Research Symposium

April 27, 2007 The Benjamin Hotel, New York, NY

Member List

Agenda
2:00 p.m. 2:10 p.m. Welcome — Clay Walker, FSA Chairman Nielsen Fantasy Basketball Nielsen Fantasy NASCAR Nielsen Fantasy Golf Nielsen Fantasy Baseball Nielsen Fantasy Football 3:00 p.m. 3:30 p.m. 3:40 p.m. 4:00 p.m. 4:30 p.m. Break Hitwise Interactive Sports Marketing Copernicus Marketing Sports Business Journal Q&A with Rex Grossman and Amani Toomer 5:00-6:30 p.m. Reception with NFL and NBA players at Emery Bar

Fantasy Basketball Market Study
April 27, 2007

0

Fantasy Basketball Market Study Table of Contents

Methodology

Fantasy Basketball Universe

Engagement Metrics

Demographics

1

Methodology

Used custom Nielsen//NetRatings MegaPanel of households; draws from panel of 120,000 computers with tracking software installed, representing 350,000 users.

Identified URLs for stand-alone fantasy basketball sites and fantasy basketball sections of major sports sites

Compiled usage results for fantasy sites/areas for December 2006  Fantasy Basketball Market “roll-up” which includes all sites

Note: MegaPanel results are for households and not individuals
2

Summary of Findings

Fantasy Basketball Universe  Total of 1.5 million unique users for fantasy basketball sites in December, 2006; FSA estimates total fantasy basketball universe at approximately 2 million  Fantasy basketball universe is approximately 20% of fantasy football universe (fantasy football universe estimated to be 10 million by FSA)

User Engagement Metrics  Total of 141 million fantasy basketball page views in December, 2006

3

Fantasy Basketball Universe
Top Fantasy Basketball Sites – December, 2006
Unique Users (000s) Yahoo.com CBS SportsLine ESPN.com NBA.com RotoWorld AOL.com Sporting News Fantasy Basketball Category 1,015 201 171 101 82 33 32 1,502 Page Views (000s) 114,017 8,364 5,789 5,990 809 42 4,324 141,068

 

Total of 1.5 million unique users for fantasy basketball sites in December, 2006 Yahoo was #1 site with 1 million unique users; CBS SportsLine in #2 position with 200k unique users

Note: Other fantasy sites include Fanball.com, CDM Sports, USA Today, and FOX Sports
4

Fantasy NASCAR Market Study
April 27, 2007

0

Fantasy NASCAR Market Study Table of Contents

Methodology

Fantasy NASCAR Universe

Engagement Metrics

Demographics

Fantasy NASCAR vs. Fantasy Football

1

Methodology

Used Nielsen//NetRatings NetView panel of 30,000 U.S. residents

Identified URLs for stand-alone fantasy NASCAR sites and fantasy NASCAR sections of major sports sites

Compiled usage results for fantasy sites/areas for Feb 2007  Fantasy NASCAR Market “roll-up” which includes all sites

Note: Data is subject to wide fluctuations due to low sample size
2

Summary of Findings

Fantasy NASCAR Universe  Total of 1.2 million unique users for fantasy NASCAR sites in Feb, 2007; FSA estimates total fantasy NASCAR universe at approximately 1.5 million  Fantasy NASCAR universe is approximately 15% of fantasy football universe (fantasy football universe estimated to be 10 million by FSA)

User Engagement Metrics  Total of 43 million fantasy NASCAR page views in Feb, 2007

3

Summary of Findings

Demographics  Fantasy NASCAR players are better educated than the average internet user; 76% have attended college  Fantasy NASCAR players are concentrated in the coveted 18-49 year old demographic; 72% of players fell within this demo vs. 49% internet average  33% of fantasy NASCAR players are female

4

Fantasy NASCAR Universe

  

Total of 1.2 million unique users for fantasy NASCAR sites in February, 2007 Yahoo was #1 site with 579k unique users; NASCAR.com in #2 position with 294k unique users Fantasy NASCAR sites generated total of 43 million pages views in February, 2007

Top 4 Fantasy NASCAR Sites – Feb, 2007
Page Views (000s) 23,800 6,672 1,680 6,902 43,337

Unique Users (000s) Yahoo NASCAR.com FOXSports.com ESPN.com Fantasy NASCAR Category 579 294 186 165 1,215

Note: Other fantasy game sites include AOL, CDM Sports Fanball.com, CBS SportsLine, Sporting News and USA Today
5

Demographics

Fantasy NASCAR players are concentrated within 18-49 year-old demographic; 72% of fantasy players fell within this age grouping vs. 49% for overall internet audience Nearly half of audience (43%) within 35-49 year-old group

Age of Fantasy Players
Under18 (%) 5 20 8 5 24 13 18-24 (%) 25-34 (%) 35-49 (%) 43 28 50+ (%) 23 31

Fantasy NASCAR category

Internet audience

6

Demographics
Income of Fantasy Players
Under $25k (%) 1 6 22 27 32 29 $25-49k (%) $50-74k (%) $75-99k (%) 17 19 $100149k (%) 16 16 $150k+ (%) 5 8

38% of fantasy NASCAR players have incomes over $75,000

Fantasy NASCAR category

Internet audience

7

Fantasy Golf Market Study
April 27, 2007

0

Fantasy Golf Market Study Table of Contents

Methodology

Fantasy Golf Universe

Engagement Metrics

Demographics

Fantasy Golf vs. Fantasy Football

1

Methodology

Used Nielsen//NetRatings NetView panel of 30,000 U.S. residents

Identified URLs for stand-alone fantasy golf sites and fantasy golf sections of major sports sites

Compiled usage results for fantasy sites/areas for April 2006  Fantasy Golf Market “roll-up” which includes all sites

Note: Data is subject to wide fluctuations due to low sample size and changes in URL structure
2

Summary of Findings

Fantasy Golf Universe  Total of 478k unique users for fantasy golf sites in April, 2006; FSA estimates total fantasy golf universe at approximately 0.5 million  Fantasy golf universe is approximately 5% of fantasy football universe (fantasy football universe estimated to be 10 million by FSA)  Yahoo was #1 fantasy golf site with 246,000 unique users in April, 2006

User Engagement Metrics  Total of 15 million fantasy golf page views in April, 2006

3

Summary of Findings

Demographics  Fantasy golf players are more affluent and better educated than the average internet user  Fantasy golf players are concentrated in the coveted 18-49 year old demographic; 67% of players fell within this demo vs. 49% internet average  Over half (51%) of fantasy golf players have incomes over $75,000

4

Fantasy Golf Universe
Top 3 Fantasy Golf Sites – April, 2006
Page Views (000s) 8,278 3,848 386 15,447

 

Total of 478k unique users for fantasy golf sites in April, 2006 Yahoo was #1 site with 246k unique users; ESPN in #2 position with 104k unique users

Unique Users (000s) Yahoo ESPN.com USAToday.com Fantasy Golf Category 245 103 31 478

Note: Other fantasy game sites include Fanball.com, Head2Head.com, and AOL.com
5

Demographics

Fantasy golf players are concentrated within 18-49 year old demographic; 67% of fantasy players fell within this age grouping vs. 49% for overall internet audience Over half of fantasy golf players (51%) in 35-49 year-old grouping

Age of Fantasy Players
Under18 (%) 10 21 8 3 18-24 (%) 25-34 (%) 13 13 35-49 (%) 51 28 50+ (%) 23 31

Fantasy Golf category

Internet audience

6

Demographics
Income of Fantasy Players
Under $25k (%) 6 6 23 27 6 38 $25-49k (%) $50-74k (%) $75-99k (%) 23 20 $100149k (%) 18 15 $150k+ (%) 10 7

Fantasy golf players are more affluent than the average internet user; 51% have incomes over $75,000

Fantasy Golf category

Internet audience

7

Fantasy Baseball Market Study
April 27, 2007

0

Fantasy Baseball Market Study Table of Contents

Methodology

Fantasy Baseball Universe

Engagement Metrics

Demographics

Fantasy Baseball vs. Fantasy Football

Future Research Topics

1

Methodology

Used Nielsen//NetRatings NetView panel of 30,000 U.S. residents

Identified URLs for stand-alone fantasy baseball sites and fantasy baseball sections of major sports sites

Compiled usage results for fantasy sites/areas for May 2006  Individual fantasy site/area data (unique users, page views, time spent, other measures)  Fantasy Baseball Market “roll-up” which includes 4 key sites

Also examined total usage by fantasy players within “host site” (i.e. site which hosts players’ fantasy baseball game); includes usage of fantasy content and non-fantasy content
2

Summary of Findings

Fantasy Baseball Universe  Total of 2.3 million unique users for top 4 fantasy baseball sites in May, 2006; FSA estimates total fantasy baseball universe at approximately 3 million, including smaller sites, offline players and partial season players  Fantasy baseball universe is approximately 1/3 of fantasy football universe (fantasy football universe estimated to be 10 million by FSA)  Yahoo was #1 fantasy baseball site with 1.5 million unique users in May, 2006; CBS SportsLine was #2 fantasy baseball site with 681 thousand unique users

User Engagement Metrics  Page view metrics demonstrate power of fantasy baseball; total of 459 million fantasy baseball page views in May, 2006  For Yahoo Sports and CBS SportsLine, fantasy baseball users accounted for 56% and 38% of total sports site page views, respectively  Fantasy baseball creates “multiplier effect” for sports sites; fantasy players generated additional 300 million page views each month for host sites (beyond 459 million fantasy baseball specific pages)
3

Summary of Findings

Demographics  Fantasy baseball players are more affluent and better educated than the average internet user  Fantasy baseball players are concentrated in the coveted 18-49 year old demographic; 65% of players fell within this demo vs. 49% internet average

Fantasy Baseball vs. Fantasy Football  Of top 8 fantasy football sites, only 3 offered fantasy baseball games in May 2006  Fantasy football and fantasy baseball have similar engagement metrics with respect to pages per person and visits per person  Time spent per person on fantasy football is approximately 20% greater than on fantasy baseball

4

Fantasy Baseball Universe
Top 4 Fantasy Baseball Sites – May, 2006
Unique Users (000s) Yahoo.com CBS SportsLine.com ESPN.com MLB.com 1,546 681 290 242

 

Total of 2.3 million unique users for Top 4 fantasy baseball sites in May, 2006 Yahoo was #1 site with 1.5 million unique users; SportsLine in #2 position with 681k unique users

Note: Other fantasy game sites include SportingNews.com, CDM/TQStats, and ProTrade.com
5

Fantasy Baseball Content Sites

Of independent fantasy baseball content sites, RotoWorld.com had highest unique visitor total in May, 2006

Selected Fantasy Baseball Content Sites – May, 2006
Unique Users (000s) RotoWorld.com KFFL.com RotoWire.com RotoTimes.com 268 146 138 122

Note: Other fantasy baseball content sites include Fanball.com, BaseballHQ.com, and TalentedMrRoto.com
6

User Engagement Measures

 

Fantasy baseball sites generated total of 459 million pages views in May, 2006 Of the major media sites, Yahoo and CBS SportsLine users consumed the most pages

Page Views, Time Spent, and Visits for Top 4 Sites
Unique Users (000s) Pages/ Person 222 109 88 19,740 458,990 85 201 1,546 681 342,935 74,563 21,752 290 242 Page Views (000s) Time/ Person 1:19 1:31 0:56 1:21 1:32 Visits/ Person 14 12 12 14 14

Yahoo.com CBS SportsLine.com

ESPN.com MLB.com

Top 4 Fantasy Baseball sites

7

User Engagement Measures

 

Fantasy baseball users represented significant percentage of total usage for selected sports sites For Yahoo Sports and CBS SportsLine, fantasy baseball page views represented 38% and 25% of total sports page views respectively

Fantasy Baseball Page Views as % of Sports Page Views
Unique Users (000s) 1,546 681 290 242 342,935 74,563 21,752 19,740 Fantasy Page Views (000s) 895,030 293,457 702,415 273,865 Sports Page Views (000s) Fantasy Pages/ Sports/ Pages 38% 25% 3% 7%

Yahoo.com CBS SportsLine.com ESPN.com MLB.com

8

User Engagement Measures

Fantasy baseball players generated 759 million total page views on sports sites that hosted their fantasy games - 459 million fantasy baseball pages and approximately 300 million additional sports pages For Yahoo Sports, fantasy baseball users generated more than 50% of site usage

FB User Page Views as % of Sports Page Views
Unique Users (000s) 1,546 681 290 242 342,935 74,563 21,752 19,740 458,990 Fantasy Page Views (000s) 503,342 112,651 108,204 34,663 758,860 FB User Page Views (000s) Sports Page Views (000s) 895,030 293,456 702,415 273,865 2,164,866 FB User Pages/ Sports/ Pages 56% 38% 15% 13% 35%

Yahoo.com CBS SportsLine.com

ESPN.com MLB.com

Top 4 Fantasy Baseball sites

9

User Engagement Measures
Home vs. Work Usage
Unique Users (000s) 1,546 681 290 242 342,935 74,563 21,752 19,740 458,990 61 50 66 37 58 Fantasy Page Views (000s) Home Page Views (%) Work Page Views (%) 39 50 34 63 42

 

Approximately 58% of fantasy baseball usage was at home, 42% of usage was at work Of major sites, MLB users consumed most pages at work, ESPN users consumed most pages at home

Yahoo.com CBS SportsLine.com

ESPN.com MLB.com

Top 4 Fantasy Baseball sites

10

Demographics
Age of Fantasy Players
Under18 (%) 15 14 7 26 17 20 9 8 6 4 10 12 20 9 8 6 16 13 18-24 (%) 25-34 (%) 35-49 (%) 38 36 49 23 40 28 50+ (%) 16 30 30 40 18 31

