washery shall not be less than 90 per cent. etc. Coal handling plant (CHP). . at a distance of 500 metres from the following dust generating source shall not exceed the standards specified in the Tables I. -Area. Railway sliding. conforming particulate matter emission standard of 150 mg/Nm' or provided with adequate water sprinkling arrangement. hoppers. II and III. Dust Generating Sources Loading or unloading.. -Water consumption in the coal washery shall not exceed 1. 4. In case any residential or commercial or industrial place falls within 500 metres of any dust generating sources. Smokes emission from heavy duty vehicle operating in the coal washeries should conform the standards prescribed under the Motor Vehicle Rules. -Vehicle movement in the coal washery area shall be regulated effectively to avoid traffic congestion. the National Ambient Air Quality Standards notified under Schedule VII shall be applicable. Sulphur dioxide (SO2) and Oxides of Nitrogen (NOX) concentration in downwind direction considering predominant wind direction. As far as practically possible conveyors. etc. Air Quality Standards The Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM). -Water or water mixed chemical shall be sprayed at all strategic coal transfer points such as conveyors. 2. Respirable Particulate Matter (RPM). in and around the coal washery shall be pucca either asphalted or concreted. 1989. Drilling. 44 .

45 . -As a result monthly monitoring.0 Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) 250 mg/l Total Suspended Solids (TSS) 100 mg/l 200 mg/l (Land for irrigation) Oil & Grease (0 & G) 10 mg/l (Monitoring frequency of these parameters shall be once in a fortnight) Optional parameters: All other parameters indicated in the general standards for discharge of environment pollutants under Schedule VI. Effluent standards The standards for effluent discharge into sewer or stream or land. . then the sampling frequency may be shifted to two days in a quarter year (3 months). are given below: pH 5. 2002 90 dBA 86 dBA 2. the value has exceeded the specified standards. manufactured in or imported into India: Provided that these rules shall not apply to: (a) Any genset manufactured or imported for the purpose of exports outside India. 2001 September 1. If the results of four consecutive weeks indicate that the concentration of pollutants is within the specified standards.10. Noise limit Noise limit for new generator sets run with petrol or kerosene shall be as given below: Sound Power Level Lwa Noise Limit from September 1.00 AM Leq 75 dB (A) Leq 70 dB (A) (Monitoring frequency for noise level shall be once in fortnight) Occupational exposure limit of noise specified by Director General of Mines Safety (DGMS) shall be complied with by the coal mines. (Monitoring frequency shall be once in a year for the optional parameters) 4. Applicability These rules shall apply to all new generator sets using petrol or kerosene as fuel.00 PM . Schedule I: Sl No 91 Noise Limit for Generator Sets run with Petrol or Kerosene 1. . then fortnight monitoring may be reverted to.5 to 9. 3.00 PM 10.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries Appendix V: Continued . if it is found that the value of the pollutant is less than 50% of the specified standards for three consecutive months. shall be in addition to the effluent standards specified under clause 3. the air quality sampling shall be done twice a week. or (b) The genset is intended for the purpose of sample only and not for sale in India. -In case. Noise Level Standards Noise Level 6.00 AM .6.

shall be prohibited. by certification body specified in clause 8. The Central Pollution Control Board shall be the nodal agency for implementation of these rules. Requirement of certification Every manufacturer or importer (hereinafter referred to as “supplier”) of genset (hereinafter referred to as “product”) to which these rules apply must have a valid certificate of type approval for all the product models being manufactured or imported after the specified dates. (1) The supplier of the ‘product’ must affix a conformance label on the product meeting the following requirements: a. Certification body The following agencies are authorized for type approval and for verification of conformity of production. Visakhapatnam. Type approval certificate number and time phase (i. 6. 46 . (2) The conformance label must contain the following information: a. The label shall be durable and legible. c. Naval Science & Technology Laboratory. The label shall be affixed on a part necessary for normal operation of the ‘product’ and not normally requiring replacement during the ‘product’ life.e. September 2001 or September 2002). Nodal agency 1. Palghat. and National Aerospace Laboratory. National Physical Laboratory.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries Appendix V: Continued . Requirement of conformance labeling 6. 3. every year. with the help of the certification agencies. Fluid Control Research Institute. b. Sale of generator sets not complying with. 8. related to the implementation of these rules. these rules The sale of a product model. Statement that “this product conforms to the Environment (Protection) Rules. 1986. Verification of conformity of production (COP) Every supplier shall subject its products to the verification for conformity of production. . Bangalore. Pune. including the disputed matters. 5. . 4. it may not be included in the label) b. The nodal agency shall constitute a Standing Committee to advise it on all matters. as determined by the verification for conformity of production. in India. Name and address of the supplier (if the address is described in the owners manual. In case of any dispute or difficulty in implementation of these rules the matter shall be referred to the nodal agency. 9. not having valid type approval certificate. 3. 6. Compliance and testing procedure The compliance and testing procedure shall be prepared and published by Central Pollution Control Board. or not complying with the noise limits. Automotive Research Association of India. 2. 7. New Delhi.

