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Here you’ll find the project website: http://id-eye.eu/

Project manual






Here you’ll find the project manual in English: http://results.ideye.eu/eBook/Workshop_Instructor_Manual/EN
Here you’ll find the project manual in Greek: http://results.ideye.eu/eBook/Workshop_Instructor_Manual/EL
Here you’ll find the project manual in Spanish: http://results.ideye.eu/eBook/Workshop_Instructor_Manual/ES
Here you’ll find the project manual in Polish: http://results.ideye.eu/eBook/Workshop_Instructor_Manual/PL
Here you’ll find the project manual in Lithuanian: http://results.ideye.eu/eBook/Workshop_Instructor_Manual/LT
Here you’ll find the project manual in Dutch: http://results.ideye.eu/eBook/Workshop_Instructor_Manual/NL
Here you’ll find the project manual components: http://results.id-eye.eu/eBook

Project material


Here you’ll find project files to download: http://results.id-eye.eu/eBook/Downloads
Here you’ll find game-related material: http://results.ideye.eu/eBook/IDentifEYE_Game_Components
Here you’ll find project outcomes: http://results.id-eye.eu/eBook/Project_Public_Outcomes

Project video:






Here you’ll find the project video in English: http://results.id-eye.eu/eBook/Promotional_Video/EN
Here you’ll find the project video in Greek: http://results.id-eye.eu/eBook/Promotional_Video/EL
Here you’ll find the project video in Spanish: http://results.id-eye.eu/eBook/Promotional_Video/ES
Here you’ll find the project video in Polish: http://results.id-eye.eu/eBook/Promotional_Video/PL
Here you’ll find the project video in Lithuanian: http://results.ideye.eu/eBook/Promotional_Video/LT
Here you’ll find the project video in Dutch: http://results.id-eye.eu/eBook/Promotional_Video/NL
Here you’ll find the project video in Augmented Reality: http://results.ideye.eu/eBook/Promotional_Video_AR

PROJECT VIDEO IN AUGMENTED REALITY

Please visit: http://results.id-eye.eu/eBook/Promotional_Video_AR and follow the instructions.
Attention. You will need a webcam to experience this. If you would be asked to give your
permission to use the camera, please provide it. Hold the marker still, in parallel to your webcam.
Make sure that the whole marker is visible to the cam and that you do not cover the marker with
your hands.

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INSTRUCTOR INTRODUCTION
Introduction
Welcome instructor! Thank you for being interested in the IDentifEYE project.
The overall aim of the IDentifEYE project is to enhance student online safety by empowering
student online resilience. But, you will not instruct students. You will instruct teachers. The reason
for this is scalability. In order to reach students in a scalable, structured way there are only two
gateways: parents and teachers. Because teachers are organized and have a far larger reach than
parents they are the ones you will deal with.
Teachers are not the easiest group to work with. They feel overburdened and underappreciated.
And they have become cynical when it comes to innovations. Education researcher Dylan Wiliam
(2011) writes: “Because teachers are bombarded with innovations, none of these innovations has
time to take root, so nothing really changes. And worse, not only is there little or no real
improvement in what happens in classrooms, but teachers get justifiably cynical about the
constant barrage of innovations to which they are subjected.”
Your task will be to find a way to win them over. What usually helps is to acknowledge that within
the education system they are the most important factor when it comes to improving the quality
of education. Teacher quality has the biggest impact on student performance. A good teacher at a
bad school turns out better students than a bad teacher at a good school.
The IDentifEYE project will not revolutionize teaching. As Dylan Wiliam writes: “there haven’t been
any real breakthroughs in teaching for the last two thousand years. Teachers need professional
development because the job of teaching is so difficult, so complex, that one lifetime is not enough
to master it.” The only thing the IDentifEYE project proposes is for teachers to try out a few new
elements in their normal teaching. The project offers a menu card from which, hopefully, some
items will be regularly used by teachers in their day-to-day teaching.
All items on the IDentifEYE menu card will have a positive impact on student online safety. And all
will, at the same time, change teacher student relations for the better. They will help students be
more open to feedback, more open to learning, more engaged, and more positively responsive
while feeling co-responsible for their learning process and for their reaction to social processes
around them. At the same time, the items will open new channels of communication between
teachers and students, leading to a more personal trust relationship. As a result, the elements that
teachers will encounter in this workshop will make their job in the class room easier and more
interesting. And they will make their students more resilient, especially regarding new technologies
and online experiences. This resilience will enhance student online safety. That’s what’s in it for
teachers.
Good practices
So, how does the project achieve this? It introduces new elements to teachers on four levels: new
topics – (online) identities and a critical view on globalized society – interactive didactics, elements
of prophylactics and introductions to new technologies and in particular to Augmented Reality.
These elements are customized for two different target groups: teachers teaching students aged 811 and teachers teaching students aged 12 – 14. And it is you who will introduce these teachers to
all of this.

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What you will present to teachers in this workshop are sets of good practices on all four levels.
These good practices are elements that can be implemented by teachers in their lessons straight
away.
You will need background information in order to be able to present these good practices, and lots
of it. This background information you will find in this manual.
Workshop sessions
How does the workshop concretely look like? The workshop consists of six sessions, five of which
will be conducted by you.
In the first two sessions you will present good practices concerning identities, interactive didactics
and prophylactics for teachers teaching 8 – 11 year olds and identities, society, interactive didactics
and prophylactics for teachers teaching 12 – 14 year olds.
In session three you will present new technology good practices and an educational Augmented
Reality game that was the starting point for creating this workshop. The game comes in two
versions: for students aged 8 – 11 years about data sharing and online identities and for students
aged 12 – 14 year about communication in the class room. At the end of session three you will ask
teachers to start creating their own lesson plan, involving workshop good practices from all four
levels. In session four the participants will finalize their lesson plans.
The creation of lessons plans is the essence of the workshop. It is a first step to get teachers to
reflect on how to concretely introduce and test elements from all four levels into their regular,
curricular lessons.
The fifth part of the workshop does not involve you. During this session teachers implement their
individual lesson plans in their own class rooms. They are to experience the effect of the new
elements that they decided to test out. During the pilot phase of the project this was the moment
that teachers saw the effect of the good practices that they had chosen for their own students. It
was the moment that many teachers felt quite insecure, or at least unsure of what to expect. And
it was the moment in which they were surprised by the positive response by their students. In
none of the pilot sessions teachers experienced a negative reaction in their classes.
In the sixth part of the workshop, session five, you meet up with the teacher participants again to
evaluate what went well and what did not.
Workshop method
The structure of the sessions is loosely based on a method called Brain Essential Learning Steps.
The creators of the B.E.L.S. method – Brain Essential Learning Steps – define it as “a consistent
thematic approach to teach children curricular content retained through interpretation and
application”.
There are four Brain Essential Learning Steps:
 B.E.L.S. 1: Providing an introduction on a subject;
 B.E.L.S. 2: Brainstorm and list ideas connected to the subject;
 B.E.L.S. 3: Create a plan for action on the subject;
 STEP 4. Implement the plan for action.
The IDentifEYE project has added a fifth step to these four: Evaluation.

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The following lifelong learning skills are developed by means of B.E.L.S.:
 Problem Solving;
 Risk Taking;
 Cooperative Learning;
 Creativity;
 Cognitive Responsibility Systems.
Teacher challenges
Your role during the workshop is crucial. You are the one who will be confronted with teachers
complaining about them having to do yet another chore, while their work schedule is already
stretched to the maximum. You will meet a sceptical attitude by teachers about yet another
innovative workshop. And you will hear the sighs when teachers hear that they will have to
evaluate their implemented lessons because that means yet another few hours of additional work
in the evening.
Nevertheless, by showing teachers what is in it for them you can win them over. Many teachers
struggle with the use of new technology in the class room. This is not so much because they are
too ignorant or too conservative but rather because they feel that students in their class room are
much better with new technology. They are afraid they will lose authority when touching upon the
subject. Also, quite a few teachers have a trust issue with their students. They believe that if they
allow technology to be used in the class room students will use it to play games or to communicate
with their friends, rather than use it for their assigned task. By means of the IDentifEYE workshop
teachers can take a relative safe first or next step, because “it’s only an experiment”.
Many teachers also struggle with their current top-down didactics. The downside of this didactics
is that teachers know what they teach but only can find out what their students have learned
when the students are tested. The test results are important not just for the future of the students
but also for the future of the teachers: they are being evaluated on the success rate of their
students. Unfortunately when the test results come out it is too late to improve the success rate –
the next subject already awaits. The IDentifEYE workshop gives teacher an excuse to experiment
with interactive didactics that allows for testing during the lessons.
A third major teacher issue is where to draw the line between professional and private. How does
one react to (cyber-)bullying? How does one deal with students who have serious problems at
home? Does one need to be available for students in the evenings and during the weekends too?
By introducing elements of prophylactics teachers get tools to deal with these types of issues too.
Student online safety
How is this exactly related to student online safety? The good practices that teachers will
encounter during the IDentifEYE workshop do not just impact them but will also impact their
students. The impact on their students is that student resilience is being empowered. The identity
related workshop elements are to make them define themselves in a less all-or-nothing fashion so
that they will become less vulnerable for identity meltdowns as a result of online attacks or
experiences. The didactics and prophylactics will help them to be embedded in a more trusted
environment so that they will always have someone to turn to when things go wrong online. And
the new technology elements open up concrete communication channels with their teachers
about online experiences.

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The idea that online safety can be increased by student empowerment is not new. The research EU
Kids Online II brought to the forefront that the most effective instrument to promote youngster
safety online is talking about online experiences with an adult. It also showed that youngsters who
are protected by filters and are forbidden by adults to experiment online seldom encounter
stressful situations online but when they do the impact of these situations on them may be
immense. Youngsters who experiment a lot, on the other hand, become resilient. They encounter a
lot of stressful online situations but the impact of these situations is much less severe.
The project does not only aim to stimulate better teacher student contacts and teacher student
contacts on online experiences. The project also aims to improve peer contact amongst youngsters
by means of the project good practices. A study by the University of Sussex found that even one
single close friendship empowers resilience among low-income youngsters.
Workshop elements
In order to present the concrete workshop impact on all three levels – impact on student online
safety, teacher impact and student impact - it is time to introduce the workshop elements
individually.
The topic of identity consists of two components: “identity labels” for all age groups and “learning
types” for the age group 8-11. Identity labels refer to the way we define ourselves. All of us create
a self-definition of whom we are when we introduce ourselves to someone or present ourselves in
an online profile. In these self-definitions we use labels such as “smart” or “pretty” as in “I’m
smart” or “I’m pretty”. The type of labels we use is important for our openness to others – or
defensiveness.
While youngsters from the age of 11 and up start to reflect on general rules they encounter,
younger children are mostly focused on their direct surroundings and on themselves. For these
younger children, therefore, there is a module on learning types. The way they think they can
achieve good results at school affects their resilience and ability to reflect on themselves.
The older children of the IDentifEYE target group are served a module on the society they live in
order to trigger their reflections on the rules that they follow and the situations they encounter
that are the consequence of our current globalization and ultra-consumption.
These modules are followed-up by modules on interactive didactics, prophylactics, new technology
and the Augmented Reality game in two age-specific versions.
Impact tables
MODULE
IDENTITY LABELS

LEARNING TYPES

IMPACT ON INTERNET
SAFETY
Less all-or-nothing
reactions to online
challenges, less prone
to being onedimensionally profiled.
Less resignation when
meeting online
challenges, less prone
to being onedimensionally profiled.

IMPACT ON
TEACHERS
More positively
responsive students.

IMPACT ON
STUDENTS
More open to
feedback, more open
to learning.

More positively
responsive students.

More engaged, more
positively responsive
to challenges.

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SOCIETY

DIDACTICS

More critical attitude
online, better skills to
deal with “otherness”
online.
Having an adult to
communicate with
about online
experiences is the most
effective instrument to
enhance student online
safety.

PROPHYLACTICS
8-11

Having an adult to
communicate with
about online
experiences is the most
effective instrument to
enhance online student
safety. Children may
enter the online world
more consciously and
safely when they can
ask an adult for help.
Having a peer friend is
essential to overcome
challenges, especially
for more vulnerable
students.

PROPHYLACTICS
12-14

Having an adult to
communicate with
about online
experiences is the most
effective instrument to
enhance online student
safety.

More critically
responsive students,
more tolerant
students.
Focus on student
learning rather than
on teaching, more
frequent and
meaningful
communication –
both teacher/
student and student/
student, formative
assessments during
the lessons. More
student engagement
and deeper trust
relationships.
Building conscious
relation and sense of
trust in the
classroom, enlarging
teacher’s abilities to
communicate with
students, more use
of interactive
methods.

More critical
attitude, more civil
skills.

Deeper trust
relationships, better
teacher
responsiveness
towards interactivity.

Deeper embedding
in one’s
environment,
improving adult –
youngster and peerto-peer
communication and
stimulating
engagement. More
personal teacher/
student contact.

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Co-responsibility for
one’s learning
process, more
engagement. More
personal teacher/
student contact.

Closer relations with
their teacher,
enlarged risk
awareness, a better
communication with
their peers, a greater
involvement in their
studying.

NEW TECH

AR GAME (8-11)

AR GAME (12-14)

Having an adult to
communicate with
about online
experiences is the most
effective instrument to
enhance student online
safety.
Provoking reflections on
data sharing, online
identities and online
safety.

Provoking discussion on
teacher – student
communications as a
starting point for
teachers becoming
suitable adult to
communicate about
online experiences.

Less teacher anxiety,
more openness to
new education
technology. A deeper
trust relationship
with students.

Getting
communication
options to talk about
new technology and
online experiences
with teachers.

Being a moderator
Getting
facilitating peer-tocommunication
peer communication. options to talk about
online experiences
peer-to-peer.
Temporary higher
engagement, higher
concentration levels,
higher trust levels.
Being a moderator
Getting
facilitating peer-tocommunication
peer communication options to talk about
while hearing
didactics. Costudent
responsibility for
communication
one’s learning
preferences.
process. Temporary
higher engagement,
higher concentration
levels, higher trust
levels.

The impact of the workshop methodology, B.E.L.S., is framed in the following table:
MODULE
IMPACT ON
IMPACT ON
IMPACT ON
INTERNET SAFETY
TEACHERS
STUDENTS
B.E.L.S.
Facilitates relevant
New skill set to
Co-responsibility for
lessons on online
create a lesson plan
one’s learning
identities, data
with colleagues or
process, more
sharing and online
with students.
engagement.
safety.
Workshop aim and success criteria
The aim of the workshop is to positively impact teachers, students and student online safety. All
the workshop elements are designed to make a positive impact on all three levels as the table
above illustrates.
The success criteria for this workshop are:
 In the evaluation form teachers state that during their implementation lesson they made a
positive impact on their teaching, their students and student online safety by implementing
some of the workshop good practices, especially the AR game.
 In the evaluation form teachers indicate that there are workshop good practices that they
will use again.
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During a follow-up meeting a few months after the workshop implementation it appears
that teachers are still using some of the workshop good practices. This does not mean that
teachers admit to this – the good practices could have been so integrated already in their
day-to-day teaching that they forgot about the origin and consider these good practices as
elements that were always there. This would be the best possible outcome.
During this follow-up meeting it occurs that teachers have tried out workshop good
practices after the workshop that they did not try out in their implementation lesson.
During the evaluation session together with the teacher you draw up a list of Best Practices
and lessons learned – and mail this list to the project partners (specifically to Mr. Onno
Hansen: onno.hansen@gmail.com).

How to read the manual
The manual consists of the following elements:
 A theoretical background to the workshop age differentiation;
 Overviews of the workshop session per age group;
 Instructor background information;
 Instructor practical documents;
 Workshop documents;
 Project information.
Enjoy your reading!

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
PROJECT VIDEO IN AUGMENTED REALITY............................................................................................1
INSTRUCTOR INTRODUCTION...............................................................................................................3
THE SOCIAL-PSYCHOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CHILDREN IN THE AGE GROUP 8-14................12
WORKSHOP OVERVIEW......................................................................................................................16
WORKSHOP OVERVIEW......................................................................................................................19
SESSION 1...........................................................................................................................................22
SESSION 2...........................................................................................................................................26
SESSION 3...........................................................................................................................................29
SESSION 4...........................................................................................................................................32
LESSON PLAN (45 minutes duration)..................................................................................................33
MODEL LESSON PLAN 2 (45 minutes duration)..................................................................................37
IMPLEMENTATION LESSON.................................................................................................................40
SESSION 5...........................................................................................................................................41
SESSION 1...........................................................................................................................................43
SESSION 2...........................................................................................................................................47
SESSION 3...........................................................................................................................................50
SESSION 4...........................................................................................................................................53
LESSON PLAN (45 minutes duration)..................................................................................................55
MODEL LESSON PLAN 2 (45 minutes duration)..................................................................................61
IMPLEMENTATION LESSON.................................................................................................................63
SESSION 5...........................................................................................................................................64
BACKGROUND TO SESSION 1..............................................................................................................66
BACKGROUND TO SESSION 2..............................................................................................................78
BACKGROUND TO SESSION 3..............................................................................................................94
WHAT IS B.E.L.S.?..............................................................................................................................109
INSTRUCTOR DOCUMENTS...............................................................................................................111
INSTRUCTOR LOGISTICS....................................................................................................................112
PROJECT DESCRIPTION.....................................................................................................................114
DIAGNOSTIC QUESTIONS..................................................................................................................119
HOW TO PLAY THE AR GAME............................................................................................................121
HOW TO PLAY THE AR GAME............................................................................................................134
Preparations for the copying of the game........................................................................................143
CREATING AN AR GAME...................................................................................................................147
IDentifEYE WORKSHOP – DECLARATION OF CONSENT PARTICIPATION AND USE OF IMAGE..........158
INSTRUCTOR EVALUATION................................................................................................................159
WORKSHOP DOCUMENTS................................................................................................................161
WORKSHOP PRESENTATION 8-11.....................................................................................................162
WORKSHOP PRESENTATION 12-14...................................................................................................167
SUCCESS CRITERIA............................................................................................................................172
LEVEL 1 GOOD PRACTICES................................................................................................................173
LEVEL 1 GOOD PRACTICES................................................................................................................174
LEVEL 2 GOOD PRACTICES................................................................................................................175
LEVEL 3 GOOD PRACTICES................................................................................................................176
LEVEL 3 GOOD PRACTICES................................................................................................................177
LEVEL 4 GOOD PRACTICES................................................................................................................178
AR MARKERS.....................................................................................................................................180
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IDentifEYE WORKSHOP - AR game task............................................................................................181
IDentifEYE WORKSHOP - AR game questionnaire............................................................................182
LESSON PLAN (45 minutes duration)................................................................................................183
TEACHER EVALUATION......................................................................................................................186
EVALUATION.....................................................................................................................................188
TEACHER EVALUATION TOOLS..........................................................................................................190
CERTIFICATE OF WORKSHOP ATTENDANCE.....................................................................................192
PROJECT PARTNERS..........................................................................................................................193
SUPPORTING PARTNERS...................................................................................................................196
VERY SPECIAL THANKS TO:...............................................................................................................198

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THE SOCIAL-PSYCHOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CHILDREN
IN THE AGE GROUP 8-14
Introduction
Students in the age groups 8-11 and 12-14 clearly differ in behavior, their skills, understanding
social norms and the degree of physical, mental and social development. This is what we, adults
working with them on a daily basis, should not forget. But what unites these two age groups is the
fact that both late childhood and adolescence is a difficult time for the young individual, as well as
for their environment. What can be regarded as particularly important is the fact that as adults /
teachers in both periods (in which emotional maturity, identity and their own "I" is dynamically
shaped) is putting special emphasis on relationship building, dialogue, communication or simply
friendship with the students. We assume that this will help students to safely go through certain
stage of their development, and for us – to better understand and help them. More detailed
characteristics of both groups are given below.
Characteristics of age group 8-11
In psychology, the developmental period between 8 and 11 years is most often called the period of
late childhood, before entering in puberty. Both late childhood and adolescence are difficult times
for a young individual, but also for their environment.
The child in earlier stages of development was taught to recognize and express emotions. The child
by now is a social being, a member of a group and can have relationships with others. Frequently
they have experienced their first friendships.
The child creates an ever more complex self-image, begins to expand, diversifies its "I". During this
period the child is no longer just a unit, it’s building its identity as a group member. In the words of
Strelau the child goes to a "higher operational level of thinking" (Maria Kielar-Turska in: Strelau, J.,
"Psychology. Academic Handbook", Volume 1, p. 307, GWP, 2002). The child begins to be guided by
the principles adopted by the group to which he or she belongs.
The child’s cognitive activity becomes more and more systematic. The child can focus its attention
better and uses different strategies to remember the absorbed material.
There are new mental activities - specific operations on simple tasks, such as addition, subtraction,
multiplication or division. With these skills the child can solve tasks that contain complete
information. Babies cannot yet formulate the principles, rules or laws based on concrete
operations.
Looking at the moral development of children aged 8-11 years, it is impossible not to recall the
achievements of researchers such as Jean Piaget and Lawrence Kohlberg. They believe that moral
development of a unit runs in stages, without the ability to override any of the stages of
development. Each subsequent change affects the further development of the individual. Both
Piaget and Kohlberg claim that the late childhood is followed by one of the milestones of children’s
moral development. In the childhood, the unit is guided by the principle based on “crime and
punishment” social rules of behavior (Maria Kielar-Turska in: Strelau, J., “ Psychology. Academic
Handbook ", Volume 1, p. 308, GWP, 2002).

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During childhood the child is able to perceive and interpret (understand) the emotional states of
others. Guided by the principles and norms applicable in a group it assumes that whatever leads to
mutual benefit is the right thing to do. On the other hand, the child treats group policies as
external (although respects them) and therefore assumes that in each case the good is what has
been (legally) established by the norms and principles.
At the end of childhood the child enters the "conventional level of moral development. The child,
adopting the perspective of his or her own, takes into account the perspectives of others; shows
interest and concern for others and tries to maintain good relations with others" (Maria KielarTurska in: Strelau, J., “Psychology. Academic Handbook”, Volume 1, p. 308, GWP, 2002).
The period of late childhood is a time of becoming a member of the classroom, which is a formal
group. The child develops relationships with peers, builds its position in class, looks for its place in
it. This position, however, doesn’t need to be constant, in the course of learning it can change.
Friendships during this period become permanent at the end of late childhood. It’s a time of
interest development.
A very important component of the child's personality is a self-image. It’s affected by the opinions
of adults and comparisons with others. A self-esteem is being formed.
Characteristics of age group 12-14
In psychology, the development period called adolescence is assumed contractually as a time
between 12 and 18 years old. Its beginning designates the physical changes, which signalizes
biological maturation. Changes in the physique, gaining weight, deepening of the voice or
appearance of hair in different parts of the body, are serious, often difficult changes to accept for a
young individual. There are also series of changes in the mental sphere, resulting in the
achievement by an individual the psychological maturity. Both late childhood and adolescence are
difficult not only for a young individual, but also for their environment.
In the first phase of adolescence, beyond observable physical changes, we can often notice a
deterioration of motor coordination. The movements lose their fluidity and lightness, they are less
precise. Sometimes hyperactivity appears.
According to Jean Piaget (source: Strelau, J., "Psychology. Academic Handbook", Volume 1, p. 311,
GWP, 2002) during adolescence a unit enters the period of formal operations in thinking. For
example, a young individual sees the connection between the premise and a possible consequence
(eg. if you read a given material, you will answer the questions during the quiz). Deductive
reasoning is formed. The young individual reason creates hypotheses and looks for an opportunity
to check them in reality.
What gradually appears in thinking during adolescence is the reflexivity, criticism, own opinions
and shaping of independence from other people’s opinions. Also the imagination develops.
Growing up, a young individual seeks his own identity. According to Erik Erikson it's then when "an
identity crisis in the development appears " (Erikson, 1997, for: Strelau, J., "Psychology. Academic
Handbook", Volume 1, p. 314, GWP, 2002). The solution to this crisis is to merge one's own past
and the present to what he already knows about himself and what he learns or discovers. The
effect of a positive solution to the crisis is a strong sense of one’s own "I".
In Piaget's concept of moral development, autonomous morality drops in the adolescence stage. A
young individual learns that "the complex of social situations require high plasticity of conduct,
and absolute application of the rules may lead to conflicts" (Strelau, J., "Psychology. Academic
Handbook", Volume 1, p. 315, GWP, 2002).
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The young individual firmly commits to free himself from the influence of adults. It is not easy.
Many times parents, not wanting to let their children grow up too quickly, put a number of
restrictions against which the young individual rebels. Many conflicts can occur in parent-child
relationship. The child becomes more critical, learns that any question can be examined from many
sides. In accordance with the principle of moral conformism, in his action, he often adapts to the
group and is affected by the opinion of majority.
Summary - Characteristics of the age groups described
Age group 8-11
A child in the earlier stages of development learned to recognize and express emotions, is a social
being, a member of the group, is able to establish relationships with others.










A self-image is being created, the child begins to expand and diversify its "I" – it’s no longer just a
unit, the child builds its identity as a group member;
The child starts to be guided by the principles adopted by the group to which it belongs;
More and more systematic becomes cognitive activity, the child better focuses attention, also uses
different strategies to remember absorbed material;
There are new mental operations - such addition, subtraction, multiplication or division. With these
skills the child can solve problems that contain complete information. Babies cannot yet use
concrete operations to formulate the principles, rules, or laws;
Late childhood is one of the milestones in moral development of children;
The child can already perceive and interpret (understand) the emotional states of others;
The period of late childhood is a time of becoming a member of the classroom, which is a formal
group; the child develops relationships with peers, builds its position in class, looks for their place in
it;
Friendships in the period of late childhood become permanent;
It’s the time of interests development;
A very important component of the child's personality is the self-image; children are affected by the
opinions of adults, compare with others;
Self-esteem is being shaped.

Age group 12-14
This age is marked by psychologists as a "crisis of identity development" often manifested as
"rebellion" and risk behaviors.






Physical changes which are the signal of biological maturation are often difficult to accept by a
young individual;
There is a number of changes in the mental sphere, resulting in the achievement of the mental
maturity;
Deductive reasoning is being shaped; a young individual argues by forming a hypothesis and looks
for an opportunity to check it in reality;
Reflexivity, criticism, own opinions and the development of the independence from other people’s
opinions appear; imagination is being developed;
A young individual growing up seeks for his own identity; according to Erik Erikson it is then when
"an identity crisis is marked in the development";
A young individual firmly commits to free himself from the influence of adults;
Many conflicts in parent - child relationship can occur; the child becomes more critical;

14


In accordance with the principle of moral conformism a young individual often adapts to the group
in his actions and is affected by the opinion of majority;
A young individual looks for his way through experiencing different, often risky, situations.

Despite the fact that both periods of development in many ways significantly differ from each
other, for us adults - parents / teachers - it's important to remember that in both these periods,
young people need us as "wise adults", i.e. friends, guides and teachers. Without us they often
cannot handle difficult and threatening situations.

15

WORKSHOP OVERVIEW
Age group: 8-11

SESSION 1
The objective of this session is to transfer knowledge of identities and learning types.
Success criteria: The teacher participants are able to explain the impact effects of identity labels and
learning types on three levels: their teaching, their students and student online safety.

TIME IN ‘
15
10
10
5
10
10
5
10
10
5

MODULE DESCRIPTION
Explaining aim of the workshop
Identity labels
Good practices
Discussion
Learning types
Good practices
Discussion
Identity theories
New online technologies and identity
Discussion

SESSION 2
The objective of this session is to transfer knowledge on interactive didactics and prophylactics.
Success criteria: The teacher participants are able to explain the impact effects of interactive
didactics and prophylactics on three levels: their teaching, their students and student online safety.
TIME IN ‘

MODULE DESCRIPTION

10
20
15
15
15
15

Interactive didactics
Good practices
Discussion
Elements of prophylactics
Good practices
Discussion

16

SESSION 3
The objective of this session is to transfer knowledge of education technologies and Augmented Reality (AR)
and on how to create and play an Augmented Reality game.
Success criteria: The teacher participants are able to explain the impact effects of educational technologies
and the AR game on three levels: their teaching, their students and student online safety.

TIME IN ‘
10
25
20
15
5
15

MODULE DESCRIPTION
Educational technologies
Playing the AR game
Creating an AR game
Discussion
Teacher perspective on the lesson plan
First lesson plan sketch

SESSION 4
The objective of this session is that teachers will fill out the lesson plan template or choose an existing
lesson plan (one of the two model lessons).
Success criteria: The teacher participants are able to write down hypotheses on the impact effects of their
lesson plan on three levels: their teaching, their students and student online safety.

TIME IN ‘
80
10

MODULE DESCRIPTION
Teachers create individual lesson plans
Discuss the evaluation template

IMPLEMENTATION SESSION
The objective of this lesson is for teachers to implement and evaluate their lesson plan, their decisions and
their chosen good practices.
Success criteria: The teacher participants are able to test the impact effects of their lesson plan on three
levels: their teaching, their students and student online safety.

TIME IN ‘
45
30

MODULE DESCRIPTION
Teachers implement their own lesson plan at their
school
Teachers fill out the evaluation template

17

SESSION 5
The objective of this session is to evaluate the individual teacher sessions and create a set of Best Practices
and Lessons learned (BP/LL).
Success criteria: The teacher participants are able to evaluate the impact effects of their lesson plan on
three levels: their teaching, their students and student online safety.

TIME IN ‘
30
50
10

MODULE DESCRIPTION
Teacher summaries of their implementations
Discussion leading to a BP/LL list
Handing out certificates

18

WORKSHOP OVERVIEW
Age group: 8-11

SESSION 1
The objective of this session is to transfer knowledge of identities and the concept of “liquid life”.
Success criteria: The teacher participants are able to explain the impact effects of identity labels and the
concept of “liquid life” on three levels: their teaching, their students and student online safety.

TIME IN ‘
15
10
10
5
10
10
5
10
10
5

MODULE DESCRIPTION
Explaining aim of the workshop
Identity labels
Good practices
Discussion
“Liquid life”
Good practices
Discussion
Identity theories
New online technologies and identity
Discussion

SESSION 2
The objective of this session is to transfer knowledge of interactive didactics and prophylactics.
Success criteria: The teacher participants are able to explain the impact effects of interactive didactics and
prophylactics on three levels: their teaching, their students and student online safety.

TIME IN ‘

MODULE DESCRIPTION

10
20
15
15
15
15

Interactive didactics
Good practices
Discussion
Elements of prophylactics
Good practices
Discussion

19

SESSION 3
The objective of this session is to transfer knowledge of education technologies and Augmented Reality (AR)
and on how to create and play an Augmented Reality game.
Success criteria: The teacher participants are able to explain the impact effects of educational technologies
and the AR game on three levels: their teaching, their students and student online safety.

TIME IN ‘
10
25
20
15
5
15

MODULE DESCRIPTION
Educational technologies
Playing the AR game
Creating an AR game
Discussion
Teacher perspective on the lesson plan
First lesson plan sketch

SESSION 4
The objective of this session is that teachers will fill out the lesson plan template or choose an existing
lesson plan (one of the two model lessons).
Success criteria: The teacher participants are able to write down hypotheses on the impact effects of their
lesson plan on three levels: their teaching, their students and student online safety.

TIME IN ‘
80
10

MODULE DESCRIPTION
Teachers create individual lesson plans
Discuss the evaluation template

IMPLEMENTATION SESSION
The objective of this lesson is for teachers to implement and evaluate their lesson plan, their decisions and
their chosen good practices.
Success criteria: The teacher participants are able to test the impact effects of their lesson plan on three
levels: their teaching, their students and student online safety.

TIME IN ‘
45
30

MODULE DESCRIPTION
Teachers implement their own lesson plan at their
school
Teachers fill out the evaluation template

20

SESSION 5
The objective of this session is to evaluate the individual teacher sessions and create a set of Best Practices
and Lessons learned (BP/LL).
Success criteria: The teacher participants are able to evaluate the impact effects of their lesson plan on
three levels: their teaching, their students and student online safety.

TIME IN ‘
30
50
10

MODULE DESCRIPTION
Teacher summaries of their implementations
Discussion leading to a BP/LL list
Handing out certificates

21

SESSION 1
Description for age group 8-11
TIME IN ‘
15

MODULE DESCRIPTION
Explaining aim of the
workshop

PPT SLIDE
1

10

Identity labels

2

10
5
10

Good practices
Discussion
Learning types

3
4
5

10
5
10
10

Good practices
Discussion
Identity theories
New online technologies and
identity
Discussion

6
7
8
9

5

HANDBOOK SECTION
INSTRUCTOR INTRODUCTION
PROJECT DESCRIPTION
WORKSHOP POWERPOINT 8-11
SUCCESS CRITERIA
DECLARATION OF CONSENT
DIAGNOSTIC QUESTIONS
SESSION 1 BACKGROUND
LEVEL 1 8-11 GOOD PRACTICES
DIAGNOSTIC QUESTIONS
SESSION 1 BACKGROUND
LEVEL 1 8-11 GOOD PRACTICES
SESSION 1 BACKGROUND
SESSION 1 BACKGROUND

10

Start the PowerPoint presentation. Make sure you’ll show the right slide at the right moment
during the workshop, as indicated in the table.
Hand out the success criteria document. Ask for the remaining teacher Declaration of consent
documents.
Explaining the aim of the workshop
After you have introduced yourself you explain the aim of the workshop:




You [teacher] will learn in this five-session workshop to create, implement and evaluate 45-minutes
lesson plans for your students aged 8-11. The lessons are to enhance student resilience to deal with
online experiences – and thereby enhance student online safety.
Important tools to achieve this aim are an Augmented Reality game, interactive didactics and
elements of prophylactics.
You will individually create one lesson plan during this workshop.
You will implement this lesson plan at your own school.
After the implementation we will meet again to evaluate and create a common list of best practices
and lessons learned.

Then you provide the session objective:

The objective of this session is to transfer knowledge of identities and learning types.
You [teacher] will get an introduction on these subjects as well as good practices to understand the
relevance of these subjects for your teaching, your students and for the online safety of your
students.

22

Success criteria:
 The teacher participants are able to explain the impact effects of identity labels and
learning types on three levels: their teaching, their students and student online safety.
Now you will ask the teachers to introduce themselves one-by-one.



You will notice that the first participant will need some time to answer. The next participant and
those following will answer quicker. The reason for this is that the first participant needs to frame
the answer. The first participant needs to choose which identity labels – see below – are
appropriate. They might choose age, profession and amount of children, for instance. The next
participants can then build on this framing of the first participant.
The next participants can either follow the framing of the first participant or choose an alternative
framing.
Whether the majority of the participants choose to follow or not to follow the framing of first
participant, you can explain that this is how identities are formed – by means of individual framing
(the first participant and those not following the first participant) or collective framing (all those
following the first participant).
Resilience now is not giving in too much to peer pressure on our identities but at the same time
being open to feedback and learning.
We will look into identities and resilience by the following introductions on identity labels, learning
types, identity theories and on the effect of new technologies on identities.

Identity labels
Present an introduction on identity labels, based on the session 1 background section. The most
import elements to highlight are:


If we take identities as self-narrations, identities are made up by identity labels. These labels can be
broader or less broad.
The less broad our identity labels are, the less we are open to feedback and thus to learning.
In situations of trust we are more open for feedback.

Good practices
Present the good practices:
 Let students repeat and understand the following three sentences:
o
o
o

Sometimes I make mistakes;
Sometimes my motivation is egoistic;
I am part of the problem.

And explain the sense behind it. By saying the sentence “Sometimes I make mistakes” we
exclude the possibility that we are always right. This ensures us a degree of humility: we might be
wrong, even now. Saying “Sometimes my motivation is egoistic” makes sure that we cannot feel
morally superior. And saying the sentence “I am part of the problem” precludes that we can divide
the world in “us” and “them” in which “they” are the problem.
 Ask your students whether they agree or not and how they feel saying these sentences.
 Give students feedback and let them distinguish between coaching and evaluation;
 Give students evaluation and let them distinguish between assessment, consequences and
judgment;
 Have students create a second scoring card to record how they reacted to a first situation.

23

Impact table
Explain the impact of identity labels and the good practices on the teacher, their students and
student online safety.
Online safety
Less all-or-nothing reactions
to online challenges, less
prone to being onedimensionally profiled.

Teacher
More positively responsive
students.

Student
More open to feedback,
more open to learning.

Learning types
Present an introduction on the concept of learning types, based on the session 1 background
section. The most import elements to highlight are:
 There are learners who see their achievements as the results of given attributes and those
who see them at least partially as the result of their efforts.
 The latter type will perform better.
Good practices
Present the good practices:


Make students aware what kind of learners they are;
Allow for failure in learning;
Create a situation of “flow”:
o Present them with a task that challenges available skills but is within reach;
o State clear goals;
o The effect: concentration, loss of self-consciousness, loss of feeling of time.

Impact table
Explain the impact of the concept of learning types and the good practices on the teacher, their
students and student online safety.
Online safety
Teacher
Student
Less resignation when
More positively responsive
More engaged, more
meeting online challenges,
students.
positively responsive to
less prone to being onechallenges.
dimensionally profiled.
Identity theories
Present an introduction on identity theories, based on the session 1 background section. The most
import elements to highlight are:


Erving Goffman’s interpretation;
Paul Ricoeur’s interpretation;
Anthony Giddens’s interpretation.