Fantasy baseball players are concentrated within 18-49 year old demographic; 65% of fantasy players fell within this age grouping vs. 49% for overall internet audience

Yahoo.com CBS SportsLine.com

ESPN.com MLB.com

Top 4 Fantasy Baseball sites

Internet Average

11

Demographics
Income of Fantasy Players
Under $25k (%) 1 3 4 3 2 7 23 17 4 21 36 26 34 27 18 15 33 32 $25-49k (%) $50-74k (%) $75-99k (%) 21 21 24 14 21 19 $100149k (%) 22 23 25 34 21 16 $150k+ (%) 5 5 6 2 5 7

 

Fantasy baseball players are more affluent than the average internet user Of the major sites, MLB users are most affluent

Yahoo.com CBS SportsLine.com

ESPN.com MLB.com

Top 4 Fantasy Baseball sites

Internet Average

12

Demographics
Education of Fantasy Players
No College (%) College (%) 55 44 52 29 51 46 31 34 23 36 34 42 Post Grad (%) 15 21 25 35 14 11

 

Fantasy baseball players are better educated than the average internet user More than 65% of fantasy baseball players have at least some level of college education

Yahoo.com CBS SportsLine.com

ESPN.com MLB.com

Top 4 Fantasy Baseball sites

Internet Average

13

Fantasy Baseball vs. Fantasy Football

 

Of top 8 fantasy football sites, only 3 offered a fantasy baseball game in May, 2006 4 of top 5 fantasy football game providers primarily employed a “free” model; 1 of top 4 fantasy baseball game providers primarily employed a “free” model

Comparison of Fantasy Football and Fantasy Baseball sites
F. Football Unique Users, Oct 2005 (000s) Yahoo.com ESPN.com CBS Sportsline.com NFL.com FoxSports.com Fanball.com Myfantasyleague.com AOL.com MLB.com 1,715 1,653 664 590 408 323 No Game 4,429 1,737 1,546 290 681 No Game No Game No Game No Game No Game 242 F. Baseball Unique Users, May 2006 (000s)

14

Engagement Metrics

Fantasy football represents a larger percentage of total sports page usage than does fantasy baseball

Fantasy Page Views as % of Sports Page Views
Fantasy Football Yahoo.com CBS SportsLine.com ESPN.com NFL.com MLB.com 45% 66% 18% 25% Fantasy Baseball 38% 25% 3% 7%

15

Engagement Metrics

Fantasy football and fantasy baseball have similar engagement metrics with respect to pages per person and visits per person Time spent per person on fantasy football is approximately 20% greater than on fantasy baseball

Page Views, Time Spent, and Visits
Fantasy Football Pages per Person Time per Person 199 1:51 13 Visits per Person Fantasy Baseball 201 1:33 14

16

Demographics

 

Fantasy Football players are slightly more affluent and better educated than fantasy baseball players Fantasy football players are more concentrated in the 18-49 demographic than are fantasy baseball players

Page Views, Time Spent, and Visits
Fantasy Football Age (% in 18-49) Income ($75k+) 76% 54% 73% Some Level of College 65% 47% 65% Fantasy Baseball

17

Sports Portal Results – October, 2006

Most major sports sites experienced significant unique user and page view growth in October, 2006 vs. October, 2005

Comparison of Major Sports Portals, Oct. 2006 vs Oct 2005
Oct. 2006 Unique Users (000s) Oct. 2006 Page Views (000s) Oct. 2005 Unique Users (000s) Oct. 2005 Page Views (000s) 2006 vs. 2005 Unique Users 964,002 1,830,551 12,239 5,245 11,400 7,766 6,830 7,218 517,875 573,386 408,531 235,445 194,651 147,991 +10% +30% +16% +135% +2% +15% -1% -11% 2006 vs. 2005 Page Views +22% -8% +26% +31% +7% +3% +33% -40%

ESPN.com Yahoo.com 14,222 12,349 11,606 8,956 6,731 6,443 752,590 438,270 241,240 258,193 88,924 655,069

17,236 16,311

1,175,399 1,692,332

15,641 12,519

FoxSports.com

CBS SportsLine.com NFL Int. Network MLB.com SI.com AOL.com

18

Fantasy Football Market Study
April 27, 2007

0

Fantasy Football Market Study Table of Contents

Nielsen//NetRatings - Usage Analysis  Fantasy Football Universe  Engagement Metrics  Rank Among Top Web Properties  Demographics

1

Methodology

Used Nielsen//NetRatings NetView panel of 30,000 U.S. residents Identified URLs for stand-alone fantasy football sites and fantasy football sections of major sports sites Compiled usage results for fantasy sites/areas for October 2006  Individual fantasy site/area data (unique users, page views, time spent, other measures)  Fantasy Football Market “roll-up” which includes 14 key sites (*) Also examined total usage by fantasy players within “host site” (i.e. site which hosts players’ fantasy football game); includes usage of fantasy content and non-fantasy content

(*) Fantasy Football Market roll-up includes ESPN, Yahoo, NFL, SportsLine, Fox, Fanball, SI, MyFantasyLeague, RTSports, Sporting News, USA Today, TQ Stats, EA, AOL

2

Summary of Findings

Fantasy Football Universe  Total of 9.6 million unique users of fantasy football sites in October, 2006  Yahoo was #1 fantasy football site with 4.7 million unique users  CBS SportsLine was #2 with 2.8 million unique users, while NFL.com and ESPN.com competed for #3 position at 1.4– 1.5 million unique users

User Engagement Metrics  Page view metrics demonstrate true power of fantasy football; total of 1.9 billion fantasy football page views in October, 2006  For Yahoo Sports and CBS SportsLine, fantasy football page views accounted for 47% and 46% of total sports site page views respectively  Fantasy football creates “multiplier effect” for sports sites; fantasy players generated nearly 1 billion additional page views per month for host sites (beyond 1.9 billion fantasy football-specific page views)

3

Summary of Findings

Rank Among Top Web Properties  Aggregated fantasy football sites ranked as #14 property on the web (includes all fantasy football page views); with “multiplier effect”, fantasy football ranked in top 10 of all web properties

Demographics  Fantasy football players are more affluent and better educated than the average internet user  Fantasy football players are concentrated in the coveted 18-49 year old demographic; 72% of players fell within this demo vs. 49% internet average  Hispanics and African Americans are under-represented in current fantasy audience

4

Fantasy Football Universe
Top Fantasy Football Sites – October, 2006
Unique Users (000s) Yahoo.com CBS Sportsline.com ESPN.com NFL.com FoxSports.com Myfantasyleague.com Fanball.com AOL.com USAToday.com RTSports.com Sporting News Total Fantasy Football Category 4,685 2,788 1,501 1,405 697 446 368 228 197 192 143 9,557
5

 

Total of 9.6 million unique users for fantasy football sites in October, 2006 Yahoo was #1 site with 4.7 million unique users; CBS SportsLine solid #2 position

Fantasy Football Universe
Selected Fantasy Football Sites – October, 2006
Unique Users (000s) FantasySharks.com KFFL.com Fantasy Football Cafe TheHuddle.com FF Today Sandbox.com EA Sports Fantasy Football FFToolbox 174 146 91 86 81 75 72 47

Wide range of smaller sites provided games and/or content services

6

User Engagement Measures

  

Fantasy football sites generated total of 1.9 billion pages views in October, 2006 Average fantasy player spent 1 hour 49 minutes on FF sites and viewed 194 pages during the month Of the major media sites, ESPN and CBS SportsLine users were most engaged

Page Views, Time Spent, and Visits
Unique Users (000s) Pages/ Person 171 124 187 106,890 105,589 80,514 54,395 9,882 643 61,873 9,557 1,858,351 76 152 180 148 43 3 322 194 4,685 2,788 800,566 346,189 281,028 1,501 1,405 697 446 368 228 197 192 Page Views (000s) Time/ Person 1:10 1:43 1:32 :44 1:34 2:20 2:15 :37 :04 2:44 1:49 Visits/ Person 11 15 12 6 10 14 16 43 2 20 13

Yahoo.com CBS Sportsline.com

ESPN.com NFL.com FoxSports.com Myfantasyleague.com Fanball.com AOL.com USAToday.com RTSports.com

Fantasy Football Category

7

User Engagement Measures
Home vs. Work Usage
Unique Users (000s) 4,685 2,788 1,501 1,405 697 446 368 228 197 192 9,557 800,566 346,189 281,028 106,890 105,589 80,514 54,395 9,882 643 61,873 1,858,351 Fantasy Page Views (000s) 71 69 64 85 89 75 46 59 47 47 70 Home Page Views (%) Work Page Views (%) 29 31 36 15 11 25 54 41 53 53 30

 

Approximately 70% of fantasy football usage was at home, 30% of usage was at work Of major sites, ESPN users consumed most pages at work, Fox Sports users consumed most pages at home

Yahoo.com CBS Sportsline.com

ESPN.com NFL.com FoxSports.com Myfantasyleague.com Fanball.com AOL.com USAToday.com RTSports.com

Fantasy Football Category

8

User Engagement Measures

 

Fantasy football usage represented significant percentage of total usage for major sports sites For Yahoo Sports and CBS SportsLine, fantasy football page views represented 47% and 46% of total sports page views respectively

Fantasy Football Page Views as % of Sports Page Views
Unique Users (000s) 4,685 2,788 1,501 1,405 697 446 368 228 197 192 800,566 346,189 281,028 106,890 105,589 80,514 54,395 9,882 643 61,873 Fantasy Page Views (000s) 1,692,332 752,590 1,175,399 271,183 655,069 58,012 88,924 146,067 Sports Page Views (000s) Fantasy Pages/ Sports/ Pages 47% 46% 24% 39% 16% 100% 94% 11% 1% 100%
9

Yahoo.com CBS Sportsline.com

ESPN.com NFL.com FoxSports.com Myfantasyleague.com Fanball.com AOL.com USAToday.com RTSports.com

User Engagement Measures

Fantasy football players generated approximately 2.7 billion total page views on sports sites that host their fantasy games – 1.9 billion fantasy football pages and 900 million additional sports pages For Yahoo Sports and SportsLine, fantasy football users generated more than 2/3 of site usage

FF User Page Views as % of Sports Page Views
Unique Users (000s) 4,685 2,788 1,501 1,405 697 446 368 228 197 192 9,557 800,566 346,189 281,028 106,890 105,589 80,514 54,395 9,882 643 61,873 1,858,351 Fantasy Page Views (000s) 1,267,358 507,609 475,535 164,761 200,216 57,943 15,503 17,723 2,741,216 FF User Page Views (000s) Sports Page Views (000s) 1,692,332 752,590 1,175,399 271,183 655,069 80,514 58,012 88,924 146,067 61,173 FF User Pages/ Sports/ Pages 75% 67% 40% 61% 31% 100% 100% 17% 12% 100%
10

Yahoo.com CBS Sportsline.com

ESPN.com NFL.com FoxSports.com Myfantasyleague.com Fanball.com AOL.com USAToday.com RTSports.com

Fantasy Football Category

Rank Among Top Web Properties

 

Aggregated fantasy football site usage ranked #14 among all internet properties When all page views generated by fantasy players on host sites are aggregated, fantasy football ranked in top 10

Top Internet Properties – October, 2006
Yahoo MySpace Google MSN/Windows Live eBay AOL FF Users Facebook Craigslist Comcast Nickelodeon Ask Search Network Electronic Arts FF Sites 15,788,669 13,553,056 13,053,465 6,874,787 5,132,875 3,528,406 3,021,098 2,455,512 2,159,867 1,917,538 1,867,272 1,858,351
11

Page Views (000s) 34,086,037 28,086,037

Demographics
Age of Fantasy Players
Under 18 (%) 10 17 10 15 12 5 9 15 NA 14 13 20 7 8 5 6 3 2 0 4 5 0 21 20 29 37 24 22 61 15 24 13 9 7 26 28 39 38 51 47 41 43 52 40 34 52 41 28 18-24 (%) 25-34 (%) 35-49 (%) 50+ (%) 16 11 14 13 16 13 17 19 NA 20 16 32
12

Fantasy football players are concentrated within 18-49 year old demographic; 72% of fantasy players fell within this age grouping vs. 49% for overall internet audience

Yahoo.com ESPN.com

CBS Sportsline.com NFL.com FoxSports.com Fanball.com My Fantasy League AOL SI Sporting News

Fantasy Football Category

Internet Average

Demographics
Income of Fantasy Players
Under $25k (%) 2 2 2 5 1 3 2 NA 5 NA 2 6 16 22 14 27 24 8 4 33 35 11 25 24 28 22 42 7 22 31 28 27 17 19 30 27 $25-49k (%) $50-74k (%) $75-99k (%) 22 24 19 23 28 38 17 28 18 14 22 19 $100149k (%) 18 19 28 15 15 20 16 9 9 35 20 16 $150k+ (%) 10 8 12 6 5 10 18 20 12 11 11 8
13

Fantasy football players are more affluent than the average internet user; 53% above $75,000/year income Of the major sites, CBS SportsLine users are most affluent; 40% above $100,000 per year income

Yahoo.com ESPN.com

CBS Sportsline.com NFL.com FoxSports.com Fanball.com My Fantasy League AOL SI Sporting News

Fantasy Football Category

Internet Average

Demographics
Education of Fantasy Players
No College (%) College (%) 59 55 56 48 68 58 57 50 30 28 43 65 56 44 25 33 24 38 22 29 12 27 Post Grad (%) 16 12 20 14 9 12 30 23 5 15 11
14

 

Fantasy football players are better educated than the average internet user More than 71% of fantasy football players have at least some level of college education

Yahoo.com ESPN.com

CBS Sportsline.com NFL.com FoxSports.com Fanball.com My Fantasy League AOL SI Sporting News