preferably. manufactured on or after the 1st July. whichever is on the higher side (if the actual ambient noise is on the higher side. 2.3 The DG set shall be provided with proper exhaust muffler with insertion loss of minimum 25 dB(A). it may not be possible to check the performance of the acoustic enclosure/acoustic treatment. 2. 2. in the night time). 04. 2003. These rules apply to DG sets upto 1000 KVA rated output. at the users end. 2003. Installation of a DG set must be strictly in compliance with the recommendations of the DG set manufacturer. 2003 shall be 75 dB(A) at 1 metre from the enclosure surface. The user shall make efforts to bring down the noise levels due to the DG set. The implementation of noise limit for these diesel generator sets shall be regulated as given in paragraph 3 below. .4 These limits shall be regulated by the State Pollution Control Boards and the State Pollution Control Committees. 02. outside his premises. 03. The manufacturer shall offer to the user a standard acoustic enclosure of 25 dB (A) insertion loss and also a suitable exhaust muffler with insertion loss of 25 dB (A). These rules shall not apply to a.1. A proper routine and preventive maintenance procedure for the DG set should be set and followed in consultation with the DG set manufacturer which would help prevent noise levels of the DG set from deteriorating with use.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries Appendix V: Continued . Noise Limit for Generator Sets Run with Diesel 1.2 The acoustic enclosure or acoustic treatment of the room shall be designed for minimum 25 dB(A) insertion loss or for meeting the ambient noise standards. shall be as follows: 2. 2003. and then averaged. 2. Under such circumstances the performance may be checked for noise. 3.5m from the acoustic enclosure/room. 02. on or after 1st July. Limits of Noise for DG sets (upto 1000 KVA) manufactured on or after the 1st July. Noise limits for diesel generator sets not covered by paragraph 1. . 2. The measurement for Insertion Loss may be done at different points at 0. manufactured or imported in India. Applicability 01.5 Guidelines for the manufacturers/users of Diesel Generator sets shall be as under: 01. Noise limit for diesel generator sets (upto 1000 KVA) manufactured on or after the 1st July. The diesel generator sets should be provided with integral acoustic enclosure at the manufacturing stage itself. within the ambient noise requirements by proper siting and control measures. 3.1 Noise from DG set shall be controlled by providing an acoustic enclosure or by treating the room acoustically. DG sets manufactured or imported for the purpose of exports 47 . The maximum permissible sound pressure level for new diesel generator (DG) sets with rated capacity up to 1000 KVA. reduction up to actual ambient noise level. Noise limit for DG sets not covered by paragraph 1.