24

New online technologies and identity
Present an introduction on the effect of new technologies on our identities, based on the session 1
background section. The most import elements to highlight are:




No segregation of audiences;
Algorithms and Big Data instead of nonverbal communication;
Templates for profiles;
Different narrations simultaneously;
No consistency and no continuity in self-narratives.

25

SESSION 2
Description for age group 8-11
TIME IN ‘

MODULE DESCRIPTION

PPT SLIDE

HANDBOOK SECTION

10

Interactive didactics

11

20
15
15

Good practices
Discussion
Elements of prophylactics

12
13
14

DIAGNOSTIC QUESTIONS
SESSION 2 BACKGROUND
LEVEL 2 8-11 GOOD PRACTICES

15
15

Good practices
Discussion

15
16

DIAGNOSTIC QUESTIONS
SESSION 2 BACKGROUND
LEVEL 3 8-11 GOOD PRACTICES
SESSION 2 BACKGROUND

Session objective
Provide the session objective:

The objective of this session is to transfer knowledge of interactive didactics and prophylactics.
You [teacher] will get an introduction on these subjects as well as good practices to understand the
relevance of these subjects for your teaching, your students and for the online safety of your
students.

Success criteria:
 The teacher participants are able to explain the impact effects of interactive didactics and
prophylactics on three levels: their teaching, their students and student online safety.
Interactive didactics
Present an introduction on interactive didactics, based on the session 2 background section. The
most import elements to highlight are:
 Students are to be co-responsible for their learning;
 We need to engage all students in the class room;
 Teaching and learning are two different domains. Only interaction can establish how much
of the teaching is actually learned.
Good practices
Present the good practices:
 Ask diagnostic questions during the lesson;
 Let students indicate whether they still follow you; if not let another student explain who
indicate they still follow;
 Not the typical students’ “hands in the air” decides which students answer a question but a
random selection by drawing.
Impact table
Explain the impact of interactive didactics and the good practices on the teacher, their students
and student online safety.

26

Online safety
Having an adult to
communicate with about
online experiences is the
most effective instrument to
enhance online student
safety.

Teacher
Focus on student learning
rather than on teaching,
more frequent and
meaningful communication –
both teacher/ student and
student/ student, formative
assessments during the
lessons. More student
engagement and deeper
trust relationships.

Student
Co-responsibility for one’s
learning process, more
engagement. More personal
teacher/ student contact.

Elements of prophylactics
Present an introduction on prophylactics, based on the session 2 background section. The most
import elements to highlight are:




Maintain a continuity of work with youngsters, do not to work episodically. Only a systematic
continuity of activities brings results - create regular interaction opportunities, avoid apparent oneoff interactions.
It is advisable to diagnose the class: discover what students can do, what they're interested in, what
problems they have and what they need as a group from adults. Then bring out and enhance
students’ potentials and resources: strengthen their social skills, give them a room to develop,
provide and teach responsibility. Focus on teaching them those competencies and life skills that will
help them to cope in difficult situations in the future.
Treat the child as a subject, as an active participant in the interaction with adults - and not as an
object.
An important element of prophylactics in this age group is to involve parents.
Be an authority for your students – children need wise adults.
Build protecting relationships and trust through teacher-student dialogues.

Good practices
Present the good practices:





Use interactive methods, in which the teacher initiates the interaction and engages the children.
The children are active participants and influence the course of interaction. For instance the
Project-based Learning Method.
Activities in which the teacher acts as an adviser, friend or mentor and only coordinates and
moderates ideas, plans and activities formed by the students themselves are the most effective
ones.
Based on the diagnosis of students the teacher plans what skills they should gain and experience
during the project. The teacher implies a very clear and specific educational aim.
Implement elements such as: discussion, brainstorm, task division, summary of each
implementation stage, evaluation of the whole project, discussion on lessons learned.
It is essential to sustain the motivation and faith of students, the faith of the teacher in the
possibilities of the children helps them to endure failure, learn from mistakes and thus learn
persistence.
„Treat yourself as a tool” – this applies to the teacher self-improvement process – as a tool you
need to improve - so develop and train yourself, take care of your professional skills and develop
skills useful for working with young people. This assumption can also have another aspect - if you
can convince young people to this approach at an early age, they will learn the value and power of
self-development.

27

“I’m part of the problem” - this approach to oneself should greatly facilitate your work and cause
more credibility as an adult in relationships with children. It is a difficult approach to your work,
because it assumes that in most problematic student situations you can have a distinct contribution
- not necessarily a positive one. For example, if a student does not understand the lesson/ topic,
analyze what you do or don’t do to cause a lack of progress before you will give them a grade. This
teacher attitude builds in the child a sense of justice, faith in adults and increases their self-esteem
(as a young individual who is treated as a subject, and not as an object).

Impact table
Explain the impact of prophylactics and the good practices on the teacher, their students and
student online safety.
Online safety
Having an adult to
communicate with about
online experiences is the
most effective instrument to
enhance online student
safety. Children may enter
the online world more
consciously and safely when
they can ask an adult for
help.
Having a peer friend is
essential to overcome
challenges, especially for
more vulnerable students.

Teacher
Building conscious relation
and sense of trust in the
classroom, enlarging
teacher’s abilities to
communicate with students,
more use of interactive
methods.

28

Student
Closer relations with their
teacher, enlarged risk
awareness, a better
communication with their
peers, a greater involvement
in their studying.

SESSION 3
Description for age group 8-11
TIME IN ‘
10
25

MODULE DESCRIPTION
Educational technologies
Playing the AR game

PPT SLIDE
17
18

20

Creating an AR game

19

15
5

Discussion
Teacher perspective on the
lesson plan
First lesson plan sketch

20
21

LESSON PLAN

22

LESSON PLAN

15

HANDBOOK SECTION
SESSION 3 BACKGROUND
SESSION 3 BACKGROUND
PLAYING THE AR GAME 8-11
GAME MARKERS
AR FORM
AR QUESTIONNAIRE
SESSION 3 BACKGROUND
CREATING AN AR GAME

Session objective
Provide the session objective:

The objective of this session is to transfer knowledge of education technologies and Augmented
Reality (AR) and on how to create and play an Augmented Reality game.
You [teacher] will get an introduction on these subjects as well as good practices to understand the
relevance of these subjects for your teaching, your students and for the online safety of your
students.

Success criteria:
 The teacher participants are able to explain the impact effects of educational technologies
and the AR game on three levels: their teaching, their students and student online safety.
Educational technologies
Present an introduction on educational technologies, based on the session 3 background section.
The most import elements to highlight are:
Educational technology is "the study and ethical practice of facilitating learning and improving
performance by creating, using and managing appropriate technological processes and resources.”
Types of
skills

21st cent. Skills

Learning Skills

Critical Thinking
Creative Thinking
Collaborating
Communicating

Literacy Skills

Information Literacy
Media Literacy
Technology Literacy

Supporting Web 2.0 tools







Blogs
Wikis
Tagging and social bookmarking applications
Multimedia sharing
Collaboration & Communication services
Aggregation services
Blogs
Wikis

29

Life Skills

Flexibility
Initiative
Social Skills
Productivity
Leadership












Tagging and social bookmarking applications
Multimedia sharing
Collaboration & Communication services
Office-like applications
Aggregation services
Wikis
Tagging and social bookmarking applications
Multimedia sharing
Audio blogging and podcasting
Social networks
Collaboration & Communication services
Aggregation services

Impact table
Explain the impact of educational technologies on the teacher, their students and student online
safety.
Online safety
Having an adult to
communicate with about
online experiences is the
most effective instrument to
enhance online student
safety.

Teacher
Less teacher anxiety, more
openness to new education
technology. A deeper trust
relationship with students.

Student
Getting communication
options to talk about new
technology and online
experiences with teachers.

Playing the AR game
Present an introduction on Augmented Reality, based on the Playing the AR game 8-11 section.
The most import elements to highlight are:
Augmented Reality (AR) consists of a real-time video stream generated by a camera to which
digital elements are added that appear in reaction to a predefined trigger.

AR triggers interest in our surroundings or in our identities.
The AR game evokes interest in the emergence of online identities as a result of online data sharing.

Good practices
Present the good practices:




Play the game with the whole class;
Get a student to play the game;
Use the game as a stimulus for discussion;
Ask students who of them has an opinion on the question themes;
Let students interpret the augmentations.

Show the AR task and the AR questionnaire.
Impact table
Explain the impact of the AR game and the good practices on the teacher, their students and
student online safety.

30

Online safety
Provoking reflections on data
sharing, online identities and
online safety.

Teacher
Being a moderator
facilitating peer-to-peer
communication.

Student
Getting communication
options to talk about online
experiences peer-to-peer.
Temporary higher
engagement, higher
concentration levels, higher
trust levels.

Now play the game on data sharing and online identities with the teachers. Read Playing the AR
game 8-11 section on how to prepare, play and interpret the game.
 URL: http://identifeye.ezzev.eu/.
Creating an AR game
In order to create an AR game you need to implement the following steps:







Establish a theme;
Create questions;
Create answer options;
Create augmentations per answer option;
Create texts and sounds (optional);
Create static blocks and pages;
Translate (optional);
Create a lesson plan.

Teacher perspective on the lesson plan
It’s now time that teachers start preparing their lesson plan. Hand out the lesson plan template
and all the good practices minus the educational technology good practices. Explain that the
teachers now need to make some decisions regarding the lesson plan template they are about to
fill out:
 Will their lesson plan concern a curricular or extra-curricular lesson?
 Which challenge or opportunity will be addressed?
When they have made their decisions they need to choose from all four levels at least one good
practice per level:
o Level one: Identity labels & learning types;
o Level two: Interactive didactics;
o Level three: Prophylactics;
o Level four: Playing the Augmented Reality game or create a new AR game;
optionally, if the anxiety of a teacher appears to be too big the teacher can choose
to implement a different educational technology good practice.
First lesson plan sketch
Teachers now fill out their lesson plan template individually and in silence.
They are to use the break between the third and the fourth session to reflect on the first lesson
plan sketch they create.

31

SESSION 4
Description for age group 8-11
TIME IN ‘
80
10

MODULE DESCRIPTION
Teachers create individual lesson
plans
Discuss the evaluation template

PPT SLIDE
23

HANDBOOK SECTION

EVALUATION
PPT

TEACHER EVALUATION
EVALUATION PPT

LESSON PLAN

Session objective
Provide the session objective:
 The objective of this session is that teachers will fill out the lesson plan template or choose
an existing lesson plan (one of the two model lessons).
Success criteria:
 The teacher participants are able to write down hypotheses on the impact effects of their
lesson plan on three levels: their teaching, their students and student online safety.
Teachers create individual lesson plans
 Teachers fill out the lesson plan template.
 While teachers fill out the templates you have one-on-one “speed dating” sessions with
individual teachers. Please sit for a few minutes with each individual teacher and support
them in their task to fill out the template. Ask them about their decisions (in session 3) and
about their choice of good practices to implement. If needed brainstorm with them or
advise them.
 If a teacher appears to be very anxious about using the AR game in their lesson or has no
idea how to implement a lesson with the AR game hand them the two age appropriate
model lessons as an option.
 If a teacher would still to be anxious about using the game even after having considered
the two model lessons you should suggest that the teacher chooses another educational
technology from the list of good practices and apply this in their lesson plan. Please hand
them the printed out educational technology good practices.
Discussing the evaluation template
 Hand out the printed evaluation template and show the evaluation PowerPoint
presentation on a big screen.
 Walk the teachers through the evaluation template slide by slide.
Tell the teachers that they need to fill out the evaluation template after their lesson
implementation. Ask them to send it to you by email before the fifth session and provide them
your email address.
Let the teachers know that they can contact you in the mean time if they have any questions.

32

LESSON PLAN (45 minutes duration)
Age group: 8-11
FIRST AND LAST NAME
SCHOOL
DATE
EMAIL ADDRESS
LESSON NAME

ID-EYE - STANDARD COURSE - "lesson model"

CURRICULAR
IF CURRICULAR WHAT SUBJECT
CHALLENGE/
OPPORTUNITY

X

EXTRA-CURRICULAR

Children start their online presence at an early age. This lesson is an
opportunity for teachers /adults to build protecting relationships with
students and to increase their future online safety.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

SUCCESS CRITERIA

LEVEL 1 – SUBJECTS
LEVEL 2 – DIDACTICS

- Students and teachers build closer relationships with each other;
- Increased awareness of the risks associated with being online while
sharing data and better ways to respond to risky online situations
among the students;
- Better communication with the group/ class;
- As an additional result: greater commitment to education and the
school community.
- Increased awareness and reflection on the dangers that comes with
presence online;
- Increased integration of the class/ group and a more positive
relationship with the teacher;
- Improved communication within the class/ group, and between
students and the teacher;
- Greater awareness of children about the dangers of the Internet and
of where to get help in an emergency situation.
GOOD PRACTICES CHOSEN
3 sentences




LEVEL 3 – PROPHYLACTICS


DIAGNOSTIC QUESTION
RANDOMLY CHOOSE A STUDENT WHO WILL READ A
GAME QUESTION AND WHO WILL SUGGEST AN ANSWER
RANDOMLY CHOOSE A PARTICIPANT WHO REPLIED NO
TO THE DIAGNOSTIC QUESTION AND ASK WHETHER THEY
COULD EXPLAIN WHY THEY HAVE CHOSEN (NO)
CHOOSE A PARTICIPANT WHO REPLIED YES TO THE
DIAGNOSTIC QUESTION AND INVITE THEM TO EXPLAIN
WHY THEY HAVE CHOSEN (YES)
Focus on listening and creating a dialogue / relationships
that one can use in the future with the group.
Be attentive, listen and build trust-based relationship -

33

young people need wise adults who want to listen to
them and talk to them.
INCLUDING AR GAME
IF NO WHY NOT

YES

NO

IF NOT WHAT EDTECH
PLANNED IMPACT
Building conscious relation and sense of trust in the
classroom, better communication with students and the use
of interactive methods.
A closer relationship with the teacher, risk awareness, better
communication with the group, greater dedication to
studying.

ON MY TEACHING
ON MY STUDENTS

ON STUDENT ONLINE SAFETY

The presence of adult in learning about the presence on the
Internet and the opportunity to talk about the risks and
about their experiences online, is an effective tool to
increase the safety of children
Children may enter the online world more consciously which
makes them safer. They will have less hesitations asking for
help from adults

ASSESSMENT TYPES
LESSON PLAN
DESCRIPTION

Discussion at the end of the lesson

STEP 1 – 2’
EXPLAIN THE PURPOSE OF THE LESSON
Children at this age cannot keep their attention for too long. Try to briefly and
concisely deliver the purpose of your lesson.
 THIS LESSON AIMS TO EXPLAIN WHAT ONLINE "IDENTITIES" ARE AND HOW
THEY ARE BUILT.
STEP 2 – 2’
DISCUSS THE RULES
 WE ARE GOING TO PLAY A GAME – IT MEANS WE ARE GOING TO DISCUSS
VARIOUS OFFLINE AND ONLINE SITUATIONS
 IT IS IMPORTANT TO REMEMBER IN THIS DISCUSSION ABOUT 3
SENTENCES, WHICH YOU WILL REPEAT AFTER ME:
o SOMETIMES I MAKE MISTAKES
o SOMETIMES MY MOTIVATION IS SELFISH
o I AM A PART OF THE PROBLEM
STEP 3 – 20’
PLAYING THE GAME
 Choose who will be playing - you or a student. If a student wants to be the
person playing, they should do so, because placing them in a role in the
foreground will increase their self-esteem and self-confidence, and the rest
of the group will participate more actively in the lesson. If none of the
students decides to play, then you as a teacher should assign yourself as a

34




player, which can be a certain attraction for students and can give a greater
commitment to the lesson. In case a student will play, remember to have
contact with them before the lesson and calibrate the game to their
features. This will allow you to implement your lesson smoothly and
without disruption.
The game is the central point of your lesson. Play it in such a way that
children keep up with you, do not hurry. This will help them to focus
attention.
FOR EACH QUESTION RANDOMLY CHOOSE A STUDENT WHO WILL READ
THE QUESTION AND WHO WILL SUGGEST AN ANSWER
ASK WHO AGREES WITH THE SUGGESTED ANSWER AND WHY?
ASK WHO DOESN’T AGREE WITH THE SUGGESTED ANSWER AND WHY?
CONDUCT A VOTE

Take frequent and longer breaks, to discuss upcoming questions. Students of this
age do not have a lot of patience; they want to understand, to learn as soon as
possible. This will allow you to maintain order in the classroom and continue the
lesson.
Listen carefully to the questions and the comments of the students, try to catch as
much information from them while speaking about the views and needs of your
students.
EXAMPLE:
QUESTION 6
Do you normally fill out all the fields during a registration, even if they are not
mandatory?
If the answer YES is selected these are suggested deliberations:
- What do you think happens with the information you entered in the fields that
are not mandatory to fill out?
- What do you think the site or app responsibles do with the information about you
that you enter? Do you think that anyone will get to see it on the web?
If the answer NO is selected these are suggested deliberations:
- Why don’t you share all the information?
- What do you think happens with your data if anyone has access to it?
If the answer SOMETIMES is selected these are suggested deliberations:
- When do you enter all the information about yourself, and when not?
- Why do you sometimes leave fields empty?
QUESTION 8
Imagine that your colleague published a photograph of you from five years back on
his profile. What do you think?
If you select an answer I LIKE THIS these are suggested deliberations:
- Why do you like it?
- Imagine that others do not like this picture, and maybe write a comment that
does not appeal to you. How would you feel then?
If you selected answer I DON’T LIKE THIS these are suggested deliberations:
- Did this happen to you, or maybe any of your friends have been in a similar
situation?
- How do you think the person whose picture was placed without their knowledge
online feels?
- What can you do in this situation?

35

STEP 4 – 6’
AFTER THE GAME – DISCUSSION
ASK YOUR DIAGNOSTIC QUESTION PREPARED BEFORE:
IS IT POSSIBLE TO BE ONLINE AND NOT TO BUILD YOUR ONLINE IDENTITY?
EVERYONE NOW HAS TO SHOW A GREEN CARD: (YES) OR A RED CARD: (NO)
 CHOOSE A PARTICIPANT WHO REPLIED NO AND ASK WHETHER THEY
COULD EXPLAIN WHY THEY HAVE CHOSEN (NO)
 CHOOSE A PARTICIPANT WHO REPLIED YES AND INVITE THEM TO EXPLAIN
WHY THEY HAVE CHOSEN (YES)
 THEN – LET THE STUDENTS VOTE AGAIN
 EXPLAIN YOUR POINT OF VIEW, EXPLAIN WHY THE ANSWER SHOULD BE
(NO) - EVERY ACTION ONLINE BUILDS OUR IDENTITY. EXPLAIN WHY, USING
EXAMPLES FROM THE GAME:
USE THE QUESTION / ANSWER OPTION - GAME NOTES: No. 8, 9
My justification (the teacher):
Each online action adds to building our online identities – It’s worth to show the
children that almost every activity on the Internet, especially on social networking
sites, leaves a trace. Profile updates, photos, videos and comments often cause
people form their own opinion about us, not always consistent with our self-image.
Uploaded information may live "their lives", which means it can be available and
disseminated by other people, that we don’t know. We have less control over
comments by others and places where they are published. Those information can
build an unwanted image. Put a particular emphasis on the thinking and online
safety, If there's anything students do not understand, let them ask for an
explanation and help from adults. In the world of both offline and online there is a
"golden" rule - "What you give is what you get", the sooner we can help students
understand this, the faster they will be at least a little more aware and safe in the
virtual world.
STEP 5 – 10’
DRAWING – MY SELF-PORTRAIT ONLINE
TASK 1 – DISTRIBUTE THE FORM
 INVITE STUDENTS TO DRAW THEIR SELF-PORTRAITS ONLINE – THEIR
ONLINE IDENTITY
 AFTER THE DRAWING – ASK ALL INDIVIDUALLY TO SHORTLY DESCRIBE
WHAT THEY HAVE DRAWN
STEP 6 – 5’
QUESTIONNAIRE

36

MODEL LESSON PLAN 2 (45 minutes duration)
Age group: 8-11
FIRST AND LAST NAME
SCHOOL
DATE
EMAIL ADDRESS

LESSON NAME

MEET THE PARENTS

X CURRICULAR
IF CURRICULAR WHAT SUBJECT
CHALLENGE/
OPPORTUNITY

Challenge: Parents hardly talk with their children on
online experiences even though children want to.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
SUCCESS CRITERIA

EXTRA-CURRICULAR
INFORMATICS

Students present their view on how to
communicate with parents on online experiences
and new technology.
The answers show an envisioned communication
that is:
- Open
- Non-moralistic
- Non-divisive.

GOOD PRACTICES CHOSEN
LEVEL 1 – SUBJECTS
Provide coaching.
LEVEL 2 – DIDACTICS
Random selection by drawing sticks (2 times).
LEVEL 3 – PROPHYLACTICS Project learning.
Involving student environments beyond the
school environment.
INCLUDING AR GAME
YES
NO
IF NO WHY NOT
IF NOT WHAT EDTECH
-

37

PLANNED IMPACT
ON MY TEACHING
More openness towards edtech, more
openness in the curriculum towards
seemingly private subjects.
ON MY STUDENTS
Opening a new communication channel with
adults (teacher and parents) on online
experiences and new technology.
ON STUDENT ONLINE SAFETY New communication channels on online
experiences and new technology hopefully
will lead to a situation in which - when
something goes very wrong online - students
feel that they can talk about it with an adult:
teacher, parent or other.
The game will provide more insights on
online data sharing and online identities.
This should lead to more student resilience.
ASSESSMENT TYPES

Formative assessment during the process of filling out
the answers by the several groups.
Discussion at the end of the lesson on the answers
provided.

LESSON PLAN STEP 1 – 10’
DESCRIPTION Introduce the learning objective, a list with questions and
success criteria.
The list of questions:
 In what respect would adults need help when playing
the game?
 What would be simple for adults when playing the
game?
 Would adults answer the questions honestly?
 What could you do to help adults play the game?
Divide the class in 4 groups by random sticks selection. Hand
out the list of questions to each group.
STEP 2 – 20’
38

Let each group play the game as a group with the list of
questions in hand.
Let them then answer the list of questions as a group.
The teacher coaches and exchanges information and
knowledge with each group.
STEP 3 – 15’
The teacher randomly selects a representative per group by
means of drawing sticks. The representative reads the group
answers. The teacher discusses with them.
This is implemented for all four groups.

39

IMPLEMENTATION LESSON
Description for age group 8-11
TIME IN ‘

MODULE DESCRIPTION

45

Teachers implement their own lesson plan at
their school
Teachers fill out the evaluation template

30

PPT
SLIDE
-

HANDBOOK
SECTION
-

-

-

Objective
 The objective of this lesson is for teachers to implement and evaluate their lesson plan,
their decisions and their chosen good practices.
Success criteria:
 The teacher participants are able to test the impact effects of their lesson plan on three
levels: their teaching, their students and student online safety.
Teachers implement their own lesson plan at their school
Teachers now individually implement the lesson plan they have written during sessions 3 and 4.
They either use one of their regular lessons or an extra-curricular lesson, depending on their
choice. You are not present.
Teachers fill out the evaluation template
After the implementation of the lesson plan teachers fill out the evaluation template and sends it
to you by email before the fifth session.

40

SESSION 5
Description for age group 8-11
TIME IN ‘
30
50
10

MODULE DESCRIPTION
Teacher summaries of their
implementations
Discussion leading to a BP/LL list
Handing out certificates

PPT SLIDE
25

HANDBOOK SECTION
TEACHER EVALUATION

26
27

CERTIFICATES

Session objective
Provide the session objective:
 The objective of this session is to evaluate the individual teacher sessions and create a set
of Best Practices and Lessons Learned (BP/LL).
Success criteria:
 The teacher participants are able to evaluate the impact effects of their lesson plan on
three levels: their teaching, their students and student online safety.
Teacher summaries of their implementations
Have teachers answer one-on-one the following questions – based on the evaluation template
they’ve filled out:
 Was your lesson curricular or extracurricular?
 What challenge or opportunity did you want to address?
 What good practices did you chose?
 What was the impact of the chosen good practices on your teaching?
 What was the impact of the chosen good practices on your students?
 What was the impact of the chosen good practices on student online safety?
Optionally record the teacher answers on camera. If you’d do so, please share a copy with us. You
can send it to one of the project authors and partners, Mr. Onno Hansen:
onno.hansen@gmail.com.
Discussion leading to a BP/LL list
Provide a discussion with the teachers about their answers. Keep the following topics in mind:


Did similar good practices have a positive impact on the teachers’ teaching, their students and on
student online safety?
Did similar good practices have no impact or a negative impact on the teachers’ teaching, their
students and on student online safety?
Under what conditions did good practices have a positive, negative or neutral impact on the
teachers’ teaching, their students and on student online safety?

41

Summarize the discussion by drafting a list of good practices that had a positive impact on the
teachers’ teaching, their students and on student online safety for many teachers (“best
practices”) and the conditions under which they worked out and a list of good practices that had
no impact or a negative impact on the teachers’ teaching, their students and on student online
safety for many teachers (“lessons learned”) and the conditions under which they failed.
Please share a copy with us. You can send it to one of the project authors and partners, Mr. Onno
Hansen: onno.hansen@gmail.com
Handing out certificates
The workshop draws to an end. The only task you have left is handing out the workshop
certificates to each teacher individually.

42

SESSION 1
Description for age group 12-14
TIME IN ‘
15

MODULE DESCRIPTION
Explaining aim of the workshop

PPT SLIDE
1

10

Identity labels

2

10
5
10

Good practices
Discussion
“Liquid life”

3
4
5

10
5
10
10

Good practices
Discussion
Identity theories
New online technologies and
identity
Discussion

6
7
8
9

5

HANDBOOK SECTION
INSTRUCTOR INTRODUCTION
PROJECT DESCRIPTION
WORKSHOP POWERPOINT 12-14
SUCCESS CRITERIA
DECLARATION OF CONSENT
DIAGNOSTIC QUESTIONS
SESSION 1 BACKGROUND
LEVEL 1 12-14 GOOD PRACTICES
DIAGNOSTIC QUESTIONS
SESSION 1 BACKGROUND
LEVEL 1 12-14 GOOD PRACTICES
SESSION 1 BACKGROUND
SESSION 1 BACKGROUND

10

Start the PowerPoint presentation. Make sure you’ll show the right slide at the right moment
during the workshop, as indicated in the table.
Hand out the success criteria document. Ask for the remaining teacher Declaration of consent
documents.
Explaining the aim of the workshop
After you have introduced yourself you explain the aim of the workshop:




You [teacher] will learn in this five-session workshop to create, implement and evaluate 45-minutes
lesson plans for your students aged 12-14. The lessons are to enhance student resilience to deal
with online experiences – and thereby enhance student online safety – while at the same time
empowering their conscious, creative and critical stance as evolving responsible citizens.
Important tools to achieve this aim are an Augmented Reality game, interactive didactics and
elements of prophylactics.
You will individually create one lesson plan during this workshop.
You will implement this lesson plan at your own school.
After the implementation we will meet again to evaluate and create a common list of best practices
and lessons learned.

Then you provide the session objective:

The objective of this session is to transfer knowledge of identities and the concept of “liquid life”.
You [teacher] will get an introduction on these subjects as well as good practices to understand the
relevance of these subjects for your teaching, your students and for the online safety of your
students.

43

Success criteria:
 The teacher participants able to explain the impact effects of identity labels and the
concept of “liquid life” on three levels: their teaching, their students and student online
safety.
Now you will ask the teachers to introduce themselves one-by-one.



You will notice that the first participant will need some time to answer. The next participant and
those following will answer quicker. The reason for this is that the first participant needs to frame
the answer. The first participant needs to choose which identity labels – see below – are
appropriate. They might choose age, profession and amount of children, for instance. The next
participants can then build on this framing of the first participant.
The next participants can either follow the framing of the first participant or choose an alternative
framing.
Whether the majority of the participants choose to follow or not to follow the framing of first
participant, you can explain that this is how identities are formed – by means of individual framing
(the first participant and those not following the first participant) or collective framing (all those
following the first participant).
Resilience now is not giving in too much to peer pressure on our identities but at the same time
being open to feedback and learning.
We will look into identities and resilience by the following introductions on identity labels, society
as a context for our identities, identity theories and on the effect of new technologies on identities.

Identity labels
Present an introduction on identity labels, based on the session 1 background section. The most
import elements to highlight are:


If we take identities as self-narrations, identities are made up by identity labels. These labels can be
broader or less broad.
The less broad our identity labels are, the less we are open to feedback and thus to learning.
In situations of trust we are more open for feedback.

Good practices
Present the good practices:
 Let students repeat and understand the following three sentences:
o
o
o

Sometimes I make mistakes;
Sometimes my motivation is egoistic;
I am part of the problem.

And explain the sense behind it. By saying the sentence “Sometimes I make mistakes” we
exclude the possibility that we are always right. This ensures us a degree of humility: we might be
wrong, even now. Saying “Sometimes my motivation is egoistic” makes sure that we cannot feel
morally superior. And saying the sentence “I am part of the problem” precludes that we can divide
the world in “us” and “them” in which “they” are the problem.
 Ask your students whether they agree or not and how they feel saying these sentences.
 Give students feedback and let them distinguish between coaching and evaluation;
 Give students evaluation and let them distinguish between assessment, consequences and
judgment;
 Have students create a second scoring card to record how they reacted to a first situation.

44

Impact table
Explain the impact of identity labels and the good practices on the teacher, their students and
student online safety.
Online safety
Less all-or-nothing reactions
to online challenges, less
prone to be onedimensionally profiled.

Teacher
More positively responsive
students.

Student
More open to feedback,
more open to learning.

“Liquid life”
Present an introduction on the concept of “liquid life” by Zygmunt Bauman, based on the session 1
background section. The most import elements to highlight are:
 Globalization;
 Ultra-consumerism;
 Fast changes so that new habits and interpretation frames are prone to fail;
 All suffer from anxiety to become superfluous.
Good practices
Present the good practices:
The only way to have a chance on self-respect is by gaining civil skills that facilitate us in living with
Others:




Conducting a dialogue;
Conducting a negotiation;
Gaining mutual understanding;
Managing and resolving conflicts;
Being able to learn and to react to new situations.

Impact table
Explain the impact of the concept of “liquid life” and the good practices on the teacher, their
students and student online safety.
Online safety
Teacher
Student
More critical attitude online, More critically responsive
More critical attitude, more
better skills to deal with
students, more tolerant
civil skills.
“otherness” online.
students.
Identity theories
Present an introduction on identity theories, based on the session 1 background section. The most
import elements to highlight are:


Erving Goffman’s interpretation;
Paul Ricoeur’s interpretation;
Anthony Giddens’s interpretation.

45

New online technologies and identity
Present an introduction on the effect of new technologies on our identities, based on the session 1
background section. The most import elements to highlight are:




No segregation of audiences;
Algorithms and Big Data instead of nonverbal communication;
Templates for profiles;
Different narrations simultaneously;
No consistency and no continuity in self-narratives.

46

SESSION 2
Description for age group 12-14
TIME IN ‘

MODULE DESCRIPTION

PPT SLIDE

HANDBOOK SECTION

10

Interactive didactics

11

20
15
15

Good practices
Discussion
Elements of prophylactics

12
13
14

DIAGNOSTIC QUESTIONS
SESSION 2 BACKGROUND
LEVEL 2 12-14 GOOD PRACTICES

15
15

Good practices
Discussion

15
16

DIAGNOSTIC QUESTIONS
SESSION 2 BACKGROUND
LEVEL 3 12-14 GOOD PRACTICES
SESSION 2 BACKGROUND

Session objective
Provide the session objective:

The objective of this session is to transfer knowledge of interactive didactics and prophylactics.
You [teacher] will get an introduction on these subjects as well as good practices to understand the
relevance of these subjects for your teaching, your students and for the online safety of your
students.

Success criteria:
 The teacher participants are able to explain the impact effects of interactive didactics and
prophylactics on three levels: their teaching, their students and student online safety.
Interactive didactics
Present an introduction on interactive didactics, based on the session 2 background section. The
most import elements to highlight are:
 Students are to be co-responsible for their learning;
 We need to engage all students in the class room;
 Teaching and learning are two different domains. Only interaction can establish how much
of the teaching is actually learned.
Good practices
Present the good practices:
 Ask diagnostic questions during the lesson;
 Let students indicate whether they still follow you; if not let another student explain who
indicate they still follow;
 Not the typical students’ “hands in the air” decides which students answer a question but a
random selection by drawing.
Impact table
Explain the impact of interactive didactics and the good practices on the teacher, their students
and student online safety.

47

Online safety
Having an adult to
communicate with about
online experiences is the
most effective instrument to
enhance online student
safety.

Teacher
Focus on student learning
rather than on teaching,
more frequent and
meaningful communication –
both teacher/ student and
student/ student, formative
assessments during the
lessons. More student
engagement and deeper
trust relationships.

Student
Co-responsibility for one’s
learning process, more
engagement. More personal
teacher/ student contact.

Elements of prophylactics
Present an introduction on prophylactics, based on the session 2 background section. The most
import elements to highlight are:







Maintain a continuity of work with youngsters, do not to work episodically. Only a systematic
continuity of activities brings results - create regular interaction opportunities, avoid apparent oneoff interactions.
It is advisable to diagnose the class: discover what students can do, what they're interested in, what
problems they have and what they need as a group from adults. Then bring out and enhance
students’ potentials and resources: strengthen their social skills, give them a room to develop,
provide and teach responsibility. Focus on teaching them those competencies and life skills that will
help them to cope in difficult situations in the future.
Treat the child as a subject, as an active participant in the interaction with adults - and not as an
object.
An important element of prophylactics in this age group is to involve parents.
Be an authority for your students – children need wise adults.
Build protecting relationships and trust through teacher-student dialogues.
Good replaces evil: Target your students' energy to perform tasks and socially useful activities that
build up their self-esteem. This promotes the extinction of disturbed behavior.
Real life: Make sure the development of your students’ social life skills takes place through tasks
that are implemented in their natural environment. This contributes to a real change in the
relationship with their environment.
Pay It Forward: Stimulate students using the competences that they have developed to empower
others – something they already do by themselves.

Good practices
Present the good practices:



Use interactive methods, in which the teacher initiates the interaction and engages the children.
The children are active participants and influence the course of interaction. For instance the
Project-based Learning Method.
Activities in which the teacher acts as an adviser, friend or mentor and only coordinates and
moderates ideas, plans and activities formed by the students themselves are the most effective
ones.
Based on the diagnosis of students the teacher plans what skills they should gain and experience
during the project. The teacher implies a very clear and specific educational aim.
Implement elements such as: discussion, brainstorm, task division, summary of each
implementation stage, evaluation of the whole project, discussion on lessons learned.

48



Young people need to confront their ideas with adults – therefore you should not avoid "difficult
issues".
It is essential to sustain the motivation and faith of students, the faith of the teacher in the
possibilities of the children helps them to endure failure, learn from mistakes and thus learn
persistence.
„Treat yourself as a tool” – this applies to the teacher self-improvement process – as a tool you
need to improve - so develop and train yourself, take care of your professional skills and develop
skills useful for working with young people. This assumption can also have another aspect - if you
can convince young people to this approach at an early age, they will learn the value and power of
self-development.
“I’m part of the problem” - this approach to oneself should greatly facilitate your work and cause
more credibility as an adult in relationships with children. It is a difficult approach to your work,
because it assumes that in most problematic student situations you can have a distinct contribution
- not necessarily a positive one. For example, if a student does not understand the lesson/ topic,
analyze what you do or don’t do to cause a lack of progress before you will give them a grade. This
teacher attitude builds in the child a sense of justice, faith in adults and increases their self-esteem
(as a young individual who is treated as a subject, and not as an object).

Impact table
Explain the impact of prophylactics and the good practices on the teacher, their students and
student online safety.
Online safety
Having an adult to
communicate with about
online experiences is the
most effective instrument to
enhance online student
safety.

Teacher
Deeper trust relationships,
better teacher
responsiveness towards
interactivity.

49

Student
Deeper embedding in one’s
environment, improving
adult – youngster and peerto-peer communication and
stimulating engagement.
More personal teacher/
student contact.

SESSION 3
Description for age group 12-14
TIME IN

10
25

MODULE DESCRIPTION
Educational technologies
Playing the AR game

PPT
SLIDE
17
18

20

Creating an AR game

19

15
5

Discussion
Teacher perspective on the lesson
plan
First lesson plan sketch

20
21

LESSON PLAN

22

LESSON PLAN

15

HANDBOOK SECTION
SESSION 3 BACKGROUND
SESSION 3 BACKGROUND
PLAYING THE AR GAME 12-14
GAME MARKERS
AR QUESTIONNAIRE
SESSION 3 BACKGROUND
CREATING AN AR GAME

Session objective
Provide the session objective:

The objective of this session is to transfer knowledge of education technologies and Augmented
Reality (AR) and on how to create and play an Augmented Reality game.
You [teacher] will get an introduction on these subjects as well as good practices to understand the
relevance of these subjects for your teaching, your students and for the online safety of your
students.

