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From the Method to the Wesen:

The Hermeneutical Experience in Truth and Method as a Clue.

109

[]

(wirkungsgecshichtliches
bewusstsen)

NameLI, CHIN-YUN
DepartmentGraduate School of Religion
ProfessorLUH JING-JONG
TopicFrom the Method to the Wesen: Take the Hermeneutical Experience of
Truth and Method as a Clue.
KeywordGadamerexperiencehermeneutical experienceTruth and Method
hermeneutic
Total pages109
Abstract
The aim of this dissertation is to research the concepts of experience, which is from
Gadamer, that is the essence of hermeneutic experience. He discusses Husserl first
and finds his effort to return to concrete experience laudable and sincere. However,
Gadamer also criticizes Husserl because the pure transcendental subjectivity of the
ego is not given as such but always given in the idealization of language.
He also discusses Francis Bacons concept of experience in the Novum Organum
and applauds his exploration of the prejudices that hold the mind captive, but
Gadamer is interested in what Bacon wants to exclude, the idols of the tribe and the
marketplace.
The fact that experience is true until contradicted by new experience is really
rehabilitation, Gadamer says, of Aristotles theory of inductuon. And he goes back to
Hegels concept of experience as the new true subject that emerges from the
dialectical movement of conscious.
Gadamer finds in Hegel a major component of his own concept. According to
Hegel, experience has the structure of a reversal of consciousness and hence it is
dialectical movement. In fact, experience is initially always experience of negation.
So experience always leads to new knowledge, and also to a more experienced self.
Gadamer notes that the experienced person is someone who, because of the many
negative experiences he has had and the knowledge he has draw from them.
The paradigm of experience is the experience of the hero in a Greek tragedy. The
Greek motto is: through suffering learn wisdom. In Greek tragedy one comes up
against the limits of human finite knowledge. Says Gadamer: Thus experience is
experience of human finitude. In experience the dogmatism which proceeds from
the soaring desires of the human heart reaches an absolute barrier. Experience
teaches us to acknowledge the real. The genuine result of experience. is to know
what is.
One of Gadamers objections to previous concepts of experience is the absence of
any sense of historicity. One gets the idea that experience, for Gadamer, means the
body of humbling encounters with reality that make an experience person. So its
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impossible to have another time and chance to change everything. In fact, genuine
experience is experience of ones historicity. It is to say, one knows that he acts and
stands in history, and nothing about the fact can reappear.
Then Gadamer makes an important turn. He says we should to seek out in the
hermeneutical experience those we have already found in the analysis of experience in
general. First, hermeneutical experience is concerned with tradition, says Gadamer.
But he goes on to say that since experience is dialectical, we experience tradition as a
Thou. We do not experience it as an external object. We experience it not as an object
but as something that is in relationship with us. We are situated in a tradition and
this is not a restriction. To be situated within a tradition does not limit the freedom of
ones knowledge but makes it possible.
Knowing and realizing this, it constitutes the highest type of hermeneutical
experience: the openness to tradition characteristic of historically effected
consciousness. This means that one to open to ones tradition, and this consciousness
leads us to Gadamers concept of wirkungsgeschichtliches Bewusstsein, A
consciousness aware that history and tradition are always work in it. An experienced
person is tolerant, open, and full tradition.

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(1993 ) 1

Hans-Georg Gadamer1900~2004
Wahrheit und Methode

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Selbstdurchsichtigkeit

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Heraclitus 540480

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epistemology, theory of knowledge


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(2001) 9
18

(1997) 57-58
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(2002) 25-26

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author-centred 28

John Barton
29genetic questions
original meaning

historical recomst
disinterested scholarship

neutral

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2002
18-27

200206
112
29
John Bartonhistorical-critical approaches, the Cambridge companion to biblical interpretation ed. Barton
(Cambridge: Cambridge university press, 1998)P.9-11. R Cbriggs

1982
7-208

16

observationcommitted participation 30
meaning
significance 31

32

30

<>

92 12
354
31
E.D Hirsch, the validity in interpretation,(new havens: yale university press1967),,P.8.
exegesis(hermeneutics)
luis Alonso schokel and jose maria bravo, a maneual of hermeneutics ,trans .lilianam. rosa, (Sheffield:
Sheffield academic press1998)P.29-30.vis verbivoluntas significandi

32
R.C.Briggs

8-9

17

33

34

33
34

135-136

2003 107-110

18


16

35

35

(1989) 112-114

19

36

( representation )

( understanding/ Verstehen )

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36
37

139271-275

(2002) 323

20

the involvement of mind

1.2.
3.4.

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38

104

21

39

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39
40

7 1961 261
138

22

41

42Produktivitat

Zuruckubersetzen
Lebendigkeit
43

aufgegebeneGegebenheiten

41
42
43

7 1961 205
-

306
102

23

das wahrhaft Gegebenen 44

45

46

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50

44
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100
7 148

5 262
7 136
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309-311
449

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53

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1.
2.3.4.