which is not having a valid Type Approval certificate and Conformity of Production certificate.5.3. 3. National Aerospace Laboratory. iii. Sale. . import or use of DG sets not complying with the rules prohibited No person shall sell. Nodal Agency i. The conformance label must contain the following information: a.7. c. DG sets intended for the purpose of sample and not for sale in India. Requirement of Conformance Labelling i. Name and address of the supplier (if the address is described in the owner's manual. Requirement of Certification Every manufacturer or importer (hereinafter referred to as "supplier") of DG set (hereinafter referred to as "product") to which these regulations apply must have valid certificates of Type Approval and also valid certificates of Conformity of Production for each year. 48 . The label shall be durable and legible. The supplier' of the 'product' must affix a conformance label on the product meeting the following requirements: a. it may not be included in the label) b.4. Pune ii. The Central Pollution Board shall be the nodal agency for implementation of these regulations. Statement “This product conforms to the Environment (Protection) Rules. ii. Naval Science & Technology Laboratory. Fluid Control Research Institute. 3. In case of any dispute or difficulty in implementation of these regulations. 1986". 3. Authorized agencies for certification The following agencies are authorized to carry out such tests as they deem necessary for giving certificates for Type Approval and Conformity of Production testings of DG sets and to give such certificates: i. Noise limit viz. Compliance and Testing Procedure The compliance and testing procedure shall be prepared and published by the Central Pollution Control Board. e. 2003 with the noise limit specified in paragraph 1. including the disputed matters. Bangalore 3. with the help of the certification agencies. import or use of a product model. outside India. New Delhi iii. . for all the product models being manufactured or imported from 1st July. Date of manufacture of the product. and b. National Physical Laboratory. Automotive Research Association of India.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries Appendix V: Continued . The nodal agency shall constitute a Committee to advise it on all matters. Visakhapatnam iv. Type approval certificate number. related to the implementation of these regulations. Palghat v. ii. 3.2. 3. the matter shall be referred to the nodal agency. 75 dB (A) at 1m d. b.6. The label shall be affixed on a part necessary for normal operation of the 'product' and not normally requiring replacement during the 'product' life.

Day Time Night Time 75 70 65 55 55 45 50 40 Day time is reckoned in between 6 a. . loudspeakers and bursting of crackers shall be banned in these zones. The Silence zones are to be declared by the Competent Authority. Silence zone is defined as areas upto 100 metres around such premises as hospitals. educational institutions and courts. Mixed categories of areas should be declared as one of the four abovementioned categories by the Competent Authority and the corresponding standards shall apply.m.2 Note.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries Appendix V: Continued .] 49 .4 Area Code Category of Area A B C D Industrial area Commercial area Residential area Silence Zone Limits in dB (A) Leg.1 Note. and 9 p. SCHEDULE III (See rule 3) Ambient Air Quality Standards in Respect of Noise Note. Night time is reckoned in between 9 p.m.m. .3 Note. Use of vehicular horns.m. and 6 a.

3.. etc. Directors (full time or part-time). Joint family concern e. Khasra No.. State Government 2. 5. Village Firka. of the Applicant. Name. Central Government 3. other kinds of office-bearers are to be furnished with their period of tenure in the respective office with telephone Nos.). and address). Status of the applicant: a. Proprietary concern c. location as per the revenue records. FORM XIII APPLICATION FOR CONSENT FOR ESTABLISHING OR TAKING ANY STEPS FOR ESTABLISHMENT OF INDUSTRY OPERATION PROCESS OR ANY TREATMENT DISPOSAL SYSTEM FOR DISCHARGE. . Union Territory h. 1974 (See Rule 32) From Date………………………. Partnership firm (Whether registered or unregistered) d. persons. Chairman (full-time or parttime). Central Pollution Control Board. Managing Directors. Managing Partners. Address of the Industry (Survey No. Address and Telephone Nos. 1974 (6 of 1974) for establishing or taking any steps for establishment of Industry/ operation/ process/ or any treatment/ disposal system to bring into use any new/ altered outlet for discharge of *sewage/ trade effluent*/ to continue to discharge *sewage/ trade effluent* from land/premises owned by. Full name of the applicant. Public Limited Company g.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries Appendix V: Continued . Foreign Company (If a foreign company. 50 . …………………………… …………………………… To The Member Secretary. Private Limited Company f. . partners. Individual b. Nationality of the applicant. Government Company 1. The other relevant details are as below: 1. I/We hereby apply for Consent/Renewal of Consent under section 25 or section 26 of the Water (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act. Any other Association or Body: 4. the details of registration. Sir. CONTINUATION OF DISCHARGE UNDER SECTION 25 OR SECTION 26 OF THE WATER (PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF POLLUTION) ACT. i.. incorporation. (The full list of individuals. 2..