Success criteria:
 The teacher participants are able to explain the impact effects of educational technologies
and the AR game on three levels: their teaching, their students and student online safety.
Educational technologies
Present an introduction on educational technologies, based on the session 3 background section.
The most import elements to highlight are:
Educational technology is "the study and ethical practice of facilitating learning and improving
performance by creating, using and managing appropriate technological processes and resources.”
Types of
skills

21st cent. Skills

Learning Skills

Critical Thinking
Creative Thinking
Collaborating
Communicating

Literacy Skills

Information Literacy
Media Literacy

Supporting Web 2.0 tools







Blogs
Wikis
Tagging and social bookmarking applications
Multimedia sharing
Collaboration & Communication services
Aggregation services
Blogs
Wikis

50

Technology Literacy

Life Skills

Flexibility
Initiative
Social Skills
Productivity
Leadership












Tagging and social bookmarking applications
Multimedia sharing
Collaboration & Communication services
Office-like applications
Aggregation services
Wikis
Tagging and social bookmarking applications
Multimedia sharing
Audio blogging and podcasting
Social networks
Collaboration & Communication services
Aggregation services

Impact table
Explain the impact of educational technologies on the teacher, their students and student online
safety.
Online safety
Having an adult to
communicate with about
online experiences is the
most effective instrument to
enhance online student
safety.

Teacher
Less teacher anxiety, more
openness to new education
technology. A deeper trust
relationship with students.

Student
Getting communication
options to talk about new
technology and online
experiences with teachers.

Playing the AR game
Present an introduction on Augmented Reality, based on the Playing the AR game 12-14 section.
The most import elements to highlight are:
Augmented Reality (AR) consists of a real-time video stream generated by a camera to which
digital elements are added that appear in reaction to a predefined trigger.

AR triggers interest in our surroundings or in our identities.
The AR game evokes interest in the emergence of the atmosphere in the class as a result of
didactics.

Good practices
Present the good practices:




Play the game with the whole class;
A teacher plays the game;
Use the game to collect data for a subsequent discussion after the game;
Ask specific individual students for their opinion on the question themes;
Ask students to review the game.

Show the AR questionnaire.
Impact table
Explain the impact of the AR game and the good practices on the teacher, their students and
student online safety.
51

Online safety
Provoking discussion on
teacher – student
communications as a starting
point for teachers becoming
suitable adults to
communicate about online
experiences.

Teacher
Being a moderator
facilitating peer-to-peer
communication while
hearing student
communication preferences.

Student
Getting communication
options to talk about
didactics. Co-responsibility
for one’s learning process.
Temporary higher
engagement, higher
concentration levels, higher
trust levels.

Now play the game on ideal didactics with the teachers. Read the Playing the AR game 12-14
section on how to prepare, play and interpret the game.
 URL: http://id-eye2.ezzev.eu/.
Creating an AR game
In order to create an AR game you need to implement the following steps:







Establish a theme;
Create questions;
Create answer options;
Create augmentations per answer option;
Create texts and sounds (optional);
Create static blocks and pages;
Translate (optional);
Create a lesson plan.

Teacher perspective on the lesson plan
It’s now time that teachers start preparing their lesson plan. Hand out the lesson plan template
and all the good practices minus the educational technology good practices. Explain that the
teachers now need to make some decisions regarding the lesson plan template they are about to
fill out:
 Will their lesson plan concern a curricular or extra-curricular lesson?
 Which challenge or opportunity will be addressed?
When they have made their decisions they need to choose from all four levels at least one good
practice per level:
o Level one: Identity labels & “liquid life”;
o Level two: Interactive didactics;
o Level three: Prophylactics;
o Level four: Playing the Augmented Reality game or create a new AR game;
optionally, if the anxiety of a teacher appears to be too big the teacher can choose
to implement a different educational technology good practice.
First lesson plan sketch
Teachers now fill out their lesson plan template individually and in silence.
They are to use the break between the third and the fourth session to reflect on the first lesson
plan sketch they create.

52

SESSION 4
Description for age group 12-14
TIME IN ‘
80
10

MODULE DESCRIPTION
Teachers create individual lesson
plans
Discuss the evaluation template

PPT SLIDE
23

HANDBOOK SECTION

EVALUATION
PPT

TEACHER EVALUATION
EVALUATION PPT

LESSON PLAN

Session objective
Provide the session objective:
 The objective of this session is that teachers will fill out the lesson plan template or choose
an existing lesson plan (one of the two model lessons).
Success criteria:
 The teacher participants are able to write down hypotheses on the impact effects of their
lesson plan on three levels: their teaching, their students and student online safety.
Teachers create individual lesson plans
 Teachers fill out the lesson plan template.
 While teachers fill out the templates you have one-on-one “speed dating” sessions with
individual teachers. Please sit for a few minutes with each individual teacher and support
them in their task to fill out the template. Ask them about their decisions (in session 3) and
about their choice of good practices to implement. If needed brainstorm with them or
advise them.
 If a teacher appears to be very anxious about using the AR game in their lesson or has no
idea how to implement a lesson with the AR game hand them the two age appropriate
model lessons as an option.
 If a teacher would still to be anxious about using the game even after having considered
the two model lessons you should suggest that the teacher chooses another educational
technology from the list of good practices and apply this in their lesson plan. Please hand
them the printed out educational technology good practices.
Success criteria:
 The teacher participants are able to predict the impact effects of their lesson plan on three
levels: their teaching, their students and student online safety.
Discussing the evaluation template
 Hand out the printed evaluation template and show the evaluation PowerPoint
presentation on a big screen.
 Walk the teachers through the evaluation template slide by slide.

53

Tell the teachers that they need to fill out the evaluation template after their lesson
implementation. Ask them to send it to you by email before the fifth session and provide them
your email address.
Let the teachers know that they can contact you in the mean time if they have any questions.

54

LESSON PLAN (45 minutes duration)
Age group: 12-14

FIRST AND LAST NAME
SCHOOL
DATE
EMAIL ADDRESS
LESSON NAME

ID-EYE - STANDARD COURSE - "lesson model"

CURRICULAR
IF CURRICULAR WHAT SUBJECT
CHALLENGE/
OPPORTUNITY

EXTRA-CURRICULAR

Young people have a chance to express their views and present them to
others, discuss controversial topics with adults, which helps the teacher to
get to know their students and helps to build trust and a mutual
understanding in the class room.
Young people will together with their teachers work on the concept of an
"ideal class" – this particular challenge increases their responsibility for
their own education and their school environment.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

SUCCESS CRITERIA

X

- Students and teachers build closer relationships with each other;
- An increase of student awareness of the risks associated with
being online and new ways for students to respond to risky
situations online;
- Better communication with the group/ class;
- As an additional result: greater commitment to education and the
school community;
- Through the use and application of methods of interactive and
media education in youth work, teachers stimulate the
development and skills of their students.
Youngsters:
- More conscious embedding in their environment, improvement of
adult-teen relationship;
- Direct communication and stimulation of involvement;
- More personal and conscious contact between the teacher and
the students.
Teacher:
- Building a relation of trust;
- More openness for communication with students;
- The use of interactive methods in teaching.

55

GOOD PRACTICES CHOSEN
3 sentences

LEVEL 1 – SUBJECTS

LEVEL 2 – DIDACTICS

DIAGNOSTIC QUESTIONS
RANDOMLY CHOOSE A STUDENT WHO WILL READ A
GAME QUESTION AND WHO WILL SUGGEST AN
ANSWER
RANDOMLY CHOOSE A PARTICIPANT WHO REPLIED NO
TO THE DIAGNOSTIC QUESTION AND ASK WHETHER
THEY COULD EXPLAIN WHY THEY HAVE CHOSEN (NO)

CHOOSE A PARTICIPANT WHO REPLIED YES TO THE
DIAGNOSTIC QUESTION AND INVITE THEM TO EXPLAIN
WHY THEY HAVE CHOSEN (YES)

LEVEL 3 – PROPHYLACTICS

INCLUDING AR GAME
IF NO WHY NOT

Focus on listening and creating a dialogue /
relationships that one can use in the future with the
group.
Be attentive, listen and build trust-based relationship young people need wise adults who want to listen to
them and talk to them.

YES

NO

IF NOT WHAT EDTECH
-

ON MY TEACHING
ON MY STUDENTS

ON STUDENT ONLINE SAFETY

PLANNED IMPACT
Building conscious relation and sense of trust in the
classroom, better communication with students and
the use of interactive methods.
More conscious embedding of students in their
environment, improving the relationship adult teenager, improving direct communication and
engagement stimulation. More personal and
conscious contact in the relation teacher – student.
The presence of an adult on the Internet and the
ability to communicate and talk about their
experiences onlin, is an effective tool to increase the
safety of students online.
Conscious peers are a big support often needed to
overcome emerging challenges and difficulties,
especially for students with difficulties.

ASSESSMENT TYPES

Discussion at the end of the lesson

56

LESSON PLAN
DESCRIPTION

STEP 1 – 2’
EXPLAIN THE LESSON OBJECTIVE
Youth in this age likes to have their own opinions and present them to
others, they also easily enter discussions on controversial topics.
THE OBJECTIVE OF THIS LESSON IS TO FIND OUT WHAT THE PERFECT
CLASS ROOM LOOKS LIKE.
STEP 2 – 2’
EXPLAIN THE RULES
 WE’RE GOING TO PLAY A GAME – THIS MEANS WE’RE GOING TO
DISCUSS HOW TEACHERS SHOULD IDEALLY TEACH AND STUDENTS
WOULD IDEALLY LEARN
 IT IS IMPORTANT TO REMEMBER IN THIS DISCUSSION ABOUT 3
SENTENCES, WHICH YOU WILL REPEAT AFTER ME:
o SOMETIMES I MAKE MISTAKES
o SOMETIMES MY MOTIVATION IS SELFISH
o I AM PART OF THE PROBLEM
STEP 3 – 5’
INTRODUCTION TO THE TOPIC
OBJECTIVE OF THE LESSON: IMAGINING A PERFECT CLASS IS IMPORTANT,
BECAUSE THE MORE “OUR CLASS” LOOKS LIKE “YOUR PERFECT CLASS”,
WE WILL TRUST EACH OTHER MORE AND IT WILL BE EASIER TO
COMMUNICATE WITH ME IF SOMETHING DIFFICULT WILL HAPPEN TO
YOU ONLINE. DO YOU AGREE?
INTRODUCTION TO AUGMENTED REALITY
Show the students a visual presentation explaining the AR. A large part of
young people consciously or intuitively uses this technology in a variety of
games and applications that are becoming increasingly popular. Take
advantage of this fact and show young people how to use AR in
education. An example you’ll find: http://youtu.be/09vxKN1zLNI.
STEP 4 – 15’
PLAYING THE GAME

Choose who will be playing - you or a student. If a student wants to be
the person playing, they should do so, because placing them in a role in
the foreground will increase their self-esteem and self-confidence, and
the rest of the group will participate more actively in the lesson. If none
of the students decides to play, then you as a teacher should assign
yourself as a player, which can be a certain attraction for students and
can give a greater commitment to the lesson. In case a student will play,
remember to have contact with them before the lesson and calibrate the
game to their features. This will allow you to implement your lesson
smoothly and without disruption.

The game is the focal point of your lesson.

57

FOR EVERY QUESTION SELECT PARTICIPANTS RANDOMLY, ASK
THEM TO READ QUESTION AND ANSWER, THIS WILL SUGGEST THE
ANSWER
 KEEP ON SELECTING ANOTHER PARTICIPANTS RANDOMLY, ASK
THEM TO READ QUESTION AND ANSWER, THIS WILL SUGGEST THE
ANSWER
 GIVE THEM MINUTES TO DISCUSS AND AGREE TO ONE COMMON
ANSWER, IF THEY DON’T AGREE, LET THEM VOTE
Playing with youngsters in this age group must proceed rapidly, with short
breaks for dialogues that you provoke with targeted individual students.
Save the discussions for later, after the game. Students will probably have
many questions, reflections and doubts which they will want to share with
you and the other participants in the lesson.
Listen carefully to the questions and comments of your students, try to
catch as much information as you can while speaking about the views and
needs of your students.
EXAMPLE:
QUESTION 1
Teachers build the highest trust when:
If answer WORK IN ACCORDANCE WITH WHAT THEY SAY was selected
these are suggested deliberations:
- What does it mean for you?
- Do you have such teachers?
- What should a teacher do you to have more confidence in them (list)?
If the answer THEY TRY TO UNDERSTAND STUDENTS is selected these are
suggested deliberations:
- Why do you think understanding so important?
- Is it possible to have a good relationship with a teacher who does not
understand you?
- For what reasons teachers may not understand their students?
If the answer THEY KNOW THEIR JOB is selected these are suggested
deliberations:
- In your opinion, what does it mean that a teacher who knows their job?
- In your opinion, how should a good teacher behave like?
QUESTION 4
When you have a problem on the Internet - to whom you speak?
If the answer PARENTS is selected these are suggested deliberations:
- What are your relations with your parents?
- What makes these relationships good? Do we have an impact on these
relations?
If answer TEACHERS was selected these are suggested deliberations:
- What makes you turn to a teacher?
58

- Does a good relationship with the teacher depend on the student, the
teacher, or maybe it depends on both sides?
If answer PEERS was selected these are suggested deliberations:
- Why would you choose peers in the case of a problem on the Internet?
- To whom of your peers would you go to ask for help?
- Did such a situation happen to you? Or maybe someone asked you for
help?
- How have you managed to solve the problem?
If answer INTERNET was selected these are suggested deliberations:
- While seeking information on the web, are you checking their source?
- Do you think that is all information on the Internet is accurate?
- Do you rather consult with people online than in real life?
AFTER THE GAME
STEP 5 – 13’
DEBATE
ASK YOUR FIRST DIAGNOSTIC QUESTION:
ARE THE STUDENTS EQUALLY RESPONSIBLE FOR THE LESSON RESULTS?
EVERYONE HAS TO SHOW NOW THE GREEN CARD: (YES) OR RED CARD:
(NO)
 CHOOSE A PARTICIPANT WHO REPLIED NO AND ASK THEM TO
EXPLAIN WHY THEY HAD CHOSEN (NO)
 CHOOSE A PARTICIPANT WHO REPLIED YES AND INVITE THEM TO
EXPLAIN WHY THEY HAD CHOSEN (YES)
 THEN – LET STUDENTS VOTE AGAIN
 EXPLAIN YOUR POINT OF VIEW, ANSWER: (YES) – A LESSON IS A
COOPORATION, SO EVERYONE IS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE RESULT
OF THE LESSON.
My justification (the teacher):
A lesson is a cooperation, so everyone is responsible for the results –
together we have decided to cooperate, so the responsibility for the result
spreads out to all of us. We have the same goal that we can achieve if we
work on it together. Important is also the co-responsibility that each of us
has for the impact on the form, course and outcome of our lesson. Our
activities, commitment and partnership affect what one learns, about
what one talks and whether one is supported by the class.
Dear teacher - most of the time, youngsters retreat or remain passive
during activities with adults when they cannot realize their ideas, or
openly express their opinions – therefore, leave room for student selfrealization.
ASK YOUR SECOND DIAGNOSTIC QUESTION:
IS IT EASIER FOR YOU TO COME TO ME IN THE IDEAL CLASS, WHEN YOU
HAVE A PROBLEM ONLINE?

59

EVERYONE HAS TO SHOW NOW THE GREEN CARD: (YES) OR RED CARD:
(NO)
 CHOOSE A PARTICIPANT WHO REPLIED NO AND ASK THEM TO
EXPLAIN WHY THEY HAD CHOSEN (NO)
 CHOOSE A PARTICIPANT WHO REPLIED YES AND INVITE THEM TO
EXPLAIN WHY THEY HAD CHOSEN (YES)
 THEN – LET STUDENTS VOTE AGAIN
 EXPLAIN YOUR POINT OF VIEW, ANSWER: (YES) – I HOPE SO.
My justification (the teacher):
Is it easier for you to come to me in the ideal classroom, when you have a
problem online? I hope so - trust and security are things without which it
is difficult for us to live, we started talking about various topics that are
important to us and often difficult. Each of us, by opening up, takes a risk,
but the risk often pays off. As a group/ class we can be a support for each
other, both in good and difficult times. However, there are cases and
situations which young people themselves would not cope with and need
a wise adult. In the ideal class that supporting adult should be a teacher,
but building a trust needs time, so sometimes you need to start small – by
a dialogue, by identifying common objectives for the group, by spending
time together and discussing (also online). Sometimes it's helpful to invite
someone to a part of our lives and see if there will be a place for them.
Dear teacher - building trust takes a long time and often consists of a lot
of details, such as dialogue, listening, understanding, discretion, time and
keeping our word. As adults we need to earn and nurture the trust of
young people. You do not get trust just because you're a teacher or you
because you decided that right now you want to be friends with
youngsters.
STEP 6 – 5’
QUESTIONNAIRE

60

MODEL LESSON PLAN 2 (45 minutes duration)
Age group: 12-14
FIRST AND LAST NAME
SCHOOL
DATE
EMAIL ADDRESS
LESSON NAME

TALKING ABOUT LIFE ONLINE

CURRICULAR
IF CURRICULAR WHAT SUBJECT
CHALLENGE/
OPPORTUNITY

EXTRA-CURRICULAR
-

Youngsters prefer talking to their peers about their life online rather
than with adults. The challenge is to get them to talk to adults more
about the subject.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
SUCCESS CRITERIA

LEVEL 1 – SUBJECTS
LEVEL 2 – DIDACTICS
LEVEL 3 – PROPHYLACTICS
INCLUDING AR GAME
IF NO WHY NOT
IF NOT WHAT EDTECH

X

Students create a mini-lesson plan for an extra-curricular
lesson with their parents.
The lesson plans contain:
- Serious reflections on how to start a conversation with
their parents;
- Realistic expectations;
- Proposals for a communication that is:
 Open;
 Non-moralistic;
 Non-divisive.
- Serious reflections on the expected impact on their parents
and themselves, including their online safety.
GOOD PRACTICES CHOSEN
3 sentences.
Random selection by drawing sticks.
Project learning.
Involving student environments beyond the school
environment.
YES (GAME 8-11)
NO
61

ON MY TEACHING
ON MY STUDENTS
ON STUDENT ONLINE SAFETY

ASSESSMENT TYPES
LESSON PLAN
DESCRIPTION

PLANNED IMPACT
More openness towards edtech, more openness
towards seemingly private subjects in the
curriculum.
Opening a new communication channel with adults
(teacher and parents) on online experiences and
new technology.
New communication channels on online experiences
and new technology hopefully lead to a situation in
which when something goes very wrong online
students feel that they can talk about it with an
adult – teacher, parent or other.

Discussion at the end of the lesson on the lesson plans created.

STEP 1 – 10’
Introduce the learning objective, a lesson plan template and success
criteria.
Introduce the three sentences as steps towards the communication
aimed for.
The less plan consists of:
 Description of instruments to be used;
 Description of the lesson;
 Description of the expected impact on their parents;
 Description of the expected impact on themselves, including
their online safety.
Divide the class in 4 groups by random sticks selection. Hand out a
lesson plan template to each group.
STEP 2 – 20’
Let each group play the game as a preparation on creating the lesson
plan. The options in the game are to inspire the students to reflect on
communication options just as the three sentences were to inspire
students to reflect on how to start a dialogue.
Let each group then fill out their lesson plan.
STEP 3 – 15’
The teacher randomly selects a representative per group by means of
drawing sticks. The representative reads the group lesson plan. The
teacher discusses with them.
This is implemented for all four groups.

62

IMPLEMENTATION LESSON
Description for age group 12-14
TIME IN ‘

MODULE DESCRIPTION

45

Teachers implement their own lesson plan at
their school
Teachers fill out the evaluation template

30

PPT
SLIDE
-

HANDBOOK SECTION

-

-

-

Objective
 The objective of this lesson is for teachers to implement and evaluate their lesson plan,
their decisions and their chosen good practices.
Success criteria:
 The teacher participants are able to test the impact effects of their lesson plan on three
levels: their teaching, their students and student online safety.
Teachers implement their own lesson plan at their school
Teachers now individually implement the lesson plan they have written during sessions 3 and 4.
They either use one of their regular lessons or an extra-curricular lesson, depending on their
choice. You are not present.
Teachers fill out the evaluation template
After the implementation of the lesson plan teachers fill out the evaluation template and sends it
to you by email before the fifth session.

63

SESSION 5
Description for age group 12-14
TIME IN ‘
30
50
10

MODULE DESCRIPTION
Teacher summaries of their
implementations
Discussion leading to a BP/LL list
Handing out certificates

PPT SLIDE
25

HANDBOOK SECTION
TEACHER EVALUATION

26
27

CERTIFICATES

Session objective
Provide the session objective:
 The objective of this session is to evaluate the individual teacher sessions and create a set
of Best Practices and Lessons Learned (BP/LL).
Success criteria:
 The teacher participants are able to evaluate the impact effects of their lesson plan on
three levels: their teaching, their students and student online safety.
Teacher summaries of their implementations
Have teachers answer one-on-one the following questions – based on the evaluation template
they’ve filled out:
 Was your lesson curricular or extracurricular?
 What challenge or opportunity did you want to address?
 What good practices did you chose?
 What was the impact of the chosen good practices on your teaching?
 What was the impact of the chosen good practices on your students?
 What was the impact of the chosen good practices on student online safety?
Optionally record the teacher answers on camera. If you’d do so, please share a copy with us. You
can send it to one of the project authors and partners, Mr. Onno Hansen:
onno.hansen@gmail.com.
Discussion leading to a BP/LL list
Provide a discussion with the teachers about their answers. Keep the following topics in mind:


Did similar good practices have a positive impact on the teachers’ teaching, their students and on
student online safety?
Did similar good practices have no impact or a negative impact on the teachers’ teaching, their
students and on student online safety?
Under what conditions did good practices have a positive, negative or neutral impact on the
teachers’ teaching, their students and on student online safety?

64

Summarize the discussion by drafting a list of good practices that had a positive impact on the
teachers’ teaching, their students and on student online safety for many teachers (“best
practices”) and the conditions under which they worked out and a list of good practices that had
no impact or a negative impact on the teachers’ teaching, their students and on student online
safety for many teachers (“lessons learned”) and the conditions under which they failed.
Please share a copy with us. You can send it to one of the project authors and partners, Mr. Onno
Hansen: onno.hansen@gmail.com
Handing out certificates
The workshop draws to an end. The only task you have left is handing out the workshop
certificates to each teacher individually.

65

BACKGROUND TO SESSION 1
Introduction
The subjects that are related to the main workshop theme - the relationship between student
online presence and student identities – are all connected to the notion of identity: identity labels
and learning types for students aged 8 to 11 and identity labels and society (the concept of “liquid
life”) for students aged 12 to 14.
These subjects coincide (fully for the older age group and partially for the younger age group) with
what sociologist Zygmunt Bauman (2005) – inspired by philosopher Richard Rorty – proclaims as
“as desirable and fulfillable aims for educators, the tasks of ‘stirring the kids up’ and instilling
‘doubts in the students about the students’ own self-images, about the society in which they
belong’.”

Identity labels [8-11; 12-14]
Douglas Stone and Sheila Heen (2014) provide tools for an interactive learning experience based
on the theme of identities. They limit themselves to the conscious part of our identity and define
identity as follows: “Identity is the story we tell ourselves about ourselves – what we’re like, what
we stand for, what we’re good at, what we’re capable of” – see Giddens in the “Identity theory”
section below. According to Stone & Heen these stories consist of labels. We try to keep these
labels simple, such as “I’m competent, I’m good, I’m worthy of love. These labels serve an
important function: Life can be messy and confusing, and simple identity labels remind us of our
values and priorities”.
These simple identity labels get us into trouble though. “They are simple because they are “all or
nothing.” That works fine when we’re “all.” But when we get feedback that we are not, we hear it
as feedback that we are nothing. There’s no “partly all” ... If we’re not good, we’re bad”. This
mechanism is an important reason why we cannot take criticism that easily and why it is hard for
students to be resilient online. Online challenges, especially critical ones, seem like an attack on
their entire identity.
Leonard Mlodinow (2012) adds to this image of our identity an element that he calls “motivated
reasoning”. This motivated reasoning helps us to “believe in our goodness and competence, to feel
in control, and to generally see ourselves in a positive light. It also shapes the way we understand
and interpret our environment, especially our social environment, and it helps to justify our
preferred beliefs.” Motivated reasoning functions as a survival strategy: “studies show that the
people with the most accurate self-perceptions tend to be moderately depressed, suffer from low
self-esteem, or both. An overly positive self-evaluation, on the other hand, is normal and healthy.”
Motivated reasoning installs a range of defense mechanisms in us to fence off negative feedback.
Simple labels do the rest. This is to keep us from falling in a black hole and help us to keep our
identity narration going. The downside of it is that it renders us incapable of receiving negative
feedback that might actually bring us further in life and might teach us something. This is an
undesirable situation since it is the opposite of resilience – it is defensiveness.
To change this situation we should give up simple labels, for ourselves and for the world, and
modify our motivated reasoning. But how do we do that? Stone & Heen write: “The first step is ...
to recognize that your identity label is a simplification. ... You’ve been complicated all along.”

66

According to them we need to accept our complexity and therefore need to embrace the following
statements:
 I will make mistakes
 I have complex intentions – they are good but are sometimes mixed with less noble ones
such as self-interest
 I have contributed to the problem
These statements are best uttered in a situation when we trust others and ourselves. In situations
of trust we are far more open for feedback. Stephen Covey (2006) writes: “In a high-trust
relationship, you can say the wrong thing, and people will still get your meaning. In a low-trust
relationship, you can be very measured, even precise, and they’ll still misinterpret you.” In a
situation of trust the mistakes that we all make are “seen as learning opportunities and [are]
quickly forgiven”.
According to Covey “trust is one of the most powerful forms of motivation and inspiration. People
want to be trusted. They respond to trust. They thrive on trust.” This trust is hard to achieve in a
transmission mode of teaching. Formative Assessment techniques help to create at least a
minimum level of trust in the classroom – see Background to session 2 section.
Covey explains what trust is: “Trust is a function of two things: character and competence.
Character includes your integrity, your motive, your intent with people. Competence includes your
capabilities, your skills, your results, your track record. ... Character is a constant; it’s necessary for
trust in any circumstance. Competence is situational; it depends on what the situation requires.”
Covey agrees with Stone & Heen that it is necessary to seen one’s self as part of the problem: “If
you think the problem is out there, that very thought is the problem.”
Covey supplies us with numerous ways to enhance trust on five levels – which he calls “waves”.
The first one is related the trust we have in ourselves: “The key principle underlying this wave is
credibility”. The second one is related to relationship trust: “The key principle underlying this wave
is consistent behavior”. The third one is related to organizational trust: “The key principle
underlying this wave [is] alignment”. The fourth one is market trust: “The underlying principle
underlying this wave is reputation.” The firth one is societal trust: “The principle underlying this
wave is contribution.”
For Covey all waves are interconnected: “We see that trust in the Fifth Wave is a direct result of
trustworthiness that begins in the First Wave and flows outward in our relationships, in our
organizations, and in the marketplace to fill society as a whole.” He stresses: “As Gandhi said, “One
man cannot do right in one department of life whilst he is occupied in doing wrong in another
department. Life is one indivisible whole.””
Here Covey’s approach seemingly runs counter to the description by Goffman – see below - that
we play different roles in different situations. But while Goffman only offers a frame to understand
situations and our position in them, Covey presents an ethical perspective in which life should be
an indivisible whole. This ethical perspective seems to be more in line with the way students see
themselves: they do not feel a major difference between their identity online and offline. They
condemn others who present themselves differently online and in real life. These are our
observations from many conversations with students in Poland and the Netherlands.
Covey’s ethics provide us with “the value that inspires the greatest trust”: “genuine caring”; with
“the agenda that generally inspires the greatest trust”: “seeking mutual benefit” and with “the
behavior that best creates credibility and inspires trust”: “acting in the best interest of others”.
This ethical approach is even more needed according to Covey, because there currently is “a crisis
of trust” and, as a result there is “an increasing focus on ethics in our society”.
67

Covey’s ethics move beyond Stone & Heen. For him it is not enough to acknowledge that we make
mistakes, that we are selfish sometimes and that we are part of the problem. If we make mistakes
we should repair them immediately: “As in almost every other aspect of life, breakdowns can
create breakthroughs. Challenges and mistakes can become some of our opportunities to learn,
grow, and improve.”
Covey adds: “We are going to have challenges. We are going to make mistakes. And others are
going to make mistakes that affect us. ... The issue is how we respond to those things ...” If we
respond wrongly we will lose the trust we’ve built so painstakingly over years in an instant.
This insight by Covey can be observed online again and again – companies making mistakes and
being severely punished for this by heaped-up criticism. On the other hand, the loss of trust online
seems extreme but very short. In line with the liquidity of the times as defined by Bauman – see
below - all return to normal quickly.
In addition to Stone & Heen’s three sentences a second instrument to open up further to feedback
is to learn to differentiate between coaching and evaluation feedback. “Coaching is aimed at trying
to help someone learn, grow, to change. The focus is on helping the person improve, whether it
involves a skill, an idea, particular knowledge, a particular practice, or that person’s appearance or
personality.” Evaluation, on the other hand, “tells you where you stand. It’s an assessment,
ranking, or rating. ... Evaluations align expectations, clarify consequences, and inform decision
making.” Making the distinction between the two “makes a huge difference in your ability to take
in feedback productively. The reason is this: While identity is easily triggered by evaluation, it is far
less threatened by coaching. ... You can learn without enduring the arduous task of reevaluating
who you are.”
A third instrument is to learn to distinguish different components of an evaluation: assessment,
consequences and judgment. By doing this “you can figure out what about a given evaluation is
triggering your identity. ... Breaking it down also helps you focus on what you want to discuss with
the feedback giver.” The judgments can be ignored while the assessment and consequences
components can be highly relevant.
A fourth instrument is to give one’s self a second score that does not concern the evaluation but
the way one handles the reception of the evaluation. “The scorecard reminds you that the initial
evaluation is not the end of the story. It’s the start of the second story about the meaning you’ll
make of the experience in your life.” This is not just a trick: “while the initial evaluation may not be
fully within your control, your reaction usually is. ... in the long term, the second score is often
more important than the first.”
Learning types [8-11]
Stone and Heen (2014) see two ways how we respond to challenges and mistakes: they call these
the “fixed mindset” and the “growth mindset”. About half of us possess a fixed mindset the other
half a growth mindset. “If you have a fixed mindset, every situation you encounter is a referendum
on whether you have the smarts or ability that you thought (or hope) you have.” People with a
growth mindset on the other hand believe that nothing is fixed. If they fail they “assume it is a skill
that can be developed, and moreover, they see struggling with a tough puzzle as just the challenge
they need to improve.” While those with growth mindsets are “amazingly accurate” in assessing
their capabilities, those with a fixed mindset are “terrible” at it.

68

The fixed mindset largely negates reality and is thus incapable of effective learning. Wiliam – see
the didactics section in Background to session 2 - agrees: “The best learners consistently attribute
both success and failure to internal, unstable causes.” Unstable causes for Wiliam are transient
causes (“working hard”) as opposed to long lasting causes (“being smart”).
Like with simple labels the fixed mindset constitutes an undesirable situation. It represents
defensiveness and not resilience. To empower resilience we should move from a fixed mindset to a
growth mindset. Wiliam observes this too: “learning in the classrooms will be considerably
enhanced if students embrace this idea of “It’s up to me, and I can do something about it.”” Only
then feedback has a chance to move learning forward. “Promote the belief that ability is
incremental rather than fixed”.
According to Stone and Heen going from a fixed to a growth mindset involves several steps. The
first step is to be aware of what kind of mindset one has.





I am fixed versus I grow;
My capabilities are fixed versus my capabilities always evolve;
My goal is success versus my goal is the process of learning itself;
I feel smart when I do something perfectly and better than others versus I feel smart when I
overcome challenges;
I feel threatened by a challenge versus I see an opportunity when I’m challenged;
I feel safe within what I can do versus I feel safe if I have to stretch myself a bit.

The second step is that students learn to accept failure as a part of their learning process. Whereas
a fixed mindset only has success as a goal, the growth mindset sees failure as a challenge to do
better next time. It is an invitation to work harder and tries one’s best harder. According to Jane
McGonigal the option to fail is one of the major attractions in gaming. She describes a research
outcome on gamers playing the game Super Monkey Ball 2: “They [the researchers] found that
players exhibited the most potent combination of positive emotions when they made a mistake ...”
The reason for this was that in the game players when they failed “hadn’t failed passively. They had
failed spectacularly, and entertainingly. The combination of positive feeling and a stronger sense of
agency made the players eager to play again. ... When we’re reminded of our own agency in such a
positive way, it’s almost impossible not to feel optimistic.”
The third step is to create a situation of flow, that is situations in which “individuals [become]
completely absorbed in the activities in which they are engaged” (Wiliam, 2011). Mihaly
Czikszentmihalyi, the originator of the concept, describes “flow” as: “the satisfying, exhilarating
feeling of creative accomplishment and heightened functioning” (quoted in McGonigal, 2011).
Wiliam writes: “This sense of flow can arise from one’s intrinsic interest in a task ... but can also
arise through a match between one’s capabilities and the challenge of the task. When the level of
challenge is low and the level of capacity is high, the result is often boredom. When the level of
challenge is high and the level of capability is low, the result is generally anxiety. When both are
low, the result is apathy. However, when both capability and challenge are high, the result is
“flow”.”
McGonigal tells us that “flow” is what makes playing a game so rewarding: “Czikszentmihalyi’s
research showed that flow was most reliably and most efficiently produced by the specific
combination of self-chosen goals, personally optimized obstacles, and continuous feedback that
make up the essential structure of gameplay. “Games are an obvious source of flow,” he wrote,
“and play is the flow experience par excellence.””

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McGonigal adds: “During this kind of highly structured, self-motivated hard work ... we regularly
achieve the greatest form of happiness available to human beings: intense, optimistic engagement
with the world around us. We feel fully alive, full of potential and purpose – in other words, we are
completely activated as human beings.”
Further reading
 Douglas Stone & Sheila Heen – Thanks for the feedback (2014)
 Dylan Wiliam – Embedded formative assessment (2011)
 Jane McGonigal – Reality is broken (2011)
 Stephen Covey – The speed of trust (2006)

Current society [12-14]
Sociologist Zygmunt Bauman (2004, 2005) describes our current society as “liquid” and our lives as
“liquid life”: „’Liquid life’ is a kind of life that tends to be lived in a liquid modern society. ‘Liquid
modern’ is a society in which the conditions under which its members act change faster than it
takes the ways of acting to consolidate into habits and routines. Liquidity of life and that of society
feed and reinvigorate each other. Liquid life, just like liquid society, cannot keep its shape or stay on
course for long.”
Liquid life is a type of radical consumerism in which everything and everyone is turned into
consumable objects. “Liquid life endows the outside world, indeed everything in the world that is
not part of the self, with a primarily instrumental value”. Everything needs to be “good for
consumption” to be useful.
The changes occurring in liquid times are radical, “modifying many ‘traditional’ concepts that have
structured our way of giving the world we live in, and our own lives, meaning”. (EGE, 2012)
Individualism does not exist in these liquid times even though the slogan is that we all should be
individuals. “In a society of individuals everyone must be individual; in this respect, at least,
members of such a society are anything but individual, different or unique. They are, on the
contrary, strikingly like each other in that they must follow the same life strategy and use shared ...
tokens to convince others that they are doing so. In the question of individuality, there is no
individual choice.”
The only choice we have is there is the unique choice of the consumer. “The struggle for
uniqueness has now become the main engine of mass production and mass consumption.”
Uniqueness is defined by being “up to date”. While slogans of authenticity are propagated and we
should all believe in a “pristine self” to listen to, all we do is buy to try and overcome our
existential state of anxiety without success.”
Children are not exempt from the liquid times. “As soon as they learn to read, or perhaps well
before that, children’s ‘shop dependence’ sets in.” This makes sense because “today’s children are
first and foremost tomorrow’s consumers”. They are seen by their parents as “knowledgeable
choosers” when it comes to acquiring goods.
Liquid life is a life of “constant uncertainty”. Constantly new commodities need to be acquired to
keep up with the requirements of this radical consumerism. “Liquid life means constant selfscrutiny, self-critique and self-censure. Liquid life feeds on the self’s dissatisfaction with itself.” In
the process a lot of waste is produced, both in the form of humans and of resources. Yes, humans
are also an “object of consumption”.