( Lebenswelt )

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(1999) 450
453
455
457

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(1999) 59
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2001 63

26

Vorhandenheit

59
:
Vorhandenheit

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60
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2001
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1998
192
192
196

27

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64
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461

600
607

196-197

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Anwesenheit
---
Substrat

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67
68
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2000
567-568
-
450

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1987
251-252

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1986
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1986
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P..162

4 P..24

1986
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450

378

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.
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127
127

258-269
-
451

259-261

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ubi non
referitur instantia contradictoria92
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2003
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35

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.
:1989
115-116
345-346

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96

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1998
125-128

37

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( ontology )

98

logos 99 logic
97

1995
28

2003
445-447
99
Logos logoi
word

(sp..eech)

reason

New Testament
2
Aristotle

(P..lato)
(Rep..ublic)
4

5Heraclitus

98

38

3
( dialectica ) 1
2

100

703
100
-
454

39

1.2.3.

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102

101
102

-
453-454

(1995) 1

40

103

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1-2
2

2003
51-52

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ubi reperitur instantia contradictoria 107

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455

(2003) 302-303

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96b

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Anschauung

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arche

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prius

prius

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1141.
2.

1.
2.3.

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457

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trial and error

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1974 p.68

1963 p.216

517-519

49

122

macht
123
1.

2.

3.

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123
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457
457-458
449

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den sich vollbringenden


Skeptizismus

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Erfahrende

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458

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(2003) 8
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98-105
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(1997) 64
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2.

.
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p.92
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75

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3.

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100

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fr es

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das
An-sich

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60-61

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458-459

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(2004) 193

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Umkehrung des
Bewusstseins 153

1.

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2.

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Nichtigkeit

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halt nicht aus

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155
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-
460

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-
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461

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dabei

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1.2.3.

1.
Sichwissen2.
WissenschaftWissen3.
4.

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1.

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2.


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()

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3.

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556-557

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Aischylos 525/524456/455

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2001
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pathei-mathos 170
1.2.3.

TuschungEnttuschung 171

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How
Why

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Sicht
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Ultimate
Concern 177

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(2002)
116-117
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(Paul Tillich1886-1965)

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Wozu man kommt

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(1992) 10
-

(
1995)66

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Louis

Dupre

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-
463
Louis Dupre

(1986) 1-2
182
() 5:1-12 6:17-26

Tabgha

(
1998) 2
181

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CD.Martyn(Loyd-Jones)

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AnawAnawah
Anawah


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5:3
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(1986) 42-43

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6-7

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191

Emile Osti


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Albert Gelin

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4-27

Archbishop F.X.Nguyen V.Thuan

(1996) 90

12:43

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3:9
3:29-31

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(3)

211
1
2
mannigfache Enttauschung von
Erwartungen

Schwarzfrberei

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(4)

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1

213

Was Ist
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464

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(Menschenkenntnis)

215

(K. Rogers)

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(W.
Pannenberg)

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-
465
K. Rogers, On Becoming a Person, (Boston: Houghton Mifflin co., 1961), P.91.

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(Martin Buber)

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2. 3.

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466

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2.

(2)

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(1)
(2)(3)
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(1)

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-
464-465

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.

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(existential index)
(person)
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465
Louis Dupre

36-37
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465
Louis Dupre

4450

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(Uberlieferung)

1.(Sprache)

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(etwas geschieht) 257

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57-58
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587

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(Insspiel kommen)

(sichausspielen) 258
2.

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(Andersheit)281

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38-39

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467-468
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90
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vis a tergo(
)

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2.3.
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1997 128

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xix

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( Vorverstndnis )XVIII

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(Geschehen)

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xxii
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xxvi-xxii
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---

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321
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1.2.
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468
-
469

98

(1)

1.2.3.
(2)

1.2.3.
(3)
99

323
1.(Positivitt)
2.
(Negativitt)
3.

(Verstndigung)
(Erfahrung des Du)
1.
2.
3.
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325

326

323
324
325
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261-262

(2004) 89

(1992) 223
226

100

327

(William James1842-1910)
(Varieties of Religious Experience)
(religious experience).
328

(1)

(Mircea ELiade)

(Rudolf Otto)
(mana)
329

327
328
329

37
William James, The Varieties of Religious Experience,(New York: Penguin Books1982),P.430-431
Louis Dupr

11-12,18

101

(2)

16

330

(3)

(Van der Leeuw)

.
330

Louis Dupr

12-16

102

331

(4)

(Leben)

(Dasein)
(Geworfenheit
Faktizitat)(Entwurfscharakter)
(Grundbrdingtheitund-bedingung)

(Selbstauslegung)
332
(Leben)

1.
2.
3.

(Prinzip Wirkungsgeschichte)

331

Louis Dupr

16-17
<>
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17-19
332

103

333

(Rudolf otto)

the numinous
numinous
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335

336

333

<>
1997 8 111-112
Rudolf OttoThe Idea of the Holytrans. By John W. Harveyc New York Oxford Unverstiny Press1923
P.3

335
Mircea Eliade,Patterns in Comparative Religiontrans by Rosemary Sheed New York:Sheed & Word,
Inc[1949] 1963
P.xiii.
336
Mircea EliadeA New Humanism ,Chicago Press1969P.53
334

104

105

John Bartonhistorical-critical approaches, the Cambridge companion to


biblical interpretation ed. Barton, Cambridge: Cambridge university press,
1998.
K. Rogers, On Becoming a Person, Boston: Houghton Mifflin co., 1961.
W. Pannenberg, Anthropologie, Gttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 1983.
William James, The Varieties of Religious Experience, New York: Penguin
Books1982

Archbishop F.X.Nguyen V.Thuan

1996
Louis Dupre 1986
R.C.Briggs ----

1987 251-252
1998
2003
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2003
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