i.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries Appendix V: Continued . (b) Licensed Annual Capacity of the Factory/Industry. I/We hereby agree to submit to the Central Board an application for renewal of consent one month in advance of the date of expiry of the consented period for outlet/ discharge if to be continued thereafter. etc. 8.. Industrial (b) Quality of effluent currently being discharged or expected to be discharged. as fees payable under section 25 of the Act. dated ………………….. Domestic ii. . Yes/No If yes.: a. domestic or combined effluents.…. State details of sold wastes generated in the process or during waste treatment. 12. Also attach analysis report of the effluents. 13. Expected date of production: 7.. (c) What monitoring arrangement is currently there or proposed.. I/We enclose herewith cash receipt No.. 11. State whether you have any treatment plant for industrial.. Description Quantity Method of collection Method of disposal I/We further declare that the information furnished above is correct to the best of my/our knowledge. District..) in favour of the Central Pollution Control Board. attach a description of the process of treatment in brief. if any obtained under the provisions of Industrial Development (Regulation) Act. Signature of the applicant. (a) State the daily maximum quantity of effluents and mode of disposal (sewer or drains or river). [Note: *Strike out which is not relevant. 1951: 9. Yours faithfully. (a) Attach the list of all raw materials and chemicals used per month. Police Station or SHQ. Details of license./bank draft No………………………. 10. 14. Approximate date of the proposed commissioning of work. State daily quantity of water in kilolitres utilized and its source (domestic/ industrial/ process/ boiler / cooling/ others). mode of disposal. b. Total number of employees expected to be employed. Tehsil. for Rs………….. a fresh application for CONSENT shall be made and until such CONSENT is granted no change shall be made.. . Type of effluent quantity in kilolitres.. jurisdiction of the First Class Magistrate). 6. I/We undertake to furnish any other information within one month of its being called by the Central Board. Attach information on the quality of treated effluent vis-à-vis the standards. I/We hereby submit that in case of change either of the point of discharge or the quantity of discharge or its quality. Name of the person authorized to sign this form (the original authorization except in the case of individual/proprietary concern is to be enclosed).] 51 . Details of commissioning. (Rupees…………………………………………………………………. New Delhi.

However. ** 24 hourly/S hourly values should be met 9S% of the time in a year. * Annual Arithmetic mean of minimum 104 measurements in a year taken twice a week 24 hourly at uniform interval.75 8 hours** 5. 2.0 8 hours** 5. Improved West and Gaeke Dioxide method. reason to institute regular/continuous monitoring and further investigations. it may exceed but not on two consecutive days.75 0. 1. Non-dispersive infrared Spectroscopy.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries Appendix V: Continued . 52 . Ultraviolet fluorescence Jacob & Hochheiser Modified (Na-Arsenite) method.1 m3/minute) AAS Method after sampling using EPM 2000 or equivalent filter paper. it shall be considered adequate. 2. Whenever and wherever two consecutive values exceed the limit specified above for the respective category.00 0.50 1. . NATIONAL Pollutant Sulphur (SO2) Time Weighted average Annual Average* 24 Hours** [SCHEDULE VII] [See rule 3(3B)] AMBIENT AIR QUALITY STANDARDS Concentration in ambient air (in ug/m3 for all pollutants except carbon monoxide which is in mg/m3) Industrial Residential Sensitive Area Rural & Area Other areas 80 60 15 120 80 30 Oxides of Nitrogen as NO2 Annual Average* 80 60 15 24 Hours** 120 80 30 Suspended Particulate Matter Annual Average* 360 140 70 24 Hours** Annual Average* 500 120 200 60 100 50 24 Hours** 150 100 75 Annual Average* 24 Hours** 1. National Ambient Air Quality Standard: The levels of an air quality necessary with an adequate margin of safety. Gas Phase Chemiluminescence. to protect the public health. .0 2.0 1. (Average flow rate not less than 1. Note. 2% of the time.0 1.0 0.0 Respirable Particulate matter (size less than 10µm) Lead (Pb) Carbon Monoxide (CO) Method of measurement 1. vegetation and property.0 2.5 1.].