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That is why humans are anxious to become waste themselves. If they cannot keep up with the
pace of the change and do not buy the latest consumer goods they will fall down the ladder until
they become useless for others – and thereby become human waste. They will then be cut off
from society, like asylum seekers are, without any chance of ever climbing up the ladder again. We
are all anxious that we will be disposed of.
Further reading:
 Zygmunt Bauman – Identity (2004)
 Zygmunt Bauman – Liquid life (2005)
 Zygmunt Bauman – Liquid times (2007)

Current society – Recipes for further action
What can you and teachers do about this situation? Bauman writes: “The thrust of education ... is
to challenge the impact of daily experience, to fight back and in the end defy the pressures arising
from the social setting in which the learner operates.” But how should this be done?
Programmatic learning of how to cope with liquid life is no option: “Conditions of action and
strategies designed to respond ... age quickly and become obsolete before the actors have a
chance to learn them properly.” The transmission model, therefore, is ruled out by Bauman:
“knowledge needs to be constantly refreshed”. Also ruled out is to identify skills that are needed in
liquid times and then learn these. “Future twists of market demand are not easily predictable,
however artful the forecasters and methodologically refined their prognoses.”
Seymour Papert (quoted in Bauman) agrees that skills education makes no real sense anymore: “So
the model that says learn while you’re at school, while you’re young, the skills that you will apply
during your lifetime is no longer tenable. The skills that you can learn when you’re at school will
not be applicable. They will be obsolete by the time you get into the workplace and need them.”
According to Bauman education nevertheless is the only way out. “Adverse odds may be
overwhelming, and yet a democratic ... society ... knows of no substitute for education and selfeducation as a means to influence the turn of events”. While students might see education as “a
gateway to jobs” we need to teach them how to be citizens too – give them “an education in
citizenship”.
This education needs to be permanent: “in the liquid modern setting, education and learning, to
be of any use, must be continuous and indeed lifelong.”
We need to empower the students’ individuality. “’Individuality’ stands today, first and foremost,
for the person’s autonomy, which in turn is perceived as simultaneously the person’s right and
duty. Before it means anything else, the statement ‘I am an individual’ means that I am the only
one responsible for my merits and my failings, and that it is my task to cultivate the first and to
repent and repair the second.”
We need to take that part of identity that is still there in liquid life as a starting point. “”The sole
‘core identity’ which one can be sure will emerge from the continuous change not only unscathed
but probably even reinforced is that of homo eligens – the ‘man choosing’ ... a permanently
impermanent self, completely incomplete, definitely indefinite – and authentically inauthentic.” It’s
not much, but it’s a start.

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The homo eligens is currently in a bad place. “What separates the present-day agony of choice
from the discomforts which have always tormented homo eligens ... is the discovery or suspicion
that there are no preordained rules or universally approved objectives that can be steadfastly
followed whatever happens, thereby relieving the choosers from responsibility for any adverse
consequences of their choices.”
Only a lifelong education can empower this homo eligens. “We need lifelong education to give us a
choice. But we need it even more to salvage the conditions that make choice available and within
our power.”
How does this empowerment look like? “’Empowerment’ requires the building and rebuilding of
interhuman bonds, the will and the ability to engage with others in a continuous effort to make
human cohabitation into a hospitable and friendly setting for the mutually enriching cooperation
of men and women struggling for self-esteem, for the development of their potential and for the
proper use of their abilities. In short, one of the decisive stakes of lifelong education aimed at
‘empowerment’ is the rebuilding of the now increasingly deserted public space where men and
women may engage in a continuous translation between the individual and the common, the
private and the communal interests, rights and duties.” Thus: “strengthening social cohesion and
developing a sense of social awareness and responsibility have become important societal and
political goals”.
What is needed, therefore, is to strengthen human bonds. “In a liquid, fast-flowing and
unpredictable setting we need firm and reliable ties of friendship and mutual trust more than ever
before.” While they currently are being replaced by “sanitized contacts” online and brand loyalty in
real life, human bonds are vital for a democracy.
How do we strengthen these human bonds? Well, “we mix daily with others who ... ‘do not
necessarily speak the same language (literally and metaphorically) or share the same memory or
history’. Under such circumstances, the skills we need more than any others in order to offer the
public sphere a reasonable chance of resuscitation are the skills of interaction with others – of
conducting a dialogue, of negotiation, of gaining mutual understanding and of managing or
resolving conflicts inevitable in every instance of shared life.”
Bauman concludes: “This is indeed how education should be so that the men and women of the
liquid modern world can pursue their life goals with at least a modicum of resourcefulness and
self-confidence, and hope to succeed.” A second effect is “making the fast changing world more
hospitable to humanity”. It is a way out of our current “landscape of ignorance”. “Ignorance leads
to paralysis of the will. One does not know what is in store and has no way to count the risks.”
Papert comes up with an additional skill that is crucial. According to him only one skill really makes
sense to teach: “The one really competitive skill is the skill of being able to learn. It is the skill of
being able not to give the right answer to questions about what you were taught at school, but to
make the right response to situations that are outside the scope of what you were taught at
school. We need to produce people who know how to act when they’re faced with situations for
which they were not specifically trained. Wiliam (2011) agrees although he does not rule out the
use of learning skills at school: “This is why education – as opposed to training – is so important.
Not only does education confer skills, but it also produced the ability to develop new skills.”

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Identity theories [8-11; 12-14]
In social sciences it is common to define identity as the answer to the question: Who am I?
Unfortunately, subsequently there exists no consensus on how to understand the answers to this
question.
According to one scientific current, personified by sociologist Erving Goffman, our identity is the
sum of all roles that we play. The key idea here is that we behave differently in different contexts
because different actions and reactions by us are required in various situations. Thus, we behave
differently at work and at home and act different with friends and in a shop. We perform different
roles for different audiences. While playing these different roles it is crucial that we keep our
audiences separated in order to avoid severe damage of our image.
To understand the damage that could occur, imagine the following situation. A mother visits at
school a student who is very popular in her class. The mother brings a cute toy that she loudly
proclaims is the favourite of her child. The effect is devastating – the child is deeply embarrassed.
The reason for this is that the audience of one role (co-students) gets a glimpse of another role
that is played by the child (cute daughter).
A second aspect of Goffman’s work on identity is that there are two ways in which we share
information about ourselves with others: consciously (“giving information”) and unconsciously
(“giving off information”). A large part of this information given off unconsciously is made up by
our nonverbal communication. Both types of information are used by others to interpret us.
Sometimes the unconsciously given off information contrasts highly with the information that we
consciously give on ourselves. For instance, we stutter and sweat while we proclaim that we are
not nervous at all. In those cases our role will not be very credible and our performance might be
rejected by our audiences.
The interpretation by Goffman is not the only approach to the concept of identity. Another
important approach is based on the philosopher Paul Ricoeur. According to Ricoeur identities
consist of two parts: those of our characteristics that discriminates us from others (l’ipsete) and
those of our characteristics that remain the same over longer periods of time (la memete).
Ricoeur’s interpretation is key for European legislation on data protection. Our l’ipsete makes us
identifiable for the law. Being identifiable, for instance in a database, causes our data to be
protected under EU law.
The Data Protection Directive [Directive 95/46/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council
of 24 October 1995 on the protection of individuals with regard to the processing of personal data
and on the free movement of such data] specifies what makes us identifiable: “an identifiable
person is one who can be identified, directly or indirectly, in particular by reference to an
identification number or to one or more factors specific to his physical, physiological, mental,
economic, cultural or social identity.” Unfortunately, no further details are provided, neither in the
Directive nor in subsequent regulations.
The use of the concept “identity” in the Directive seems to indicate that identity equals an
identifiable person – a use that is seen as too limited by advisory body European Group on Ethics
in Science and New Technologies to the European Commission (EGE) in its Opinion 26: “it is not
enough to analyse identity questions in terms of those matters that mostly concern the
identification of a person rather than his or her identity as a person”.
A third interpretation of identity postulates that identities are stories we tell ourselves and others
about ourselves. For instance sociologist Anthony Giddens writes on identity: “A person’s identity is
not to be found in behavior, nor – important though this is – in the reactions of others, but it the
capacity to keep a particular narrative going.” Philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre calls this a “lifelong
project”. The idea in this interpretation is that we reflect the understanding of ourselves into an
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“ongoing ‘story’ about the self” which is “the individual’s biological narrative”.
Only one, rather coherent version of our story about ourselves can exist at any moment. Over time
the stories change but never can two versions be told at the same time.
This interpretation lies underneath the so-called European Union “right to be forgotten” – the
right of individuals “to request that his or her data be removed from accessibility via a search
engine”. According to the Giddens tradition we have the right to erase unwanted elements from
our narration.
Further reading:
 Anthony Giddens – Modernity and Self-Identity (1991)
 Erving Goffman – The presentation of Self in everyday life (1959)
 Paul Ricoeur – Oneself as another (1992)

New online technologies and identity [8-11; 12-14]
Having the notions from the “Identity theory” section in mind the concept of online identity now
seems easy to construct: online identities are the answer to the question who we are online. To
understand the answers we just need to apply one of the three identity interpretations to the
concept of online identity.
Following the first interpretation our online identity would then consist of the information we give
consciously and give off unconsciously online. According to the second interpretation our online
identity then could be seen as that what makes us different online with regard to others and that
what is online consistent about us. For EU legislation, therefore, online identities, or digital
identities, are defined by “identity-as-identification” online. This basically means that our online
identity equals our passwords and username combinations or our biometric identifiers or our login tokens and certificates rather than us as online persons. In the third interpretation of online
identity then we would be the online narration we provide of who we are – our profiles.
Unfortunately, the relationship between online presence and identity cannot be summarized by
just applying interpretations of identity to online identities. Digital technologies have complicated
our interpretations of identities per se.
Let’s start with the impact of new technologies on the first interpretation of identity as
represented by Goffman. We still do segregate our audiences to a certain degree – we behave
differently on Facebook and on LinkedIn and we publish different texts on Twitter and on World of
Warcraft – but in no way a hermetic wall exist separating our audiences. Whereas for Goffman the
separation is complete and truths from one role are not to leak to another role, we have troubles
maintaining this segregation online. Only a few of us consequently use the options available in
social media to target a different audience for each message that we send. Rather we share our
holiday pictures and funny cat videos with friends, families and colleagues alike. Some of us even
consciously link many or all of our profiles to each other. But even if we would be careful and try to
segregate audiences then Google functions as the great connector, linking us to our online content
for anyone who cares to search.
Because of our online presence also a shift has also taken place in the kind of information we
accidentally give off. Whereas information that was giving off traditionally occurred between two
or more people during a physical get-together, currently our accidentally given off information
mainly consists of our click behaviour that is being interpreted by companies and authorities
unknown to us by means of algorithms and Big Data (“profiling”). Nonverbal communication has
almost completely disappeared online. We rather chat or SMS, thereby missing out on the
information that was traditionally given off.
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Taking the Ricoeur-based interpretation of identities into account, we cannot but notice the
similarities between our profiles online. Whereas in older social networks like MySpace we could
co-create our profiles in newer social networks such as Facebook an Twitter we are all condemned
to fit in the same template. Therefore, it is very hard to be different (l’ipsete).
Next, we have an enormous tendency to conformism online. We all pull the same duckfaces on
selfies and many of us show our tanned upper legs near the sea on our holiday pictures. We all
share cute children’s pictures, memes with lolcats and weird news stories.
The reason for this conformism could stem from our insecurities. Duval & Wicklund (1972)
describe this logic in their Objective Self-Awareness (OSA) theory. According to them we are always
shocked when we attentively look in a mirror, because the image of ourselves that we carry in us is
positively distorted. When we look in the mirror and see our actual self we thus are disappointed
and insecure. The easiest way out of this negative emotional state is by starting to conform more
to the norm of beauty and being accepted as we perceive it around us. If we are to accept that our
profiles are mirrors in a way then our online conformism could at least be partially explained.
Facebook’s timeline on the other hand erodes our memete. By placing us on a historic timeline it
becomes visible how we change. We change partners, friends, work and our opinion and all this is
neatly presented as information elements that make up our identity.
In the same fashion Facebook’s timeline challenges the third interpretation of identities – our
identities as narrations by us on ourselves. Facebook’s timeline shows multiple versions of our
story at the same time – and this runs counter to our narrative being a unique coherent story
about us that is told by us to ourselves and to others – a story that exists in one version only. In
addition, others add their content to our profile so that it is no longer only “by ourselves”.
EGE, an advisory organization to the European Commission, comments on this: “Facebook now
allows its members to store a life story and hence structure their entries in a diachronic manner.
Memory and forgetting are complementary concepts for personal identity: without some
forgetting and the necessary selection process in giving meaning to one’s identity, the creation of
an identity of the self (ipse) becomes more and more dependent on the socially ascribed ‘markers’
of identification (idem). As has been stated with respect to the legal initiative of the ‘right to be
forgotten’, however, the web seems to ‘never forget’. The ethical question with respect to identity
concepts, then, is how it affects one’s self-relation and social relations alike over time — there are
signs that the impossibility of ‘deleting’ a part of one’s life story from the collective memory of the
web may create an unforgiving culture, either with respect to employment or social forms of
shaming, or with respect to surveillance policies.”
But this is not the only challenge in the digital age to the Giddens inspired interpretation. A second
one is the notion from interpretation one that our consciously given information is only a part of
our identity. More powerful is the information that is “given off” on us, either by third parties or
unconsciously by ourselves. This was the case in pre-digital times when our body language and our
voice were important indicators for others of who we are and it is the case now.
Research results from neurosciences show us how important our own information “given off”
about us is. To fully appreciate this we need to delve a bit into neuroscience theory. Timothy
Wilson (2002) was one of the first to proclaim that a large part of our identity is made up by what
he calls “the adaptive unconscious”. This unconscious part of us has nothing to do with Freud’s
unconscious. Wilson defines the adaptive unconscious as “mental processes that are inaccessible
to consciousness but that influence judgments, feelings or behavior”. It “plays a major executive
role in our mental lives. It gathers information, interprets and evaluates it, and sets goals in
motion, quickly and efficiently.” According to some the unconscious makes up 95% of our
behaviour.
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The remaining conscious 5% is only “loosely related” to the other 95% and has no access to it. It
can merely try to rationalize what the other part has decided – as people seem to do in a range of
experiments. Wilson calls this: “confabulation”. Wilson writes: “we are forced to make educated
guesses about our unconscious dispositions”.
The unconscious part of us “is tied to the here-and-now, It reacts quickly to our current
environment, skilfully detects patterns, alerts us to any dangers, and sets in motion goal-directed
behaviors. What it cannot do is anticipate what will happen tomorrow, next week, or next year and
plan accordingly. Nor can the adaptive unconscious muse about the past and integrate it into a
coherent self-narrative. Among the major functions of consciousness are the abilities to anticipate,
mentally stimulate, and plan.”
Nobel Prize winner Daniel Kahneman (2011) translates Wilson’s unconscious versus conscious into
two decision-making systems that we humans have. He calls these systems “System 1” that
performs automatic operations and “System 2” that performs controlled operations. For
Kahneman these are two modes of thinking that he labels “fast” versus “slow”.
Leonard Mlodinow (2012) takes the unconscious to the social realm. He sees the unconscious as
the reason why nonverbal communication is so important. Most of human interactions take place
at the unconscious level. Mlodinow: “we ... have a parallel track of nonverbal communication, and
those messages may reveal more than our carefully chosen words and sometimes be at odds with
them. Since much, if not most, of the nonverbal signalling and reading of signals is automatic and
performed outside our conscious awareness and control, through our nonverbal cues we
unwittingly communicate a great deal of information about ourselves and our state of mind. The
gestures we make, the position in which we hold our bodies, the expressions we wear on our
faces, and the nonverbal qualities of our speech – all contribute to how others view us.”
Experimental psychologist Joshua Greene (2013) claims that the two realms even create two
different sets of morality that he calls “morality fast and slow”.
A third challenge to the Giddens-inspired interpretation of identity comes from Zygmunt Bauman’s
“liquid life”. According to him in these times we do not consistently try to build one narration as we
used to do. Once we might have tried to create a final image with jigsaw puzzle pieces in hand.
Nowadays we also start with jigsaw puzzle pieces in hand but then “you try to find out how you
can order and reorder them to get (how many?) pleasing pictures. You are experimenting with
what you have. Your problem is ... what are the points that can be reached given the resources
already in your possession, and which ones are worthy of your efforts to obtain them.” He adds: “A
cohesive, firmly riveted and solidly constructed identity would be a burden, a constraint, a
limitation on the freedom to choose. It would portend an incapacity to unlock the door when the
next opportunity knocks.”
The EGE Opinion links to Bauman and speaks about “fluid self”: “Its relevance for ethical reflection
lies in its impact on the traditional concepts of ‘authenticity’ and ‘autonomy’: fluid or hybrid
identities may threaten the consistency and continuity that has been considered to be crucial for
the concept of a practical identity, which ultimately relies upon a self that may not only identify
with his or her actions but is also identified by others. Hence, the new possibilities for shaping
one’s own identity, constrained only by the features and rules of the programs one uses, make
social relationships potentially insecure; ethical concepts such as trust, truthfulness or reliability
may lose their function to create spheres of belonging — while at the same time enforcing
short-term relationships that can easily be replaced.”
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Further reading:
 Daniel Kahneman – Thinking, fast and slow (2011)
 EGE, Opinion 26: Ethics of Information and Communication Technologies (2012)
 Joshua Greene – Moral tribes (2013)
 Leonard Mlodinow – Sublimal (2012)
 Shelly Duval & Robert Wicklund – Objective Self-Awareness (1972)
 Timothy Wilson – Strangers to ourselves (2002)
 Zygmunt Bauman – Identity (2004)

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BACKGROUND TO SESSION 2
Introduction
In this session two main workshop elements are discussed: interactive didactics and prophylactics.
Interactive didactics
Introduction
The dominant didactics currently implemented at the majority of schools in the European Union
still is the transmission model, in which a teacher teaches top-down and students try to
understand what the teacher teaches. The transmission model rests on the assumption that
knowledge is to be transmitted and learnt, that understanding will develop later, and that clarity of
exposition accompanied by rewards for patient reception are the essentials of good teaching”
(Black & Wiliam, 1998).
After having analyzed the outcomes of a vast body of research education researchers and
innovators Black & Wiliam boldly state that is a “wealth of evidence that this transmission model
does not work, even by its own criteria”. According to them “there is little, or no, worthwhile
learning”.
Black & Wiliam propose an alternative didactics: a didactics that is interactive rather than topdown: “the commitment must be to teaching through interaction to develop each pupil’s power to
incorporate new facts and ideas into his or her understanding.”
This kind of didactics is more effective when it comes to the most important curricular point of
reference: the exams results. This, according to Wiliam (2011), holds good for all students but
interactive didactics is “most beneficial for lower-achieving students” and for “students from
different ethnic backgrounds”.
Interactive didactics rests on the following premises:





Students are co-responsible for their learning.
In order to achieve this co-responsibility students should also be co-responsible for the lessons. The
students’ role should not be limited to “playing a game of “guess what’s in the teacher’s head””
(Wiliam, 2011).
No longer is the teaching of the teacher crucial. Teachers are to facilitate effective learning
environments.
Teachers should clearly express the learning objectives and the criteria for success for each lesson.
Students need to know what is expected of them to take their responsibility.
Teachers have to open up more channels of communication with their students. Wiliam (2011)
assures us: “When teachers open up the channels of communication with the students, the
students will use them.”
Teachers no longer postpone their actual checking whether students have understood the lessons
until during the exams. Exams grading is a closure of a subject after which no additional learning
takes place, not even by those who failed the exams. Instead, teachers need to permanently check
interactively whether all individual students understand the lesson’s content. If one or more
students have lost track of what the lesson is about, the teacher or peers should give more
attention to this student on this subject. Interactivity is the constant sensitivity by a teacher to
individual student learning. The essence of interactive checking is that teachers accept that they do
not know what students have learned until they check.
Because teachers allow for a far greater student involvement engagement by all students becomes
more possible.

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Wiliam defines his version of interactive didactics, which he labels Formative Assessment, as
follows: “An assessment functions formatively to the extent that evidence about student
achievement is elicited, interpreted, and used by teachers, learners, or their peers to make
decisions about the next steps in instruction that are likely to be better, or better founded, than
the decisions they would have made in absence of that evidence.”
Formative Assessment didactics are not easy to implement. It will take time and a step-by-step
approach. Wiliam explains: “When teachers try to change more than two or three things about
their teaching at the same time, the typical result is that their teaching deteriorates and they go
back to doing what they were doing before. My advice is that each teacher chooses one or two of
the techniques ... and tries them out in the classroom. If they appear to be effective, then the goal
should be to practice them until they become second nature.”
This is why the IDentifEYE workshop does not propose to radically change teacher day-to-day
teaching but rather tries out a few items from a larger menu card of good practices.
It is advisable that teachers participating in the IDentifEYE workshop start to create teacher
learning communities (TLCs). We suggest that the IDentifEYE workshop is not treated as a one off
exercise but will function as the starting-point for monthly teacher meetings on didactics. In line
with Wiliam’s prescription we advise a group size of eight to twelve teachers. “The idea of the TLC
is that each participant comes to the meeting with their personal professional development plan,
and gets support of the group in achieving this.”
Good Practices
In his book Formative Assessment Embedded Wiliam describes quite a few concrete good
practices. Within the framework of the IDentifEYE pilot workshops European teachers have tested
out a selection of them. Below you’ll find the good practices that were evaluated the best:

Diagnostic questions
o An important instrument to check whether you are understood in the class room is the
instrument of diagnostic questions. These are “questions that provide a window into
student’s thinking”. They are not easy to generate but reading Wiliam’s book Embedded
Formative Assessment (2011) will support you. Rule of thumb for those questions is: “What
makes a question useful as a diagnostic question ... is that it must be very unlikely that the
student gets the correct answer for the wrong reason.” And, the question should be
constructed in such a way that “the incorrect answers should be interpretable.” The
underlying assumption should be: “it is better to assume that students do not know
something when they do than it is to assume they do know something when they don’t.”
The best time to ask these questions is “at hinge points in lessons”. These are points “at
which the teacher checks whether the class is ready to move on”.
o To save time create multiple choice diagnostic question, preferably only with an A and a B
answer. Hand out two colors of Post-Its before the lesson: for instance a blue for A and a
yellow for B. Now if the teacher asks a diagnostic question, students are to raise one of the
two colors. If more than 80% of the students shows the right color, the teacher can move
on. Optionally the teacher could ask a random student why they picked the answer. If the
students provides the right reasoning the lesson can move on. If less than 80% of the
students show the right color the teacher should ask a student with the right answer to
provide their reasoning. If the student provides the right reasoning the teacher should ask
the students who had another color whether they understand what the first student had
said and whether they agree with it. If yes, the teacher can go to the next subject. If not, or
if a student with the right color provides a faulty motivation, the teacher knows they should
stick to the subject still.

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Red/ green Post-Its. Each student receives a red and a green Post-It card. As long as a student
understands the lesson they have the green Post-It on top. The moment they lose track they put the
red Post-It on top. Since all other students at that moment still have a green Post-It on top all show
that they still understand the lesson. Thus, the teacher can ask any of them to explain to their
colleague showing the red color what the lesson is about at that point. Wiliam explains: ““This
technique neatly encapsulates two key components of effective formative assessment –
engagement and contingency. If a student is showing ... green, he can be called upon to explain the
work to someone else, which requires the student to be monitoring their own learning and,
therefore, engaged. And the flow of information from the students about the pace of instruction
helps the teacher make adjustments to better meet the students’ learning needs.”
Random selection. One of the few certainties teachers have in the class room is that always a few
students are willing to answer teacher questions. Most often these are time and again the same
students who show their eagerness to answer a teacher question by raising their hands. While
these students and their replies, that are often correct, give the teacher a comfortable feeling that
they can move on, in reality they only provide a false sense of interactivity. While a part of the
students is engaged the majority is not. They have lost track but do not show that they have lost
track because they feel that they are not asked anything. This situation seems safe for all involved:
the teacher can move on without too much loss of time, the students raising their hands get
teacher appreciation and confirm also that they are star students while the students not raising
their hands do not have to endure public humiliation that follows not knowing the answer to a
question. But the students not raising their hands now also reinforce their feeling of being second
grade students by not answering and not reacting. Both “good” students and “bad” students thus
are reinforced in their self-definitions. As was described in the background to session 1 section
tighter defined identity labels have a negative effect on student ability to learn or to hear feedback.
This is a very undesirable effect of only reacting to students who raise their hands. A way to end this
situation is to write all student names down on identical sticks, like from ice creams, and have the
teacher draw out one of the sticks when they have a question. At first this is very uncomfortable for
all involved. The teacher might find out that a randomly chosen student does not know the answer
– which means time loss. A “good” student is not always chosen and therefore has far less
opportunities to shine. Worse even, a “good” student might be selected randomly at the rare
moment that they do not know the answer to a question – which means a dent in their selfdefinition. And “bad” students cannot hide anymore: there is a looming risk that their stick will be
drawn. Nevertheless, it makes sense to start drawing sticks – it challenges student self-definitions
and teacher prejudices and engages all students. After a while this will have a positive effect on
exams results.

Further reading:
 Paul Black & Dylan Wiliam – Inside the black box (1998)
 Dylan Wiliam – Assessment for learning: why, what and how (2009)
 Dylan Wiliam – Embedded formative assessment (2011)

Prophylactics
A Positive Education – raising awareness in the teacher-student relationship
The Gdansk Addiction Prevention Centre team’s collaboration with schools and organisations in
Gdansk led to the conclusion that preventive campaigns should take the young peoples’ needs into
consideration. Hence, other areas, apart from school activities ought to be taken into account i.e.
family issues, the local environment, and online activities. In contrast, the ‘adults know best’
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approach to the campaign should be avoided.
The most effective campaigns are, in our opinion, those addressing the subjectivity of the student;
giving an opportunity to develop, decide, and participate, as well as raising social awareness and
responsibility in order to enhance social skills within a safe environment.
The implementation of these actions is only possible if adults act not only as partners in the
dialogue and guides, but also as demanding teachers.
One of the recommended methods of implementing the above mentioned schemes, currently
used at the Gdansk Addiction Prevention Centre and selected schools in Gdansk, is the ProjectBased Learning Method.
A GOOD PROJECT ALLOWS YOUTH TO BECOME INVOLVED IN ACTIONS AND SITUATIONS
PREVIOUSLY ATTRIBUTED TO ADULTS, THUS GIVING YOUTH A CHANCE TO GAIN SPECIFIC SKILLS
NEEDED IN ADULTHOOD.
What is the Project-Based Learning Method?
The Project-Based Learning Method is a task or series of tasks with common goals and using
coherent content designed and coordinated by the educator (teacher, instructor, counsellor),
implemented independently by young people. It is flexible, versatile and enables combining
various forms of interaction. The stages of implementation of the Project-Based Learning Method
are based on a simple scheme that uses the intuitive logistics processes. The project, seen as an
educational process, gives an opportunity to prepare young people to take on social roles.
This method is derived from didactics and is effectively used in activities aimed at selfdevelopment, as well as in prevention and correction of behavioural disorders.
According to Krzysztof Ostaszewski, the Project-Based Learning Method, as a prophylactic factor,
carries the basics of positive prevention i.e.:
• strengthening the skills and the development of social competences
• assuming the existence of protective factors of an individual, within a family as well as external
ones
• seeking to balance the influence of risk factors (considering their existence but not focusing on
eliminating them)
• using a positive approach
How to implement the project?
The aims of the project are the following: reinforcing protective factors (e.g. developing social
skills, developing interests, building positive relationships and becoming involved in constructive
activities, emphasising values, etc.), correcting unwanted behaviour.
PREVENTIVE FACTORS CONSTITUTE A CERTAIN BUFFER REDUCING THE EFFECT OF RISK FACTORS
AND MODIFY (REDUCE) THEIR IMPACT.
The Project-Based Learning Method is interactive!
Tobler and Stratton (1997), and Tobler (2000) indicate that the key element of effective prevention
programs are interactive methods: the teacher initiates the process of interaction - creates a task
specific situation in which a young man discusses, plans, communicates with others, cooperates,
verifies the skills, makes decisions, etc.
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The project as a method of social work



The project may incorporate a vast array of resources and themes (e.g. a Youth Club prepares
contests for children from the day care centres).
The project involves both, people who are in need, and people willing to give (e.g. children take
care of the disabled / young people become volunteers)
The project works towards a common goal and develops new goals as well (e.g. through a
collaboration between various organizations)
Whole families may be involved in the implementation of the project

Types of projects
1. Group projects: an experience for an entire group.
2. Individual projects: a specific experience for a particular child.
Roles in the project
1. Adult: coordinator, trainer, project-partner, companion, student, expert, etc.
2. Child: partner, guardian, teacher, initiator, coordinator, leader, announcer, planner, buyer, a PR
specialist, etc.
By assuming these roles, every project participant has the opportunity to gain experience and
important social skills!
Stages of implementation
1. Diagnosis of the current needs of the group













What difficulties have the children been facing recently?
What are they unable to do?
Which of their behaviours are disturbing, destructive?
What do they like, what do they refuse to do?
What influences them and what does not?
What are they keen on?
What questions do they ask?
What is unknown to them?
What do they enjoy?
What issues are they currently interested in?
What do they do spontaneously?
What do they offer, what do they ask for?
What surprises you in their behaviour?
What are the underlying problems and needs of these "signals"?

2. Long-term diagnosis - key questions







What future do you want for your protégés?
Who are they going to be in the future?
What are the social roles they play in the family, at work, in the community?
How do they behave, refer to others, fulfil their duties?
How are they perceived by others?
What do the children need, to make this vision of the future possible?
In what situations children can gain the knowledge, skills and abilities they need?
What experiences do they need?

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3. Initiating the project








The adults attitude: faith in children, enthusiasm and commitment
Showing children what may change as a result of initiatives taken by them
It ought to be a real, socially useful activity
Preparation – preliminary steps (distribution of tasks, selecting coordinators, scheduling,
communication methods).
A respected and significant person (educator, volunteer, priest, manager...) gives meaning to an
event, a situation, tells the children what needs to be prepared, asks the children how to do it? (e.g.
we want to make a music video, how should it look like and how can we do it?)
The message should contain an element of uniqueness and mystery
Adults ask the kids for their help
Openness to children’s ideas, affirming their belief that it is a good initiative
Passing the responsibility for the activities and situations on to the children

4. Implementation of activities





Establishing the group’s resources – assessing the strengths of group members and their willingness
to take part in certain activities
Cooperating with the community - checking on whom you can count (the people, institutions and
organizations).
Encouraging the project participants - by supporting, motivating, convincing.
Resolving conflicts (being a negotiator).
Motivating further actions (support new ideas, do not limit the kids!)
Adults supervise the progress, provide assistance (you are important for children)

5. Summary - assessment of the activity effects, conclusions.




Summarizing every activity with the children (e.g. What did you manage to do? How do you feel
about it?)
Appreciating the group and individual participants
Building a positive identity (e.g. I am a person that managed to ...; We are a group that managed
to... .)
External presentation of the project results!
Talking about future plans

What else you need to know while using the Project-Based Learning Method?
Characteristics of a good project:











Referring to realistic, everyday situations for young people – applying them in practice
An interesting and socially useful purpose
Co-operation and an open approach
Giving freedom to leaders but also motivating less active participants
Supporting participants
Acknowledging the participants’ contribution
Meeting deadlines on every stage of the project
Transparent task assigning,
Developing a good plan, including objectives, working methods, deadlines
Creating space for individual and team work
Involving experts (specialists in various fields),
External presentation of the results of the project

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The SMART analysis – a method of goal setting
The SMART analysis helps to set proper and feasible goals, which in turn increases the chance of
achieving them. It requires a thorough analysis and consequently gives the participants a great
deal of satisfaction, as the results are clearly measurable.
Specific – the goal should be easy to understand and clear, rather than vague and open to
interpretation.
Measurable - the goal must be measurable in order to determine whether it has been achieved.
Attractive - the goal should be attractive, its achievement should require effort and work, the goal
cannot be a routine.
Realistic – for a goal to be measurable, it ought to be feasible and realistic for the participants, as
such goals are motivating.
Time-related - to achieve the goal it is important to determine the time frame of every stage of the
project.
Unlike a process, the project is carried out once and every project has a definite start and end date
(however, it does not mean that these dates cannot be changed - in practice it happens quite
often).
Benefits of the Project-Based Learning Method



Helps the children with behavioural problems.
Prepares for carrying out social roles in the society:
o Gaining social skills
o Gaining experience in performing social roles.
Children can work within their community and influence it, they can play a GOOD role.
The implementation of a project changes the functioning model of the facilities involved.
Integration of the community due to common goals and values:
o Reorganising work schemes, a flexible approach, creativity, acknowledging the changing
needs of children, cooperation with the community,
o Changing the traditional role of educators and teachers - towards the role of instructors,
animators, partners, mentors, etc.

Difficulties in the Project-Based Learning Method
 De-motivation - sustaining the dynamics of the project (e.g. poor time management).
 Loss of individual participants.
 Routine projects.
 Deciding on the degree of involvement of adults.
 Projects as part of the annual work plan.
The 3 principles of working with children and youth
1. Good replaces evil.
Focusing children's energy on performing tasks and socially useful activities that build their selfesteem, helps to eliminate behavioural problems..
2. Real life.
Developing social skills takes place through the tasks carried out in the natural environment of the
child. This contributes to a real change in the relationship of the child and the society.
3. Pay It Forward.
Children use the competences they have developed for the benefit of others.
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Competences
Every project, regardless of its nature, may develop a "package" of competencies and skills such as:















Interpersonal communication
Co-operation, teamwork
Creativity
Conflict management
Time management
Analysing the actions taken
Gaining allies
Formulating problems
Using different sources of information
Formulating and expressing opinion
Active listening
Group decision-making
Creative thinking
Setting goals
Self-assessment of work
Public presentation

The project may relate to a particular person (protégé) and take into account their individual
needs, deficits, interests and talents.
REMEMBER! The project is just an excuse – it will not replace conscious educational work based
on:
• dialogue (individual interviews and group interviews),
• VALUES,
• building relationships,
• setting requirements and giving support,
• intervening (e.g. in a situation of violating the norms),
• building confidence in young people, appealing to their needs,
• conducting daily activities - you can include them in the project as well,
• creating a group rapport, etc.
THIS BELONGS TO YOU
Examples of activities that use elements of the Project-Based Learning Method:
1. The streetworking program "ULICA" run by the Gdansk Addiction Prevention Centre www.gcpu.pl
2. Environmental Prevention Society "Mrowisko" - www.mrowisko.org.pl
3. Youth Club Association ‘St. Philip Neri in Ruda Slaska’ - www.nereusz.pl
Prepared by:
Radosław Nowak and Andrzej Skorupski - Gdansk Addiction Prevention Centre
Study materials used:
Aleksandra Karasowska - "Projekt jako metoda wspierania rozwoju, korygowania zaburzeń i
zapobiegania zagrożeniom "
Dariusz Kowalski - "Metoda projektu w profilaktyce"
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Good practices 8-11
How to talk? Lessons based on The Project-Based Learning Method:
Drawing upon the experience of experts working with the youth, I would like to suggest a good
practice in working with children in the area of communication.
The group between the ages of 8 and 11 is known as the younger school age. During this stage
children experience rapid changes, both in their physical and mental development. Starting and
continuing education at school is a huge step for children and their parents, as it means changing
the dominant form of activity. What has been dedicated to fun in the previous stage, is now being
increasingly replaced by learning (at school). The child learns to solve problems, is being evaluated,
must meet different requirements and accept responsibilities; hence the two stages differ
significantly. Learning at school places certain requirements upon the child, nevertheless it also
helps in the mental development (J. Strelau: Podstawy Psychologii. P. 235).
The school-age children’s observations are more accurate than those of preschool age, however
with more complex tasks there are still signs of difficulty with the analysis and synthesis of data;
therefore it is important to take this notion into account when choosing topics for conversation.
Children this age often still live in the 'fairy tale' world, which means that in many cases they are
not able to imagine the implications and consequences of their behaviour. It is not without reason
that the sincerity of a child is the most brutal and often painful one, especially in peer relations.
We often hear statements such as: you are fat, you smell bad, etc., nevertheless there is no
intention of harming the listener, it is just a statement of fact. Therefore, it is important to start
interacting at such a young age, so that certain behaviours are not reinforced or embedded and
that adults can begin to model positive attitudes. Before presenting the proposed working
methods, it is advisable to learn with whom we work with, based on the emotional development,
keeping in mind that an 8-year-old is at its beginning, and the 11-year-old is slowly entering
maturation:
General characteristics of the period
In this age, increasingly emotional reactions are accompanied by an intellectual assessment, e.g.
the child begins to understand why he/she is getting angry or laughing, develops a skill of selfcontrol of the feelings. Moreover, the manifestation of emotions is more durable. Furthermore, the
ability of experiencing longer lasting feelings and the disappearance of sudden outbursts of anger
is also shaping.
Communication with parents
Feelings are still predominantly linked with family life, wherein the mother is traditionally
considered to be the person to whom the child is most closely emotionally attached. She is the
parent the child spends practically the most efficient time with, the one giving support in the
emotional life, and the one who is trying to understand the child.
Contacts with peers
A need to live in harmony with a group of peers is growing. The group’s well-being is increasingly
important, as well as loyalty, sacrifice, acceptance of the group’s interests and standards. The
group members’ opinion starts to play a key role and the process of learning to interact is
developing.
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Values
The child begins to recognize the values and norms of the group, adheres to the principles and
learns to perform duties within the group.
When it comes to relations with peers it is worth remembering that an 8-year-old has colleagues
and IS a colleague, but an 11-year-old already has friends and IS a friend. During this period the
teacher naturally may become an authority and a role model.
The proposed good practice is one of the methods that can be used to start a dialogue and in my
opinion has at least two advantages.
Firstly, it can stimulate young people to look at themselves and learn skills that in the future may
prove crucial in their professional, personal and social life.
Secondly, the ability of conversation / dialogue acquired at an early age would result in greater life
resourcefulness in conflict situations, and thus may lead to a potential reduction of stress and
frustration. The preventive approach should result in a reduction of risk factors that could cause,
for example, a will to try psychoactive substances.
While deciding to initiate the dialogue and to use the proposed good practice, you may use the
prophylactic approach based on the Project-Based Learning Method, which draws from personal
experiences of professionals who work with youth on a daily basis.
The proposed stages of implementation and preparation:
1. Diagnosis of the groups’ current needs
If you decide to diagnose the current needs of the group, try to answer a few questions, which are
a mini-diagnosis of the group you work with. While looking for an answer, use individual
interviews, group discussions, observation and suggestions from other people you work with.
The questions and the diagnosed areas are the same for all children between the ages of 8 and
11.
Examples of areas to be checked may include (keeping to the topic of Dialogue):











What are the difficulties young people lately experience?
What are they not able to do?
What seems to be disturbing, destructive about their behaviour?
What works and what does not work?
What kind of activities do they willingly take part in?
What questions do they ask?
What are they not aware of and do not understand?
What issues are they currently interested in?
What do they do spontaneously?
What are they proposing, what do they ask for?
What surprises you in their behaviour?
What are the underlying problems and needs of these "signals"?