Fantasy Football Category

Internet Average

Demographics

People of Hispanic origin are under-represented within fantasy football category; slight growth over 2005 Of major fantasy sites, NFL had highest percentage of Hispanic players

Ethnic Origin of Fantasy Players
Hispanic Yes (%) Yahoo.com ESPN.com CBS Sportsline.com NFL.com 2 6 4 5 96 95 98 94 Hispanic No (%)

Fantasy Football Category Internet Average

5 9

95 91
15

Demographics
Race of Fantasy Players
White (%) 88 93 95 89 89 85 98 4 9 11 9 0 6 5 5 1 1 2 0 7 2 African American (%) Asian (%) Other (%) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

 

African Americans are under-represented within fantasy football category Of major fantasy sites, FoxSports.com had highest percentage of African American players

Yahoo.com ESPN.com

CBS Sportsline.com NFL.com FoxSports.com Fanball.com My Fantasy League

Fantasy Football Category

90 88

6 9

3 2

0 1
16

Internet Average

FSA Research Symposium April 27th, 2007

Methodology

 504 online surveys were completed using ISM’s proprietary panel of fantasy sports players

 Surveys were completed between February 27th and March 31st

 Respondents include a mix of fantasy sports players:

 Multiple sports and websites

 Free players and pay players

 Varying levels of experience playing fantasy sports

1

Summary of Findings

Player and Website Overview

PGA TOUR and NFL fantasy players index the highest for incomes above $75k and $100k

43% of PGA TOUR and 37% of NFL fantasy players have a household income above $75,000

Although Yahoo! remains the overall leader in number of players, CBS Sportsline and ESPN have a higher percentage of players in the upper income ranges

20% of online fantasy sports play/research is done from work

NFL and MLB fantasy players are very active in following games and their fantasy stats using both the TV and internet

2

Summary of Findings

Leisure Activity and Product Ownership

69% of fantasy players have attended a live sporting event in the past year

PGA TOUR and MLB fantasy players index the highest for attending live sporting events

Approximately 50% of fantasy sports players participate in recreational sports

Participation in sports aligns with fantasy sport played, but not always with sporting goods purchased

Fantasy sports players’ ownership of consumer electronics indexes favorably across many products

69% of fantasy players own a video game system, which indexes at 168 vs. U.S. households

3

Summary of Findings

Online Advertisements

42% of fantasy players remember seeing advertisements on fantasy sports websites

Sporting categories (tickets, equipment and apparel) dominate recall

60% could name at least one brand that advertised on a fantasy sports website without prompting

Almost half of fantasy players have clicked on an online advertisement

2/3 of which has been done on a fantasy sports website

Almost 2/3 of fantasy sports players feel that if a company is advertising on a fantasy sports website, the products will fit with their interests

Fantasy sports players are heavy television and internet users

Almost half watch at least six hours of TV per weekday

Over a third spend at least six hours per weekday on the internet for nonbusiness reasons

4

Demographic Snapshot

 88% of players in sample are male

 88% are in the 18-49 demographic

 14% -- 18-24

 36% -- 25-34

 38% -- 35-49

 55% have an income of $50,000 or higher

 31% - $75,000 or higher

 85% have a broadband connection at home

 vs. 78% of online population

5

Household Income by Fantasy Sport Played

 PGA TOUR and NFL fantasy players index the highest for incomes above $75k and $100k  37% of NFL fantasy players have a household income above $75k  NFL fantasy players are a close second to The PGA TOUR for incomes above $75k

Fantasy Sport Played Household Income Level MLB 31% 100 16% 96 105 121 17% 20% 82 119 26% 37% 43% 136 26% 161 NBA NFL PGA TOUR

NHL 14% 44 10% 63

NAS CAR 28% 89 14% 85

Over $75,000

Over $100,000

How to Read the Table Above:  43% of PGA TOUR fantasy players have an income above $75k, which is an index of 136 vs. the overall sample in this survey  26% of PGA TOUR fantasy players have an income above $100k, which is an index of 161 vs. the overall sample in this survey

6

Fantasy Sports Websites

 Overall ranking of top sites remained fairly consistent with April 2006 FSA Study  Yahoo! is clearly the leader with ESPN and CBS Sportsline still ahead of the pack in 2nd and 3rd position, respectively
% of Respondents that have played at eac h site in the last 12 months
Yahoo! ESPN CBS Sportsline FOX Sports NFL.com 10% 10% 9% 6% 4% 4% 3% 3% 2% 2% 1% 9% 11% 19% 30% 34% 44%

The Sporting News AOL

CDM Fantasy Sports

RealTime Fantasy Sports MLB.com Fanball NBA.com Sportsbuff EA Sports PROTRADE Other

Head2Head Sports

0%

5%

10%

15%

20%

25%

30%

35%

40%

45%

50%

7

Household Income by Fantasy Sport Website

 Although Yahoo! remains the overall leader in number of players, CBS Sportsline and ESPN have the highest percentage of players in the upper income ranges  41% of CBS Sportsline players have a household income over $75k compared to 36% of ESPN players and 32% of Yahoo! players

Fantasy Sport Played Household Income Level AOL 8% 66 35% 108 32% 136 19% 127 5% 62 0% 0 138 9% 117 12% 136 20% 88 88 16% 109 5% 53 7% 92 21% 21% 84 100 27% 33% 31% 95 24% 99 20% 134 6% 67 10% 137 86 153 73 10% 19% 9% ES PN 13% 105 36% 110 27% 113 14% 95 9% 102 1% 17

CBS S portsline

CDM Fantasy S ports

FOX S ports

NFL.com 13% 105 43% 130 23% 98 15% 100 2% 24 4% 56

The S porting News 15% 126 33% 102 28% 118 18% 121 3% 29 3% 34

Yahoo! 13% 106 32% 97 23% 98 18% 122 7% 77 7% 96

Under $25,000

$25,000 - $49,999

$50,000 - $74,999

$75,000 - $99,999

$100,000 - $150,000

Over $150,000

8

Online Hours Playing Fantasy Sports

 NFL and MLB fantasy players spend the most time online per week playing and researching fantasy sports  NASCAR was a surprising third place with almost 4½ online hours per week per player  20% of fantasy players’ online time playing/researching fantasy sports was done from work

Online Hours per Week Playing & Researc hing Fantasy Sports

Work NFL MLB NASCAR NBA NHL PGA TOUR Other 0.43 0.53 0.60 0.83 0.98 3.51 2.98 2.40 1.59 2.34 0.95 4.02 1.19 3.86 5.05 4.97 4.49 3.80 2.83 2.12 2.94

Home

Total

9

Fantasy Player Engagement Behavior

 NFL and MLB fantasy players are the most likely to follow the games and their fantasy teams across multiple devices  38% of MLB fantasy players still check stats in the following day’s newspaper even though they watch live games and follow their fantasy stats live on the internet  NASCAR players are also far more likely than the remaining sports to watch the actual race

MLB
88% 13% 84% 13% 83% 38% 60% 6% 72% 20% 7% 63%

NBA

NFL
94% 20% 80% 14% 80% 28%

PGA TOUR
59% 6% 64% 5% 74% 18%

NHL
43% 6% 74% 3% 74% 29%

NASCAR
83% 16% 66% 6% 76% 22%

I watch the games/events live on TV

I record the games/events on a DVR (TiVo®) and watch them at a later time

I follow the games/events and my fantasy stats on the internet

I follow the games/events and my fantasy stats on my cell phone or PDA

I check stats the next day on the internet

I check stats the next day in the newspaper

10

Motivations for Playing Fantasy Sports

Most common responses (in order of frequency):

 For fun

 For the competition

 Because my friends/husband/co-workers/kids play

 Makes watching games even more exciting

 To win prizes/cash

 Makes mundane games/events interesting

11

Live Sporting Events Attended

 69% of fantasy sports players have attended a live sporting event in the last 12 months  27% of fantasy sports players have purchased tickets online in the last 12 months
% of Respondents that have attended eac h type of sporting event
MLB NFL NASCAR NBA NHL PGA TOUR 3% 3% 2% 10% 31% 9% 9% 16% 22% 30% 30%

Ultimate Fighting Championship

Major League Soccer Box ing Other

None in last 12 months

0%

5%

10%

15%

20%

25%

30%

35%

12

Sporting Events Attended by Fantasy Sport Played

 Overall, PGA TOUR and MLB fantasy players index the highest for attending live sporting events  Including having the highest attendance % at NFL games  Even though NFL fantasy players skew towards a higher income, their attendance % at live sporting events was generally “middle of the pack”

Fantasy Sport Played Live Sporting Event A ttended MLB 56% 184 25% 155 40% 134 14% 167 13% 137 15% 67 78% 114 22% 69 158 11% 121 12% 55 72% 105 28% 89 13% 127 38% 227 134 38% 127 11% 131 12% 132 14% 61 71% 104 29% 91 37% 22% 137 134 42% 41% 47% 155 26% 164 41% 136 20% 238 14% 148 10% 44 77% 113 23% 72 NBA NFL PGA TOUR MLB NBA NFL PGA TOUR NHL NAS CAR

NHL 29% 94 23% 142 37% 124 6% 67 26% 282 9% 39 57% 83 43% 136

NAS CAR 27% 88 14% 87 29% 96 7% 78 9% 93 27% 122 66% 97 34% 106

Have attended a live sporting event in last 12 months

Have not attended a live sporting event in last 12 months

13

Leisure Activities

 Almost half of fantasy sports players participate in recreational sports  55% of fantasy sports players rent movies and 42% go out to see movies  A quarter of fantasy sports players also stated that a movie advertisement on a fantasy sports website would catch their attention
Other Ac tivities Respondents Do For Fun
64% 55% 54% 49% 42% 39% 35% 35% 32% 23% 10%

Listen to music

Rent mov ies

Go out with friends

Participate in sports

Go to mov ies

Ex ercise

Gamble in a casino Trav el

Read books Shop Other

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

70%

14

Recreation by Fantasy Sport Played

 NASCAR fantasy players had materially lower participation rates in exercise and recreational sports  Participation for NASCAR players in other “less active” activities was average

MLB
52% 73% 66% 60% 45% 48%

NBA

NFL

PGA TOUR
55% 70%

NHL
43% 66%

NASCAR
35% 45%

Exercise

Participate in Sports

15

Sport Participation by Fantasy Sport

 Fantasy players generally have higher participation rates in recreational sports that align with their fantasy sports participation

Fantasy Sport Played Recreational Sport Played MLB 33% 56% 37% 61% 7% 26% 8% 42% 15% 44% 12% 7% 19% 26% 9% 38% 14% 4% 6% 63% 58% 35% 40% 29% 70% 5% 27% 9% 29% 12% 65% 57% 53% 25% 24% 22% 21% 58% 42% 46% 21% 21% 13% 38% 17% NBA NFL PGA TOUR NHL Baseball Basketball Football Golf Hockey Running S occer S oftball Tennis

NAS CAR 21% 55% 39% 49% 6% 26% 5% 38% 13%

16

Sporting Goods Purchased

 75% of fantasy sports players have purchased sporting goods even though only half participate in recreational sports

% of Respondents that have purc hased eac h type of sporting good
46% 30% 20% 18% 16% 10% 7% 7% 4% 11% 25%

Athletic Shoes Golf Football Basketball Baseball Softball Soccer Tennis Hockey Other

Hav e not purchased in last 12 months

0%

5%

10%

15%

20%

25%

30%

35%

40%

45%

50%

17

Sporting Goods Purchased by Fantasy Sport

 Sporting goods purchases are not always dictated by fantasy sport participation  NASCAR and NHL fantasy players have a higher incidence of non-purchase in the last 12 months than other fantasy sports players

Fantasy Sport Played Sporting Goods Purchased MLB 28% 23% 22% 40% 4% 8% 13% 8% 58% 16% 10% 51% 16% 13% 9% 4% 4% 9% 11% 8% 51% 21% 33% 36% 22% 21% 21% 52% 7% 13% 11% 9% 60% 12% 23% 23% 26% 18% 18% 21% 20% 26% 20% 20% 9% 14% 9% 11% 46% 23% NBA NFL PGA TOUR NHL Baseball Basketball Football Golf Hockey S occer S oftball Tennis Athletic S hoes Have not purchased in last 12 months

NAS CAR 16% 17% 21% 25% 4% 7% 10% 6% 44% 27%

18

Consumer Electronics Ownership

 Fantasy sports players have significantly higher household ownership in important consumer electronics categories  Ownership percentages are consistent with TV watching, video game playing and music listening interests and behaviors  Only 13% of fantasy sports players do not own any of these items
34% 33%

High Definition TV

DVR 12%

42%

Video Game Sy stem

69% 41%

Video iPod / MP3 Play er 7%

31%

Satellite Radio Sy stem 10%

15%

0%

10%

20%

30% FS A S urvey

40%

50% US Households

60%

70%

80%

19

Video Game Playing Time

 More fantasy sports players play video games (76%) than own video game systems (69%)  In addition to playing their own system, players are playing on-line, using handheld devices and with friends’ systems

Hours Playing Video Games per Week

Between 0-2 hours Between 3-5 hours Between 6-10 hours Between 11-20 hours Over 20 hours I do not play video games 17% 9% 4% 3% 24%

42%

20

Beverage Consumption Behavior

 75% of players have consumed alcoholic beverages in the last 30 days  65% have consumed more than one type of beverage during that same time period

% of Respondents who have c onsumed eac h type of beverage in the last 30 days

Beer

66%

Liquor

41%

Wine

27%

Liqueur

11%

Flav ored malt bev erage

10%

None of the abov e

25%

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

70%

80%

21

Advertisements on Fantasy Sports Websites

 Sports related categories hold three of the top four spots  Fast food was notable in its absence from the most remembered categories
% of Respondents who remember seeing an advertisement in eac h produc t c ategory
Sporting Tickets Sports Apparel Automobiles Sporting Goods Beer Online Gambling 28% 27% 26% 24% 23% 23% 22% 22% 18% 17% 16% 13% 13% 12% 19%