i. ii.. iv.. v.. 4.... ii.... v. Name and Address of the consumer Purpose for which water consumed 1 Quantity of water consumed in kilolitres 2 If the meter was out of order the monthly average consumption of water for the previous 3 months of the working period 5 6 1. .. FORM I (See rule 4 of Water (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Cess Act. 1974 RETURN REGARDING WATER CONSUMED DURING THE MONTH OF. Reading at the end of the last day of calendar month under report 4 Remarks* 7 8 from Municipal water supply mains from well/ tube-well from canal from river from any other source from Municipal water supply mains from well/ tube-well from canal from river from any other source from Municipal water supply mains from well/ tube-well from canal from river from any other source from Municipal water supply mains from well/ tube-well from canal from river from any other source Signature of the consumer. ... Processing whereby water gets polluted and the pollutants are not easily bio-degradable and are toxic.. iv.. v.. Processing whereby water gets polluted and the pollutants are easily bio-degradable... v. iv..... Name………………………………………. * For claiming rebate under column 7 the assessee shall indicate in this column the analytical and other reports annexed to this return in support of this claim. iii. iii. Domestic purpose.. Address……………………………………. Industrial cooling spraying in mine pits or boiler feed. i..... iii. ii.. Reading at the beginning of the first day of calendar month under report 3 Quantity of water qualifying for rebate according to the assessee i. iii.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries Appendix V: Continued . i.. 53 . ii........ 3... iv. 2...

......... 54 ................. Sample collected on……………………….....condition noticed the plant tion and Control of Pollution) Act........... By the Laboratories………………………… ConcentraMaximum Date on which SI.. : Original Analysis report of Laboratory........... as mentioned in the limits or ranges of conditions imposed under break under consent granted allowed as per parameters perfordown or as per report failure of consent under sections 25/26 mance of the Water (Preven....Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries Appendix V: Continued . Polluting parameters tion of range There was On which permissible No. 1974 1 2 3 4 5 6 End. Address……………………....... ANNEXURE TO FORM I Report of Analysis of treated effluent showing performance of the treatment plant for the month of... Sample tested on……………………………......... . ... Signature…………………… Date………………………… Name………………………..

No 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 List of Questions Mining Plan Is the excavation within the approved mining plan? Is the method of excavation as per the mining norms? Have the mining authorities brought about any change or altered in raw material or manufacturing process resulting in change in quality and/or quantity of emissions? Has prior approval been taken from the State Pollution Control Board? Are the mining authorities operating as per the terms and conditions stipulated by the Mining Department.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries C HECK L IST –I (F OR I NTERNAL AND E XTERNAL A UDITORS ) Format 1 (VG1): Verification Guidelines on Mining and Consent Aspects Sr. directly or indirectly? Is the mode of disposal and the area selected for the same got approval from the Board? Is the overburden disposed according to that approved in Mining Plan? 55 YES NO . has it been located in consultation with the State Pollution Control Board? Has the consent conditions of a period of 8 hours monitoring so as to cover the cycle of 24 hours altleast once a week being adhered to? Have the mining authorities been maintaining a register for the data collected? Has the monthly extract of data collected being sent to the State Pollution Control Board? Has the mining authorities disposing off all solid waste generated from the process and from the effluent treatment plant in such amanner that the groundwater and surface water is not polluted. GoI? Consent Conditions Is there any generation of trade effluent from any activity of mining process? If yes. are the consent condition being complied? Are the mining authorities using water for sprinkling system to suppress dust generation? Is domestic wastewater from the mining area treated with septic tank with soak pits? Are the septic tank and soak pit designed are per IS 2470 Part I & II? Have the mining authorities brought about any change or altered either the quality and quantity or rate of emission or install/replaced/altered air pollution control equipments? Has prior approval been taken from the State Pollution Control Board? Has an ambient air monitoring station been set-up? If yes. GoK / IBM approved plan / Ministry of Environment and Forest.