2. Long-term diagnosis: key questions
When thinking about prevention, consider whether it is worth to ask yourself a few questions e.g.:
What do your mentees need to learn? What skills should they acquire? Who are they supposed to
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be in the future? When looking ahead at working with young people during a three year period of
middle school, one might begin the "process of change", nevertheless it is worth remembering
that such a process needs to be monitored and watched over.
Questions and areas to check in the diagnosis are the same for all children between 8 and 11
years old.
Examples of questions that can help in thinking about the long-term operation ought to include:







What kind of future do you want for your mentees?
Who are they going to be in a few years’ time?
What are the social roles they play in the family, at work, in their community?
How do they behave, relate to others, cope with their responsibilities?
How are they perceived by others?
What do the children need, to make this vision of the future possible?
In what situations can the children gain the knowledge, the skills and competencies they need?
What experience do they need?

3. Initiation
After answering the above mentioned questions and deciding to start a project in this form, you
initiate a phase during which, together with the children, you define the subject matter, e.g.: How
to talk to each other? What is dialogue? How to be a friend / colleague? (the theme is the result of
a mini – diagnosis). It is worth to save enough time for conversations and discussions, so that
everyone can speak and understand the topic/issue you will deal with.
Do not rush. The more time you spend on the discussion, the less resistance due to ignorance and
reluctance there will be later. Give the youth initiative, do not impose your ideas, resolve only to
making suggestions. Assume that there are no bad solutions, they only need to be checked and
possibly changed, and the decision is to be made by the whole group.
At this stage it is necessary to pay attention to the age, the possibility of perception and the
understanding of the topics to be covered by the children, as well as to remember the key
differences between 8-year-olds and 11-year-olds.
At this stage, the following issues are worth emphasising:






The attitude of an adult: faith in children, enthusiasm and commitment
Showing the youth, what may change as a result of initiatives taken by them
It must be a real, socially useful activity
Preparation – setting specific stages (task delegation, the appearance of coordinators, scheduling,
communication methods)
A respected and significant person (educator, volunteer, priest, manager...) gives meaning to an
event, a situation, tells the children what needs to be prepared, asks the children how to do it? (e.g.
we want to make a music video, how should it look like and how can we do it?)
The message should contain an element of uniqueness and mystery
Openness to children’s ideas, affirming their belief that it is a good initiative
Passing the responsibility for the activities and situations on to the children

4. Implementation
It is worth remembering to be a wise adult. Contrary to the stereotypical opinion, there are few
people on whom the youth can rely on and be understood. It is a developmental period in which
the teacher can quickly become an authority and an example to follow. Consequently, it is a big
88

responsibility, nevertheless it is worth to accept it, as the child can build the capacity and
confidence which is useful in later stages of development. This stage requires:





Assessing the children and their abilities - check who can do what and if they want to do it
Cooperating with the community - on whom can you count - the people?, institutions and
organizations?
Reassuring the project participants - supporting, motivating, convincing
Resolving conflicts - be a negotiator
Motivating further activities - supporting new ideas, encouraging
Supervising and providing assistance - you are important for children

5. Summary - evaluation and conclusions
During this stage the activity is summarised and the ability to reflect on the previous experiences
(which is a particularly important social skill) is being learned. This stage can also be the moment
to start a new topic with the children.




Summary of every activity/conversation with children: "What did we manage to do?", "How do you
feel about the things we did?"
Appreciation of the group and individual participants
Building a positive identity: "You are the person who ...", "We are a group that ..."
External presentation of the results!
A discussion about plans “ What plans have you got for the future?”

The proposed good practice is developed as a combination of assumptions and methods regarding
education and prevention, in cooperation with the project partners: Beata Staszyńska - Citizen
Project Foundation and Onno Hansen - Ezzev Foundation.
In the initiating stage, as well as during the implementation, an adult ought to consider adopting
an attitude, which at the very beginning of the project takes two key assumptions into
consideration:
1. "Think of yourself as a tool" - this applies to the teacher’s self - improvement – tools need to be
improved, therefore it is advisable to develop and educate oneself, to improve professional skills as
well as skills useful when working with young people. This assumption can also have another
aspect: if one can convince young people to follow this approach at an early age, they will learn
the value and power of self-development.
2. "I'm part of the problem" – this approach ought to facilitate the work and cause more
credibility of an adult in relationship with youth. This is a difficult approach to one’s work, because
it is assumed that in most problematic situations related to the student, the teacher can have their
distinct contribution - not necessarily positive. Consequently, if a student does not understand the
topic of a lesson, before giving a grade, the teacher analyses what has been done and what has
not been done in order for the student to make progress.
It is vital to keep in mind the 3 principles of working with children and youth
1. Good replaces evil.
Focusing children's energy on performing tasks and socially useful activities that build their selfesteem helps to eliminate behavioural problems..
2. Real life.
Developing social skills takes place through the tasks carried out in the natural environment of the
child. This contributes to a real change in the relationship of the child with the society.
3. Pay It Forward.
89

Children use the competences they have developed for the benefit of others.
To conclude, I would like to draw attention to a few issues, the inclusion of which had a beneficial effect on
working with children.

1. Create a ritual - make sure you save enough time to talk individually with the pupils, and for a
discussion with the whole group about the difficulties, needs and ideas (it can be once a month, but
it must be clearly defined, e.g. during the first lesson of the month) - kids love rituals, secrets,
uniqueness.

2. Jointly create a list of topics for discussion that are important for the children and talk them over
during the school year - let the children prepare the meeting and give them a possibility to invite
guests, teachers, parents (not only does the inclusion of parents have a beneficial effect on the
children’s self – confidence, but it also enables parents to become more easily and closely
involved in other school activities).

3. Media literacy - using the skills of the participants and becoming familiarised with the online
world - the Internet and the media can be of help, as they allow for a better understanding of the
children’s needs and their online identity (and also allows for self-education along the way).

The above described group is very specific, not only because of the age, but also because it is the
first generation that was born when the Internet was already widespread. Hence, it is something
ordinary and natural for them, just one of the tools to use, to have fun with, and to learn from.
They do not really see it as a risk the adults talk about. The online reality is also a place where
children spend a lot of time and where, just as in the "real world", the same communication skills,
and the ability of maintaining a dialogue are needed.
Good practices 12-14
Dialogue lessons based on The Project-Based Learning Method:
Drawing upon the experience of experts working with the youth, I would like to suggest a good
practice in working with young people in the area of communication. The time of adolescence, and
thus the period of learning in middle school is a special time for learning the skill of dialogue,
which both the youth and adults simply lack. Each of these age groups has its own explanation for
this situation - both worth listening to and reflecting on.
Young people usually believe that most adults do not understand them or are just plain stupid,
while adults say that young people are arrogant (‘we were not like them’), and that it is all because
of the Internet which is dangerous (at least there is an excuse) or the school system which set up
middle schools and thus isolated a very specific and demanding period of development (both for
young people and their caregivers).
During this period the parent is often at a loss, and, motivated by love or helplessness, begins
seeking for help, reading guides, self-educating, in order to understand the child. In turn, a teacher
neither willing to understand the child nor to improve his teaching skills, gets angry or may
become burned-out, which often results in mutual frustration and lack of any benefits on both
sides (adult / youth).
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It is worth remembering that children this age are self-centred and experience the world, school,
and family issues from their subjective point of view. The questions that they ask are not easy and
could on occasion be waking fear, e.g.: Who am I?, Who am I going to become?, Who am I to
others?, How do others see me?, Who do I want to be? etc.
The proposed good practice is one of the methods that can be used to start a dialogue and in my
opinion has at least two advantages.
Firstly, it can stimulate young people to look at themselves and learn skills that may prove crucial in
their professional, personal and social life. Secondly, a skilful and clever introduction to the theme
by an adult / teacher can promote dialogue between teachers and children. Later on, the children
may use this experience when encountering other adults.
While deciding to initiate the dialogue and to use the proposed good practice, you may use the
prophylactic approach based on the Project-Based Learning Method, which draws from personal
experiences of professionals who work with youth on a daily basis.
Suggested stages of implementation and preparation:
6. A diagnosis of the groups’ current needs
If you decide to diagnose the current needs of the group, try to answer a few questions, which are
a mini-diagnosis of the group you work with. While looking for an answer, use individual
interviews, group discussions, observation and suggestions from other people you work with.
Examples of areas to be checked may include (keeping to the topic of Dialogue):











What are the difficulties young people lately experience?
What are they not able to do?
What seems to be disturbing, destructive about their behaviour?
What works and what does not work?
What kind of activities do they willingly take part in?
What questions do they ask?
What are they not aware of and do not understand?
What issues are they currently interested in?
What do they do spontaneously?
What are they suggesting, what do they ask for?
What surprises you in their behaviour?
What are the underlying problems and needs of these "signals"?

7. Long-term diagnosis: key questions
When thinking about prevention, consider whether it is worth to ask yourself a few questions e.g.:
What do your mentees need to learn? What skills should they acquire? Who are they supposed to
be in the future? When looking ahead at working with young people during a three year period of
middle school, one might begin the "process of change", nevertheless it is worth remembering
that the process needs to be monitored and watched over.
Examples of questions that can help in thinking about the long-term operation ought to include:




What kind of future do you want for your mentees?
Who are they going to be in a few years’ time?
What are the social roles they play in the family, at work, in their community?
How do they behave, relate to others, fulfil their responsibilities?
How are they perceived by others?

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What do the children need to make this vision of the future possible?
In what situations can the children gain the knowledge, the skills and competencies they need?
What experience do they need?

8. Initiation
After answering the above mentioned questions and deciding to start a project in this form, you
initiate a phase during which, together with the children, you define the subject matter, e.g.: How
to talk to each other? What is dialogue? How to be a friend / colleague? (the theme is the result of
a mini – diagnosis). It is worth to save enough time for conversations and discussions, so that
everyone can speak and understand the topic/issue you will deal with.
Do not rush. The more time you spend on the discussion, the less resistance due to ignorance and
reluctance there will be later. Give the youth initiative, do not impose your ideas, resolve only to
making suggestions. Assume that there are no bad solutions, they only need to be checked and
possibly changed, and the decision is to be made by the whole group.
At this stage, the following issues are worth emphasising:







The attitude of an adult: faith in children, enthusiasm and commitment
Showing the youth, what may change as a result of initiatives taken by them
It must be a real, socially useful activity
Preparation – setting up specific stages (task delegation, the appearance of coordinators,
scheduling, communication methods)
A respected and significant person (educator, volunteer, priest, manager...) gives meaning to an
event, a situation, tells the children what needs to be prepared, asks the children how to do it? (e.g.
we want to make a music video, how should it look like and how can we do it?)
The message, which contains an element of uniqueness and mystery
Openness to ideas of young people to affirm their belief that it's a good initiative
Giving young people responsibility for the activities, situations...

9. Implementation
It is worth remembering to be a wise adult. Contrary to the stereotypical opinion, there are few
people on whom the youth can rely on and be understood. It is a developmental period in which
the teacher can quickly become an authority and an example to follow. Consequently, it is a big
responsibility, nevertheless it is worth to accept it, as the child can build the capacity and
confidence which is useful in later stages of development. This stage requires:





Assessing the children and their abilities - check who can do what and if they want to do it
Cooperating with the community - on whom can you count - the people?, institutions and
organizations?
Reassuring the project participants - supporting, motivating, convincing
Resolving conflicts - be a negotiator
Motivating further activities - supporting new ideas, encouraging
Supervising and providing assistance – remember that you are important for children

10. Summary - evaluation and conclusions
During this stage the activity is summarised and the ability to reflect on the previous experiences
(which is a particularly important social skill) is being learned. This stage can also be the moment
to start a new topic with the children.
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Summary of every activity/conversation with children: "What did we manage to do?", "How do you
feel about the things we did?"
Appreciation of the group and individual participants
Building a positive identity: "You are the person who ...", "We are a group that ..."
External presentation of the results!
A discussion about plans: “What plans have you got for the future?”

The proposed good practice is developed as a combination of assumptions and methods regarding
education and prevention, in cooperation with the project partners: Beata Staszyńska - Citizen
Project Foundation and Onno Hansen - Ezzev Foundation.
In the initiating stage, as well as during the implementation, an adult ought to consider adopting
an attitude, which at the very beginning of the project takes two key assumptions into
consideration:
1. "Think of yourself as a tool" - this applies to the teacher’s self – improvement. Having in mind
that tools need to be improved, it is advisable to develop and educate oneself, to improve
professional skills as well as skills useful when working with young people. This assumption can
also have another aspect: if one can convince young people to follow this approach at an early age,
they will learn the value and power of self-development.
2. "I'm part of the problem" – this approach ought to facilitate the work and cause more
credibility of an adult in relationship with youth. This is a difficult approach to one’s work, because
it is assumed that in most problematic situations related to the student, the teacher can have their
distinct contribution - not necessarily positive. Consequently, if a student does not understand the
topic of a lesson, before giving a grade, the teacher analyses what has been done and what has
not been done in order for the student to make progress.
It is vital to keep in mind the 3 principles of working with children and youth
1. Good replaces evil.
Focusing children's energy on performing tasks and socially useful activities that build their selfesteem helps to eliminate behavioural problems..
2. Real life.
Developing social skills takes place through the tasks carried out in the natural environment of the
child. This contributes to a real change in the relationship of the child and the society.
3. Pay It Forward.
Children use the competences they have developed for the benefit of others.

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BACKGROUND TO SESSION 3
Introduction
In session three new technologies are discussed: educational technologies and Augmented Reality.
In addition you’ll focus on how teachers could create an Augmented Reality game themselves.
Educational technologies [8-11; 12-14]
Educational technology, also known as instructional technology, information and communication
technology (ICT) in education, EdTech, and learning technology, is "the study and ethical practice
of facilitating learning and improving performance by creating, using and managing appropriate
technological processes and resources." (Richey, 2008)
Approaches

There are three prominent approaches towards educational technology. The distinction is made by
the channels utilized for the delivery of the learning result.
More in particular the basic distinctions made with regards to the educational technology types
are the following:

Figure 1: Educational technologies (ICT) approaches

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Hardware Approach
The hardware approach focuses on the technical/physical medium through which learning results
can be achieved.
The particular approach is product oriented and focuses on the development of learning machines
i.e. audio-visual aid material such as computers, sophisticated gadgets etc.

Figure 2: Example of a pre-school learning machine

Software Approach
This approach focuses on the didactics and learning methods with which learning results can be
obtained. The cornerstones of the software approach are behavioural sciences and psychology.
Emphasis is given to the ways in which students learn. The advantage of this approach is that a vast
variety of typical and non-typical learning tools can be used by the educator in the learning
procedure as long as they are utilized in the proper educational framework.

System Approach
The system approach is a relatively new approach that focuses on the learning process in a more
systemic and integrated context.
This approach considers the overall school environment as a system. The classrooms, faculty,
student groups etc. are considered sub-units of this system. This system approach focuses on:





Identifying and stating the goals to be achieved;
Identifying the processes, methods, techniques and strategies that may be most relevant to
achieving the predetermined goals;
Building up theoretical foundation justifying the relevance of these processes to achieving the
goals;
Determining specific interactions visualized existing among various other components of inputs;
Specifying the various kinds of controls needed in the total system at different points; and
Keeping the whole in mind all the time while preparing the model or the system.

It acts as a link between hardware and software approach. It is also known as 'Management
Technology'. It has brought to educational management a scientific approach for solving
educational administrative problems.

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It is essentially a new management approach, influencing management decisions in business,
industry and education. Education is regarded as a system while the system approach is a
systematic way of designing an effective and economical educational system.
The IDentifEYE project addresses the development of the appropriate software that acts in
accordance with hardware (Software and Hardware approach) and examines how the project
results can be integrated in school systems (System approach).
Current Trends

According to 2013 survey results from the 2013 Speak-Up Survey from the project Tomorrow,
which CEO Julie Evans revealed at the FETC 2014 conference the following trends were considered
to have the most significant impact on the school classrooms for the aforementioned year in the
United States schools.
Personal Access to Mobile Devices: Mobile devices have already become an integral part of our
everyday and social lives even. Educational approaches need to be organic and adaptable. Mobile
devices when introduced into the curriculum properly can provide powerful learning results.
According to this research: Sixty percent of students are using mobile devices for anytime research,
43 percent for educational games and 40 percent for collaboration with their peers. Thirty-three
percent of the students surveyed use mobile devices for reminders and alerts related to their
academic lives, 24 percent for taking photos of their assignments, and 18 percent for in-class
polling.
Surprisingly, said Evans, 12 percent of the students responding said they use mobile devices to text
questions to their instructors while in the classroom.
Internet Connectivity: Connection to the World Wide Web is a fundamental right in some
countries. Internet connection is already an essential part of many school curriculums and most of
students use the Internet for everyday homework.
Use of Video for Classwork and Homework: Learning tools that use audio visual have the power
to convey large amounts of information to learners in a way that is both fast and effective. That
particular trend has been in use for several years now; the only new tool introduced is new devices
(mostly portable).
Social Media in Schools: More and more schools had adopted social media and Web 2.0 tools in
general (blogs, wikis, social networks, etc.).
An increased Interest in Online Learning: Learning management systems like Moodle are on the
rise not only in informal contexts but also in formal contexts such as universities and schools. Their
use is expected to be established even more.
Using Different Tools for Different Tasks: Rather than using one or even a few platforms for
various tasks, students are increasingly savvy about taking advantage of the benefits of the tools
available. “We find them using video, social media and cell phones for communications; they use
e-readers for reading texts and articles; they write, take notes and do research on laptops. But,”
she paused, “where does that leave tablets?” According to Evans, tablets were the second or third
choice device for completing many of the academic tasks students are faced with. “They like the
devices,” she noted, “but they are more focused on using the right tool for the task at hand,” and
many times tablets don’t seem to fit.
Paying Attention to the Digital Footprint: Digital footprint was a new research area for the 2013
survey and, according to Evans, showed some interesting results. Sixty-four percent of high school
students responding admitted to being careful about the things they post online; 39 percent said
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they advise friends about the content they post, with 32 percent saying they stopped interacting
with friends who post inappropriate content online. Finally, 44 percent of high school students said
they believe a positive digital profile is an important part of their future.
Gaming is Growing, and the Gender Gap is Closed: This year’s results showed 60 percent of
students using laptops as a gaming device. Cell phones and game consoles tied with 54 percent
use, while tablets clocked in at 44 percent.
Of particular note is students’ interest in taking gaming technology and applying it to learning
difficult concepts, as well as their interest in using games as a way to explore career opportunities.
Evans also noted no gender difference in students’ interest in games, with younger girls actually
showing more gaming activity than their male counterparts.
What Devices Belong in 'The Ultimate School?': The final piece of data Evans shared focused on
students’ ranking of the relative importance of devices in their classroom experience. Fifty-six
percent of students said laptops were most important; 51 percent chose digital readers; and 48
percent selected tablets.
As for the current ICT trends in European schools, they share similar orientations, but the focus is
given more on:
 Students’ soft skills development (communication, leadership etc.);
 Acquisition of key competences by the students;

Focusing on teacher training.

Emerging trends

The pace of change and development in education has picked up substantially in recent years –
largely because of the key role ICT is increasingly playing in both teaching and learning.
To think that only a few years ago we lived in a world with no social networks – today these
constitute a vital part of our, and even more, our youngsters’ lives. One can hardly imagine a
student unable to use a computer when they leave school. This is why predicting what the trends
in European education will be in the coming years is almost impossible.
Cloud computing: However, there are some obvious developments, such as the latest phrase du
jour: cloud computing. With applications increasingly moving from your desktop computer to the
internet, cloud computing represent a revolution in how IT services are delivered. It allows users to
scale and virtualize resources over the Internet, carrying immense implications for the education
sector, in particular as it is likely to dramatically reduce costs for institutions such as schools.
Gaming: Gaming is probably a surprising area to include, however games – or rather so called
serious games or educational games, if done right, can become a powerful tool to get groups to
work together, increase social interaction and civic engagement among youth. Gaming also allows
learners to "fail to success". This concept of failing forward allows learners to test their limits in a
safe environment. In addition, gaming increases muscle memory, or the rehearsal necessary to
solidify correct behaviour. Finally, gaming increases an internal and external competitive spirit
related to learning opportunities.
Mobile devices: New advances in hardware and software are making mobile “smart phones”
indispensible tools – in schools as much as elsewhere. Just as cell phones have leapfrogged fixed
line technology in the telecommunications industry, it is likely that mobile devices with internet
access and computing capabilities will become a valuable tool along with the personal computers
as the information appliance of choice in the classroom.
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One-to-one computing: One-to-one computing describes a notion that every child should be given
a computer or a device that would allow them to have universal access to technology. One-to-one
computing will give the student access to knowledge anytime anywhere and it gives the teacher
the possibility to personalize the learning to suit the single student’s learning style. Also some of
the benefits associated with this notion include increasing student achievement and engagement.
However, it is particularly important to development of the workforce of the future. An example of
this trend is the one laptop per student initiative: http://one.laptop.org/
Emergence of free online courses and the move towards providing credits and credentials for
them: If one pays even the slightest bit of attention to the education media, it’s impossible to miss
the recent mention of MOOCs (“Massively Open Online Courses”) in one article after another. Of
course, MOOCs are just one option for learning – not all free courses are MOOCs (and not all
MOOCs are free). A particularly intriguing aspect of this discussion is the move to provide formal
credits or credentials for these courses, which seems to be picking up traction.
Student Response Systems (SRS), polling apps, and other synchronous tools to increase
interaction and engagement in both online courses and ground courses: Smartphones and tablets
can work as SRS tools, and a history of responses can provide learning analytics that help teachers
focus on which topics need the most reinforcement (an idea that also happens to go hand in hand
with the flipped classroom). SRS’s have been around for years and they have been gradually
gaining popularity as a classroom tool, but what seems to be ‘emerging’ about the concept is the
move towards using more common, less proprietary devices to access these classroom interactivity
and assessment apps, and the growing number of innovative applications like Lecture Tools and
LearningCatalytics.
OER (Open Educational Resources): While OER has not necessarily seen the increases in popularity
and adoption over the last year that some of the technology-based ideas above have, it continues
to hold tremendous potential, and only more so as the quality and quantity of offerings continue
to improve. OER is a transformational idea that can play an important role in changing the nature,
availability, and costs of educational materials, content, and tools.
Learning Analytics: Yet another technology that has really begun to gain momentum over the last
year or so, and is clearly focused on enhancing learning outcomes by leveraging data. Learning
Analytics may only be emerging from its infancy, but the growing number of institutions and
organizations working to deliver and leverage the concept positions it as one of the top
technologies that can help to deliver on the promise of increasing the efficiency and effectiveness
of instruction through the thoughtful and informed application of information technologies.
All in all, it seems that one of the few things that can be said for sure is that ICT is more critical to
education now than ever before and likely to increase in its importance. Today, computers,
software and the internet aren’t simply part of the educational process, they are embedded in it.
With the emergence of increasingly robust connectivity infrastructure and cheaper computers,
school systems around the world are developing the ability to provide learning opportunities to
students “anytime, anywhere”. ICT has already transformed how we access information and that
has in turn transformed the skills our educated people require.
Web 2.0

Definition: Web 2.0 is the network as platform, spanning all connected devices; Web 2.0
applications are those that make the most of the intrinsic advantages of that platform: delivering
software as a continually-updated service that gets better the more people use it, consuming and
remixing data from multiple sources, including individual users, while providing their own data and
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services in a form that allows remixing by others, creating network effects through an “architecture
of participation,” and going beyond the page metaphor of Web 1.0 to deliver rich user experiences.
(O’ Reilly T., 2005)

Figure 3: Web 2.0 Meme Map

Figure 4: Web 2.0 - Key points

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Web 2.0 tools
Web 2.0 consists of a set of certain technologies. There are more categories (e.g. virtual worlds)
than that are explained below but, the following were chosen as they facilitate the needs of the
target group.
Blogs: The term web-log, or blog, was coined by Jorn Barger in 1997 and refers to a simple
webpage consisting of brief paragraphs of opinion, information, personal diary entries, or links,
called posts, arranged chronologically with the most recent first, in the style of an online journal
(Doctorow et al., 2002).
Wikis: A wiki is a webpage or set of webpages that can be easily edited by anyone who is allowed
access (Ebersbach et al., 2006). Wikipedia’s popular success has meant that the concept of the
wiki, as a collaborative tool that facilitates the production of a group work, is widely understood.
Tagging and social bookmarking applications: Social bookmarking systems share a number of
common features (Millen et al., 2005): They allow users to create lists of ‘bookmarks’ or
‘favourites’, to store these centrally on a remote service (rather than within the client browser)
and to share them with other users of the system (the ‘social’ aspect).
Multimedia sharing: One of the biggest growth areas has been amongst services that facilitate the
storage and sharing of multimedia content. Well known examples include YouTube (video) Flickr
(photographs) and Odeo (podcasts).
Audio blogging and podcasting: Podcasts are audio recordings, usually in MP3 format, of talks,
interviews and lectures, which can be played either on a desktop computer or on a wide range of
handheld MP3 devices.
Social networks: Professional and social networking sites that facilitate meeting people, finding
like minds, sharing content—uses ideas from harnessing the power of the crowd, network effect
and individual production/user generated content.
Collaboration services: Collaborative, Web-based project and work group productivity tools which
use architecture of participation.
Office-like applications: Web-based desktop application/document tools. Replicate desktop
applications. They are continually renewed based on technological developments.
Aggregation services: Gather information from diverse sources across the Web and publish in one
place. Includes news and RSS feed aggregators and tools that create a single webpage with all your
feeds and email in one place— uses ideas from individual production/user generated content.

Why implement Web 2.0 tools
Web 2.0 tools are ideal for enhancing the so-called 21st century skills (i.e. the necessary skillset that
a today’s student), since:






They support collaboration across time and space;
They are easily accessible and easy to use;
Many people already have a comfort level using them;
They are low-cost (sometimes even free);
They do not require much IT support;
They have very little “downtime”;
Because they are inexpensive and easy to use, there is little risk in trying them.

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The table below illustrates the 21st century skills and what Web 2.0 tools can be utilized to develop
these skills.
Table 1: 21st century skills and supportive tools

Types of skills

21st cent. Skills

Learning Skills

Supporting Web 2.0 tools


Critical Thinking
Creative Thinking
Collaborating
Communicating


Literacy Skills

Information Literacy
Media Literacy
Technology Literacy






Life Skills




Flexibility
Initiative
Social Skills
Productivity
Leadership





Good practices
WEB 2.0 TOOLS

Blogs
Wikis
Tagging and social
bookmarking
applications
Multimedia sharing
Collaboration &
Communication
services
Aggregation services
Blogs
Wikis
Tagging and social
bookmarking
applications
Multimedia sharing
Collaboration &
Communication
services
Office-like applications
Aggregation services
Wikis
Tagging and social
bookmarking
applications
Multimedia sharing
Audio blogging and
podcasting
Social networks
Collaboration &
Communication
services
Aggregation services

TOOLS & SUGGESTED USE

Blogs


Blogger: Professional e-portfolio www.blogger.com
Wordpress: Professional e-portfolio www.wordpress.org

Wikis

Wikipedia: Info management and sharing www.wikipedia.org

Tagging and social
bookmarking
applications


Delicious: Info management and sharing www.delicious.com
Diigo: Info management and sharing www.diigo.com

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Social networks


LinkedIn: Personal and professional networks www.linkedin.com
Instagram: Personal and professional networks
www.instagram.com
Twitter: Personal and professional networks www.twitter.com
Google+: Personal and professional networks
www.plus.google.com

Edmodo: Info management and sharing www.edmodo.com
Fotobabble: Communication skills development
www.fotobabble.com
Vimeo: Info management and sharing www.vimeo.com

Audio blogging and
podcasting


AudioBoo: Communication skills development www.audioboo.fm
iPadio: Communication skills development www.ipadio.com

Collaboration &
Communication
services







Google Docs: Effective collaboration www.drive.google.com
Google Drive: Effective collaboration www.drive.google.com
Dropbox: Effective collaboration www.dropbox.com
YouTube: Info management and sharing www.youtube.com
Clilstore: Communication without barriers www.multidict.net
Skype: Communication without barriers www.skype.com
WhatsApp: Communication without barriers www.whatsapp.com

Khan Academy: Info management and sharing
www.khanacademy.org
Google Maps: Info management and sharing
www.google.com/maps
Scoop.it: Info management and sharing www.scoop.it
Paper.li: Info management and sharing www.paper.li
Google Alerts: Info management and sharing
www.google.com/alerts

Multimedia sharing



Aggregation services



Office-like
applications





Mind24: Engaging presentations www.mind24.com
Prezi: Engaging presentations www.prezi.com
Screenr: Engaging presentations www.screenr.com
Slideshare: Engaging presentations www.slideshare.net
GoAnimate: Engaging presentations www.goanimate.com

Reflection tools



IDentifEYE AR game: Serous game
8-11: http://identifeye.ezzev.eu/
12-14: http://id-eye2.ezzev.eu/

Impact on teacher’s profession

Subject matter and didactic knowledge is not enough; teachers must have supervisory and
guidance skills as well. The ability to work in a team, to organize and to plan is important. It will
become increasingly taken for granted that teachers have basic ICT skills.

Competences and skills
The teacher in this scenario is a tutor who facilitates the learning process of the group and the
individual students, employing all her/his creativity.

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Pedagogical knowledge and skills and subject knowledge in a broad field are expected of teachers.
They become ‘educational designers’, preparing not lessons but projects. This makes planning and
coordination skills important. These projects cross the customary boundaries between disciplines
and subjects which necessitates intensive cooperation between teachers. Consultation with
colleagues from the same and other schools is important in preparing and implementing projects.
Subject specializations and specific teaching skills are utilized in implementing particular methods
of working. The roles of instructor, trainer, coach, etc., are important in this scenario too. In
addition teachers are adept at prompting and holding discussions with students about meaningful
questions. Internet plays an important role in communication between teachers. Ideas are
presented and discussed. In this way teachers have access to the ideas and materials of others, a
source of inspiration for lessons and projects.

Figure 5: The portrait of the networked teacher

Playing the Augmented Reality game [8-11; 12-14]
Definition: Augmented Reality (AR) consists of a real-time video stream generated by a camera to
which digital elements are added that appear in reaction to a predefined trigger.

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Augmented Reality as a technology is not new. During the twentieth century AR components were
conceived from the nineteen fifties onwards. In the nineteen sixties and seventies the first AR
applications appeared while in the nineteen nineties the term “Augmented Reality” was coined.
But it was only from 2009 that it slowly started to take off as a mass consumption technology.
Despite large-scale implementations by for instance IKEA and McDonald’s the technology has
remained a fringe technology in the consumer market.
In education AR is being used to stimulate interest in our surroundings by adding digital
information to physical objects – as seen on our smartphone screen, tablet screen or computer
screen - by means of digital Post-It-like labels. This digital information can refer to objects that are
registered on our screens such as mountains. The digital information concerns for instance the
name of the mountain or its height. The digital information can also refer to objects that are
invisible on our screen because they are blocked by other objects – for instance metro stations that
are a few blocks away – or that were once here in another era.
This use of AR in education is being popularized by teachers in the United States but also in Europe
and beyond.
The Augmented Reality game [8-11]
The IDentifEYE AR game is to evoke interest in our online identities. The game stimulates the
emerging relationship between our online data sharing and our online identities.
“Emergence” is a specific kind of causal relationship between two processes (one process leading
logically to the other), in this case between online data sharing and online identities. The
relationship is causal but the concrete causality cannot be established. It is impossible to pinpoint
how the causality exactly works.
Think of emergence in the following way. If you would be reading the rules of a game to play you
can try to imagine how it would be to play this game. Nevertheless, you will never succeed in
predicting how it is to play the game. The experience of playing is always different than imagined
before. Although the experience of playing the game is evoked by following the rules of the game
it cannot be logically derived from these rules.
The AR game also is a kind of emergent. Visual digital elements (augmentations) appear as a
response to answers given in the game. These visual elements together build the representation of
our online identity that emerges from the game answers on data sharing. Still, the direct
relationship between the answers and the augmentations is not clear. This lack of clarity is to
reflect the lack of clarity in the online identity building process and is to evoke questions and
reflections.
The Augmented Reality game [12-14]
The IDentifEYE AR game is to evoke interest in our online identities. The game stimulates the
emerging relationship between didactics that are employed by the teacher and the atmosphere in
the class room.
“Emergence” is a specific kind of causal relationship between two processes (one process leading
logically to the other), in this case between didactics and class room atmosphere. The relationship
is causal but the concrete causality cannot be established. It is impossible to pinpoint how the
exactly causality works.
Think of emergence in the following way. If you would be reading the rules of a game to play you
can try to imagine how it would be to play this game. Nevertheless, you will never succeed in
predicting how it is to play the game. The experience of playing is always different than imagined
before.
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Although the experience of playing the game is evoked by following the rules of the game it cannot
be logically derived from these rules.
The AR game also is a kind of emergent. Visual digital elements (augmentations) appear as a
response to answers given in the game. These visual elements together build the representation of
our online identity that emerges from the game answers on data sharing. Still, the direct
relationship between the answers and the augmentations is not clear. This lack of clarity is to
reflect the lack of clarity in way the atmosphere in the class room is trigged by the didactics chosen
by the teacher and is to evoke questions and reflections.
Creating an AR game
Disclaimer
In order to create their own game teachers must get into contact with the project partners –
contact Mr. Onno Hansen: onno.hansen@gmail.com. Teachers need to order a copy of the game
and install this copy on their own server – or request that it will be hosted by IDentifEYE.
Unfortunately the creation of a copy and the optional hosting are not free. For the actual
conditions and terms of use, please check out our site.
The copy of the game consists of a CMS that links directly to the IDentifEYE game engine. In the
CMS teachers can add, edit and delete questions, answer options, augmentations, texts, sounds
and static pages and blocks – in up to four different languages simultaneously. Optionally the game
interface can be personalized, again for a fee.
Introduction
In order to create one’s own game one need to understand the essence of the game. It is a
multiple choice questionnaire in which the game immediately reacts to the individual answers
given. In the game there are no scores or levels. It is not about winning or losing. Rather it provides
an experience.
The game is a great tool to:


Start a conversation on a “hard” subject;
Trigger understanding of an abstract subject;
Change the tone of an ongoing discussion.

STEP ONE: Establish a theme
Before one does anything else one needs to choose a subject for the game:


A concrete “hard” subject about which it seems difficult to talk in the class room, for instance
because it is too personal or too controversial. Our didactics game for the age group 12-14 is an
example.
An abstract subject that needs a lot of visualization to become more accessible. Our game on the
relation between online data sharing and online identities for the age group 8-11 is an example.
An ongoing discussion that has derailed and needs a change of tone. An example could be a game
about how to understand the school regulation.

Age group differentiation:

For students in age group 8-11 more individual themes are relevant. Too abstract themes should be
avoided.
For students in age group 12-14 more social themes are relevant: themes that have to do with
social norms or group processes. The themes can be abstract but should have a direct link to the
daily life of one’s students.

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STEP TWO: Create questions
As soon as one has established a theme for the game one can start to create the questions for the
game. The optimal amount of questions is eight to fourteen. Only if a subject is abstract and of
great interest to one’s students one could create up to twenty questions.
There are several methods to create relevant game questions:

Break down the chosen theme in smaller steps and then allocate one question per step.
Create a lot of questions that are relevant for your target group and let representatives of the target
group select the most relevant questions.

Basically, there are two types of questions one could create:

Diagnostic questions – see the didactics section – to check whether one’s students have understood
knowledge that was transferred to them.
Survey questions to poll student opinions on the chosen theme. The both IDentifEYE games are
examples of this type.