Cell Phones and Service Video Games Credit Cards

49% of respondents have researched or purchased an automobile online

Sports Beverages Cable/Satellite TV Movies Electronics Job Hunting I don't remember

0%

5%

10%

15%

20%

25%

30%

22

Unprompted Brand Recall

 42% recall seeing advertisements on fantasy sports sites they have visited in the last three months  60% of which could name one brand or more on an unprompted basis

% of Respondents who named the following brands on an unprompted basis

Budweiser Nike Miller Lite Toyota Coors Coca-Cola Pepsi McDonald's Ford

18% 9% 8% 6% 6% 6% 6% 5% 5%

23

Advertisements on Fantasy Sports Websites

 45% have clicked on an online advertisement  Two-thirds of those clicking have done so on a fantasy sports website  25% responded that a movie ad would catch their attention (42% of respondents attend movies)
% of Respondents stating ads for these produc t c ategories would “c atc h their attention”
Sporting Goods Sporting Tickets Sports Apparel Beer Video Games Movies Electronics Automobiles Music Sports Beverages Liquor 19% 18% 16% 16% 16% 14% 14% 19% 19% 24% 24% 26% 31% 38% 38% 36%

Sports Trading Cards DVDs Online Gambling Energy Drinks Travel

0%

5%

10%

15%

20%

25%

30%

35%

40%

45%

24

Behavior Towards Online Ads by Sport
Fantasy Sport Played MLB
58% 39% 40% 34% 40% 60% 49% 55%

NBA

NFL

PGA TOUR

NHL
54% 49%

NASCAR
43% 30%

Remember seeing ad on fantasy sports site

Clicked ad on fantasy sports site

Top 5 Product Categories S porting Tickets S ports Apparel Cell Phones/S ervice S porting Goods Video Games S porting Goods S porting Tickets S ports Apparel Beer Video Games Beer Video Games S ports Apparel S porting Goods S porting Tickets Cell Phones/S ervice Video Games S porting Goods Online Gambling S porting Tickets S porting Goods S ports Apparel Beer Video Games Automobiles Automobiles S ports Apparel S ports Apparel S porting Tickets S porting Tickets S ports Apparel S porting Tickets Automobiles Video Games Cell Phones/S ervice S porting Goods S porting Tickets S ports Apparel Beer Video Games S porting Tickets Cell Phones/S ervice Video Games S ports Apparel Movies S porting Tickets Video Games S porting Goods S ports Apparel Electronics S porting Tickets S ports Apparel Automobiles Cell Phones/S ervice Beer S porting Tickets S porting Goods S ports Apparel Beer Video Games

Remembered:

Likely to "catch my attention":

25

Attitudes Towards Advertisements
% Responding Somewhat or Strongly A gree 60%

I think brands that advertise on fantasy sports websites are cool

I am more likely to pay attention to/notice an advertisement on a fantasy sports website than other websites

56%

I am more likely to purchase products from a company that advertises on a fantasy sports website than other websites

50%

If a company is advertising on a fantasy sports website, their products will fit with my interests

62%

I expect to see advertisements on a free fantasy sports website

80%

I expect to see advertisements on a fantasy sports website where I pay to play

49%

I am more likely to play a fantasy sports contest that is sponsored by a company or brand I recognize

65%

26

Attitudes Towards Advertisements

For respondents who said they are more likely to purchase products from a company that advertises on a fantasy sports website, the most common reasons were (in order of frequency):

 I assume that their products will interest me since they are

advertising on a fantasy sports website

 I want to support the sponsors that keep the site in business

 I notice them more because I am on the site regularly

 If I like the site, I feel I can trust the advertisers

27

Media Consumption Behavior

 Fantasy sports players are heavy television and internet users  87% watch at least two hours of television per weekday (88% on a weekend day)  45% watch at least six hours of television per weekday (42% on a weekend day)  75% spend at least two hours per weekday on the internet for personal reasons (68% on a weekend day)  35% spend at least six hours per weekday on the internet for personal reasons (27% on a weekend day)
Hours per Day No Time Weekday Weekend Weekday Weekend Weekday Weekend Weekday Weekend Weekday Weekend 19.4% 4.4% 5.2% 50.8% 51.8% 6.9% 10.5% 7.5% 26.2% 20.0% 0-1 Hours 50.6% 53.8% 24.2% 39.9% 8.7% 6.7% 18.5% 17.9% 18.1% 21.6% 2-5 Hours 26.4% 18.8% 35.7% 30.0% 41.7% 46.0% 22.2% 23.0% 40.1% 40.9% 6-10 Hours 2.4% 0.6% 19.6% 7.1% 24.2% 29.0% 5.2% 5.2% 17.5% 16.1% >10 Hours 0.6% 0.6% 12.9% 3.6% 21.0% 13.1% 3.4% 2.2% 17.5% 10.9%

Reading newspapers and magazines

Listening to the radio

Watching live television

Watching recorded shows on a DVR (TiVo®)

On the internet for personal (not business) reasons

28

Reference to Outside Data Sources

 Broadband penetration – Nielsen/NetRatings, December 2006

 HDTV ownership – Envisioneering Group, January 2007

 DVR ownership – Leichtman Research Group, November 2006

 Video Game System ownership – Nielsen Media Research, March 2007

 Video iPod/MP3 ownership – Ipsos/TEMPO Study, June 2006

 Satellite Radio ownership - Consumer Electronics Association 2006 Ownership & Market Potential Survey

29

Contact : Clay Walker 202.957.5319

Adam J. Rosenbaum 847.980.8605

Copernicus Marketing Custom Fantasy Football Study

0

Methodology

Study conducted by Copernicus Marketing, a leading research firm A total of 1,066 interviews conducted online Respondents were recruited from a nationally representative online panel and screened to be male, 18 – 54 years old, and have played fantasy football in 2005 A mix of players were recruited:

   

From the different major sites Free vs. pay players First time players and veterans Individual players vs. League Players

1

Summary of Findings

Profile of Site Players  Fantasy football category has expanded dramatically over past three years

– Approximately 60% of fantasy football users began playing after 2002 – More than 30% of users in 2005 were 1st time players; NFL had highest new player % – “Word of mouth” and availability of “free games” were most important influencers for 1st time players

 

Average fantasy football user played 2.1 teams in 2005, spent 5.2 hours per week online managing fantasy team, visited “host” site 7 times per week Average fantasy football player spent $51 on game subscription/entry fee 46% of fantasy football players also played another fantasy sport

Fantasy Content/Information  Approximately 35% of players purchased supplemental online feature such as live stats tracker, draft kit, or fantasy news service; average expenditure of $16  Fantasy players frequently visit sites other than “host” for information; average player visited non-host sites 4.7 times per week for fantasy football information  Majority of non-host visits were to major fantasy/sports sites  Approximately 23% of fantasy players visited secondary content providers such as rotoworld.com and fantasyguru.com
2

Summary of Findings

Offline Behavior/Television Viewing  Fantasy Football players participated in range of offline fantasy activities
36% purchased a fantasy football magazine 30% attended a fantasy draft party, event, or dinner 35% watched a fantasy football preview show 12% used a cell phone/service to check fantasy team

– – – –

Average fantasy football player watched 4.1 NFL games/wk for total of 6.8 hours; more involved fantasy players watched more hours of NFL games 57% of fantasy players noticed fantasy features and information in NFL game broadcasts; 52% thought these features were outstanding or very good Fantasy football players multi-task; 24% watched games and checked web each week; another 35% did occasionally

Advertising Impact  Players who saw online ads in fantasy sites had much more favorable impression of fantasy advertisers than those who hadn’t seen ads
3

Summary of Findings

Motivating Power – Drivers of Fantasy Football Site Selection  Overall, the most critical motivators impacting site selection were: user friendly, reliable, free, and familiar (a site everybody will be happy with)  For high involvement players, customizable features were more important; for low involvement players, free game and “user friendly” were more important  Less motivating factors included: comprehensive draft kit, video highlights, same site used for sports, home page, and/or email

New Opportunities  Fantasy football players showed strong interest in weekly fantasy TV show, TV stat tracker, and fantasy football events  Players showed moderate interest in weekly magazine, fantasy TV highlights, and wireless services  In general, Fox and ESPN audiences were most receptive to new opportunities

4

Profile of Site Players

5

Profile of Site Players
Awareness and Usage of Fantasy Football Sites
Ever Heard Of
(1066) % (1066) %

 

Yahoo has the highest awareness and usage. About half of players had a team on Yahoo last season On average, players have tried 2.3 sites since they began playing and 1.3 this past season

Ever Played 54 33 33 26 17 8 12 10 10 12 8 6 2.3

Played 2005
(1066) %

Yahoo.com ESPN.com CBS Sportsline.com NFL.com FoxSports.com SI.com AOL.com Sportingnews.com Myfantasyleague.com Sandbox.com Fanball.com USAToday.com Average number played

66 66 55 55 46 26 25 23 22 21 19 18 na

45 22 20 17 10 2 6 3 5 1 2 1 1.3
6

Profile Of Site Players

 

Yahoo is the most successful in terms of converting awareness to usage ESPN, NFL, and FoxSports are below average in generating usage among those aware

Relationship Between Awareness and Current Usage
R Square= . 594
Yahoo.com

60

50

40

30
ESPN.com CBSSportsline.com NFL.com Fox Sports.com AOL.com

20

Played In 2005

10

0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70

0

Ever Heard Of

7

Profile of Site Players

   

41% of current players have been playing since 2002 (or earlier) Category expansion has increased exponentially over the past 4 seasons Play at Yahoo has grown consistently over time ESPN and NFL usage increased sharply over the past two seasons

Usage of Fantasy Football Sites
Played 2002 (or earlier)
(1066) % (1066) % (1066) %

Played 2003

Played 2004

Played 2005
(1066) %

+ 20%

Played Fantasy Football Yahoo.com ESPN.com CBS Sportsline.com NFL.com FoxSports.com SI.com AOL.com Sportingnews.com Myfantasyleague.com Sandbox.com Fanball.com USAToday.com Average number played

41 19 7 12 4 3 4 4 4 3 8 3 3 0.7

49 + 31% 25 9 15 6 4 2 2 3 2 3 2 2 0.8

64 + 56% 36 17 20 12 5 2 5 4 5 3 3 2 1.1

100 45 22 20 17 10 2 6 3 5 1 2 1 1.3

8

Profile of Site Players

31% of respondents played fantasy football for the first time this past season

Played Fantasy Football For The First Time This Past Season

46% 37% 16% 21% 38%

50%

31%

Total

CBSSportsline .com Yahoo.com

ESPN.com

NFL.com

FoxSports.com

AOL.com

9

Profile of First Time Players

 

Word of mouth is the primary catalyst to begin playing fantasy football  Particularly among younger players and those who played at CBSSportsline and Yahoo  Promotions and switching to free games motivate older players to begin playing Online advertising attracted older players and brought new players to AOL Advertising (on- and off-line) prompted many to begin playing at FoxSports

Reasons For Playing for the First Time This Past Season
Sites Played in 2005 CBSSports line.com
(253) % (579) % (276) % (188) %

Age FoxSports .com
(98) %

Total
(1066) %

Yahoo .com

ESPN .com

NFL .com

AOL .com
(70) %

1824
(156) %

2534
(403) %

3544
(335) %

4554
(172) %

Convinced by someone I know 59 24 24 16 26 14 13 28 17 77 76 63

46 25 34

44 37 20

22 64 27

63 18 15

69 25 19

54 20 34

45 34 35

Saw ad online

Game was now free

Saw/heard as on TV, radio, or in print 9 11 4

11

17

17

13

11

8

8

9

Saw a TV show about fantasy football 6 6 0 4

3 7

9 5

9 9

17 0

3 0

6 8

5 1

2 6

12 9
10

Other

Profile Of Site Players
Player Demographics
Total
(1066) % (253) % (579) % (276) %

CBSSportsline .com

Sites Played in 2005 Yahoo ESPN NFL .com .com .com
(188) %

FoxSports. com
(98) %

AOL. com
(70) %

Age 23 33 28 18 34 yrs 49 50 $73k 71 64 39 84 8 79 70 38 87 7 59 $82k 53 36 yrs 20 16 33 yrs 49 52 $73k 73 66 38 85 6 35 25 36 38 9 22 31 28 23 19 33 yrs 44 43 $73k 63 59 38 82 4 23 28 34 16 34 yrs 54 42 $62k 72 55 41 80 7 33 26 22 19 33 yrs 41 51 $78k 70 69 43 77 16 23 29 20 29 36 yrs 46 41 $67k 55 64 45 80 17
11

18 – 24

25 – 34

35 – 44

45 - 54

Average Age

% M arried

% College Grad or M ore

Average HH Income

% Employed Full-time

% Own House

% With Children Under 18

% Caucasian

% Hispanic Descent

Profile Of Site Players
Other Fantasy Games Played
Sites Played in 2005 Total
(1066) % (253) % (579) %

 

Half only play fantasy football Yahoo players somewhat more likely to be playing other fantasy games as well

CBSSportsline .com 31 16 8 11 9 56 41 24 15 13 10 44

Yahoo .com

ESPN .com
(276) %

NFL .com
(188) %

FoxSports .com
(98) %

AOL .com
(70) %

Fantasy Baseball 19 12 9 8 54

31

30 25 16 10 6 51

24 20 10 8 11 52

32 20 13 5 4 53

27 31 13 9 6 52

Fantasy Basketball

Fantasy Hockey

Fantasy Golf

Other

Did Not Play Other (Net)

12

Profile Of Site Players
Sites Used For Other Fantasy Sports
(Among Those Who Played Other Fantasy Sports)
Sites Played in 2005 Total
(490) % (111) % (324) % (135) %