GoK. etc..Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 Have water meters been installed as per the Water (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Cess Act. Department of Mines and Geology. and the Karnataka State Pollution Control Board? Have adequate water harvesting and groundwater recharge facilities been provided in the mining area? Has the authorities ensured that the top soil from the mining operation being carefully removed without causing soil erosion and siltation in the area/valley? Has the overburden dump periodically stabilised to take up plantation? Have adequate number of retaining wall been provided to arrest run off? Is the overburden being dumped in the nearby seasonal nallah or valleys? 56 . in the mining area and in immediate neighbourhood? Have the mining authorities provided adequate check dams and gulley plugs to protect seasonal nallahs in the mine lease area from getting contaminated? Are the mining authorities carrying out adequate soil and water conservation measures as suggested by the Ministry of Environment and Forest. GoI. 1977 and 2003? Are the mining authorities furnishing detailed programme of work in form of pert chart of implementation of water and air Pollution control works to the Karnataka State Pollution Control Board? Are the mining authorities maintaining greenbelt around the mining area as per the approved Mining Plan? Are the mining authorities maintaining sufficient buffer zone around the mining area as per the Mining Plan? Are the mining authorities maintaining good roads around the mining area as a social obligation and to mitigate dust pollution? Are the mining authorities maintaining preventive measures like water sprinklers. 1977? Are the mining authorities filing water cess returns in Form – I and other provisions of the Water (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Cess Act.

Has the holder of prospecting license or mining lease undertaken phased restoration reclamation and rehabilitation of lands affected by prospecting or mining operations? 57 YES NO . is it stored separately for future use? Storage of overburden waste rock etc. No 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 List of Questions Protection of environment. are the waste dumps being suitably terraced and stabalised through vegetation or otherwise? Are the fines rejects or tailings from mine beneficiations or metallurgical plants deposited in a specially prepared tailings disposal area so that they are not allowed to flow away and cause land degradation or damage to agricultural field pollution of surface water bodies and ground water or cause floods? Reclamation and rehabilitation of lands. Does any top soil exists which is to be excavated for the prospecting or mining operations? If yes is the top soil removed separately? If the top soils is not removed separately. be backfilled into the mine excavations? If yes. slimes and fines produced during sizing sorting and benefactions or metallurgical operations being stored in separate dumps? Are the dumps properly secured to prevent escape of material stored in harmful quantities which may cause degradation of environment and to prevent causation floods? Is the site for dumps tailings or slimes selected on impervious ground to ensure minimum leaching effects due to precipitations? Is there a possiblity that the waste rock.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries Format 2 (VG2): Verification Guidelines on Environment aspects Sr. etc. overburden. then why? Is the top soil so removed utilized for restoration or rehabilitation of the land which no longer required for prospecting or mining operations or for stabilizing or landscaping the external dumps? If the top soil cannot be utilized. what steps are being taken with a view to restoring the land to its original use as far as possible? If backfilling of waste rock in the area excavated during mining operations is not feasible. Does the mine operator hold a prospecting license or a mining lease? Are all possible precautions for the protection of the environment being taken? Are all steps for control of pollution while conducting prospecting.. Are the overburden waste rock rejects and fines generated during prospecting and mining operations or tailings. mining beneficiation or metallurgical operations in the area being taken? Removal and utilization of top soil.

Is the air pollution control equipments in place and functional? Is the air pollution due to fines dust smoke or gaseous emissions during prospecting mining beneficiations or metallurgical operations and related activities being controlled and kept within permissible limits specified under various environmental laws of the country including the air (prevention and control Act) 1981 (14 of 1981). And the Environmental (protection) Act. Is stoping in underground mines being carried out as to keep surface subsidence under control? Precaution against Air pollution. Are the ground vibrations caused by blasting operations within safe limit to prevent damage to public buildings or monuments? Control of surface subsidence. 1986 (29 of 1986) and the consent conditions given by the Pollution Control Board? Discharge of toxic liquid.Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 Has the holder ensured that the restoration is complete before the conclusion of such operations and abandonment of prospect or mine? Precaution against ground vibrations. Is the noise arising out of prospecting mining benefications or metallurgical operations controlled at the source so as to keep it within the permissible limit? Restoration of flora. Has the mine operator obtained environmental clearance under the Environment protection Act and Rules? Has the mine operator obtained site clearance from the central Government in the MOEF? Are the recommendations of the Impact Assessment agency 58 . Is the prospecting or mining operations carried in a manner to cause least damage to the flora of the area held under prospecting licence or mining lease and the nearby areas? Are immediate measures for planting (not less than twice the number of trees destroyed) in the same area or any other area selected by the Controller General or the authorized officer being taken? Is the mine operator look after them during the subsistence of the licence /lease after which these shall be handed over to the state Forest department or any other authority as may be nominated by the Controller General or the authorized officer? Is the mine operator restoring to the extent possible other flora destroyed by prospecting or mning operations? Environment clearance of the mining projects. Are precautions to prevent or reduce the discharge of toxic and objectionable liquid effluents from mine workshops beneficiations or metallurgical plants tailings ponds into surface water bodies ground water aquifer and useable lands being taken? Are these effluents being suitably treated to conform to the standards laid down in this regard? Precaution against noise.

Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries 33 34 35 adhered to? Are the project authorities concerned submitting a half yearly report to the concerned agency in order to enable the Impact assessment agency concerned to monitor the effective implementation of the recommendation and conditions subject to which the environmental clearances has been given? Forest Conservation Act 1980. Is forest land being diverted for mining? Has the permission/approval of the Government of India for the diversion taken? 59 .

Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries C HECK L IST –II (F OR I NTERNAL AND E XTERNAL A UDITORS ) Format 3 (VG3): Verification Guidelines on Resource Auditing Aspects A. Monthly Raw material consumption RAW MATERIAL INTAKE [i] Type of Raw material Weight used (Kg) PRODUCT PRODUCED [ii] Type of Product Weight produced (Kg) Total Total Note:i = ii + waste products + fugitive losses through air and water C. Monthly Energy Balance Sheet ENERGY INTAKE ENERGY CONSUMPTION [a] [b] Source of Energy Kilowatts Mode of Use of Energy Kilowatt Grid Process Diesel Generator Set Cooling Solar Energy Air Pollution Control Devices Any other Water Pollution Control Devices Water Sprinkling systems Total Total Note: a = b + loss due to heat 60 . Monthly Water Balance Sheet WATER INTAKE WATER CONSUMPTION [a] [b] Mode of Abstraction of Volume Mode of Use of Water Volume Water (m3) (m3) Tanker Process Surface Water Cooling Ground Water Domestic Piped Water Water Sprinkling systems Rain Water (harvested) Total Total Note: a = b + waste water generated + loss due to evaporation B.

Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries A NNEXURE ……. M AINTAINING L OG B OOKS Log Book 1: Log Book for Daily Water Balance Sheet (Volume m3) Mode of Abstraction of Water Tanker Surface Water Ground Water Piped Water Rain Water (harvested) Total Mode of Use of Water of Water Process Cooling Domestic Water Sprinkling systems WATER INTAKE 1/2/04 2/2/04 3/2/04 4/2/04 5/2/04 3/2/04 4/2/04 5/2/04 6/2/04 7/2/04 … … … … WATER CONSUMPTION 1/2/04 2/2/04 Total 60 6/2/04 7/2/04 .

Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries Log Book 2: Log Book for Daily Resources Balance Sheet (Weight Kg) Type of Raw material used RAW MATERIAL INTAKE DATES 1/2/04 2/2/04 3/2/04 4/2/04 5/2/04 6/2/04 7/2/04 … … Total Type of Products manufactured PRODUCTION DATES 1/2/04 2/2/04 3/2/04 4/2/04 5/2/04 Total Note:For only mining projects the products includes the ore which is transported 61 6/2/04 7/2/0 4 … … .

Standard Operating Procedure for Mining Industries Log Book 3: Log Book for Daily Energy Balance Sheet (Kilowatts) ENERGY INTAKE DATES Source of Energy 1/2/04 2/2/04 3/2/04 4/2/04 1/2/04 2/2/04 3/2/04 4/2/04 5/2/04 6/2/04 7/2/04 … … Grid Diesel Generator Set Solar Energy Any other Total Energy Consumption ENERGY CONSUMPTION DATES 5/2/04 Process Cooling Air Pollution Control Devices Water Pollution Control Devices Water Sprinkling systems Total 62 6/2/04 7/2/04 … … .

Peenya Industrial area. 3rd Phase. Bangalore-560 058 .Environmental Management And Policy Research Institute Urban-Eco Park. 100 feet Road. Peenya.