Age differentiation:

For students in age group 8-11 it is advisable to choose diagnostic questions or personal survey
questions that directly link to personal student experiences.
For students in age group 12-14 it is advisable to choose diagnostic questions or more abstract
survey questions.

NB The second question in the game always is associated with the player taking a picture or not.
This is a system question that is hardcoded in the game.
STEP 3: Create answer options

Diagnostic questions require answer options in which one answer option represents the right
interpretation of the knowledge transferred while one or more other answer options represent
assumed student prejudices and false assumptions that might have survived despite the knowledge
transferred.
Survey questions require a set of answer options that are relevant for the target group. Students
will react negatively if an answer option is irrelevant or, worse, if a relevant answer option is
missing. It is advisable to check one’s answer options against representatives of the target group
when drafting.

STEP 4: Create augmentations per answer option
Once the answer options have been drafted one needs to create augmentations for each of them
individually. One could do this one’s self or involve a graphic designer in this. For the technical
specs of the augmentations, please read section Creating an AR game.
One has to choose between several options – for the implementation of these options see section
Creating an AR game:


Static or dynamic: the augmentations can remain placed motionless at the same space on the
screen or can be ordered to follow the head of the individual playing the game.
Temporary or permanent: the augmentations can be made to last only until the individual who
plays the game answers the next question or can be allowed to stay until the end of the game.
Replacing or additional: the augmentations can replace any previous augmentation that was
triggered by an earlier answer option or can be added to the existing set of augmentations on the
screen. The replacing option is tricky to implement though. One needs to define the earlier
augmentation or augmentations that one wants to replace by means of a layer code. If one would

106

just define the new augmentation to present itself on the same place as a previous augmentation or
augmentations the new augmentation will either overlap or immediately be overlapped depending
on the layer code number – see the section Creating an AR game.
Animated or static: one can create augmentations that consist of one image only or animations that
change form and/ or placement. The trick to animate augmentations is to upload more than one
image in the CMS as augmentations associated to the relevant answer option. The multiple pictures
will then be played at a speed of 12 images per second – just as film frames are played to create a
film.

It is a good practice to define the augmentations associated with answer options linked to one
single question in such a way that they cover more or less the same space on the screen. This way
it is easier to keep an oversight over all the subsequently appearing augmentations, question after
question. An example of this good practice is a design like this in which “1” stands for all answer
options associated with question 1, “2” for all options associated with question 2 etc.:

Age differentiation:

For students in age group 8-11 it is advisable to create cartoon-like, colourful animations – at best
many appearing at the same time. Students in that age group also generally like lots of movement,
temporary chaos and “naughty”/ funny animations.
For students in age group 12-14 it is advisable to create more realistic, more serious and “arty”
augmentations – especially for 14-years old students. There should be controlled movement and a
sense of overall organization in the way that augmentations are placed on the screen.

107

STEP 5 [optional]: Create texts and sounds
In addition to augmentation one can also add, optionally texts (“Ticker tape texts”) and sound files
to individual answer options. The texts will be shown in the tickertape at the top of the screen. The
sounds will be played temporary when the associated augmentation appears.
NB Be careful with adding heavy sound files. They might interfere with the game performance.
STEP 6: Create static blocks and pages
One can add one’s own texts in the CMS that will appear on the game start page and on additional
pages – so-called “static texts”. The texts could consist of an introduction on the theme as well as
an explanation on how to play the game.
STEP 7 [optional]: Translate
Once one has entered all the necessary content in one’s own language – questions and answers,
static texts and user interface items – one can translate these texts in up to three languages.
NB If one chooses to add a language beyond the current default languages (English, Greek,
Polish, Spanish, Lithuanian and Dutch) one should contact us for changing the flag in the game
linking to that translation. This is not cost-free.
STEP 8: Create a lesson plan
The game one creates is half of the job, creating an appropriate lesson plan is the other half. One
creates the lesson plan by filling out the workshop lesson plan template – see the session 3
description section for your relevant age group.
Age group differentiation

For students in age group 8-11 it is advisable to first provide an introduction, both to the chosen
theme and the game and then play the game for at least twenty minutes. During the game play
there should be enough time for students to relate their personal experiences and for the
occasional discussion. It is advisable to end the lesson with a “to do” task such as drawing or
retrieving information online.

For students in age group 12-14 it is advisable to first provide an introduction, both to the
chosen theme and the game and then play the game for a maximum of fifteen minutes.
During the game play the teacher is to listen very carefully to all remarks by the students
and their contributions to emerging discussions. The teacher is to come back to those in a
more organized way after the game during a structured discussion. The teacher should
include space for student reviews of the game. Then the teacher could end the lesson by
asking students to write down their suggestions for improvement while explaining the
background of their suggestions.

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WHAT IS B.E.L.S.?
Introduction
The creators of the Brain Essential Learning Steps (B.E.L.S.) method define
it as “a consistent thematic approach to teach children curricular content
retained
through
interpretation
and
application”.
[http://www.achildsworldcenters.com/curriculum.html] Rather than a
method to enable a top-down transfer of knowledge B.E.L.S. aims at
empowering the understanding of new information from one’s own
perspective and at empowering learning by experiencing. As such B.E.L.S.
is a fruitful frame for the implementation of the IDentifEYE teaching
workshop that aims to positively impact teachers, students and student online
safety by means of letting teachings try out and evaluate new good practices.

B.E.L.S. finds its origin in neuroscience. Author Andrea Seidman and her team at the A Child’s
World Center, came up with the method “to bring the world a new pedagogy that would make
teaching
the
way
the
brain
learns
the
new
paradigm
in
education”.
[http://www.achildsworldcenters.com/about-us.html] This means that the method is in constant
flux.
B.E.L.S. was at first implemented by a Child’s World as an early care and early education method.
Later on the method was used in all kinds of educational settings
[http://www.pakeysconsulting.com/PDF/4B.E.L.S._Abstract.pdf], including lifelong learning. This is
how B.E.L.S. is used in the IDentifEYE workshop: as a method for lifelong learning.
Skills
The following lifelong learning skills are developed
[http://www.achildsworldcenters.com/curriculum.html]:
 Problem Solving;
 Risk Taking;
 Cooperative Learning;
 Creativity;
 Cognitive Responsibility Systems.
Four steps
There are four Brain Essential Learning Steps:



B.E.L.S. 1: Providing an introduction on a subject;
B.E.L.S. 2: Brainstorm and list ideas connected to the subject;
B.E.L.S. 3: Create a plan for action on the subject;
B.E.L.S. 4. Implement the plan for action.

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by

means

of

B.E.L.S.

The first Brain Essential Learning Step can be described as follows
[http://www.pakeysconsulting.com/PDF/4B.E.L.S._Abstract.pdf]: “This is the
introduction to the learning unit, theme, specific curricular content or
subject. The fact-finding begins here.” The step may concern a broad subject
or a sub-subject. The step helps participants to “begin exploring what they
know about the topic”.
In the IDentifEYE workshop the first step takes place during the introductions
of the themes during the first three sessions.

B.E.L.S. 2 concerns collaborative brainstorming:: “List the activities on your
mind map that reinforce the theme, topic, concept you are teaching – This
step should include visual, auditory and kinesthetic exercises. Brainstorm and
list ideas related to the main topic. The ideas include each student’s
understanding of the topic, each student’s personal knowledge and
experience on the topic, and each student’s evolving ideas for a working plan
as each student builds ideas on the contributions of the members in the
class.” [http://www.pakeysconsulting.com/PDF/4B.E.L.S._Abstract.pdf]
The second step is in implemented in the workshop in the form of a
discussion after each introduction.
B.E.L.S. 3 is about developing a learning plan: “It is time to plan how to use
the information introduced and learned. This step requires the student to
interpret the facts and concepts for application. The focus in this step is why
this information is relevant to the class and to each of its members. Relevance
is basic or more abstract depending upon the content and the goal of the
lesson. It is always necessary to have students clarify the meaning of the
information for a specific purpose that is personally relevant. Gather the facts
and information together as a group and develop a plan for action. Plan for
action suggestions are: original skits, journal writing, presentations, through
dance, through music, through art displays or through combinations of all
these suggestions. Each student’s strengths are represented in developing the
plan.” [http://www.pakeysconsulting.com/PDF/4B.E.L.S._Abstract.pdf]
The third step takes places in the workshop at the end of session three and
then comprises the whole of session four. Some brainstorm elements (step
two) will still be present as well.
In B.E.L.S. 4 action is taken: “– It is time to use the information and implement
the plan. Should we create a bulletin board display? Should we make
costumes, scenery, props for a show? Are we presenting to an assembly of
other classes? Parents? Community groups? School parade? Class museum?
School display? The possibilities are as numerous as our imaginations will take
us!” [http://www.pakeysconsulting.com/PDF/4B.E.L.S._Abstract.pdf]
The fourth step is executed during the teacher implementation of their lesson
plan at their own school.

Step 5
In the workshop there is a fifth step added to the original B.E.L.S. method: Evaluation. This has
been done because in education good practices can only be good practices when they are tested.
By creating in addition a Best Practices/ Lessons Learned document based on the evaluation the
evaluation results become sustainable.
110

INSTRUCTOR DOCUMENTS
In this section you will find documents that will help you prepare the workshop as an instructor.
The first document, the INSTRUCTOR LOGISTICS, will present you with a step by step overview
what to do and how to prepare. The PROJECT DESCRIPTION will help you, and later your
participants, to remember the aim of the workshop. The RECRUITMENT document will support you
in recruiting teachers. It was drafted by partners who used the document to draft teachers for the
pilot sessions.
The DIAGNOSTIC QUESTIONS document should give you inspiration to create your own diagnostic
question for the workshop, but naturally you are cordially invited to use these to test whether your
transfer of knowledge to your participants was successful.
The PLAYING THE AR GAME documents concern two different games, one for teachers teaching
students in age group 8-11 and one for teachers teaching students in age group 12-14. In both
versions you’ll find playing instructions, the game storyboard and potential interpretations of the
occurring augmentations. Do not attach absolute value to these interpretations – rather think of
your own interpretations or, better yet, invite teachers to come up with creative ideas. The
CREATING AN AR GAME documents help you both functionally and technically set up your own
version of the AR game.
The TEACHER CONSENT FORM is a document you’ll need to distribute to your workshop
participants before the workshop so that you can freely document the workshop while you provide
it.
The last document in this section, INSTRUCTOR EVALUATION, is the evaluation that you should fill
out, to measure the impact of your workshop.

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INSTRUCTOR LOGISTICS
STEPS

TO DO

NB

PRINT DOCUMENTS

Printing organizational documents:
School management approval is
INSTRUCTOR LOGISTICS so that the
essential.
instructors can start preparing
RECRUITMENT PROCESS so that the
instructors can start planning the
recruitment
PROJECT DESCRIPTION for the relevant age
group so all know what the project is about
DECLARATION OF CONSENT so
dissemination material may be produced

CHOOSE DATES

CREATING A DETAILED TIME-TABLE

It is important to leave enough time
(more than a week) between the
first set of sessions (sessions 1 to 4)
and the fifth session (evaluation) so
that teacher have enough time to
prepare their implementation
lesson.

RECRUITING TEACHERS

Follow the RECRUITMENT section

Important to inform the teachers
that they will be recorded on video
and that they need to take pictures
in theit class room. In some
countries the recording in the class
room may be legally (near)
impossible.

PREPARATION

Read the background sections to session 13

ORGANIZE AN INTRO
TEACHER MEETING

Hand out the printed out document
DECLARATION OF CONSENT to the teachers
which they should sign
Hand out document DECLARATION OF
CONSENT so that the representatives of
their students can sign it

PREPARING WORKSHOP
SPACE

Choose a workshop space where there is a
central computer with Internet access and
with a beamer & screen/ digiboard and
space to create a U-shaped setting for the
teachers

EDIT DOCUMENTS

Customize the CERTIFICATES – create an
individual copy for each teacher who
participates.

TEST THE AR GAME

Test the online game on the same computer
and at the same place where the workshops
will be organized. Instructions are provided
in the section PLAYING INSTRUCTIONS for
the appropriate age group

112

Since the students are under age
their parents or caretakers should
sign the DECLARATION OF
CONSENT. In case they refuse make
sure to NOT take pictures of these
children or film them.

Keep a copy as evidence

PRINT INSTRUCTOR
DOCUMENT

Print and read the age group appropriate
session descriptions.
Print and read the instructor evaluation.
Print and read the document DIAGNOSTIC
QUESTIONS. If needed create new
diagnostic questions of your own.

In the section BACKGROUND TO
SESSION 2 you will read more on
diagnostic questions.

PRINT TEACHER AND
WORKSHOP DOCUMENTS

Print the SUCCESS CRITERIA for each
session.
Print the DIAGNOSTIC QUESTIONS.
Print the 4 levels of GOOD PRACTICES for
the appropriate age group.
Print the game MARKERS, game TASK (for
teachers of age group 8-11), the game
QUESTIONNAIRE.
Print the age appropriate MODEL LESSONS
(1 and 2).
Print CREATING AN AR GAME.
Print the LESSON PLAN.
Print the teacher EVALUATION documents:
EVALUATION and IMPLEMENTATION
CRITERIA EVALUATION.
Print the customized CERTIFICATES.

Print a few copies of the teacher
documents extra

DOWNLOAD WORKSHOP
DOCUMENTS

Download the appropriate WORKSHOP PPT.

PROVIDE THE WORKSHOP
SESSIONS

Hand out the teacher and workshop
documents at the appropriate time as
described in the session descriptions.
Show the WORKSHOP PPT.
Make sure that all teachers know when the
EVALUATION session takes place.
Let the teacher participants know that you
are available for them.
Make sure teachers organize their
IMPLEMENTATION lession, fill out the
TEACHER EVALUATION form and the
IMPLEMENTATION CRITERIA EVALUATION
form.

EVALUATION

Fill out the INSTRUCTOR EVALUATION form. Please send the filled out
INSTRUCTOR EVALUATION
instructor to us: Mr. Onno Hansen –
onno.hansen@gmail.com.

CHECK AFTER A FEW
MONTHS

Please meet up with the teachers again
after a few months and ask them the
questions provided in the INSTRUCTOR
EVALUATION form.
Add the new information to the existing
filled out INSTRUCTOR EVALUATION form.

113

Please send the filled out teacher
evaluation documents to us: Mr.
Onno Hansen –
onno.hansen@gmail.com.

Please send the completely filled
out INSTRUCTOR EVALUATION
instructor to us: Mr. Onno Hansen –
onno.hansen@gmail.com.

PROJECT DESCRIPTION
Age group: 8-11
Instructors teach teachers - by means of a five-session workshop plus implementation - to create,
implement and evaluate 45-minutes lessons plans for students aged 8-11 that enhance student
resilience to deal with online experiences – and thereby enhances student online safety. Important
tools to achieve this are an Augmented Reality game, interactive didactics and elements of
prophylactics.
Age group: 12-14
Instructors teach teachers - by means of a five-session workshop plus implementation - to create,
implement and evaluate 45-minutes lessons plans for students aged 12-14 that enhance student
resilience to deal with online experiences – and thereby enhances student online safety – while at
the same time empowering a conscious, creative and critical stance by students as evolving
responsible citizens. Important tools to achieve this are an Augmented Reality game, interactive
didactics and elements of prophylactics.

114

How to recruit teachers to IDentifEYE workshops?
Tricks and tips in recruitment management.
1. Prepare a work plan that will help with managing the tasks.
The beginning of recruitment should start at least 3 months before the workshops. Here's an
example of a basic work plan:
When?

What?

Tasks

Material
s

Person responsible

Deadlines

October 2014
November 2014
December 2014
January 2015
February 2015...
2. Start with a school database.
This will be your most important tool in managing the first tasks. Create an excel file with
information about schools in your area that you would like to recruit. Prepare separate sheets for 2
groups of teachers (8-11, 12-14). Put in the tables information about:
- name of the school
- contact information (address, telephone number, website and e-mail)
- name of the headmaster (very important)
TIP: Start with schools that are already cooporating with your organisation. Think of any teachers
or school board members you know personally that would be of any help in the recruitment
process.
TIP 2: Remember that you will need at least 8 teachers in each group. From our experience it's best
to have 2-4 teachers from each school. Make sure you will have at least 2 schools extra from each
group on the final list in case some of them will withdraw last minute.
3. Prepare necessary documents.
Before you start calling the schools prepare the documents with information that you want to sell
to the headmasters. During the meetings they will ask you a lot of questions, so you need to
outrun them. Prepare:
- document with information about the project (put down the main topic and objectives of the
project, mention the international partners and the financial funding source, write your name and
how to contact you)
- official invitation to the project addressed to the management of schools
- preliminary declaration of participation form for teachers
- poster/leaflet of the project

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4. The calling begins!
Sending e-mails to schools with information about the workshops is good, but from our experience
it doesn't bring as many results as direct calls. When you call the school you want to recruit, ask
the secretary to connect you directly with the headmaster. If they're not available leave a
message, but then call again. When you talk to the headmaster don't waste your time to explain
the whole project. Briefly mention its objectives and why is it so important. Tell the headmaster
that their school was chosen among many other schools to take part in the project and ask for the
meeting to talk about the details. This way they will be eager to know more. Leave them with the
feeling that they are important and one of a kind.
TIP: Remember that the headmasters are also people. Probably they are busy with their own
problems, so you may encounter their lack of time or lack of interest. Sometimes they might be
even angry that "another person is bothering them with some new projects like they didn't have
any better things to deal with". Be aware of that and prepare for such situations. Always be cool
and polite. Tell them you understand their situation.
TIP 2: National holidays, school events, trips and vacations... A lot of things can occur on the way,
so plan the meetings at least few days ahead.
5. During the meeting.
The meeting with the headmasters are the most important part of the recruitment process. They
shouldn't last longer than 15 minutes. It's a lot of time to talk about the details of the workshops:
what is its main purpose and objectives, how they will be organized, when they will start and how
long they will last, who will conduct them, what will come out of them, what skills the teachers will
gain, etc. It's also the time to get down to business. What are your expectations? Of course
recruiting teachers to the workshops. Tell them how many teachers should they delegate and
what is the deadline for applying. Remember that there no conditions regarding the subjects the
teachers teach - the only condition is that they should teach in one of the age groups mentioned
before and that they shouldn't be school counselors. Keep the documents you prepared before
with you. Hand them to the headmaster. Repeat your name and how to reach you. Assure them
that you are available if they have any further questions or doubts.
TIP: The first impression is the most important, so be prepared. Dress well and smile a lot! A
compliment never hurt nobody, so while you're there congratulate the headmaster of his/her
latest achievements (schools like to brag about how good they are, you don't have to dig deep to
learn about them - school websites are usually full of information about their successful students
and school projects).
6. After the meeting.
Send the e-mail to the headmasters to remind them about yourself. Thank them for the meeting.
Even though you handed them the documents about the project during the meeting, attach them
to the e-mail again. Remind the headmasters about the application deadline. Don't forget about
attaching the forms with preliminary declarations of participation for teachers! Stay in touch with
schools. Make sure you send the reminder about the deadline also a week before it finishes.

116

7. Prepare a teachers data base.
Organize the data base of recruited teachers. Create a new excel file or simply add new sheets to
the previous one. Prepare 2 sheets for each age group. Put in the tables information about:
- name of the teacher
- school they represent
- e-mail and telephone number
- subject they teach
From now on you will contact the teachers directly, not through schools. The headmasters gave
you what you wanted so there is no need to bother them anymore. Once the recruitment process
is finished and you have a full list of at least 16 teachers, send the e-mail to congratulate the
teachers that they have been selected to participate in the workshops. Briefly explain again the
objectives of the workshops. Write down the list of names and groups the teachers will belong to.
Attach the documents you have prepared before - the file with information about the project and
also the form with preliminary declaration of participation in case you are still missing some of
them. Write in the e-mail when and where the workshops will take place (add the directions on
how to get there).
TIP: From our experience it's good to prepare a sort of an organizational meeting. A simple 1-2
hour meeting when everyone can meet each other, break the ice and ask additional questions (and
also bring the missing preliminary declarations). If you feel like preparing such meeting, send the
teachers an e-mail with information about it too. And a reminder a day before! :)
8. Organizational meeting.
During this meeting everyone can meet each other. Instructors can get to know the teachers,
teachers can get to know the instructors and other teachers. It's a good time to break the ice and
talk more about the project. It's also a space for questions from the public and dealing with formal
issues like preliminary declarations of participation and other documents that will be needed from
teachers (for example permission to the use of image). The organizational meeting should take
place around 2 weeks before the workshops. What to prepare for the meeting?
- attendance list
- forms to be fulfilled by teachers (preliminary declarations in case you are STILL missing some :))
- a workshop "portfolio" with: information about the workshop, information about your
organisation, program of the workshops with timetable, a pen and a company notebook or
something to write on)
After the meeting send an e-mail to the teachers with a short summary. Attach to the e-mail the
forms they need to fill out and bring to the workshops after signing (permission to the use of
image). Once again attach the program of the workshops. Remind about the time and place of the
workshops. Send them also a reminder a day before. :)

117

9. Workshops.
Although it might look differently the recruitment process hasn’t finish yet. The workshops will be
prepared and conducted by the instructors, but you should be there too to assist in case there are
any (for example technical) problems. What to prepare for the workshops?
- attendance list for each group
- portfolios with workshop materials
- certificates
Stay in touch with teachers. After the workshops send them an e-mail with the summary.
Congratulate them on completion of the workshops. Send them any additional materials they
might need (some of the things can come up during the workshops, that's why you need to be
there to follow up). Thank them for the cooporation and wish good luck in the future. :)
A BONUS
Tips on how to encourage headmasters to delegate their teachers to the workshops.
During your recruitment process you may meet, let's say "difficult" headmasters on your way. They
can be tired, bored, even fussy. They will try to refuse to meet with in person claiming they have
no time, etc. How to handle a phone call with a headmaster when you have only few minutes to
"sell the product"? Here are some key words and phrases I picked up from my experience that you
can use to convince the headmasters to the project. Remember: they don't need to be entirely
true! :)
Key words and phrases:
- your school was chosen as one of the (for example) 5 schools in the whole region to take part
because of your achievements (mention the achievements)
- prestigious project, it's a first project on such a level in the region
- international impact (partners from 5 countries - you can mention all of them)
- transfer of innovation
- pilot project of great importance
- free of charge workshops
- certificate of participation
- new technologies (mention the game)
- current topic, interesting and developing for teachers
- European impact followed by a wide promotion (publications, promo video, etc.)
Prepared by: Ewelina Gerke (GCPU)

118

DIAGNOSTIC QUESTIONS
1. In interactive didactics you are not allowed to correct students.
A. Yes
B. No
Correct answer: B (No). As facilitators teachers do correct but as a coach, not as a person who
judges.
2. A facilitator is to invite parents or representatives of the police to the class room.
A. Yes
B. No
Correct answer: A (Yes). Involving student environments beyond the school environment is an
important prophylactic instrument.
3. In interactive didactics a teacher gives up their right to privacy.
A. Yes
B. No
Correct answer: B (No). By accepting a role as facilitator a teacher still needs to set clear
boundaries as can be seen from the prophylactics good practices. One of those boundaries to be
set is to which extent the teachers want to communicate about private issues.
4 Identities are different offline and online.
A. Yes
B. No
Correct answer: B (No). The contexts online are different and online life heavily influences both
personal identities and the concept of identity but both offline and online identity is the answer to
the question: “Who am I?”
5. [12-14] Tradition according to Bauman is an effective strategy to survive “liquid life”.
a. Yes
b. No
Correct answer: B (No). Holding on to tradition is a logical reaction against fast change and fast
globalization but this does not shield us against the extreme consumer times we live in. Only by
learning to learn and acquiring skills that help us be citizens and deal with otherness might help us
to preserve a modicum of self-determination.
6. Students that do well in the traditional class room also will do well in real life.
a. Yes
b. No
Correct answer: B (No). [8-11] Students that never fail tend to attribute their success to given
attributes. As a result, they are less open to learning and feedback. [12-14] The skills needed to be
successful in the traditional class room are different from the skills needed to be successful in the
21st century. For instance, adaptability by redefining one’s identity over and over again is not a skill
leading to success in the class room but is a skill set that is very useful in real life.

119

7. [8-11] If a student is a “fixed learner” the teacher needs to intervene.
a. Yes
b. No
Correct answer: A (Yes). Fixed learners have troubles adapting, learning and hearing feedback. This
hampers their development.
8. In the interpretation of Goffman – is it possible to be one’s self with someone?
a. Yes
b. No
Correct answer: B (No). According to Goffman we always play a role.
9. [12-14] Does it make sense to create a new school curriculum now based on pre-defined skills
for the 21st century?
a. Yes
b. No
Correct answer: B (No). Unfortunately, we cannot predict what exact skills we might need in the
near or not so near future. What we can do is introduce skills to learn how to learn and skills that
empower us to deal with Otherness – but this is a far cry from creating a definite new curriculum.
10. Grading is harmful.
a. Yes
b. No
Correct answer: A (Yes). Grading as such focuses on fixating a result at a certain time. Less
important is to provide insights to students how to improve the parts that they do not really
master yet. Even when these insights are provided they are not taken very serious by students
because the grade terminates a lesson subject and the mastering of the missing parts does not
lead to a better grade.

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HOW TO PLAY THE AR GAME
Age group: 8-11
Quick overview


















To play the AR game you need computer with Internet access and webcam (built in or plugged in);
The game needs constant acces to the Internet during the play, so we suggest to use ethernet cable;
It is good to have constant background behind you when playing the game. The color of the
background should be different from skin tone – the best background would be a monochromatic
blue or green wall or sheet;
You need to have Silverlight installed – see below;
Before starting the game you need to calibrate it. You can calibrate the game here
http://identifeye.ezzev.eu/?debug – see below;
The game is available here http://identifeye.ezzev.eu/ - ENG, GR, PL, NL versions and in
http://identifeye2.ezzev.eu – for ES, LT versions
When start window will appear, click on the flag in upper left corner to choose the language of the
game;
Now we can play the game;
We can fill in the data form on the start page, but it's not necessary to start the game;
Click "Start" to start the game;
A new window will appear. We will see the view from the camera – optionally you need to give
permission first - and, in the bar over the view of camera, instructions and questions and answers
will appear;
Click on the image of the markers on the right side of the screen. A PDF file will open. Please print
the markers (one page A4 format). After you have printed the markers cut out the markers to get
four seperate markers for the game;
Follow the instructions on the screen. Begin by showing marker A to the camera;
In the bar over the view of camera, questions will be shown. After choosing an answer option show
the corresponding marker (A for A, B for B etc.);
On the right side of the screen at the bottom there is a "Quit" button. When you click it you will be
transfered to the start page;
Show the marker only for a short period into the camera, untill the next question will appear in bar.
If you show the marker too long, it is possible that the game interprets the marker as the answer to
the next question;
After your have provided your answer by means of a marker, a graphic representation of the answer
(augmentation) will appear on the screen;
After you have answered all of the questions, "Finish" button will appear next to the "Quit" button.
Click on it to end the game;
After finishing the game, we will see a summary of the game on the screen with all questions and
answers and a photo of the view of the final screen with all the augmentations. Questions and
answers can be downloaded by clicking on "Download results" button; the photo can be
downloaded by clicking on the "Download photo" button;
To end the game click "Finish".

121

Storyboard
Marker
A
Augmentation

Marker
B
Augmentation

Marker C Augmentation

Marker
D
Augmentation

A new page opens. In one
frame one sees one’s self.
Pre-screen: Before
In a separate page frame
[Start]
you enter the
there is a running
game, please fill [Allow
tickertape. In it are the
the
out the following
data that were entered at
fields: - Name – camera the startup screen. If no
to
Age - Town of
data were provided the
0A residence - School operate] tickertape shows: * * * *

An augmented
popup with
instructions
appears [This
should be in the
language as
0B
chosen]
Click on the image
with letters A-D
below. A PDF will
appear containing
4 markers. Print all
4 markers - with
them you can
answer the
questions in the
game. Now show
marker A to the
0C
camera.

1

2
3

Are you a boy or a
girl?

[OK, I
understa
nd]

The popup disappears.

[Show
marker
A]

Starting - good luck!

Boy

Do you want to
take a picture of
yourself?
Yes
I’m your helper,
Gadget
nice to meet you! I
s
would like to get to
know you a bit
better. I will ask
you a few
questions. There
are no right or
wrong answers, so

An augmented kakhi
crown appears on the
head of the player. In a
separate page frame a
realistic helper character
appears, male version.

A picture is taken and
twice uploaded as an
augmented picture in a
picture frame – one to
the left and one to the
right of the face; the
tickertape becomes
bigger
The pictures/ signs from
2. are displayed on two
augmented tablets

An augmented
purple crown
appears on the
head of the player.
In a separate page
frame a realistic
helper character None of
appears, female
your
Girl
version.
business
Two “no
photography”
signs
augmentations are
added as
augmented
pictures in a
picture frame –
one to the left and
one to the right of
No
the face
x
Animals The pictures/ signs Music
from 2. are
displayed on two
augmented
puppies

122

An augmented
golden crown
appears on the
head of the player.
in a separate page
frame a random
helper character
appears - male or
female version.

x

x

x
x
x
The pictures/ signs Footba The pictures/
from 2. are
ll
signs from 2.
displayed on two
are displayed
augmented musical
on two
notes
augmented
footballs

4

How would you
describe yourself?

5

When you register
on a website (like
you just did for the
game) why would
you hand out
information about
yourself?
I don't

6

Do you usually fill
out all the
registration
screens, even the
ones that are not
compulsory?

7

Let's see if you are
in the know. What
do you think
'Terms &
Conditions'
means?

8

Say, a friend
uploaded a picture
of you made five
years ago on his
profile page. How
do you feel?

Trendy

Yes

I click
that
away

I like
that

An augmented
smartphone is added to
the crown

The following text is
added to the tickertape:
"my lips are sealed"

The crown turns icy
white; the font of the
tickertape becomes
bigger

Augmented
sneakers are
added to the
crown

Relaxed

Otherwi The following text
The following text
se I’m
is added to the
Everyon is added to the
blocked tickertape: "please e does
tickertape: "hi
out
let me in"
that
friends"

A flash of dust; the
font of the
tickertape
becomes smaller

No

A hawk flies by and drops
poop that permanently
That's A hawk flies by and
remains on the lower
where drops an egg that
edge of the AR frame –
the
appears on the
does not move with the rules of crown. The hawk
head. The hawk
the site
disappears, the
disappears, poop stays
are
egg stays

An augmented button
with a smiley is added;
the tickertape becomes
bigger

Cool

Augmented
sunglasses are
added to the
crown - not
covering the eyes
but on top

I don’t
like that

An augmented
button with a
smiley is added;
the tickertape
becomes bigger

Someti
mes

The crown turns
grey
A hawk flies by and
drops poop that
permanently
remains on the
lower edge of the
AR frame – does
not move with the
I don't head. The hawk
know
disappears.

Sporty

An
augmented
baseball cap
is added to
the crown

As if I
care

The
following
text is added
to the
tickertape: "i
have nothing
to hide"

x

x

x

x

x

x
x
A message is
shown that
someone decided
to change the
child’s identity
too– then an
augmented
A
button with a
“cyberb mean looking face
ully”
is added to the Nothin
button
crown
g

x

A messageis shown
Now it’s time for
that someone
action. You can
decided to change
now make a
A message is shown that
the child’s identity
change to the
someone decided to
too – then an
identity of another
change the child’s
augmented
A flash of
child playing the
A
identity too – then an
A
“peace” button is
dust/
game. What do
“nerd” augmented“nerd” button “peace”
added to the
nothing
9
you add?
button
is added to the crown
button
crown
happens
2 augmented
white buttons are
added plus one
button with a bit
4 augmented
blurry image of
4 augmented
Only if buttons are
I wonder. Do you
creepy stranger
buttons are added they added with a
accept friendships
4 augmented buttons are
and onebutton
with a bitblurry
are
bit blurry
and chats from
added with a bit blurry
with a bit
Only if
nice (2) and
friends nice (2) and
people you don't
nice (2) and creepy (2)
blurryimage of a they are
creepy (2)
of
creepy (2)
10 know in real life?
Yes
strangers
No
nicestranger
nice
strangers
friends
strangers

11

If someone you
don't know in real
life wants to be
friends with you
online, what do
I look
you do before you at their
accept?
profile

The images with
strangers on the buttons
added in Q10. are
replaced by similar
buttons with sharper
I ask my
images
friends

The images with
strangers on the
buttons added in
Q10. are replaced
by similarbuttons
with sharper
images

123

I just
accept
them

The images with
strangers on the
buttons added in
Q10. are replaced I don't
by similar buttons accept
with very blurry strange
images
rs

A flash of
dust/
nothing is
changed

12

OK. Do you share
data like your
mobile phone
number with all
your friends?

Do you think it's
important that
your friends’
profile pictures
give a realistic
impression of who
13
they are?

14

Yes

No, I
don’t

Now some
questions on
friendship.
Suppose there's a
new kid at school. We like
You start calling
the
them friend
same
when ...
things

All 4 buttons added in
Q10. start sending visual
messages

A flash of dust/
nothing is changed

x

x

x

x

All 4 buttons
added in Q10. are
All 4 buttons added in
changing into
Q10. are changing into
buttons with a
buttons with a slideshow
slideshow of
of random images all the
randomimages all
time
Yes, I do
the time

x

x

X

x

An augmented mouth is
added to the face

No

I know
them

An augmented
brain is added to
the face

They are
nice

We
have
Augmented
the
ears are
same added to the
friends
face

An augmented
nose is added to
the crown

15

When do you
consider yourself
A temporary
A temporary
friends with
! accept A temporary augmented We have augmented rain of We like augmented rain of
someone you met their rain of pigeons starts in the the same dolphins starts in the same cats starts in the They are
online? When... request
background
friends
the background
things
background
nice

16

Do you think you
could fall in love
with someone you
only know online? Yes

17

How do you tell
someone at school I ask
that you like
someone The crown gets a parrotthem?
to tell it print

I’ll try to The crown gets a
stand out tiger-print

18

How do you tell
someone online
that you like
them?

A temporary
augmented rain of
buttons with tigerI’ll try to print starts in the I just tell
stand out background
them

19

We’re almost at
the end. Do you
defriend a friend
when it appears
they seriously lied
f.i. about their
age?
Yes

Augmented cupids start
flying around the crown

A temporary augmented
I ask
rain of buttons with
someone parrot-print starts in the
to tell it background

No

Half of the slideshow
buttons (Q13.) get an
addition X over them. They
do keep sendingmessages No

Augmented koalas
start flying around
the crown

A flash of dust/
nothing is changed

124

Maybe

Augmented
balloons start flying
around the crown x

I just tell The crown gets a
them
hearts-print

x

x

I don’t

A temporary
augmented rain of
buttons with
hearts-print starts
in the background I don’t

x

A temporary
augmented
rain of dogs
starts in the
background

x

The crown
turns grey
A temporary
augmented
rain of grey
buttons starts
in the
background

x

20

Final question.
Would you like to
clean up your
image by
unsharing all your
data?
Yes

Half of the augmented
crown turns black; half of
the augmentation added in
2. is colored black; the
slideshow buttons (Q13.)
are half black – no matter
if they are crossed out in
Q19 or not
No

A flash of dust/
nothing is changed

x

x

x

x

Explanation of the augmentations
Questi
on
Topic

Augmentations – description

Explanation

A tickertape will present the data that are
filled out. A tickertape is a field with text
flowing from right to left. Think CNN. The

An identifier is a characteristic that helps to identify you like name, age, town

information is not stored in any other way, it of residence and school. By sharing these there is a major chance that they will
0

Sharing

is there only as session information. If you

become visible for others too. The tickertape represents throughout the game

characteristics

start the game up again it will be gone.

the information that you share.

Interpreting information often equals stereotyping: Prejudices are getting
confirmed. These augmentations are an example of this. Boys are stereotyped
as tough and get a khaki colored crown as a hint to the army. Girls are
Boys (A) will get a khaki colored crown and a
Sharing
1

stereotyped as sweet and get a sweet, pink color. If you do not chose you

male helper. Girls (B) get a pink crown and a

cannot be profiled exactly. But some guessing takes place (male or female

female helper. Option C leaves the player

helper). The crown, as well as the picture taken in question 2, will be the place

characteristics with a golden crown and a random helper.

in the game where identity elements are added.

Pictures are an essential element in profiling. For some they even equal
A picture will be taken and in twofold added

biometric information. There are two pictures to illustrate that if you have a

Sharing

as augmentation for (A). For (B) a sign is

picture online it will be copied. These copies are beyond one’s control – as will

2

characteristics

added that no picture was taken.

appear in 20A.

3

Sharing

added with a symbol – gadgets (A), animals

Our ‘Like it’s are a crucial instrument to profile our preferences and routines.

characteristics

(B), music notes (C) or footballs (D).

They are directly linked to our identity as symbolized by our pictures.