CBSSportsline .com
(90) %

Yahoo .com 98 21 16 5 4 9 7 4 37 73 29 18 14 14 14 4 40 40 35 21 17 13 13 6

ESPN .com

NFL .com

FoxSports .com
(46) %

AOL .com
(34) %

Yahoo.com 33 28 13 13 11 9 4 4 11 4 4 9 11 7 30 5 2 9 11 11 9 7 75 36

65

50

28 38 38 57 19 9 13 11

38 21 35 25 92 10 19 10

ESPN.com

CBSSportsline.com

FoxSports.com

AOL.com

Sandbox.com

Sportingnews.com

Fanball.com

Myfantasyleague.com

2 4 4 2 5

8 14 10 6 10

2 33 8 10 21

13 23 15 11 4

6 27 4 2 6
13

NFL.com

SI.com

USAToday.com

Other

Profile of Site Players

Most play 1-2 teams overall  Particularly among CBS and Yahoo players

Number of Fantasy Teams Played
Sites Played in 2005 Yahoo.com
(343) % (158) %

CBSSportsline.com
(123) %

ESPN.com 34 21 17 11 10 7

NFL.com
(126) %

FoxSports.com
(64) %

AOL.com
(45) %

Played 1 team 28 14 9 4 2 1.4 2.1 4 1.9 2.3 6 10 14 29

43

39

26 30 16 12 7 9

37 15 12 8 17 11

31 30 12 12 7 8

Played 2 teams

Played 3 teams

Played 4 teams

Played 5 teams

1.9 2.6

1.9 2.7

1.8 2.8

2.0 2.6
14

Played 6 teams Average # of teams played (at site) Average # of teams played (overall)

Profile of Site Players

 Sites Played in 2005 Total
(1066) % (253) % (579) % (276) %

On average, players spent 5 hours per week on fantasy football websites  Up from 4 hours per week last season CBSSportsline players spent more time online (7 hours on fantasy football sites)

Amount Of Time Spent on Fantasy Football Websites
CBSSportsline .com 19 30 30 17 5 0 7.1 28 29 23 7 1 5.3 11 14 26 32 20 7 1 5.4 Yahoo .com ESPN .com NFL .com
(188) %

FoxSports .com
(98) %

AOL .com
(70) %

More than 10 hours 25 30 23 8 1 5.2

12

17 22 28 24 8 1 5.8

15 22 29 21 10 3 6.0

11 17 26 38 7 2 4.6

4 to 10 hours

2 to 3 hours

30-60 minutes

Less than 30 minutes

None

Average number of hours on fantasy football websites

Average number of hours last season (among those who played last season)

4.0

5.3

3.8

4.4

5.5

4.8

4.1
15

Profile of Site Players

The method of joining fantasy leagues varies by site and number of teams  CBSSportsline players, and those with 10+ teams, are more likely to join as an entire league  NFL and AOL players are most likely to join as individuals

Method of Joining Fantasy Football Leagues
Sites Played in 2005 Total
(1066) % (253) % (579) %

CBSSportsline .com 31 24 61 43 32 49

Yahoo .com

ESPN .com
(276) %

NFL .com
(188) %

FoxSports .com
(98) %

AOL. com
(70) %

As an individual 32 39

45

52 40 26

67 32 22

53 38 24

68 31 17

With a group, but less than an entire league

As an entire league

16

Profile of Site Players

The more involved fantasy football players are more likely to:  Join as part of an entire league  Have been playing for 4+ years

Time Invested in Fantasy Football
Joined As: Total
(1066) % (488) % (333) % (456) %

Individual

Group

League

First Time
(293) %

Tenure 2-3 Years
(299) %

4+ Years
(474) %

Average number of hours on fantasy football websites 5.2 5.2 5.4

6.0

4.2

4.9

6.2

17

Profile of Site Players

 

Half did not spend any money on entry/subscription fees last season On average, players spent $51  CBSSportsline and FoxSports players spent twice as much ($94.) AOL players also spent more than average.  Yahoo players spent the least ($30 on average)

Dollars Spent on Entry and Subscription Fees
Sites Played in 2005 Total
(1066) % (253) % (579) %

CBSSportsline .com 36 24 12 14 15 $94 9 9 7 13 62 $30

Yahoo .com

ESPN .com
(276) %

NFL .com
(188) %

FoxSports .com
(98) %

AOL .com
(70) %

$100 or more 11 10 14 47 $51

18

23 10 15 12 40 $64

17 9 6 15 54 $58

27 6 18 17 32 $94

30 8 6 20 37 $79

$50 - $99

$25 - $49

$1 - $24

$0

Average dollars spent

18

Profile of Site Players
Dollars Spent on Entry and Subscription Fees
Joined As: Total
(1066) % (488) % (333) % (456) % (293) %

 

Individuals are more likely to have played for free Players with longer tenure spend most on entry/subscription fees

Individual 16 8 7 12 57 $48 41 $48 17 15 10 13 40 $61 10 15 18 22 14 10 10 17 50

Group

League

First Time

Tenure 2-3 Years
(299) %

4+ Years
(474) %

$100 or more 11 10 14 47 $51

18

15 11 11 13 50 $42 $41

23 13 10 13 42 $66

$50 - $99

$25 - $49

$1 - $24

$0

Mean

19

Profile of Site Players
Percent of Time Accessing Team By Location

 

Full-time employees access fantasy teams from work 21% of time Access doesn’t vary by site played

Total
(1066) % (794) %

Full Time

Not Full Time
(272) %

Home Computer Work Computer School Computer Wireless Device Other 1 1 3 16

78

76 21 1 1 1

83 5 7 2 2

20

Fantasy Content/Information

21

Fantasy Football Content

On average, players visit their fantasy football website 7 times a week  CBSSportsline players visit their “host site” more frequently Players also visit other websites 5 times a week for information about fantasy football

Number of Visits To Websites for Fantasy Football Information
Sites Played in 2005 Total
(1066) (253) (579)

CBSSportsline .com

Yahoo .com

ESPN .com
(276)

NFL .com
(188)

FoxSports .com
(98)

AOL .com
(70)

# of visits to “host” sites per week 7.0 4.7 5.7 8.8

7.5 5.0

6.8 4.5

6.6 4.9

7.7 5.7

5.2 3.6

# of visits to “non-host” sites per week 60% 61%

Share of visits to host site

60%

60%

57%

57%

59%

22

Fantasy Football Content
Sites Played in 2005 Total
(1066) % (253) % (579) % (276) %

 

Most players visit other “non-host” sites for fantasy football information ESPN and NFL continue to be the most visited sites

“Non-Host” Sites Visited For Fantasy Football Information
CBSSportsline .com Yahoo .com ESPN .com NFL .com
(188) %

FoxSports .com
(98) %

AOL .com
(70) %

Percent of time spent at “non-host” sites for fantasy football information 31 85 51 45 26 24 23 21 11 10 10 7 6 6 30 27 -13 13 16 10 5 12 25 59 62 89 83 53 44 -20 21 19 13 10 10 6 4 7 29 32

31 86 -51 21 28 27 22 11 13 11 9 5 3

31 85 50 -23 31 31 22 15 15 11 13 8 3

38 87 45 43 19 -26 27 10 11 10 11 12 4

33 93 42 36 19 19 23 19 7 11 7 7 -2
23

Visited “non-host” for information

ESPN.com

NFL.com

Yahoo Sports

FoxSports.com

Individual NFL Team Website

CBS Sportsline.com

SI.com

TheSportingNews.com

Local Newspaper Websites

USAToday.com

AOL Sports

Other

Online Features

  

One in three purchased online features FoxSports and AOL players most likely to buy online features Live stat tracking was the most commonly purchased, followed by fantasy news/analysis and draft kits

Online Features Purchased
Sites Played in 2005 Total
(1066) % (253) % (579) %

CBSSportsline .com 43 29 21 19 5 1 29 23 8 8 2 1

Yahoo .com

ESPN .com
(276) %

NFL .com
(188) %

FoxSports .com
(98) %

AOL .com
(70) %

Purchased Any 22 15 13 4 1

35

40 24 21 15 4 0

35 16 19 14 7 0

47 25 27 25 16 0

48 31 15 24 3 0

Live stat tracking

Fantasy news / analysis service

Draft kits

Wireless access to online games

Other

24

Online Features

  

Average spending on online features was $16 NFL, FoxSports, and AOL players spent more on online features Yahoo players spent the least

Dollars Spent on Online Features
Sites Played in 2005 Total
(1066) % (253) % (579) %

CBSSportsline .com 6 20 7 10 57 $23 2 6 9 12 71 $10

Yahoo .com

ESPN .com
(276) %

NFL .com
(188) %

FoxSports .com
(98) %

AOL .com
(70) %

$100 + 13 7 10 65 $16

5

6 18 7 9 60 $19

8 19 2 5 66 $27

15 18 8 6 53 $37

12 17 10 9 52 $31

$20 - $99

$10 to $19

$1 - $9

$0

Average

25

Secondary Content Providers

Overall, 23% have used secondary information providers (such as Fantasyguru.com or Rotoworld.com) FoxSports players are more likely to use these websites

Fantasy Football Information Providers: Used in the Past Season
44% 26% 19% 24% 30% 26%

23%

Total

CBSSportsline .com Yahoo.com

ESPN.com

NFL.com

FoxSports.com

AOL.com

26

Secondary Content Providers

  

Yahoo users were most aware of KFFL.com CBSSportsline users were most aware of FantasyGuru.com and Rotoworld.com NFLFantasyextra.com had highest awareness among NFL users

Fantasy Football Information Providers: Ever Heard Of
Sites Played in 2005 Total
(1066) % (253) % (579) %

CBSSportsline .com

Yahoo .com

ESPN .com
(276) %

NFL .com
(188) %

FoxSports .com
(98) %

AOL .com
(70) %

FantasyGuru.com 18 16 13 12 7 9 12 21 19 26

18 23 15 8 4

19 12 11 17 11

20 11 14 22 10

25 13 15 21 19

21 17 12 23 8

KFFL.com

Rotoworld.com

NFLFantasyextra.com

Footballinjuries.com

27

Secondary Content Providers

 

In general, usage is low; no clear market leader Usage is highest among FoxSports players  NFLFantasyextra.com used more by FoxSports, NFL, and AOL players

Fantasy Football Information Providers: Used in the Past Season
Sites Played in 2005 Total
(1066) % (253) % (579) %

CBSSportsline .com

Yahoo .com

ESPN .com
(276) %

NFL .com
(188) %

FoxSports .com
(98) %

AOL .com
(70) %

FantasyGuru.com 6 5 4 3 6 4 5 5

6

7

5 3 9 6 1

7 9 4 4 5

8 12 5 3 5

14 14 3 8 8

8 15 6 2 3

NFLFantasyextra.com

KFFL.com

Rotoworld.com

Footballinjuries.com

28

Secondary Content Providers
(Average on 0-100 Scale)
Sites Played in 2005 Total
(1066) (253) (579)

Written information is most desirable (daily news, preseason draft kits, and articles/features)

Attributes Desired In A Fantasy Football Information Provider
CBSSportsline .com
(276)

Yahoo .com

ESPN .com

NFL .com
(188)

FoxSports .com
(98)

AOL .com
(70)

Daily fantasy news and injury reports 75 79 75

74

75

80

64

Preseason online draft kit that provides expert analysis, stats, projections, mock drafts, sleeper picks, and position rankings 70 72 67 68

69

71

71

75

61

Fantasy football articles and features written by fantasy experts providing advice and analysis 52 46

65

67

69

72

61

Broadband video segments featuring commentary and analysis from fantasy experts 48

48

57

54

61

55

Weekly online fantasy football themed radio shows

46

46

54

49

58

53

29

Offline Behavior

30

Offline Behavior

Most (64%) did not purchase a fantasy football magazine  Yahoo players were even less likely to have purchased a magazine More than half of CBSSportsline and Fox players bought a magazine

Number Of Fantasy Magazines Purchased Past Year
Sites Played in 2005 Total
(1066) % (253) % (579) %

CBSSportsline .com

Yahoo .com

ESPN .com
(276) %

NFL .com
(188) %

FoxSports .com
(98) %

AOL .com
(70) %

Did not purchase a fantasy football magazine 64 17 10 9 16 11 26 47

73 13 8 6

62 16 9 13

64 13 11 12

43 23 16 18

57 18 10 15

1

2

3 or more

31

Offline Behavior

  

30% attended a fantasy draft dinner or event Many more did this if joining as an entire league or playing CBSSportsline Individual and NFL players were least likely to attend draft events

Percent Who Attended A Fantasy Draft Dinner, Party Or Event

58% 48% 34% 27% 26% 15% 30% 17% 31%

30%

Total

CBSSportsline .com

Yahoo .com

ESP N .com

NFL.com

FoxSports .com

AOL.com

Indivdual

Group

Entire League

Site Played

Joined As:
32

Offline Behavior

37% purchased “offline” fantasy football materials  CBSSportsline, FoxSports, and AOL players were more likely to buy these materials Average offline spending was $3

Amount Spent “Offline” On Fantasy Football Materials
(Magazines, newspapers, draft parties/events, and or other offline fantasy related expenditures )

Sites Played in 2005 Total
(1066) % (253) % (579) %

CBSSportsline .com

Yahoo .com

ESPN .com
(276) %

NFL .com
(188) %

FoxSports .com
(98) %

AOL .com
(70) %

Did Not Buy Fantasy Materials 63 9 28 $2.7 43 $3.6 10 47

73 3 24 $1.3

59 15 26 $4.1

61 16 23 $4.2

46 19 35 $5.0

52 18 30 $5.1

$10 Or More

$1 to under $10

Average

33

Offline Behavior

 

35% watched a fantasy football preview show CBSSportsline, NFL, and FoxSports players most likely to have watched

Percent Who Watched Fantasy Football Preview Shows On Television

44% 30% 37%

50%

46% 33%

35%

Total

CBSSportsline .com

Yahoo .com

ESPN .com

NFL.com

FoxSports .com

AOL.com

34

Offline Behavior

Over half (57%) noticed a fantasy football feature while watching an NFL game

Percent That Noticed Fantasy Football Features As Part Of NFL Game

66% 57% 59% 61%

57%

53%

53%

Total

CBSSportsline .com

Yahoo .com

ESPN .com

NFL.com

FoxSports .com

AOL.com

35

Offline Behavior
Overall Opinion Of Fantasy Football Features
(Base: Noticed Features)
Sites Played in 2005 Total
(626) % (174) % (343) %

Generally, the features were perceived to be “good/neutral or very good”

CBSSportsline .com
(169) %

Yahoo .com 10 38 39 11 2 16 36 33 11 4

ESPN .com

NFL .com
(120) %

FoxSports .com
(59) %

AOL .com
(41) %

Outstanding 40 35 11 2 1 14 33 45

12

7

19 45 27 8 1

26 36 36 2 -

16 42 29 13 -

Very Good

Good

Fair

Poor

36

Offline Behavior

Few, 12%, used their cell phone to check their fantasy teams

Percent Who Used Cell Phone To Check Fantasy Team In Past Year

12% 9%
Yahoo .com ESPN .com

18% 14%

17%

17% 8%
NFL.com FoxSports .com AOL.com

Total

CBSSportsline .com

37

Television Habits
Number Of NFL Games Watched Per Week
Sites Played in 2005 Total
(1066) % (253) % (579) %

 

On average, players watched 4 NFL games per week; for a total of 7 hours CBSSportsline players invested more time watching games and online for fantasy football

CBSSportsline .com
(276) %

Yahoo .com 14 15 26 24 19 2 16 19 29 24 11 1

ESPN .com

NFL .com
(188) %

FoxSports .com
(98) %

AOL .com
(70) %

7 Or more 17 26 23 18 2 4.1 6.8 5.2 9 4.6 7.9 7.1 21 27 27

14

16

13 15 28 22 20 2

21 10 18 18 27 6

20 17 15 28 16 4

5-6

4

3

1-2

0

Average Number of NFL Games Watched

4.0 6.6 5.3

4.4 6.8 5.4

4.0 7.2 5.8

3.9 6.4 6.0

4.2 6.5 4.6
38

Average Hours Watching NFL

Hours spent Online for Fantasy Football

Television Habits
Number Of NFL Games Watched Per Week
Hours Spent Online for Fantasy Football (per week) Total
(1066) % (252) %

More “involved” fantasy players also spend more time watching NFL games

7+ Hours 26 26 19 20 8 5.0

2-6 Hours
(496) %

1 Hour Or Less
(318) %

7 Or more 17 26 23 18 2 4.1 6.8 4.6

14

13 17 29 25 16 1 4.1

8 12 25 23 27 5 3.5

5-6

4

3

1-2

0

Average Number of NFL Games Watched

Average Hours Watching NFL

8.6 16.3

6.9 3.4

5.3 0.7
39

Hours spent Online for Fantasy Football

Television Habits
Types Of Television Broadcasts Received/ Subscribe To NFL Sunday Ticket Package
Sites Played in 2005 Total
(1066) % (253) % (579) %

 

About half have digital cable. Among the other half, equally split between satellite and standard cable. Overall, 8% subscribe to the Sunday ticket (31% among those with satellite/DSS)

CBSSportsline .com 45 30 20 4 1 13 40 26 25 8 1 6

Yahoo .com

ESPN .com
(276) %

NFL .com
(188) %

FoxSports .com
(98) %

AOL .com
(70) %

Digital Cable 25 25 6 1 8

43

47 23 23 5 2 11

46 25 24 5 11

43 26 23 5 3 11

41 31 24 2 2 7

Satellite/DSS Television

Standard Cable

Standard broadcast TV

Don’t Know

Subscribe to NFL Sunday Ticket

40

Television Habits

 

Most have the ability follow NFL games online while watching on TV One in four do this regularly  However, 41% never follow online while watching

Watching NFL Games While Following On Internet
Sites Played in 2005 Total
(901) % (218) % (504) %

CBSSportsline .com

Yahoo .com

ESPN .com
(231) %

NFL .com
(160) %

FoxSports .com
(77) %

AOL .com
(54) %

Have ability to simultaneously watch TV & surf the Internet 84 85

87

82

86

74

76

Percent who do this: 24 35 41 40 26 34 24 38 38 22 35 43 25 40 35 20 40 40 24 23 53

Regularly: every/almost every week

Occasionally/once a season

Never

41

Television Habits

 

Most players follow the NFL games on their “host” game site Yahoo is missing valuable interactive features

Sites Used To Follow Games While Watching On TV
(Base: Watch NFL Game While Using Internet)
Sites Played in 2005 Total
(647) % (169) % (358) %

CBSSportsline .com 23 30 12 78 8 4 4 2 5 3 30 34 16 9 2 3 3 1 1 33 70 35 16 17 12 6 5 6 4 2

Yahoo .com

ESPN .com
(167) %

NFL .com
(125) %

FoxSports .com
(64) %

AOL .com
(35) %

ESPN.com 35 34 26 12 5 4 3 3 2 2

36

33 72 17 18 14 4 7 7 7 3

33 29 28 28 55 3 11 9 4 9

39 50 17 15 9 53 8 4 15 6

NFL.com

Yahoo Sports

CBSSportsline.com

FoxSports.com

AOL Sports

Individual NFL Team Site

SI.com

TheSportingNews.com

USAToday.com

Other

2

2

2

3

1

42

Television Habits

  

Primary online activities are following scores and fantasy teams CBSSportsline players most like to be following their fantasy team online FoxSports and AOL players more likely to be following general game related stats

Activities Done On The Internet While Watching The Game
(Base: Watch NFL Game While Using Internet)
Sites Played in 2005 Total
(647) % (169) % (358) %

CBSSportsline .com 77 85 44 11 6 6 6 76 70 42 12 9 10 6

Yahoo .com

ESPN .com
(167) %

NFL .com
(125) %

FoxSports .com
(64) %

AOL .com
(35) %

Followed scores 69 43 16 11 9 7

73

73 67 44 21 20 11 9

76 67 45 32 14 17 11

63 56 54 22 14 13 15

72 48 51 20 17 12 16

Followed fantasy team

Followed live game related stats

Participated in live polls

Played live interactive games

Answered trivia

Viewed enhanced graphics

43

Advertising Impact

44

Advertising Impact Assessment
Overall Impression of Advertisers
(% Outstanding/ Very Good) Played Yahoo.com Visa Total
(579) % (251) % (328) %

Players who saw the online ads generally have a more favorable impression of the advertisers

GMC Saw Ad
(36) %

Saw Ad 71 56 43 Played NFL.com GMC 54

Did Not See Ad

Did Not See Ad
(445) %

Did Not Play Yahoo.com
(487) %

Overall impression of: 62 49

Visa

72 63

61 48

65 52

Goodyear

Sprint Did Not See Ad Saw Ad Did Not See Ad Did Not Play NFL.com

Total
(188) %

Saw Ad
(60) %

Overall impression of:

(128) %

(78) %

(110) %

(878) %

GMC

60 41

79 52

52 37

58 50

60 35

49 34
45

Sprint

Advertising Impact Assessment
Overall Impression of Advertisers
(% Outstanding/ Very Good) Played CBSSportsline.com McDonald’s Total
(579) % (251) %

Saw Ad 58

Did Not See Ad
(328) %

Did Not Play CBSSportsline.com
(487) %

Overall impression of: 43

McDonald’s

39

45

Played ESPN.com Goodyear Total
(579) %

Saw Ad
(251) %

Did Not See Ad
(328) %

Did Not Play ESPN.com
(487) %

Overall impression of:

Goodyear

55

68

53

53

46

Motivating Power – Drivers of Fantasy Football Site Selection

47

Motivating Power
“Problem Detection” Desirability rating versus satisfaction “Preference Detection” Relationship between perceptions and preference

“Dream Detection”

Self-reported “desirability”

“Motivating Power” of Different Benefits/Attributes
48

Motivating Power
Key Motivators

Overall, the key motivations for fantasy players are more similar than different

The most critical motivators overall are:  Being “user friendly”

– Easy to use/navigate – Easy registration

Familiarity

– A site everybody in the league will be happy with – Game I am familiar with

Game Features

– – – – –

Most reliable fantasy game Provides (free) live scoring Is free Provides up-to-the-minute fantasy news and injury updates Offers customizable rules and scoring

49

Motivating Power

 The “High Involved” are more motivated by customizable rules and scoring and having many draft times and options  “League” and “Pay” players also desire customization  “Free” players want many draft times and options  The “Low Involved” are more motivated by free games that offer free draft kits and are easy to join as an individual  “League” players are more willing to pay for the game site

Highly Motivating (75+) Total
(1066) (346) (496) (224)

Fantasy Football Game Selection Criteria
Involvement Low Mod High
(488)

Joined As: Individual Group
(333)

League
(456)

Sites Played Free Pay
(813) (253)

Easy to use/ navigate 88 87 87 85 84 84 83 77 75 81 85 74 80 91 84 87 81 85 84 77 74 87 87 84 90 88 88 85 80 83 79 83 71 85 90 89

92

96

92

86

91 88 82 87 84 90 82 87 72 75

91 89 87 86 79 93 79 82 73 77

91 89 92 86 89 75 88 78 84 74

94 87 87 87 84 87 81 84 74 76

85 91 89 86 91 74 92 80 85 72
50

M ost reliable fantasy game

Everybody in league will be happy

Free live scoring

Up-to-the minute fantasy news and injury updates

Is free

Offers live scoring

Easy registration

Customizable rules and scoring

Game I am familiar with

Motivating Power
Fantasy Football Game Selection Criteria

Moderately Motivating (60 – 74) Total
(1066) (346) (496) (224) (488)

Involvement Low Mod High
67 72 78 67 75 66 63 61 59 61 68 62 60 60 65 65 66 68 62 67 63 60 71 77 71 68 72 77 75 78 79 67 82 76 67 65 67 61 52 57

Joined As: Individual Group
(333)

League
(456)

Sites Played Free Pay
(813) (253)

Easy to use live draft interface 73 72 71 69 66 65 62 60 60

73

77 71 75 73 66 64 70 61 66 56

70 79 64 70 66 65 64 68 64 62

76 71 76 75 68 65 68 61 58 59

68 79 60 61 68 68 60 68 67 64

Free customizable rules

Easy to join as individual

M any live draft times / options available

Free draft kit

Expert analysis/advice

Provides online draft

Site league has used for years

Provides ability for offline draft

Comprehensive draft kit

51

Motivating Power
Fantasy Football Game Selection Criteria

Less Motivating (Under 60) Total
(1066) (346) (496) (224) (488)

Involvement Low Mod High
(333)

Joined As: Individual Group
59 58 56 55 49 43 61 57 54 49 49 44

League
(456)

Sites Played Free Pay
(813) (253)

Same site used for sports news 56 55 54 48 41 33 31 28 30 33 32 28 30 33 44 40 38 38 24 27 50 45 49 53 55 53 54 55 56 54 57 56

58

57

57

61

55 54 58 57 46 34

59 56 57 53 48 41

54 59 51 60 48 40

Rated the #1 fantasy site

Same site used for other fantasy sports

Fantasy newsletter and email alerts

Recognizable brand name

Video highlights of my team

Provides wireless tools to follow my team wirelessly

33 33 28

35 30 26

34 31 32

30 32 29

43 27 27

Same site used for email

Same site used as homepage

52

New Opportunities

53

New Opportunities Assessment

 Based on empirical evidence of respondent “overstatement,” we apply weights to the “self-reported” responses to better predict ‘real-world’ behavior  The lower the “self-reported intent,” the less we believe it

Probability of Signing-Up/Using Service
100% 75%

Predicted Probability of Signing-Up/ Using
50% 25% 0% “Not At All Likely”

= xx %
“Slightly Likely” “Somewhat Likely” “Very Likely” “Extremely Likely”

Self-Reported Likelihood
54

New Opportunities Assessment

Self-Reported Likelihood to “Sign-Up/ Use” Each Service

Weekly TV S eries
(619) % (613) % (605) % (602) %

TV S tat Tracker

Fantasy Football Events

Weekly Pro Football Magazine

Fantasy Video Highlights

Wireless Fantasy Companion
(609) %

Wireless S tand-Alone Fantasy Game
(599) %

(617) %

Extremely likely 26 32 12 15 19 20 21 23 31 28 30 27 23 17 20 12

14

12

10

8

7 12 30 25 27

7 8 20 25 41

5 7 19 23 46

Very likely

Somewhat likely

Not very likely

Not at all likely

55

New Opportunities Assessment

 A “weekly fantasy football TV series” generated the greatest interest  The “TV stat tracker” and local “fantasy football events” also had relatively broad appeal

Probability Of “Signing-Up/ Using” Each Service

28% 22% 22% 17% 16% 13% 11%

Weekly TV Series

TV Stat Tracker

Fantasy Football Events

Weekly Pro Football Magazine

Fantasy Video Highlights

Wireless Fantasy Companion

Wireless StandAlone Fantasy Game

56

New Opportunities Assessment
Probability Of “Signing-Up/ Using” Each Service

Total
% % %

High 37 29 28 22 21 18 13 30 23 24 19 17 13 12

Level Of Involvement Moderate

Low
%

Television Series 22 22 17 16 13 11

28

20 17 15 11 13 9 7

Stat Tracker

Fantasy Football Events

Weekly Pro Football Magazine

Fantasy Video Highlights

Wireless Fantasy Companion

Wireless Stand-Alone Fantasy Game

57

New Opportunities Assessment

Probability of Watching a “Weekly Fantasy Football Television Series”

A weekly half-hour television program dedicated to fantasy football. The show would provide fantasy news, information, highlights, tips, and expert analysis.