Our pictures, as taken in question 2, now are

Interpreting lifestyle is – like our ‘Like it’s - a crucial instrument to profile our
Sharing
4

5

The crown is added with a smartphone (A), preferences and routines. They are directly linked to our identity as symbolized

characteristics sneakers (B), sunglasses (C), baseball cap (D)

Attitude
towards sites
Amount of

The following text is added to the
tickertape:
A. My lips are sealed
B. Please let me in
C. Hi! Friends
D. I have nothing to hide

by the crown.

These additions are paraphrases of the person’s attitude towards the site.
They are important for interpreting actions by that person and are therefore
added to the ticker as basic data material. For tickertape – see 0.

A. The crown turns icy white and the font of If we share a lot of information we become more visible – the tickertape font

125

6

information
shared

Attitude
7

the tickertape becomes bigger
B. A flash of dust – nothing happens
C. The crown turns grey

becomes bigger – and more transparant – the crown becomes icy white (A). If
we do not – nothing changes to our identity – represented by a flash of dust
throughout the game. If we do share information sometimes our crown turns
grey – as a symbol of being between the extremes.

A. A hawk flies by and poop appears on the
screen. The hawk disappears, poop stays.
B. A hawk flies by and an egg appears on
the
crown. The hawk disappears, the egg stays.
C. A hawk flies by and poop appears on the The hawk is the symbol of good eyes, seeing things sharply. You have sharp
screen. The hawk disappears, poop stays. eyes to read the Terms and Conditions. If you don’t do that, poop happens. If

towards sites

you do read it new insights, symbolized by the egg, comes into existence.

Attitude
towards

8

A. A button with a smiley is added; the

others,

tickertape becomes bigger.

If someone publishes a picture of you, to third parties it appears you agree

others add

B. A button with a smiley is added; the

and are happy with it. The only way to change that impression is to convince

information

tickertape becomes bigger.

your friends to take the picture offline, or force them legally.

A text is displayed that someone changed
Attitude

your profile too:

towards

A. A “nerd” button is added

others,

B. A “peace” button is added

you react to them. If you do something to them, they will do something to

C. A ”cyberbully” button is added
D. A flash of dust, nothing changes

you. Whether you will flame (C), stereotype (A) or be nice (A), others are likely

others add
9

10

information

Attitude
towards
others
Attitude
towards

11

others

What you give is what you get. Most people will react to you in the way that

to do the same to you.

A. Buttons are added with fuzzy images of
nice and creepy strangers
B. White buttons are added and buttons
If you accept as your friends people you don’t know then you don’t really have
with fuzzy images of nice and creepy
an image of them as they really are – represented by the fuzziness of the
strangers
pictures. These friends can turn out to be nice or creepy. Friends who are
C. Buttons are added with fuzzy images of
known to you are symbolized by the imageless buttons. But even your friends
nice and creepy strangers
are not known to the end. They can turn out to be (online) nice or creepy.
D. Buttons are added with fuzzy images of
nice and creepy strangers
A. The pictures from 10. become sharper
B. The pictures from 10. become sharper
C. The pictures from 10. become very fuzzy
D. A flash of dust/ nothing changes

never be 100% sharp. But if you don’t check at all, everything becomes very

A. The buttons from 10. start

with you as symbolized by virtual messages that are sent by the buttons. They

communicating
B. A flash of dust/ nothing changes

become clear in 18A.

The more you check the sharper image of others you’ll achieve, but they’ll
fuzzy.
As soon as you share contact data, people can and will start communicating

Amount of
information
12

shared

will keep sending you information, even if you would defriend them, as will

A. The images on the buttons from 10. are

13

Attitude

replaced by slideshows

Whether you like it or not others can and will represent themselves any way

towards

B. The images on the buttons from 10. are

they want to – by profile pictures or by whatever images. The same goes for

others

replaced by slideshows

you. You can do that too.

Attitude

A. An augmented mouth is added to your

The mouth symbolizes what we talk about – we talk about the things we like.

towards

face

The brain symbolizes the cognitive; knowing something.

friendship

B. An augmented brain is added to your

The nose symbolizes intuition. You sniff up trust (they are nice) but it is

face
intangible.
C. An augmented nose is added to your face From friends we get information on others. The ears receive that information.
D. Augmented ears are added to your face

126

14

Attitude
towards
15

A. A temporary rain of pigeons appears
B. A temporary rain of dolphins appears
C. A temporary rain of cats appears
D. A temporary rain of dogs appears

friendship

16

17

Attitude
towards love

A. Cupids start flying around the crown
B. Koalas start flying around the crown
C. Balloons start flying around the crown

Attitude
towards love

A. The crown gets a parrot print
B. The crown gets a tiger print
C. The crown gets a heart print
D. The crown turns grey

Pigeons always flock together, do things synchronized even though they have
not a lot in common. They seem to accept whatever happens to always
peacefully and trustingly return to the same placed.
Dolphins are the symbol of social animals.
Cats are fickle, they only seem to do things they like.
If someone is nice to them, dogs are trusting.
Cupids are the classic symbol of love and falling in love
Koalas are cute and lazy animals that do not seem to want a lot.
Balloons can be associated with the light and temporary.

The parrot stands for the go-between – someone is to repeat your words.
Tigers can be associated with wild and impressive.
Just telling them is showing your heart.
Not telling others what you feel makes you difficult to interpret – grey identity.

A temporary rain appears with buttons with
A. Parrot print
B. Tiger print
18

19

Attitude

C. Heart print

towards love

D. A grey color

Attitude

A. Half of the slideshow images of 13 get an

See 17.

towards

“X” over them

Defriending means that you cross out friends. But they can still send you

others

B. A flash of dust/ nothing happens

messages if you shared your contact data (12A)

A. Half of the crown is blacked, one picture
Amount of
2

information

0

shared

of
you turns black, half of the buttons turn
black.
B. A cloud of dust/ nothing changes.

Even if you delete all the information from the Internet that you have ever
shared, an important part will remain nevertheless. Independent of your will
you leave serious traces. That information has started to live a life of its own,
without you.

Preparing the game
Prerequisites





Computer with a webcam (preferably a PC since the installation of Silverlight on a MAC can be more
troublesome)
Browser with MS Silverlight 5 plug-in
2+ GHz CPU
1+ GB RAM
Internet connection
Digiboard (or beamer with projection screen)

Silverlight
The IDentifEYE game has been developed as a MS Silverlight application. In order to be able to play the
game, the user must have a browser, preferably with the latest, MS Silverlight plug-in installed. The installed
version of the plug-in must at least support MS Silverlight version 5.

127

If you have a previous version of MS Silverlight installed, please de-install it completely before installing the
latest version.
MS Silverlight plug-ins are available for both Windows and OSX, as well as for a multitude of browsers.
IDentifEYE does not require a specific platform or a specific browser. Given the fact that Silverlight is a
Microsoft product though, best results will likely be obtained on a Windows machine, using Internet
Explorer. Only the Internet Explorer version of the Silverlight plug-in has the necessary hardware
acceleration for graphics operations.
IDentifEYE has been tested on both Windows and OSX, using Internet Explorer, Chrome and Safari (OSX
only). Chrome no longer supports Silverlight.
Silverlight can be downloaded free from: http://www.microsoft.com/getsilverlight/GetStarted/Install/Default.aspx Installation instructions are provided on the same page. After installation, the
user should be able to start the IDentifEYE game right away by visiting the url.
Mac Users should completed delete all earlier versions of Silverlight before installing V4 or V5.
Webcam
In terms of hardware, IDentifEYE does not impose any restrictions, other than the requirement of a
webcam. These days, most webcams are close to HD resolution. For performance reasons though,
IDentifEYE works with 320x240 screen captures. As long as the webcam supports that lower limit, it will
suffice for playing the game.
CPU
The CPU is the abbreviation for central processing unit. Sometimes referred to simply as the central
processor, but more commonly called processor, the CPU is the brains of the computer where most
calculations take place. In terms of computing power, the CPU is the most important element of a computer
system.
In theory, wherever the Silverlight plug-in runs, IDentifEYE will run. However, as IDentifEYE’s core
functionalities are all centered around the face detection, face tracking, augmentation and marker
detection -- which are all computationally (very) demanding operations -- it is recommended to have a
powerful CPU. What a powerful CPU is depends on the used platform and what other processes are running
on the machine at the same time, so it can’t be specified.
Great results have been obtained with Intel 2 GHz and up CPU’s. The effect of lesser CPU’s will be that the
machine’s CPU usage will peek while playing the game, and the cooler fan will probably spin up. During
tests, only when using an Intel Atom powered netbook, noticeable glitches in the game operations were
detected.
RAM
RAM is the acronym for random access memory, a type of computer memory that can be accessed
randomly; that is, any byte of memory can be accessed without touching the preceding bytes. RAM is the
most common type of memory found in computers and other electronic devices.

128

In terms of RAM, the IDentifEYE game can be pretty demanding. Due to the graphical nature of the game,
many images will be held in the memory at any one time while playing. Based on tests, a lower limit of 1 GB
of RAM was determined. Keep in mind, that other processes running on the same machine as the browser
will also consume RAM and might lead to a higher overall RAM usage.
Not having enough RAM available while playing the game will result in hard disk swapping -- orchestrated
by the operating system -- and ultimately creating unwanted visual side-effects (glitches).
Getting best results
Face detection
Face tracking in IDentifEYE is based on skin colour detection. In order to get best results, try to:
 Face the camera whilst playing the game;
 Sit straight in front of the camera, centering the face in the view pane;
 Sit at about 80 centimeters away from the camera;
 Avoid multiple faces and/or other body parts (like hands) in the camera view;
 Arrange for clear ambient light, that:
o does not cast a lot of shadows onto the face;
o does not cause bright highlights in the face, eyes or glasses;
 Sit in front of a background of a non-skin color. Blue and green backgrounds work best.
When you play the game and augmentations become jumpy or fails completely, one of the following things
is the matter:
 There is insufficient light;
 There are other objects in the camera’s view that are assumed to be (potential) faces.
When you play the game and augmentations are projected all over the game’s screen you are probably
sitting too close to the webcam.
Please make sure that when you show the marker to the webcam the whole marker is visible on the screen.
Please show the marker only until you see an indication that the marker has been recognized. Showing the
marker longer might cause the game to interpret the marker as the answer to the next question.
Tweaking face detection
In order to adjust the game to your environment, please visit http://identifeye.ezzev.eu/?debug . Run the
game up to the point that your camera is activated. In the frame where you see yourself you’ll find sliders at
the bottom. These are your controls to play with.
Now you can tweak what shades of color should be interpreted as skin tones. This is based on YCbCr color
space (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/YCbCr) – as is the default for these kinds of applications.
On the screen you will see yellow sections – those are the detected skin tones. In red you’ll see what the
game considers to be your head. Now you can change the values of the thresholds in such a way that only
your head will be found and the section is not too jumpy. You will notice that the red section will have a
delay versus the yellow section. This is a conscious decision. It makes the augmentation less jumpy.
Make sure you use the debug functionality on the face of the person who is to play the game!

129

Once you have found the ideal setting for your environment, click “SAVE”. From that moment on the game
settings will be stored on that particular computer, also outside of the debug-page. If you want to return to
the default settings, just click DEFAULT and then SAVE.
Marker detection
To some extent the 4 markers (ABCD) are not a very sensitive process and therefore should not cause
marker detection errors. For best results however, avoid:
 Displaying multiple markers at the same time;
 Holding markers in a way that fingers overlap the marker (the black border is part of the actual
marker).
When things go wrong
Important
Silverlight applications run in a sandbox. This means that a Silverlight application cannot crash the browser,
nor can it freely access resources on the user’s computer. If a problem occurs related to the stability of the
browser, or to any other program or file on the user’s computer, IDentifEYE cannot be the cause!
Trouble shooting
Whenever a user has problems starting or playing the game, please do the following:
 Make sure the Silverlight plug-in is installed by visiting any other MS Silverlight based website, or
directly by going to the previously mentioned download URL;
 Make sure the user is not behind a firewall that blocks Silverlight applications (.XAP); XAP
(pronounced ZAP) is the file extension for a Silverlight-based application package (.xap). This file
contains the compressed assemblies and resources of a Silverlight 2 application.
 Determine whether the currently signed in user has enough privileges to:
o Download Silverlight games;
o Execute Silverlight games;
o Use the webcam.

130

Silverlight will show a popup every time that an application wants to access the webcam. On that popup a
user can choose to accept his choice. You should either not see the game URL on this tab, or see it with the
above Allowed permissions. In case you read Deny there, please remove the permission and restart the
browser. Next time, the same popup will be shown to ask for permission to access the webcam.

131

If you see yourself in this format (page image can differ with platform) you know the webcam is working
properly and the user has access permissions to use it.
The actual window lay-out of the Silverlight Preferences window and tabs may differ per operating system
and plugin version.
Still having problems
Sometimes, when the above doesn’t solve the experienced problems or lead you to a root cause, the
following might help:
 Uninstall Silverlight, then reinstall it;
 Clear the browsers cache;
 Add the game URL to the trusted sites of the browser.
Last resort
When all above fails, please make a written note of the items below to assist the game developers to help
you or rectify possible programme errors.
 Computer (Make / CPU / RAM / Webcam);
 Operating System (including version);
 Browser (including version);
 Firewall (yes/no);
 Wifi or wired network;
 Is the user administrator on his/her computer (yes/no);

132


A clear description of the problem;
Screenshots of the problem screen (if applicable);
Screenshot of the Silverlight Preferences tabs (context menu, right click on the game).

Please Note
No data whatsoever are transferred to a server outside of the local machine on which the game is played.
No data are requested by an external server, neither are data offered to an external server.
The personal data that are optionally entered at the beginning of the game are temporarily stored in the
machine’s RAM during the game session. Those temporarily stored local data are cleared after the session
by means of the ‘explicit content clear’ functionality that is part of the game software.
It can thus be guaranteed that no data that are entered in the IDentifEYE game are stored for whatever
purposes, either externally or locally.

133

HOW TO PLAY THE AR GAME
Age group: 12-14
Quick overview


















To play the AR game you need computer with Internet access and webcam (built in or plugged in);
The game needs constant acces to the Internet during the play, so we suggest to use ethernet cable;
It is good to have constant background behind you when playing the game. The color of the
background should be different from skin tone – the best background would be a monochromatic
blue or green wall or sheet;
You need to have Silverlight installed – see below;
Before starting the game you need to calibrate it. You can calibrate the game here http://ideye2.ezzev.eu/?debug – see below;
The game is available here http://id-eye.ezzev.eu/ - for PL, GR, ES, LT versions and in http://ideye2.ezzev.eu/ for ENG, NL versions
When start window will appear, click on the flag in upper left corner to choose the language of the
game;
Now we can play the game;
We can fill in the data form on the start page, but it's not necessary to start the game;
Click "Start" to start the game;
A new window will appear. We will see the view from the camera – optionally you need to give
permission first - and, in the bar over the view of camera, instructions and questions and answers
will appear;
Click on the image of the markers on the right side of the screen. A PDF file will open. Please print
the markers (one page A4 format). After you have printed the markers cut out the markers to get
four seperate markers for the game;
Follow the instructions on the screen. Begin by showing marker A to the camera;
In the bar over the view of camera, questions will be shown. After choosing an answer option show
the corresponding marker (A for A, B for B etc.);
On the right side of the screen at the bottom there is a "Quit" button. When you click it you will be
transfered to the start page;
Show the marker only for a short period into the camera, untill the next question will appear in bar.
If you show the marker too long, it is possible that the game interprets the marker as the answer to
the next question;
After your have provided your answer by means of a marker, a graphic representation of the answer
(augmentation) will appear on the screen;
After you have answered all of the questions, "Finish" button will appear next to the "Quit" button.
Click on it to end the game;
After finishing the game, we will see a summary of the game on the screen with all questions and
answers and a photo of the view of the final screen with all the augmentations. Questions and
answers can be downloaded by clicking on "Download results" button; the photo can be
downloaded by clicking on the "Download photo" button;
To end the game click "Finish".

134

Storyboard
Q

Marker A Augmentation Marker B

1

A summery blue
Act in line sky with a little Try to
with what cloud hardly understan
they say
d students
moving

Teachers build the
highest trust when
they

[Question for the
teacher] How do you
want to play the
game? Rather
privately or as a
teacher?
2

As a
private
person

What is the best style
for teachers in relation
3 with students? Being: Specialists

4

5

When you have a
problem online – to
whom do you turn?
Does using new
technologies during
class always makes
sense?

How do you want to
learn? By means of
How should a teacher
find out whether all
that was presented
during the lesson was
understood? By
7
means of
6

In what kind of lesson
activities do you like
8
to participate?
How do you like to
9 work during lessons?

Augmentation

Marker C

Autumn sky with
complicated clouds
in which it seems
that familiar shapes Know their
could be recognized profession

A system
generated
picture – no
additional
augmentation
needed

As a
teacher

Like a school
board – with
mathematic
equations

Wall with a poster of.
two hands holding
Sensitive
each other

Augmentation

Marker D Augmentation

Are
befriended
Autumn sky with
with
Spring sky with
clouds racing one students on beautifully
behind another social media placed clouds

A wheel of colours

Funny

Able to
Bricks (closeWall full of comic maintaining up: abstract
characters
order
pattern)

Roof tiles (close
Glas roof –
Glass roof – seen
up: abstract
seen from the
Parent
Teacher
Peer
from the inside
Internet
pattern)
Cement
outside
Rather
Depends on
Close-up of
Close-up of
only
the decisions
young and old
Close-up of a during ICT
Close up of a
and skills of someone clicking
hands clicking
the keyboard
Never
keyboard
lessons projected keyboard the teacher
Always
the keyboard
A mouth and an
Several
eye as in a
Hands and a brain as
mouths as in
Hands as in a
medical
Experienc
in a medical
Creating
a medical
Lecture
handbook
e
handbook
something medical handbook Discussion
handbook
Control
Irregular tiles – close- questions Very small tiles like
up
during the an irregular mozaic
– close-up
Exams
Discussion
lesson
A computer screen
while searching –
Draw or
no specific
build
A paintbrush
Write A pen writing text – Search for
something painting – close- somethin no specific language something company or results
visible – close-up
manually
up
g
– close-up
online
Collectively
Individuall One abstract
A group of abstract
with the A horde of abstract
persons
y
person
In groups
persons
whole class
Very regular tiles
– close-up

Move
around

A moving
landscape
(animation)

Explanation of the augmentations
Questi
on

Topic

Augmentations - description

Explanation

0

Sharing
A tickertape will present the data that are filled out. A
characteri tickertape is a field with text flowing from right to left. Think
stics
CNN. The information is not stored in any other way, it is
there only as session information. If you start the game up
again it will be gone.

1

Ideal class
room

1a - A summery blue sky with a little cloud hardly moving
(animation)
1b - Autumn sky with complicated clouds in which it seems
that familiar shapes could be recognized
1c - Autumn sky with clouds racing one behind another
(animation)
1d - Spring sky with beautifully placed clouds

135

An identifier is a characteristic that helps to identify you like
name, age, town of residence and school. By sharing these
there is a major chance that they will become visible for
others too. The tickertape represents throughout the game
the information that you share.
A. The simple, near still cloud at a clear sky indicates that the
approach is almost carefree.
B. The clouds have appearantly recognizable forms to indicate
that we might interpret others but never know to the end
whether our interpretation is right.
C. The racing clouds symbolize the teacher pace of having to
keep up as a specialist.
D. The spring sky is a cliche for upcoming beautiful times.

2

Ideal class
room

2a - A system generated picture – no additional
augmentation needed
2b – A wheel of colours

B. The wheel of colours represents the numerous aspects that
characterize being a teacher while at the same time being a
symbol rather than a person.

3

Ideal class
room

3a - Like a school board – with mathematic equations
3b - Wall with a poster of two hands holding each other
3c - Wall full of comic characters
3d - Bricks (close-up: abstract pattern)

A. The school board stands for traditional teaching.
B. The hands holding eachother stand for friendship.
C. Cartoons represent lightness, entertainment.
D. Bricks stand for order, discipline. Think Pink Floyd.

4

Ideal class
room

4a - Roof tiles (close up: abstract pattern)
4b - Cement
4c - Glass roof – seen from the inside
4d - Glas roof – seen from the outside

A. Roof tiles stand for „home”.
B. Cements rpresents the empathetic teacher who keeps
different spheres of life together.
C. The glass roof symbolizes transparancy. The look from the
inside symbolizes a common starting point.
D. The glass roof symbolizes transparancy. The look from the
outside symbolizes a common aim.

5

Ideal class
room

5a - Close-up of a keyboard
5b - Close up of a projected keyboard
5c - Close-up of someone clicking the keyboard (animation)
5d - Close-up of young and old hands clicking the keyboard
(animation)

A. The keyboard is not in use – no ICT is used.
B. The projected keyboard stands for advanced technology.
C. Someone clicking means the teacher themselves clicking.
D. Several hands clicking stands for the use by all of ICT.

6

Ideal class
room

6a - A mouth and an eye as in a medical handbook
6b - Hands and a brain as in a medical handbook
6c - Hands as in a medical handbook
6d - Several mouths as in a medical handbook

A. A lecture consists of someone speaking – the mouth – and
the audience listening and observing – the eyes – what is
being demonstrated.
B. The hands symbolize doing something. The brain stands for
thinking.
C. The hands symbolize doing something.
D. The mouths represent multiple persons speaking.

7

Ideal class
room

7a - Very regular tiles – close-up
7b - Irregular tiles – close-up
7c - Very small tiles like an irregular mozaic – close-up

A. Regular tiles symbolize neatly following the pattern.
B. Irregular tiles represent the unpredictability of a discussion.
C. The small and irregular tiles stand for detailed information
that is being discussed in an unpredicatable interaction as
triggered by control questions (diagnostic questions).

8

Ideal class
room

8a - A paintbrush painting – close-up (animation)
8b - A pen writing text – no specific language – close-up
(animation)
8c - A computer screen while searching – no specific
company or results visible – close-up (animation)
8d – A moving landscape (animation)

A. Symbol for creativity.
B. Symbol for writing.
C. Symbol for online search.
D. The moving landscape represents the view we would have
when running .

9

Ideal class
room

9a - One abstract person (animation)
9b - A group of abstract persons (animation)
9c - A horde of abstract persons (animation)

A. B. C. speak for themselves.

Preparing the game
Prerequisites





Computer with a webcam (preferably a PC since the installation of Silverlight on a MAC can be more
troublesome)
Browser with MS Silverlight 5 plug-in
2+ GHz CPU
1+ GB RAM
Internet connection
Digiboard (or beamer with projection screen)

136

Silverlight
The IDentifEYE game has been developed as a MS Silverlight application. In order to be able to play the
game, the user must have a browser, preferably with the latest, MS Silverlight plug-in installed. The installed
version of the plug-in must at least support MS Silverlight version 5.
If you have a previous version of MS Silverlight installed, please de-install it completely before installing the
latest version.
MS Silverlight plug-ins are available for both Windows and OSX, as well as for a multitude of browsers.
IDentifEYE does not require a specific platform or a specific browser. Given the fact that Silverlight is a
Microsoft product though, best results will likely be obtained on a Windows machine, using Internet
Explorer. Only the Internet Explorer version of the Silverlight plug-in has the necessary hardware
acceleration for graphics operations.
IDentifEYE has been tested on both Windows and OSX, using Internet Explorer, Chrome and Safari (OSX
only). Chrome no longer supports Silverlight.
Silverlight can be downloaded free from: http://www.microsoft.com/getsilverlight/GetStarted/Install/Default.aspx Installation instructions are provided on the same page. After installation, the
user should be able to start the IDentifEYE game right away by visiting the url.
Mac Users should completed delete all earlier versions of Silverlight before installing V4 or V5.
Webcam
In terms of hardware, IDentifEYE does not impose any restrictions, other than the requirement of a
webcam. These days, most webcams are close to HD resolution. For performance reasons though,
IDentifEYE works with 320x240 screen captures. As long as the webcam supports that lower limit, it will
suffice for playing the game.
CPU
The CPU is the abbreviation for central processing unit. Sometimes referred to simply as the central
processor, but more commonly called processor, the CPU is the brains of the computer where most
calculations take place. In terms of computing power, the CPU is the most important element of a computer
system.
In theory, wherever the Silverlight plug-in runs, IDentifEYE will run. However, as IDentifEYE’s core
functionalities are all centered around the face detection, face tracking, augmentation and marker
detection -- which are all computationally (very) demanding operations -- it is recommended to have a
powerful CPU. What a powerful CPU is depends on the used platform and what other processes are running
on the machine at the same time, so it can’t be specified.
Great results have been obtained with Intel 2 GHz and up CPU’s. The effect of lesser CPU’s will be that the
machine’s CPU usage will peek while playing the game, and the cooler fan will probably spin up. During
tests, only when using an Intel Atom powered netbook, noticeable glitches in the game operations were
detected.
RAM
RAM is the acronym for random access memory, a type of computer memory that can be accessed
randomly; that is, any byte of memory can be accessed without touching the preceding bytes. RAM is the
most common type of memory found in computers and other electronic devices.

137

In terms of RAM, the IDentifEYE game can be pretty demanding. Due to the graphical nature of the game,
many images will be held in the memory at any one time while playing. Based on tests, a lower limit of 1 GB
of RAM was determined. Keep in mind, that other processes running on the same machine as the browser
will also consume RAM and might lead to a higher overall RAM usage.
Not having enough RAM available while playing the game will result in hard disk swapping -- orchestrated
by the operating system -- and ultimately creating unwanted visual side-effects (glitches).
Getting best results
Face detection
Face tracking in IDentifEYE is based on skin colour detection. In order to get best results, try to:
 Face the camera whilst playing the game;
 Sit straight in front of the camera, centering the face in the view pane;
 Sit at about 80 centimeters away from the camera;
 Avoid multiple faces and/or other body parts (like hands) in the camera view;
 Arrange for clear ambient light, that:
o does not cast a lot of shadows onto the face;
o does not cause bright highlights in the face, eyes or glasses;
 Sit in front of a background of a non-skin color. Blue and green backgrounds work best.
When you play the game and augmentations become jumpy or fails completely, one of the following things
is the matter:
 There is insufficient light;
 There are other objects in the camera’s view that are assumed to be (potential) faces.
When you play the game and augmentations are projected all over the game’s screen you are probably
sitting too close to the webcam.
Please make sure that when you show the marker to the webcam the whole marker is visible on the screen.
Please show the marker only until you see an indication that the marker has been recognized. Showing the
marker longer might cause the game to interpret the marker as the answer to the next question.
Tweaking face detection
In order to adjust the game to your environment, please visit http://id-eye2.ezzev.eu/?debug . Run the
game up to the point that your camera is activated. In the frame where you see yourself you’ll find sliders at
the bottom. These are your controls to play with.
Now you can tweak what shades of color should be interpreted as skin tones. This is based on YCbCr color
space (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/YCbCr) – as is the default for these kinds of applications.
On the screen you will see yellow sections – those are the detected skin tones. In red you’ll see what the
game considers to be your head. Now you can change the values of the thresholds in such a way that only
your head will be found and the section is not too jumpy. You will notice that the red section will have a
delay versus the yellow section. This is a conscious decision. It makes the augmentation less jumpy.
Make sure you use the debug functionality on the face of the person who is to play the game!

138

Once you have found the ideal setting for your environment, click “SAVE”. From that moment on the game
settings will be stored on that particular computer, also outside of the debug-page. If you want to return to
the default settings, just click DEFAULT and then SAVE.
Marker detection
To some extent the 4 markers (ABCD) are not a very sensitive process and therefore should not cause
marker detection errors. For best results however, avoid:
 Displaying multiple markers at the same time;
 Holding markers in a way that fingers overlap the marker (the black border is part of the actual
marker).
When things go wrong
Important
Silverlight applications run in a sandbox. This means that a Silverlight application cannot crash the browser,
nor can it freely access resources on the user’s computer. If a problem occurs related to the stability of the
browser, or to any other program or file on the user’s computer, IDentifEYE cannot be the cause!
Trouble shooting
Whenever a user has problems starting or playing the game, please do the following:
 Make sure the Silverlight plug-in is installed by visiting any other MS Silverlight based website, or
directly by going to the previously mentioned download URL;
 Make sure the user is not behind a firewall that blocks Silverlight applications (.XAP); XAP
(pronounced ZAP) is the file extension for a Silverlight-based application package (.xap). This file
contains the compressed assemblies and resources of a Silverlight 2 application.
 Determine whether the currently signed in user has enough privileges to:
o Download Silverlight games;
o Execute Silverlight games;
o Use the webcam.

139

Silverlight will show a popup every time that an application wants to access the webcam. On that popup a
user can choose to accept his choice. You should either not see the game URL on this tab, or see it with the
above Allowed permissions. In case you read Deny there, please remove the permission and restart the
browser. Next time, the same popup will be shown to ask for permission to access the webcam.

140

If you see yourself in this format (page image can differ with platform) you know the webcam is working
properly and the user has access permissions to use it.
The actual window lay-out of the Silverlight Preferences window and tabs may differ per operating system
and plugin version.
Still having problems
Sometimes, when the above doesn’t solve the experienced problems or lead you to a root cause, the
following might help:
 Uninstall Silverlight, then reinstall it;
 Clear the browsers cache;
 Add the game URL to the trusted sites of the browser.
Last resort
When all above fails, please make a written note of the items below to assist the game developers to help
you or rectify possible programme errors.
 Computer (Make / CPU / RAM / Webcam);
 Operating System (including version);
 Browser (including version);
 Firewall (yes/no);
 Wifi or wired network;
 Is the user administrator on his/her computer (yes/no);
 A clear description of the problem;

141

Screenshots of the problem screen (if applicable);
Screenshot of the Silverlight Preferences tabs (context menu, right click on the game).

Please Note
No data whatsoever are transferred to a server outside of the local machine on which the game is played.
No data are requested by an external server, neither are data offered to an external server.
The personal data that are optionally entered at the beginning of the game are temporarily stored in the
machine’s RAM during the game session. Those temporarily stored local data are cleared after the session
by means of the ‘explicit content clear’ functionality that is part of the game software.
It can thus be guaranteed that no data that are entered in the IDentifEYE game are stored for whatever
purposes, either externally or locally.

142

Preparations for the copying of the game
Preparations on PC/Laptops (for Windows):
 Create an Azure account http://azure.microsoft.com/ or get access to an existing account
 Download and install Visual Studio (2013 – http://www.dobreprogramy.pl/Visual-StudioUltimate,Program,Windows,12106.html; or 2015 - https://www.visualstudio.com/enus/downloads/download-visual-studio-vs.aspx ). Attention! Depending on the software
version you can be asked to install additional software.
 Download and install Silverlight 4 SDK http://www.microsoft.com/enus/download/details.aspx?id=7335
 Download and install NuGet http://www.nuget.org/
 Download and install Notepad++ https://notepad-plus-plus.org/download/
 Download and install Silverlight 5: http://www.microsoft.com/silverlight/
 Download and install an FTP client like: Total Commander
http://www.ghisler.com/download.htm or FileZilla https://filezillaproject.org/download.php?type=client
Online preparations (for an empty game, without any data like: questions, augmentations, texts):
 Go to http://manage.windowsazure.com/
 Log in with your Azure credentials
 Click (on the bottom of the screen): NEW -> COMPUTE -> WEB APP -> QUICK CREATE
 Choose a URL, for instance: test-ezzev.azurewebsites.net
 Choose an app service plan
 Click CREATE WEB APP
 In a few moments your web app will be created
 Go to WEB SITES (by choosing in the toolbar on the left)
 Select your web app, i.e: test-ezzev
 Go to DASHBOARD
 Click on DOWNLOAD THE PUBLISH PROFILE
 Save the profile on your disk, please remember where you saved it.
 Click (on the bottom of the screen): NEW -> DATA SERVICES -> SQL DATABASE -> CUSTOM
CREATE
 Choose the name of the database, i.e.: TEST
 Choose a subscription (your subscription will be chosen by default), choose the BASIC
service tier, choose your server and click COMPLETE
 In few moments your database will be created
Online preparations (for a copy of an existing game, with all data like: questions, augmentations,
texts):
 Go to http://manage.windowsazure.com/
 Log in with your Azure credentials
 Click (on the bottom of the screen): NEW -> COMPUTE -> WEB APP -> QUICK CREATE
143















Choose a URL, for instance: test2-ezzev.azurewebsites.net
Choose an app service plan
Click CREATE WEB APP
In a few moments your web app will be created
Go to WEB SITES (by choosing in toolbar on the left)
Select your web app, i.e: test-ezzev
Go to DASHBOARD
Click on DOWNLOAD THE PUBLISH PROFILE
Save the profile on your disk, please remember where you saved it.
Go to SQL DATABASES (by choosing in toolbar on the left)
Chose an existing database with the game, i.e. ID-EYE
Click COPY (on the bottom of the screen)
Choose the name for the copy of the database, i.e. TEST2
Choose a server and click COMPLETE
In few moments your database will be created

Copying of the game via FTP:
 Go to http://manage.windowsazure.com/
 Go to WEB SITES (by choosing in toolbar on the left)
 Select your web app with the existing game, i.e. IDENTIFEYE
 Go to DASHBOARD
 Click on DOWNLOAD THE PUBLISH PROFILE
 Save the profile on your disk, please remember where you saved it.
 Open the profile via regular notepad or Notepad++
 Look in the file for <publishProfile> for FTP (i.e. <publishProfile profileName="adt-ezzev FTP">) and copy to a different document:
 publishUrl (i.e.: ftp://waws-prod-am2-031.ftp.azurewebsites.windows.net/site/wwwroot )
 userName (i.e.: adt-ezzev\$adt-ezzev)
 userPWD (i.e.: tixHYirlZwBLXBclupBD6SLHKRXwTozw9pPjmEAoaRnLRN3lji1mifwpprG4)
 Open your ftp client
 Create a new connection using the url without "ftp://" and "/site/wwwroot) so only wawsprod-am2-031.ftp.azurewebsites.windows.net and provide your user name and password
 After you are logged in, copy all folders and data to your hard drive.
 After you are done, close the connection.
 Open the folder with downloaded files, go to: site\wwwroot\ and open the WEB.CONFIG
file with the Notepad++
 Go to the section <connectionStrings> and find the line starting with "<add name", i.e.
<add name="IDentifEYE" connectionString="Data
Source=tcp:lpqaf9z5zy.database.windows.net,1433;Initial Catalog=IDENTIFEYE;User
ID=identifeye@lpqaf9z5zy;Password=!d3nt1f3y3"
providerName="System.Data.SqlClient" />
 Change the Initial Catalog name to the name of your database, i.e. TEST. So the string
should look like <add name="IDentifEYE" connectionString="Data
Source=tcp:lpqaf9z5zy.database.windows.net,1433;Initial Catalog=TEST;User
ID=identifeye@lpqaf9z5zy;Password=!d3nt1f3y3"
144

















providerName="System.Data.SqlClient" />
Save the changes
Now go back to http://manage.windowsazure.com/
Go to WEB SITES (by choosing in toolbar on the left)
Select your web app created for the copy of the game,i.e. test-ezzev
Go to DASHBOARD
Click on DOWNLOAD THE PUBLISH PROFILE
Save the profile on your disk, please remember where you saved it.
Open the profile via regular notepad or Notepad++
Look in the file for and copy to a different document strings of characters for:
publishUrl (i.e.: ftp://waws-prod-am2-031.ftp.azurewebsites.windows.net/site/wwwroot )
(Attention. It should be the same as used before)
userName (i.e.: adt-ezzev\$adt-ezzev)
userPWD (i.e.: tixHYirlZwBLXBclupBD6SLHKRXwTozw9pPjmEAoaRnLRN3lji1mifwpprG4)
Open your ftp client
Create a new connection using the url without "ftp://" and "/site/wwwroot) so only wawsprod-am2-031.ftp.azurewebsites.windows.net and provided user name and password
After you are logged in, upload from your disk all downloaded files to opened space
When the upload is complete, you can close the ftp client.
Now go to the game's url (i.e. test-ezzev.azurewebsites.net) and test your game

Copying the game via Visual Studio:
 Open the developer file of the project
 If you will be asked, please log into your Azure account
 If the file already has built a solution, click on it with right mouse button and choose
PUBLISH SOLUTION.If not, first click BUILD SOLUTION, from the BUILD menu
 When the publish window will open, click IMPORT in the PROFILE section
 Choose the downloaded publish profile
 When the CONNECTION section will open, you will see all login data extracted from the file.
 Click NEXT
 In the SETTINGS section choose a database created for this game
 Click PUBLISH
 The game will be uploaded to the site
 When the publishing will finish, your game url will be opened by the browser
Adding access to game's CMS:
 Locate the WEB.CONFIG file (either on an FTP server, or a copy on your computer)
 Go to section <authentication>
 Under <credentials> add new login and new password, i.e. <user name="test@test.com"
password="43v3r" />
 Save the file
 If it's a local copy, log onto the FTP server, and replace it under "/site/wwwroot"
 Reload the CMS page in your web browser

145

Useful links:
 http://blogs.msdn.com/b/kaushal/archive/2014/08/02/microsoft-azure-web-site-connectto-your-site-via-ftp-and-upload-download-files.aspx#comments
 http://blogs.technet.com/b/cbernier/archive/2013/09/24/deploy-your-web-application-towindows-azure-from-with-visual-studio.aspx
 http://www.asp.net/mvc/overview/getting-started/database-first-development/publish-toazure

146

CREATING AN AR GAME
Intro
In this section you can find out how to use the IDentifEYE game CMS (Content Management
System) to create your own Augmented Reality game.
In the IDentifEYE CMS the following game elements can be defined:






Questions;
Answers;
Augmentations;
Sounds;
Ticker Tape texts;
Static texts – blocks and pages;
GUI (Graphic User Interface) labels.