33% 25% 29%

28%

31%

31%

29%

Total

CBSSportsline.com Yahoo.com

ESPN.com

NFL.com

FoxSports.com

AOL.com

Sites Played in 2005
58

New Opportunities Assessment

Probability of Signing-Up For a “TV Stat Tracker”

This would be a feature that enables you to view live statistics for you and your opponent on your television set during NFL game broadcasts. Using your clicker, you can access a live stats ticker at the bottom of your TV screen and see your team information.

31% 21% 20% 24%

32% 21%

22%

Total

CBSSportsline.com Yahoo.com

ESPN.com

NFL.com

FoxSports.com

AOL.com

Sites Played in 2005
59

New Opportunities Assessment

Probability of Attending “Fantasy Football Events”

These fantasy events in your community would feature fantasy football forums and programs, NFL player appearances, competitions and prizes, and other related activities.

28% 21% 21%

22%

24%

28%

23%

Total

CBSSportsline.com Yahoo.com

ESPN.com

NFL.com

FoxSports.com

AOL.com

Sites Played in 2005
60

New Opportunities Assessment

Probability of Subscribing To a “Weekly Pro Football Magazine”

The magazine would be dedicated exclusively to NFL Football and cover a wide range of topics, including fantasy football. It would provide in-depth behind-the-scenes feature stories, high-impact photography, game recaps and previews, fantasy football analysis, and articles on your favorite teams and players that provide unique access and perspective.

17% 14%

17%

22%

23%

23%

19%

Total

CBSSportsline.com Yahoo.com

ESPN.com

NFL.com

FoxSports.com

AOL.com

Sites Played in 2005
61

New Opportunities Assessment

Probability of Signing-Up For “Fantasy Video Highlights”

This would be a feature that would enable you to watch video highlights on your TV of your fantasy team, after NFL games are completed each Sunday.

16% 15% 14%

21%

21%

25%

21%

Total

CBSSportsline.com Yahoo.com

ESPN.com

NFL.com

FoxSports.com

AOL.com

Sites Played in 2005
62

New Opportunities Assessment

Probability of Signing-Up For a “Wireless Fantasy Companion”

This would be a service that allows you to access your existing online fantasy team via your mobile phone. You can get fantasy news, view player profiles, make line-up changes, and access live stats for your team, anytime, anywhere from your mobile device. The cost for this service would be $10 for the season.

13% 10%

14%

19%

23% 16% 14%

Total

CBSSportsline.com Yahoo.com

ESPN.com

NFL.com

FoxSports.com

AOL.com

Sites Played in 2005
63

New Opportunities Assessment

Probability of Playing a “Wireless Stand-Alone Fantasy Game”

This would be a fantasy football game that is played exclusively on your mobile device. The game would include similar features and functionality to the online games you currently play. The cost for this service would be $10 for the season.

11% 9%

13% 11%

14%

19%

14%

Total

CBSSportsline.com Yahoo.com

ESPN.com

NFL.com

FoxSports.com

AOL.com

Sites Played in 2005
64

Fantasy Sports In the Media

Close Window SEPTEMBER 1, 2006 GAMING

By Catherine Holahan

Fantasy Football 2.0

Virtual leagues are big business for sites like Yahoo! and Sporting News, but upstarts like AOL want a slice of the gridiron pie
Ryan Lester trains for his NFL fantasy draft with the intensity of a Division I cyber-athlete. The 30-year-old Minnesotan spends hours online researching players' health histories, analyzing statistics, and reading scouting reports. He blogs theories on which prospective picks will have a good season, tweaking his would-be roster in response to posted opinions. He even practices for draft day in mock online drafts before officially choosing the lineups for his several teams. Welcome to the high-stakes world of online fantasy sports. The teams are virtual, but the prizes are real. In typical fantasy leagues, winners receive a portion of the entrance fees, which vary depending on the number of players in the league and how much everyone anted up. On major online sites, such as SportingNews.com, Yahoo! Fantasy Sports (YHOO ), and CDM Fantasy Sports, prizes range from a T-shirt and virtual trophy to $25,000. For Lester, it's all about being called the best: "The bragging rights are the best part," he says.

SLIDE SHOW >>

More than 15 million U.S. adults play fantasy sports, according to studies commissioned by the Fantasy Sports Trade Assn. (FSTA ), a group of more than 240 companies, leagues, and publications in the fantasy sports industry. Of that number, about 90% gear up for football season, says Greg Ambrosius, director of the industry's biannual fantasy sports trade conference. SCORING DRIVES GROWTH. The pro football season kicks off Sept. 7, but fantasy football is well under way, with much of the action online. There, players have been blogging about picks, joining leagues, and selecting teams for weeks, says Peter Schoenke, president and founder of Rotowire, a subscription fantasy site that provides statistics for Yahoo Fantasy Sports. "There is a very small minority not playing online," Schoenke says. "Before the Internet came along, you really had to be a diehard to play some of these games. The Internet came along and it lowered that barrier of entry, because the stats and scoring are done for you." Fantasy football fans are flooding the Net, lured by blogs, message boards, and a host of other social-networking capabilities that let people research, build teams, and debate topics from who's the best running back to which fantasy player has the best strategy, Ambrosius says. In July alone, Yahoo Fantasy Sports drew 3.1 million users, compared to 952,000 at ESPN's fantasy site and 929,000 who used Sportsline's fantasy site, says comScore Media Metrix. Last September, 10 million people played fantasy sports on the three top sites, Yahoo Fantasy Sports, Walt Disney's (DIS ) ESPN, and CBS's (CBS ) Sportsline, says TJ Mahony, managing director of Compete, an online research firm that monitors fantasy sports. Online fantasy sites have grown 20% to 25% a year over the past five years, Mahony says. "We have only begun to see the growth of fantasy—this evolution from males in dorm rooms with a pen and paper to people organizing large groups on the Internet." And big groups mean big money. The fantasy sports industry generates $1 billion to $2 billion a year on publication subscriptions, paid league entrance fees, mail-order draft kits, and fantasy software and other products, says Jeffrey Thomas, FSTA president. It's a safe bet a lot of that revenue is ending up online, the playing field for 92% of those who engage in fantasy sports. DREAM DEMOGRAPHIC. Those numbers aren't lost on advertisers eager to court an especially attractive demographic—men under the age of 35 (see BusinessWeek.com, 9/4/06, "Secrets of the Male Shopper"). About 86% of the participants in fantasy leagues are male and 63% are under age 40, according to a 2005 study from the Pew Internet & American Life project, which then put the number of American adults playing online at 11 million. Compete says the percentage of men has dropped to about 70% as more women have gotten into the game, increasing participation overall. The Sporting News, a sports magazine with a large subscription fantasy site, is cashing in on some of the online advertising dollars. Since relaunching its fantasy site in October, 2005, the site has seen more than a million unique users a month. With the traffic has come ad revenue increases of 50% for the past two quarters, says Jason Kint, head of the company's online division. Kint says the site is particularly focused on engaging registered users, who pay $20 to run a team on it. Engagement often determines user satisfaction and advertising dollars, because advertisers pay more when they know a computer user is spending time on a page displaying their message. Average registered users spend seven hours a week on the site reading and writing blogs, catching up on news and commentary, and running their online teams. "Our primary focus is staying No. 1 in engagement across the category," says Kint, adding that part of the reason the league charges for teams is to ensure that players keep up with their roster and don't disappear in the middle of the season. "We believe at the end of the day advertisers are shifting from mass-reach vehicles to depth-of-engagement vehicles." WHY THEY PLAY. Lester, who manages a team on Yahoo's site and several on SportingNews.com, was awarded the maximum of five stars on SportingNews.com for his engagement. He regularly writes about teams on his blog, Lester's Legends, and uses message boards to trade and talk trash. Another draw: fast access to information and ease of accurate scoring. "Before, you had to sit down with friends and chart the stats down by

hand, the old-fashioned way, and use a calculator and a piece of paper to double-check the scoring," he says. "I would always have at least one of my guys not getting the points he thought he was supposed to get." Most sites keep score for players, letting them run leagues without having to spend hours calculating points. David Funk, 31, from North Carolina, was in a 25-man league a few years ago. The league came unraveled after the guy running it bailed amidst the stress of scoring. "He was the one keeping track of all the points, and he got overloaded and pretty much quit after that year," he says. Partially as a result, Funk moved online six years ago. He now has teams on Yahoo and Sporting News. With the computer keeping score, leagues can support 75 teams or more, he says. AOL'S GAME. More sites are awakening to the fantasy. Time Warner's (TWX ) newly free AOL began offering a free fantasy game in 2005 and is trying to expand its relatively small site with blogs and fan pages. Executives hope to exceed the 350,000 users they had last football season. It's a strategy that makes sense given AOL's new focus on advertising (see BusinessWeek.com, 8/3/06, "AOL Casts Its Fate with Ads"). There is already so much competition in the fantasy sports arena that Neal Scarbrough, editor and general manager of AOL Sports, says AOL is trying to find a special niche to better compete. "We have to come up with something that is different than other sites so people can say, 'Yeah there is fantasy, but have you heard about that AOL game?'" he says. "We want that AOL game to be something different and better." But different doesn't matter for Funk. Like many competitors, he just wants to see his name up there with the winners. "A lot of people, including myself, they like to see their name at the top of the list when they go online," he says. "It's nice to have your name seen there." Click here to see the slide show.

Holahan is a writer for BusinessWeek.com in New York
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Fantasy Sports Bring Real Opportunities
by: Anonymous source: published :

Fantasy Sports Bring Real Opportunities
By Christopher M. Leporini Once enjoyed by a relative handful of sports enthusiasts, fantasy sports have hit the major leagues, expanding into a $1.5-billion-a-year business. All-star players such as Yahoo!, ESPN, and CBS Sportsline have established free or subscription services, and advertisers are lining up for the chance to reach these games' engaged audience of approximately 16 million participants. “Fantasy sports are now viewed as mainstream,” according to University of Mississippi professor Dr. Kim Beason, who conducts an annual study, sponsored by the Fantasy Sports Trade Association (FSTA), tracking the consumer behavior of fantasy sports participants. “Five years ago, a lot of businesses had zero use for fantasy sports, but now they have seen that it can be lucrative and they are trying to get involved.” Leagues allow participants to “manage” their own sports teams, with game play connected directly to real-world athletes' performance. For instance, in fantasy football, the most popular fantasy sport, participants draft a roster of athletes from across current team lineups, choosing players for key positions. Points are then awarded or deducted throughout the season based on players' performance, creating an unpredictable gaming environment that many sports fans find addictive. Variations on this idea have existed for decades, but fantasy sports' popularity have exploded in recent years, according to FSTA President Jeff Thomas. Fantasy sports built momentum throughout the 1990s, boasting between seven and eight million participants, Thomas estimates. He attributes the current boom, which doubled the number of players, to technology and the involvement of more broadcasters and companies with larger marketing budgets. Fantasy sports represent an easy, cost-effective way for advertisers to reach an engaged, demographically focused group of consumers, says the University of Mississippi's Beason. The latest edition of his annual study offers a profile of the average fantasy sports participant—a married white male, age 36, with an household income of $76,871. In addition, the study found that the average participant spends $493.60 annually on fantasy sports and approximately three hours per week managing a team.

“The most important message for advertisers and marketers to consider is that fantasy sports offer a long-term connection to a consumer," says Thomas. Many players are passionate about the activity, and participate in several fantasy sports throughout the year. And the loyal audience that fantasy sports are building today will have staying power, according to Thomas. "Our median 37-year-old consumer will play when they are 47, and 57, and even 67,” he predicts. Indeed, statistics from the FSTA find that the average fantasy sports participant has played for nine years. So, what makes fantasy sports participants so committed? One reason might be that the games restore a feeling of ownership that slipped away from many fans with the advent of free agency, Beason suggests. "There’s not the same connection to team and players that there used to be," he points out. "Players used to stay on the same team for years, but these days, you can almost guarantee that something is going to change each season." Instead, fans put an emotional investment in their fantasy team, whose lineup they can control and develop. Similarly, individuals located outside of major markets may not have a "home team," but they can put themselves in the middle of the fantasy sports world, Beason adds. Elements of social networking and friendly competition play a major role in fantasy sports’ popularity, states Thomas. Players enjoy the opportunity to match their skills against coworkers, friends, and family members. Three out of four fantasy sports participants play with people they know, according to the FSTA. Despite the growth that fantasy sports have achieved in the past decade, interest in these games hasn't peaked, according to Beason. "Fantasy sports are still new on the product development scale and we haven’t gone halfway up the growth scale,” he says. For instance, the types of participants are diversifying, with more women playing fantasy sports, as are the types of games available. Beason says the emergence of fantasy leagues for soccer, the world's most popular sport could attract a huge new international audience. Meanwhile, smaller leagues have cropped up devoted to sports as divergent as auto racing, surfing, golf, and professional bass fishing. Technology, which has defined the current era of fantasy sports, granting participants easier access to statistics and a greater ability to network with one another, promises to play a prominent role in the games' future. Fantasy sports leagues from providers such as MSN/Fox Sports, CBS Sportsline, and ESPN supplement their offerings with extras such as podcast and instant message updates. Mobile devices will allow participants to immerse themselves in fantasy sports on the train, waiting in line at the bank, or on their lunchbreak. From its pencil and paper roots to today's sophisticated multimedia offerings, fantasy sports offer participants the chance to escape into an league where they call the shots. And as technology allows participants to engage themselves ever more deeply in their personal field of dreams, marketers have the opportunity to go with them, forging a real connection from fantasy sports.