All the language-based elements can be translated in the CMS in three languages besides the
default English language. The default English language could be replaced by another language by
overwriting it.
Log in
Go to the game CMS online. Use the game URL that has been provided to you but now add /cms to
the address.
Log-in information is required:

Username: [will be provided to you];
Password: [will be provided to you].

Creating questions
In the CMS a maximum of twenty questions can be defined.
To enter the question definition functionality you need to click on the navigation item Questions in
the navigation bar at the top of the screen.

On the page that opens you can add questions (by means of the link: Add new question), edit an
existing question by clicking on the question number as displayed to the left of a question and
delete a question by clicking on the X symbol on the right of an existing question.

147

All questions can be freely defined except for Q2. This is a system question that always triggers a
photo to be taken (answer option A) or an augmentation to occur on the place where the photo
would have been (answer option B). The place where the photo or the augmentation will appear is
a system defined value and cannot be changed in the CMS.
Add new question
After clicking the link Add new question a new form opens. Here you need to define the question
number – this defines the ranking order of the question. The question number will not be
displayed in the game. It is advisable to add the number manually to the question as an indication
of game progress.
The field number needs to be in the range from 1 to 20. Field number 2 is taken by the system
question.

148

Then the question itself can be entered – in a maximum of four languages. The game’s default
language is English but should an English version be absent the question will be displayed in the
first available language – even when playing the game in English. This also holds for the other
languages: should no question text be added in this language then the English translation of the
question will be displayed.
NB This language logic applies for most fields in the CMS. Only when described otherwise the
language fields below do not share this language logic.
Edit an existing question
After clicking the question number to the left of the question on the question overview page, an
individual question can be edited.
On this page the field number and the question itself can be edited in four languages.
To save the changes, click SAVE.
Delete a question
By clicking the X to the right of a question, individual questions can be deleted. After clicking the X
a pop-up will appear requesting a confirmation.
By deleting the question you will delete more than just the question. Also the associated answers,
augmentations, sounds and Ticker Tape texts will be deleted. So be careful with this functionality.
Question 2 is given. It is system defined and cannot be deleted.
Answers
On the question overview page answer functionalities are opened up by clicking on the displayed
answer option letters belonging to an individual question [A,B,C,D] or – if absent – by clicking on
the three dots that are displayed under the header Answers.

On the individual answer page a maximum of four answers can be entered or edited. These
answers are associated with the individual question that is displayed on the top of the page. The
answer options can be entered in four languages.
149

The default amount of four answers involves all questions except system question 2. System
question 2 has a maximum of two. This is system defined and cannot be changed in the CMS.
The answers should be kept as concise as possible since the GUI space for them is very limited.
There is no preview functionality. The only way to check whether the answers fit is by saving them
and then loading the game. Be sure to first empty your browser cache. In the game GUI it will show
whether the answers fit or not.
Answer options also can be edited and deleted on the same page where you have entered them.
You delete the answer option by just deleting your text and then SAVE the result. And you edit
answer options by just editing them and clicking SAVE.
Augmentations
On the question overview page augmentation functionalities are opened up by clicking on the
displayed answer option letters belonging to an individual questions [A,B,C,D] or – if absent – by
clicking on the three dots that are displayed under the header Augmentation.

150

This opens a page containing an overview of the existing augmentations and their characteristics
(type, layer number, permanent or not and static or not). On this page existing augmentations can
be deleted.

When clicking on the letter placed before the individual augmentations [A,B,C,D] an individual
augmentation page opens. On this page we can add or delete one or more augmentations, define
the layer number of the augmentations, define whether it’s permanent and whether it follows the
player’s head.
Adding images is simple: one uploads images by means of the UPLOAD IMAGES button.

151

Augmentations for the AR game are created in layers – like in Photoshop


.PNG format, most preferably PNG-8;
Resolution: 640 x 480;
They take a template as their starting point:

The template layer is used to position the augmentation’s location vis-à-vis the future player’s head
and to establish its relative size. When the augmentations are finished the template layer is NOT
included in the end result.
They are created in mirror reverse.

If you add more than one image the game will display the images at a rate of 12 frames per second
in the following order of their alphanumerical file names. This means that you’ll need 12 images
for one second of animation. The CMS automatically then changes its type from image to
animation and adds the amount of uploaded images on the overview page.
The uploaded image(s) can be removed by clicking ticking their boxes and then clicking the SAVE
button.
NB If the original images should be uploaded again as augmentations after they have been
deleted before it is not sufficient to simply upload them again. The images should first be
renamed.

152

The layer number is simply entered. The higher the layer number the higher the augmentation is
located on the screen – and the less chances it has to be blocked by a next augmentation on the
same place.
The highest layer number, 1000, is a system layer number for the pictures taken or the
augmentation triggered by answering question 2.
If you would choose a layer number that was already used before for an augmentation belonging
to an earlier question it replaces the earlier augmentation. In the same way an augmentation
linked to a later question that is given the same layer number as the current one will replace the
current one.
By ticking the box “Augmentation stays until it's layer is recycled.” you’ll create an augmentation
that is permanent. Not ticking the box means the augmentation is only temporary.
By the ticking the box “Augmentation should not follow the user's face.” you’ll create an
augmentation that remains static at the same place on the screen. Not ticking the box means that
the augmentation will follow the user’s face.
The last element to add on this page is sound. A sound file can be uploaded here simply by clicking
the UPLOAD AUDIO button. The sound will be released accompanying the augmentation and will
last until the player chooses a next answer in the game.
NB Be careful with heavy sound files. They might seriously interfere with the game’s
performance.
Ticker Tape text
A next option to add to an answer option – besides augmentation and sound – is a Ticker Tape
text. The Ticker Tape is a flowing text field displaying texts at the top of the player’s game screen.
Ticker Tape texts are permanent.
On the question overview page Ticker Tape text functionalities are opened up by clicking on the
displayed Ticker Tape texts belonging to an individual question or – if absent – by clicking on the
three dots that are displayed under the header Ticker Tape Text.

153

On this page a new Ticker Tape text can be added or existing Ticker Tape texts can be edited or
deleted.

Add a new Ticker Tape text
A new Ticker Tape text can be added by clicking on the Add new ticker tape text link on the Ticker
Tape text overview page. On the form that opens now an answer option needs to be chosen with
which the Ticker Tape text will be associated. Then the new Ticker Tape text can be entered in four
languages.

Editing an existing Ticker Tape text
On the Ticker Tape text overview page all existing Ticker Tape texts are displayed. By clicking on the
displayed answer option letters belonging to an individual question [A,B,C,D] or – if absent – by
clicking on the three dots that are displayed under the header Ticker Tape Text an individual Ticker
Tape text editing page opens. On this page a text edited by just editing them and clicking SAVE.
Deleting an existing Ticker Tape text
On the Ticker Tape text overview page all existing Ticker Tape texts are displayed with an X to the
right of them. Clicking that X will delete the text in all four languages. By clicking on the letter
[A,B,C,D] to the left of the ticker tape text line on the individual ticker tape text page linked to an
individual answer a page opens where the entered ticker tape text can be deleted – if followed by
clicking the SAVE button.

154

Static Texts
Static texts are larger text fields that are displayed at the IDentifEYE game site. These static texts
consist of static text pages that can be opened by the player by clicking a link on the game site and
of text blocks on the opening screen of the game.
The static texts editor can be entered by clicking the navigation item Texts in the in the navigation
bar above.

After clicking the navigation item Texts a static texts overview page opens. Here all the static texts
are displayed as fields belonging to system codes. Next to it are the static texts in a maximum of
four languages.

If no texts are defined the system code itself will be displayed at the place where the static text
would have been displayed had they be defined.
To enter, edit or delete a static text one should click on the system code. Now an individual static
text page opens in which the text can be entered, edited or deleted in a maximum of four
languages.

155

The static pages have an additional option. The individual text pages also allow for uploading an
image and editing or deleting this image.
Labels
Labels are short texts as displayed in the IDentifEYE site and game GUI. These include button texts,
headers, labels and titles.
The labels should be kept as concise as possible since the GUI space for them is very limited.
There is no preview functionality. The only way to check whether the labels fit is by saving them
and then loading the game – first empty your browser cache. In the game GUI it will show whether
the labels fit or not.
The labels editor can be entered by clicking the navigation item Labels in the in the navigation bar
at the top of the screen.

After clicking the navigation item Labels a labels overview page opens. Here all the labels are
displayed as fields belonging to system codes. Next to it are the labels in a maximum of four
languages.

156

On this page labels can be added, edited or deleted for a maximum of four languages. One just
needs to add, edit or delete a text and click the SAVE button.
If no texts are defined the system code itself will be displayed at the place where the label would
have been displayed had it be defined.

157

IDentifEYE WORKSHOP – DECLARATION OF CONSENT PARTICIPATION AND USE
OF IMAGE

I, the undersigned, agree to participate in the workshop based on the educational European project
IDentifEYE [2013-1-GR1-LEO05-13907] - realized within the Lifelong Learning Programme LEONARDO DA
VINCI – and agree to be registered in audio, video and photo format while performing activities during the
workshops and events.
During the IDentifEYE workshop participants will create, implement and evaluate 45-minutes
lessons plans for students aged 8-14 that enhance student resilience to deal with online experiences – and
thereby enhances student online safety – while at the same time empowering a conscious, creative and
critical stance by students as evolving responsible citizens. Important tools to achieve this are an
Augmented Reality game, interactive didactics and elements of prophylactics.
Registered materials will be used for non-commercial purposes only on the Internet and in
electronic and in printed media. I declare my consent to the publication of my activities, statements and
images (photos, videos).
I agree to the processing of my personal data – and the publishing of my first, last name, profession
and country of residence –for research purposes and purposes associated with media education.
More about ID-EYE project can be found at the project website: http://www.id-eye.eu.
PARTICIPANT NAME
NAME OF LEGAL CUSTODIAN
(IF APPLIABLE)
CONTACT
TELEPHONE
DATA
SIGNATURE

E-MAIL
DATE/ PLACE

[INSERT YOUR ORGANIZATION NAME, LOGO, CONTACT DATA]

158

INSTRUCTOR EVALUATION
After the workshop
How many teachers stated in their evaluation form that during their implementation lesson they
made a positive impact on:
#POSITIVE IMPACT
OUT OF HOW MANY
PARTICIPANTS
THEIR TEACHING
THEIR STUDENTS
STUDENT ONLINE SAFETY
How many teachers stated that they will use workshop good practices again?
INDIVIDUAL WORKSHOP
# WILL USE AGAIN
# WILL NEVER USE AGAIN
GOOD PRACTICE

List of Best Practices and Lessons Learned
BEST PRACTICES

LESSONS LEARNED

159

How do you assess the workshop impact on teachers, students and student online safety?
IMPACT ON
1 – Very
2345 – Very
negative
Negative
Neutral
Positive
positive
TEACHERS
STUDENTS
STUDENT ONLINE
SAFETY
After a few months
How many teachers are still using workshop good practices?
INDIVIDUAL WORKSHOP GOOD PRACTICE
#TEACHERS STILL USING IT

How many teachers have tried out workshop good practices after the workshop that they have not
tried out during their individual implementation lesson?
INDIVIDUAL WORKSHOP GOOD PRACTICE
#TEACHERS TRIED OUT AFTER THE
WORKSHOP

How do you assess the workshop impact on teachers, students and student online safety?
IMPACT ON
1 – Very
2345 – Very
negative
Negative
Neutral
Positive
positive
TEACHERS
STUDENTS
STUDENT ONLINE
SAFETY

160

WORKSHOP DOCUMENTS
In this section you’ll find the documents you’ll need during your workshop with your participants.
The WORKSHOP POWERPOINT is a visual support for your participants to keep track of your
themes. In each session description you’ll find a table that tells you which slide to show when.
The SUCCESS CRITERIA document is to make your participants understand what they should be
able to do after each session. The explicit criteria should help your participants focus on which part
of your transfer of knowledge and skills is essential to them.
The GOOD PRACTICES overviews for the workshop modules on four levels are to serve as a big
basket from which your participants will pick at least one for each level to implement in their own
implementation lesson.
The GAME MARKERS you will need to play the game. The GAME TASK is important to understand
for teachers of students in age group 8-11. You should tell them that the task consists of students
drawing their own online identity, inspired by the game. You could let the teachers try out the task
by asking them to draw their online identities, either in forms or by means of words. Also let the
participants get acquainted with the GAME QUESTIONNAIRE that students are to fill out after
having played the game.
The LESSON PLAN template is of utmost importance because your participants are to spend a part
of the third and the fourth session filling this out. Since you are to give them support, you should
be very familiar with the template.
The EVALUATION documents are also of great importance, because they will be the feedback from
the teachers to you about their implementation lessons. The EVALUATION document itself
concerns teachers only. The IMPLEMENTATION EVALUATION CRITERIA document concerns both
your teachers and their students.
The last document, the CERTIFICATE, is to be personalized by you for all your participants and
serves as recognition of your participants’ efforts and progress in the workshop.

161

WORKSHOP PRESENTATION 8-11

162

163

164

165

166

WORKSHOP PRESENTATION 12-14

167

168

169

170

171

SUCCESS CRITERIA
SESSION 1
[8-11] You are able to explain the impact effects of identity labels and learning types on three
levels: your teaching, your students and student online safety.
[12-14] You are able to explain the impact effects of identity labels and the concept of “liquid life”
on three levels: your teaching, your students and student online safety.
SESSION 2
You are able to explain the impact effects of interactive didactics and prophylactics on three levels:
their teaching, their students and student online safety.
SESSION 3
You are able to explain the impact effects of educational technologies and the AR game on three
levels: your teaching, your students and student online safety.
SESSION 4
You are able to write down hypotheses on the impact effects of your lesson plan on three levels:
your teaching, your students and student online safety.
IMPLEMENTATION SESSION
You are able to test the impact effects of your lesson plan on three levels: your teaching, your students and
student online safety.

SESSION 5
You are able to evaluate the impact effects of your lesson plan on three levels: your teaching, your
students and student online safety.

172

LEVEL 1 GOOD PRACTICES
Age group 8-11
Identity labels Good Practices
 Let students repeat and understand the following three sentences:
o
o
o

Sometimes I make mistakes;
Sometimes my motivation is egoistic;
I am part of the problem.


And explain the sense behind it.
Ask your students whether they agree or not and how they feel saying these sentences.


Give students feedback and let them distinguish between coaching and evaluation;
Give students evaluation and let them distinguish between assessment, consequences and
judgment;
Have students create a second scoring card to record how they reacted to a first situation.

Learning type Good Practices


Make students aware what kind of learners they are;
Allow for failure in learning;
Create a situation of “flow”:
o Present them with a task that challenges available skills but is within reach;
o State clear goals;
o The effect: concentration, loss of self-consciousness, loss of feeling of time.

173

LEVEL 1 GOOD PRACTICES
Age group 12-14
Identity labels Good Practices
 Let students repeat and understand the following three sentences:
o
o
o

Sometimes I make mistakes;
Sometimes my motivation is egoistic;
I am part of the problem.


And explain the sense behind it.
Ask your students whether they agree or not and how they feel saying these sentences.


Give students feedback and let them distinguish between coaching and evaluation;
Give students evaluation and let them distinguish between assessment, consequences and
judgment;
Have students create a second scoring card to record how they reacted to a first situation.

“Liquid life” Good Practices
The only way to have a chance on self-respect is by gaining civil skills that facilitate us in living with
Others:




Conducting a dialogue;
Conducting a negotiation;
Gaining mutual understanding;
Managing and resolving conflicts;
Being able to learn and to react to new situations.

174

LEVEL 2 GOOD PRACTICES
Age groups 8-11; 12-14
Interactive didactics Good Practices
 Ask diagnostic questions during the lesson;
 Let students indicate whether they still follow you; if not let another student explain who
indicate they still follow;
 Not the typical students’ “hands in the air” decides which students answer a question but a
random selection by drawing.

175

LEVEL 3 GOOD PRACTICES
Age group 8-11
Prophylactics Good Practices
 Use interactive methods, in which the teacher initiates the interaction and engages the
children. The children are active participants and influence the course of interaction. For
instance the Project-based Learning Method.
 Activities in which the teacher acts as an adviser, friend or mentor and only coordinates
and moderates ideas, plans and activities formed by the students themselves are the most
effective ones.
 Based on the diagnosis of students the teacher plans what skills they should gain and
experience during the project. The teacher implies a very clear and specific educational
aim.
 Implement elements such as: discussion, brainstorm, task division, summary of each
implementation stage, evaluation of the whole project, discussion on lessons learned.
 It is essential to sustain the motivation and faith of students, the faith of the teacher in the
possibilities of the children helps them to endure failure, learn from mistakes and thus
learn persistence.
 „Treat yourself as a tool” – this applies to the teacher self-improvement process – as a tool
you need to improve - so develop and train yourself, take care of your professional skills
and develop skills useful for working with young people. This assumption can also have
another aspect - if you can convince young people to this approach at an early age, they
will learn the value and power of self-development.
 “I’m part of the problem” - this approach to oneself should greatly facilitate your work and
cause more credibility as an adult in relationships with children. It is a difficult approach to
your work, because it assumes that in most problematic student situations you can have a
distinct contribution - not necessarily a positive one. For example, if a student does not
understand the lesson/ topic, analyze what you do or don’t do to cause a lack of progress
before you will give them a grade. This teacher attitude builds in the child a sense of justice,
faith in adults and increases their self-esteem (as a young individual who is treated as a
subject, and not as an object).

176

LEVEL 3 GOOD PRACTICES
Age group 12-14
Prophylactics Good Practices
 Use interactive methods, in which the teacher initiates the interaction and engages the
children. The children are active participants and influence the course of interaction. For
instance the Project-based Learning Method.
 Activities in which the teacher acts as an adviser, friend or mentor and only coordinates
and moderates ideas, plans and activities formed by the students themselves are the most
effective ones.
 Based on the diagnosis of students the teacher plans what skills they should gain and
experience during the project. The teacher implies a very clear and specific educational
aim.
 Implement elements such as: discussion, brainstorm, task division, summary of each
implementation stage, evaluation of the whole project, discussion on lessons learned.
 Young people need to confront their ideas with adults – therefore you should not avoid
"difficult issues".
 It is essential to sustain the motivation and faith of students, the faith of the teacher in the
possibilities of the children helps them to endure failure, learn from mistakes and thus
learn persistence.
 „Treat yourself as a tool” – this applies to the teacher self-improvement process – as a tool
you need to improve - so develop and train yourself, take care of your professional skills
and develop skills useful for working with young people. This assumption can also have
another aspect - if you can convince young people to this approach at an early age, they
will learn the value and power of self-development.
 “I’m part of the problem” - this approach to oneself should greatly facilitate your work and
cause more credibility as an adult in relationships with children. It is a difficult approach to
your work, because it assumes that in most problematic student situations you can have a
distinct contribution - not necessarily a positive one. For example, if a student does not
understand the lesson/ topic, analyze what you do or don’t do to cause a lack of progress
before you will give them a grade. This teacher attitude builds in the child a sense of justice,
faith in adults and increases their self-esteem (as a young individual who is treated as a
subject, and not as an object).

177

LEVEL 4 GOOD PRACTICES
Age groups 8-11; 12-14
Education technology Good Practices
WEB 2.0 TOOLS
Blogs
Wikis
Tagging and social bookmarking
applications


Blogger: Professional e-portfolio www.blogger.com
Wordpress: Professional e-portfolio www.wordpress.org

Wikipedia: Info management and sharing
www.wikipedia.org

Delicious: Info management and sharing
www.delicious.com
Diigo: Info management and sharing www.diigo.com



Social networks



Multimedia sharing



Audio blogging and podcasting



Collaboration & Communication
services





Aggregation services

TOOLS & SUGGESTED USE

LinkedIn: Personal and professional networks
www.linkedin.com
Instagram: Personal and professional networks
www.instagram.com
Twitter: Personal and professional networks
www.twitter.com
Google+: Personal and professional networks
www.plus.google.com
Edmodo: Info management and sharing
www.edmodo.com
Fotobabble: Communication skills development
www.fotobabble.com
Vimeo: Info management and sharing www.vimeo.com
AudioBoo: Communication skills development
www.audioboo.fm
iPadio: Communication skills development
www.ipadio.com
Google Docs: Effective collaboration
www.drive.google.com
Google Drive: Effective collaboration
www.drive.google.com
Dropbox: Effective collaboration www.dropbox.com
YouTube: Info management and sharing
www.youtube.com
Clilstore: Communication without barriers
www.multidict.net
Skype: Communication without barriers
www.skype.com
WhatsApp: Communication without barriers
www.whatsapp.com
Khan Academy: Info management and sharing
www.khanacademy.org

178




Office-like applications

Reflection tools

Google Maps: Info management and sharing
www.google.com/maps
Scoop.it: Info management and sharing www.scoop.it
Paper.li: Info management and sharing www.paper.li
Google Alerts: Info management and sharing
www.google.com/alerts





Mind24: Engaging presentations www.mind24.com
Prezi: Engaging presentations www.prezi.com
Screenr: Engaging presentations www.screenr.com
Slideshare: Engaging presentations www.slideshare.net
GoAnimate: Engaging presentations
www.goanimate.com



IDentifEYE AR game: Serous game
8-11: http://identifeye.ezzev.eu/
12-14: http://id-eye2.ezzev.eu/

179

AR MARKERS

180

IDentifEYE WORKSHOP - AR game task
AGE GROUP: 8-11
FIRST NAME AND FAMILY NAME
CLASS
AGE

PLACE/
DATE

181

IDentifEYE WORKSHOP - AR game questionnaire
Age group: 8-11 / 12-14
FIRST NAME AND FAMILY NAME
CLASS
AGE

PLACE/ DATE

QUESTIONNAIRE QUESTIONS
1

What use does this kind of Augmented Reality game have during the lesson? /Please
answer in one sentence /

2

What do you think about the game? /Mark with X one of four possibilities/:
boring
innovative
exciting
interesting
3 Were the questions in the game understandable for you? /Mark with X one of three
possibilities/:
yes
no
partially
4 Were the symbols in the game understandable for you? /Mark with X one of three possibilities/:
yes
no
partially
5 Would you be willing to play this game again? /Mark with X one of three possibilities/:
yes
no
don’t know
Why (not)? /Please answer in one sentence/

6

7
8

Were you more than usually engaged in the course and the theme of this lesson?
/Mark with X one of three possibilities/:
yes
no
don’t know
Do you feel co-responsible for your learning? /Mark with X one of three possibilities/:
yes
no
don’t know
If you have any remarks – please write them here:

182

LESSON PLAN (45 minutes duration)
Age group: 8-11

FIRST AND LAST NAME
SCHOOL
DATE
EMAIL ADDRESS

LESSON NAME
CURRICULAR
IF CURRICULAR WHAT SUBJECT

EXTRA-CURRICULAR

CHALLENGE/
OPPORTUNITY
LEARNING OBJECTIVES
SUCCESS CRITERIA

GOOD PRACTICES CHOSEN
LEVEL 1 – SUBJECTS
LEVEL 2 – DIDACTICS
LEVEL 3 – PROPHYLACTICS
INCLUDING AR GAME
IF NO WHY NOT

YES

IF NOT WHAT EDTECH

183

NO

PLANNED IMPACT
ON MY TEACHING

ON MY STUDENTS

ON STUDENT ONLINE SAFETY

ASSESSMENT TYPES

184

LESSON PLAN
DESCRIPTION

185

TEACHER EVALUATION

186

187

EVALUATION
FIRST AND LAST NAME
SCHOOL
DATE
EMAIL ADDRESS

LESSON NAME
HOW WAS YOUR
CHALLENGE/
OPPORTUNITY
ADDRESSED?
ASSESSMENT
RESULTS

LESSON IMPACT
ON YOUR
TEACHING

LESSON IMPACT
ON YOUR
STUDENTS

188

LESSON IMPACT
ON STUDENT
ONLINE SAFETY

WHICH GOOD
PRACTICE WILL
YOU USE AGAIN?

WHICH GOOD
PRACTICE WILL
YOU NEVER USE
AGAIN?

DID YOU MEET YOUR
LEARNING OBJECTIVES
MEASURED AGAINST
YOUR SUCCESS
CRITERIA?

ADDITIONAL REMARKS

189

TEACHER EVALUATION TOOLS
For your students
Create a questionnaire with the following multiple choice questions measuring the broadness of
identity labels (questions 1 – 3), the fixedness of mindsets (question 4, for age group 8-11), the
level of tolerance for otherness (question 4, for age group 12-14). Hand these out at the start of
the implementation lesson.
Q1
Q2
Q3
Q4
Q4

From time to time I make mistakes. Agree/ Don’t agree.
From time to time my motivation is selfish. Agree/ Don’t agree.
If there is a problem, I’m part of it. Agree/ Don’t agree.
[8-11] It’s a good thing to fail from time to time. Agree/ Don’t agree.
[12-14] I have the skills to communicate with people who have a completely different
opinion than I have. Agree/ Don’t agree.

Count the amount of “Agree”s and take this score as point zero. Then ask the same questions at
the end of the implementation lesson. Again count the amount of “Agree”s and take this score as
point one. The amount of “Agrees” at point one should at least be 10% higher. Enter the results in
the evaluation template under the section: “Lesson impact on your students”.

Student online safety
Add to the questionnaire one question on online safety:
Q5

Rate the following on a scale from 1 (don’t agree at all) to 5 (very much agree): if
something bad happens online I’ll know what to do.

Ask the same questions at the end of the implementation lesson. Enter the results in the
evaluation template under the section: “Lesson impact on student online safety”.

For you [the teacher]
Rate the expected positive impact of the following elements on a scale from “1” (very low
expectations) to “5” (very high expectations) before your implementation lesson:
 Identity theory;
 Interactive didactics;
 Prophylactics;
 Augmented Reality.

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These ratings are your point zero. After the implementation lesson but before you fill out the
evaluation template rate the elements again, but this time on experienced positive impact:
 Identity theory;
 Interactive didactics;
 Prophylactics;
 Augmented Reality.
These ratings are your point one. Now enter both scores in the evaluation template under the
section: “Lesson impact on your teaching”.

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Project title: Augmented Reality towards better understanding of Online Identities - IDentifEYE –
2013-1-GR1-LEO05-13907

CERTIFICATE OF WORKSHOP ATTENDANCE
In the IDentifEYE workshop participants learn to create, implement and evaluate 45-minutes lessons
plans for students aged 8 -14 that enhance student resilience to deal with online experiences – and
thereby enhances student online safety – while at the same time empowering a conscious, creative
and critical stance by students as evolving responsible citizens. Important tools to achieve this are an
Augmented Reality game, interactive didactics and elements of prophylactics.
The workshop is based on the educational European project IDentifEYE [2013-1-GR1-LEO05-13907] realized within the Lifelong Learning Programme LEONARDO DA VINCI. The workshop was piloted in
Greece, Poland, Spain and Lithuania. It originated in Cyprus and the Netherlands.
More about ID-EYE project can be found at the project website: http://www.id-eye.eu.

PARTICIPANT NAME
DATE
PLACE
INSTRUCTOR NAME
INSTRUCTOR SIGNATURE

192

PROJECT PARTNERS

CrystalClearSoft (Greece)

http://www.ccseducation.com/

CrystalClearSoft (CCS) was founded in 2005 by a group of
teachers and technologists who recognized the benefits
that new technologies can bring to both teachers and
learners of all ages. The mission of CCS is to propel the
teaching-learning process into a new era, increasing its
effectiveness through the use of specially structured
technologies.

EZZEV Foundation (EF) is a small non-profit foundation
that stimulates youngsters’ awareness on their online
rights and on the effects of their online presence, as well
as technologies that enable on-topic communication with
youngsters. EF was founded in 2005.
Ezzev Foundation (The Netherlands)
http://www.ezzev.eu/

COSMIC INNOVATIONS (COIN) is a very dynamic
consultancy offering a vast range of services bridging the
gap between the commercial and public/EU funding
ecosystems.
Cosmic Innovations (Cyprus)
http://www.cosmic-innovations.eu/

Fundacja Citizen Project (Poland)
http://www.foundationcitizenproject.
eu/home/

COIN’s service provision ranges from business
development and public funding acquisition to custom
implementation, training and technology transfer. All
services are offered with focus on high quality of results
which is what separates COIN from most consultancies
that distance themselves from technical implementations
leaving their customers exposed.
The Citizen Project Foundation (FCP) is a small non-profit
foundation. It aims to empower civil society by promoting
new media skills, new didactics and civil skills among
Polish and European citizens. The foundation functions as
a network organization, cooperating with volunteers,
experts and institutions such as schools and local
government organizations alike.

193

The Gdansk Centre for Addiction Prevention (GCPU) was
created by the Gdansk local government to initiate, realize
and coordinate actions in the field of addiction
prevention.
Gdańskie Centrum Profilaktyki
Uzależnień (Poland)
http://www.gcpu.pl/

Within the GCPU there is one team specialized in school
and extracurricular prevention, psychological or pedagogic
help, while a second team undertakes activities associated
with education, providing training information and
organizing campaigns to raise social awareness,
knowledge and a sense of responsibility conducted in
cooperation with the police and local media on behalf of
the Gdansk mayor.
The mission of GCPU is the improvment of the quality of
life of Gdansk inhabitants through the reduction of
problems connected with addictions and family violence.
The organization cooperates with groups of professional
and social workers, NGOs, schools and public institutions.

Viešoji įstaiga JAUNIMO KARJEROS
CENTRAS (Lithuania)
www.karjeroscentras.eu

JKC is non-governmental, non-profit organisation with
more than 10 years' experience supporting youth and
adults through non-formal education programmes and
guidance services. It aims to meet public needs through
educational, scientific, cultural, social and legal initiatives.
JKC has 5 permanent staff members and a strong network
of trainers, experts, consultants and advisers providing
education and guidance all around the country.
Since 2001 JKC actively works with teachers and
educational support staff (psychologists, social
pedagogues, etc.) in order to equip them with knowledge
and skills and provide them resources necessary for
expanding lifelong learning and guidance opportunities in
their schools. As the accredited in-service teacher training
institution it constantly implements projects for
development of teaching/learning tools and resources and
delivering in-service trainings, which could contribute to
the successful guidance and skills development in
educational system.

194

Fundación Privada Joan XXIII
http://www.cetei.info
http://www.j23.fje.edu/

The CETEI, under Joan XXIII Foundation is a center of
technological innovation that creates new opportunities
for personal and professional development throughout
long life learning, creates synergies between training and
employment and improving competitiveness and business
productivity.
The CETEI acts as comprehensive provision and
management of projects in education center to boost
innovation and profound change in schools and
institutions in their transformation challenges and
improve their professional skills.
It is divided into four areas:
- Pedagogical Innovation
- Application of ICT in the classroom
- Leadership techno-pedagogical
- Educational consulting services.
The CETEI is the Jesuitas Educación Foundation and its
center’s node of educational innovation through ICT and
the Internet. CETEI also offers educational innovation in
teaching and learning methodologies, transformation and
change of schools services.

195

SUPPORTING PARTNERS

Gdańsk

Ateneum Szkoła Wyższa w Gdańsku

http://www.gdansk.pl/

http://ateneum.edu.pl/

Szkoła Podstawowa nr 57 w Gdańsku
Primary School no. 57 in Gdansk
www.sp57gda.pl

Szkoła Podstawowa nr 21 w Gdańsku
Primary School no. 21 in Gdansk
www.sp21.to.pl

Szkoła Podstawowa nr 75 w Gdańsku
Primary School no. 75 in Gdansk
www.zssio.eu/szkolapodstawowa

Szkoła Podstawowa nr 79 w Gdańsku
Primary School no. 79 in Gdansk
www.sp79.gda.pl

Gimnazjum nr 10 w Gdańsku
Secondary School no. 10 in Gdansk
www.gim10.edu.pl

Gimnazjum nr 2 w Gdańsku
Secondary School no. 2 in Gdansk
www.gim2.gda.pl

105ο ΔΗΜΟΤΙΚΟ ΣΧΟΛΕΙΟ ΑΘΗΝΩΝ
105st Primary School of Athens

Gimnazjum nr 25 w Gdańsku
Secondary School no. 25 in Gdansk

www.gimnazjum25.pl

JESUITAS BELLVITGE
BELLVITGE JESUIT

JESUITAS CASP. SAGRAT COR DE JESUS
CASP JESUIT. JESUS' SACRED HEART

http://www.joan23.fje.edu/

http://www.casp.fje.edu/
196

JESUITAS EL CLOT. ESCOLA DEL CLOT
CLOT JESUIT. CLOT SCHOOL
http://www.clot.fje.edu/

JESUITES GRÀCIA. ESCOLA KOTSKA
GRÀCIA JESUIT. KOTSKA SCHOOL
http://www.kostka.fje.edu/

JESUITES POBLE SEC. ESCOLA SANT PERE CLAVER
POBLE SEC JESUIT. SANT PERE CLAVER SCHOOL
http://www.spclaver.fje.edu/

JESUITES SANT GERVASI. ESCOLA INFANT JESUS
SANT GERVASI JESUIT. JESUS SCHOOL
http://www.santgervasi.fje.edu/

JESUITES SARRIA. SANT IGNASI.
SARRIA JESUIT. SANT IGNASI
http://www.santignasi.fje.edu/

Kauno Simono Daukanto vidurinė mokykla
Kaunas Simonas Daukantas middle school
http://www.daukantas.kaunas.lm.lt/

Kauno Rokų gimnazija
Kaunas Rokai gymnasium

Prienų rajono Veiverių Tomo Žilinsko gimnazija
Prienai disctric of Veiveriai Tomas Zilinskas
gymnasium
http://www.vtzg.lt /

Raseinių rajono Nemakščių Martyno Mažvydo
gimnazija
Raseiniai district of Nemaksciai Martynas
Mazvydas gymnasium
www.nemaksciugimnazija.lt

KTU Vaižganto progimnazija
KTU Vaizgantas pro-gymnasium
www.ktuprogimnazija.lt

Kauno Jono Jablonskio gimnazija
Kaunas Jonas Jablonskis gymnasium
www.jablonskis.kaunas.lm.lt

Biržų "Aušros" pagrindinė mokykla
Birzai "Ausra" high school
http://birzuausra.lt

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VERY SPECIAL THANKS TO:
All who contributed to implementation of the project and Paweł Adamowicz, Irena Adamowska,
María Teresa Arbués, Mariola Ataman-Mańkowska, Anna Baranowska, Beata Bukowska, Maria
Christodoulou, Patrycja Cybulska, Anna Dąbrowska-Górska , Miguel Delgado Caballero, Dimitris
Diamantis, Anna Dolata, Jadwiga Drosdowska, Jelmer Evers, Alicja Fortenbach, Greta Gedgaudaitė,
Ewelina Gerke, Hanna Górecka, Joanna Gregorowicz, Michał Guć, Onno Hansen, Mattheos Kakaris,
Petra Keller, Piotr Kowalczuk, Joanna Kowalczyk, Jakub Kownacki, Jovyta Kumpienė, Adam
Landowski, Lidia Lisińska, Hans en Sofie van Manen, Elena Mantzari, Katarzyna Marczewska,
Milena Misztal, Urszula Młynarczyk, Anna Mrotek, Radosław Nowak, Piotr Olech, Henryk
Olszewski, Chara Papanikolaou, Monika Piotrzkowska-Dziamska, Małgorzata Perzyna, Liliana
Płoszaj, Agata Rafałowska, Anna Rejkowska, Piotr Romanowski, Magdalena Skiba, Sylwia Sorn,
Marzena Sorokosz, Beata Staszyńska, Teresa Staszyńska, Ewelina Szajdziuk, Grzegorz Szczuka,
Waldemar Tłokiński, Anna Turowska, Antonis Vlahakis, Hein Wils, Anna Wolińska, Dariusz
Wołodźko, Elżbieta Zakrzewska, Michał Zapolski-Downar, Katarzyna Ziemann, Joanna Zorn-Szumiło,
all students from Gdansk schools, all the participants in the Polish, Spanish, Greek and Lithuanian
workshop.

198

COLOPHON
PROJECT TITLE: Augmented Reality towards better understanding of Online Identities
IDentifEYE - 2013-1-GR1-LEO05-13907
EDITORS: Onno Hansen, Beata Staszyńska
ASSISTANT EDITORS: Jakub Kownacki, Ewelina Gerke, Chara Papanikolaou
TEXTS: Onno Hansen, Beata Staszyńska, Mattheos Kakaris, Radosław Nowak , Jakub Kownacki
GRAPHIC DESIGN: Chara Papanikolaou, Beata Staszyńska
PHOTOS, ILLUSTRATIONS: Jakub Kownacki, Beata Staszyńska
ISBN: 978-83-63988-10-4
COPYRIGHT BY: IDentifEYE – WWW.ID-EYE.EU
NOT FOR SALE