August 29, 2005 A Healthy Fantasy Life
By Devin Gordon Newsweek

Newsweek

In a booming armchair industry, football rules the roost.

Aug. 29 - Sept. 5, 2005 issue - Four days before his wedding last September, my college roommate called to say hello. I was his best man, and I was a bit nervous about the job. But talk soon turned, as usual, to our fantasy football team. We were facing our first crisis of the season: our top running back, Shaun Alexander of the Seattle Seahawks, was on a bye week, and his backup wasn't getting any carries. We needed another RB, fast. But after throwing around some names, I started to feel bad. Didn't we have more serious matters to discuss? My closest pal was about to be married, for crying out loud. Was there anything I could do to help? Did he need to talk? I braced for a heart-to-heart. "Find us a running back," he said. "This is your top priority." As the NFL preseason swings into high gear, 10 million Americans are beginning to reorganize their real priorities—work, family, mental health—to make room for an altogether pointless one: fantasy football. They will have trouble falling asleep at night and they'll blame it on Terrell Owens, the Philadelphia Eagles' wide receiver, whose big mouth might (or might not—who knows?) torpedo a big season. And they'll chip in, on average, $154 a head to an industry that, according to the Fantasy Sports Trade Association, will top $3 billion in 2005. It barely existed just a decade ago. "The game has transitioned from a geek mentality to a cool mentality," says Steve Snyder of Sportsline.com, the leading Web site for fantasy players. "It's become like the NCAA Tournament brackets. You've gotta do it. Who doesn't?" Fantasy football is a game of statistics: you "draft" players, collect points based on how many yards and touchdowns they roll up in actual NFL games, and compete against other "fake" teams. It's a cousin of rotisserie baseball, with fewer stats to manage and only a day's worth of games per week. And it has emerged as the industry's juggernaut largely because the NFL has wholeheartedly embraced the game. Why? It turns football fans into bigger football fans. According to Chris Russo, the NFL's senior vice president of new media, fantasy participants watch nearly three hours more football per week than nonfantasy viewers. They even watch Arizona Cardinals games. Now the NFL and its partners are scrambling to turn those eyeballs into dollars. This season, for the first time, ESPN published its own fantasy guide. Later this month, Fox, CBS and ESPN will each air fantasy preview shows hosted by their "A" coverage teams—also a first. Executives at all three networks say they plan to devote more attention to fantasy during their Sunday kickoff shows and live-game broadcasts. The NFL, meanwhile, just unveiled a new series of fantasy commercial spots featuring consensus No. 1 fantasy stud LaDainian Tomlinson. "I'm sure LT knows he's the top dog in fantasy, and I'm sure he gets a kick out of it," says ESPN morning radio host Mike Golic, a former NFL tackle who retired in 1995. "And it's harmless. It's not like it's gonna change the way he plays."

Once they stop playing, more and more ex-NFLers start playing fantasy. Former star quarterback Warren Moon refused for years until he became host of Fox Sports Net's "Ultimate Fantasy Football." Now, he says, "I'm getting sucked in. I lost a lot of close games last year. This year I'm coming in prepared." Then there are the grizzled veterans, like CBS sportscaster Bill Macatee, who's been playing for 18 years and once squeezed in a draft between commercial breaks while calling a U.S. Open tennis match. "I dated this girl once, and one of her friends invited me to join their fantasy league," he says. "Well, the girl and I broke up—but I got custody of the league. And I'm still in it." See, relationships come and go. But fantasy football is for life. With Stephen Saito

April 15, 2007
CHEERING SECTION

In Fantasy Sports, It Helps Being a Rocket Scientist
By VINCENT M. MALLOZZI One night last month, Clark Olson sat at his home computer and selected players in three different fantasy baseball drafts. “It took about three hours,” said Olson, a 38-year-old Seattle Mariners fan. “It was time-consuming, but I actually managed to cook dinner during the second draft.” Olson is one of the top fantasy sports players in the world. Last year, he nickel-and-dimed his way to the top of ESPN’s Über standings, which rank the online performance of everyone who plays fantasy games across multiple sports. “Clark is a bit of a legend on our message boards,” said Matthew Berry, the senior director for fantasy leagues at ESPN. “When you consider that 15 million people play fantasy sports, what he has done as a fantasy gamer has been unreal.” In a thinking-man’s universe where success and failure are mostly a reflection of time spent doing statistical analysis and research, Olson has a galactic edge. He is not only a knowledgeable sports fan, but also a rocket scientist. Olson worked for five years at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., where he helped develop techniques for Mars rovers and other applications in which information is extracted from digital images. “The job required a lot of computational and algorithmic thinking,” said Olson, who lives with his wife, Rebecca, in Seattle. “That way of thinking and looking at numbers is a benefit when it comes to playing fantasy sports, which is heavily based on statistics.” In recent years, nearly every would-be general manager in cyberspace has had trouble staying in Olson’s orbit. They have long since come to grips with a sobering reality: They cannot formulate lineups with the same kind of deft drafting, shrewd trading and waiver-wire finds made by a man whose former day job was out of this world. “Clark is a very impressive, high-skilled player,” Berry said. “He is the Albert Pujols of fantasy sports, a player who consistently produces, a player who is money in the bank.” Olson is an associate professor of computing and software systems at the University of Washington at Bothell. He graduated from the University of Washington at Seattle, where he also received a master’s degree in electrical engineering, and he earned a doctorate in computer science from the University of California. He achieved his highest honors in fantasy land through years of studying statistical spreadsheets, newspaper and

magazine articles, box scores and rosters. He finished third in the 2002 Über rankings, second in 2003, third in 2004, third again in 2005 and first last year. Olson has been consistently in the top 10 this year, running 16 teams in ESPN leagues: seven in baseball, five in basketball and four in hockey. He is pondering a return to fantasy bass fishing. “The key to most of these sports is knowing where to get good information to help determine which players might do well,” said Olson, who lists the 2005 signing of Milwaukee Brewers pitcher Derrick Turnbow as one of his greatest steals. “Sure, I’m good at problem solving and using analytical skills. But like any other fantasy player, I need to be smart in other areas, like picking up free agents, studying current sports news and trends, paying attention to who’s hot and who’s not, and knowing the rules of each league that I belong to.” In addition to his ESPN teams, Olson spends about 10 hours a week handling the budgets of fantasy teams in high-stakes events. He competes in the National Fantasy Baseball Championship, which is made up of 375 teams. The entry fee is $1,300 and the top prize is $100,000. In the past three years, Olson has won two league titles in that event, collecting $5,000 for each. He and a partner also earned $5,000 for winning a league in the World Championship of Fantasy Football. Serious fantasy players are always eager to team with Olson. In fact, he joined forces with the singer Meat Loaf in the 2004 World Championship of Fantasy Baseball. “Meat Loaf is a huge fantasy sports fan,” Olson said. “We sat beside each other that year at the draft in Las Vegas. We finished third out of 15 teams in our league and won $1,000. But that didn’t even cover our entrance fee.” Olson said that real-life general managers had made moves on paper that he would have never made online. “I would not have brought José Vidro to Seattle to be our designated hitter because we could have better used that money,” he said. “We also traded Rafael Soriano, a great setup man, to Atlanta for Horacio Ramirez, a starting pitcher who is often injured, another move I definitely would not have made. “And Gil Meche going from Seattle to Kansas City for $55 million, that really shocked me. To me, those numbers just didn’t seem to add up.” E-mail: cheers@nytimes.com
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Fantasy football...real money
Yahoo!, Disney and CBS should score financial touchdowns thanks to the increased popularity of fantasy football.
By Paul R. La Monica, CNNMoney.com editor at large August 11 2006: 3:07 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) -- Are you ready for some fantasy football? With the start of the NFL season just around the corner, many Americans are getting ready to cheer on their local football teams. But a growing number of pigskin junkies are also planning to root heavily for individual players...even if they play for their favorite team's most hated rival. Fantasy football, a "sport" that lets people draft teams of players and compete against other teams based on their players' real gridiron statistics, has become an increasingly popular pastime. According to figures from the Fantasy Sports Trade Association - yes, this is big enough of a market to warrant a real trade group - there are currently between 15 million and 18 million fantasy sports players in the U.S. The number of players has grown 7 percent to 10 percent a year for the past three years. About 85 percent of all fantasy sports participants play fantasy football, mainly online. And big consumer-oriented companies have taken notice. "Advertisers are really keeping an astute eye on fantasy football. It's a very loyal market," said Scott Linzer, director of media with iCrossing, a digital marketing agency. "Several of our large clients are doing direct advertising for the fantasy football market." Linzer said that marketing research has shown the average fantasy football player to be predominantly male, married, in a high income bracket and more likely to do research or make purchases online. Most fantasy addicts have leagues set up on Web sites run by big media companies like Yahoo! (Charts), CBS (Charts), Walt Disney's (Charts) ESPN and News Corp.'s (Charts) Fox, which runs its fantasy site in conjunction with Microsoft's (Charts) MSN. Fantasy fanatics are real ad targets So the increased popularity of fantasy sports could be a financial boon for these firms. There is real money to be made from people pretending to be NFL general managers and coaches. In most cases, people can set up a league and play for free. Some sites offer premium fantasy packages for a fee that offer more services such as news, draft strategies (Should you take Larry Johnson, Shaun Alexander or LaDainian Tomlinson with the first pick? What a dilemma!) and scouting reports about individual players as well as real-time stat updates. But several media companies are recognizing that it is more lucrative to not charge fantasy players since free games draw more traffic...and hence, more advertising revenue. The biggest beneficiary by far should be Yahoo. Jeff Thomas, founder and CEO of fantasy sports site SportsBuff.com and president of the Fantasy Sports Trade Association, said Yahoo has become the fantasy football leader because it kept promoting a basic, free service even when competitors were charging fees to set up leagues. "The industry has gone back and forth between charging fees and being free. Yahoo was the one who primarily stayed free and that helped them gain a lot of market share," he said.

According to research from comScore Media Metrix, traffic at Yahoo's fantasy football site was more than twice that of ESPN's during last year's football season. Yahoo would not disclose how many registered fantasy football players it has. But David Katz, who is the head of Yahoo's sports and studios divisions, said the company has seen steady growth for its free product and strong growth in its premium game. Visa and General Motors' GMC unit have returned as the main marketing sponsors for Yahoo's fantasy football. "We're seeing significant growth in our ad revenue. Fantasy is driven by the fact that it is, was and continues to be one of the most engaged audiences on the Internet," Katz said. Yahoo also stands to gain more users through a marketing deal with the web site of Sports Illustrated. SI.com no longer hosts leagues on its site and instead sends people to Yahoo. (SI, like CNNMoney, is owned by Time Warner (Charts).) ESPN is looking to close the gap though. On their respective fantasy football pages, Yahoo held just a slim lead over ESPN last month, with 1.33 million unique visitors in July compared to 1.24 million for ESPN. John Kosner, senior vice president and general manager for new media for ESPN, said ESPN's decision last year to introduce a free fantasy football service led to a five-fold increase in its members in 2005 and that numbers were way up this year. He would not disclose how many total registered players it had though. The increase in players has also led to dramatic growth in advertising revenue. Kosner said that GMC, Samsung and DirecTV are sponsors for ESPN's fantasy football game this year while Coca-Cola's Coke Zero is the sponsor for fantasy football news and columns. "Fantasy football is being wildly embraced by our advertisers," Kosner said. And this year, ESPN is stepping up its efforts to increase its fantasy presence. It is launching a fantasy football TV show later this month that will air on ESPN2. ESPN also offers fantasy advice through its magazine, radio shows and podcasts. Kosner thinks that the breadth of ESPN's fantasy coverage gives it a leg up on Yahoo and other competitors. "The power is in being at all these different media, hitting the fan everywhere he or she is," Kosner said. CBS still believes in "premium" product Still, not all media companies think that free fantasy football is the way to go. Steve Snyder, general manager of CBS SportsLine, said that it has "well over a million" users playing in paid football leagues. And even though CBS doesn't have as many members as Yahoo or ESPN because of its paid subscription model, Snyder said its fantasy site is still attractive to advertisers. In fact, he said having people that are willing to pay for fantasy football has been a lure. "Since we have a high-end audience, we've always had success with advertisers. Ad inventory for fantasy football has been sold out for years," Snyder said, adding that GMC, McDonald's, Budweiser, Toyota and Coke are big advertisers this year. Nonetheless, free competition from Yahoo and ESPN has caused CBS SportsLine to begin offering its own free product as well. But the company also is trying to differentiate itself with new games. Snyder said CBS is launching a free offering called Heads Up Fantasy Football this season that will allow people to draft new players every Sunday and make changes after every quarter of those games. (Think fantasy football meets day-trading.) There appears to be plenty of room for small independents to thrive as well. SportsBuff.com's Thomas said his firm has worked in the past with the Minneapolis Star Tribune and Chicago Tribune to create fantasy games as promotional tools that were designed to help increase their circulation and newsstand sales. The fantasy sports industry also won an important legal battle earlier this week that should allow most leagues to remain free. A U.S. District Court Judge ruled that fantasy baseball leagues do not have to get licensing agreements from Major League Baseball in order to use players' names and statistics. Some had feared that a court victory for Major League Baseball would have meant that smaller fantasy baseball league companies (and possibly fantasy leagues of other sports) would have to pay for stats, which would make it tough for them to compete unless they passed on costs to fantasy participants. "The recent litigation news is a great positive for fantasy companies that have been around for more than a decade and put a lot of sweat equity into the industry," Thomas said. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------Fantasy's 'rights' and wrongs NFL sacks cable companies The NFL, post Tagliabue Disclosure: The reporter of this story owns shares of Time Warner through his company's 401(k) plan and is also a hopeless fantasy football addict. Go Brooklyn Brawlers!