Make candles at home.

Recipes with easy to follow instructions to make beautiful floating candles, gel candles, layered, pressed flowers, candles in containers and more!

Floating Candles Recipe 1/2 pound (4oz or 125 g) • Candle wax • Candle dye Fragrance of choice • Candle wick - medium lead free wire • 4 Suitable candle molds (approx 2-3 in. diameter)

Prepare your molds. Center your candle wick into your molds. (I experimented a little here and used a wick with a clip and one without - both methods worked out well) Melt the candle wax in the double boiler or tin can in a pan of water, on your stove top over a medium high heat, add your colour one drop at a time until the desired tint is reached. Remove the melted wax from heat, add fragrance, and allow to cool only 15 to 20 seconds. Carefully pour your wax into prepared molds. Allow to completely cool before removing from molds. CAUTION: Never leave melting wax unattended on you stove top, when heating as overheated was is flammable. ** Floating candles in a clear bowl creates an extra special lighting effect. Using distilled water eliminates mineral buildup on the side of crystal or glass, preserving its unique presentation of floating candles. Container Candles Recipe
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¼ pound (4 oz or 125 g) Candle wax (to fit 6 oz container size) Wax crayon, colour of choice Fragrance of choice Candle wick 1 inch longer that the height of your container Heat resistant glass container

Double boiler or suitable tin can in pan of water

Prepare your candle container. Center your candle wick (I prefer medium lead free wire candle wicking) into your glass container. Let a drop or two of your scent roll down the wick from top to bottom. Melt the candle wax in the double boiler or tin can in a pan of water, on your stove top over a medium high heat, add pieces of your crayon and stir into the candle wax note the color will intensify as the wax cools. Remove the melted wax from heat and allow to cool slightly - about 1 minute, then add your scent 6 to 9 drops to your preference. Carefully pour your wax into prepared container. Reserve some of the wax - as your candle cools it will shrink away from the center around the wick - when it is cold you will want to reheat the reserved wax and pour into the depression around the wick to even out your candle top. Allow to cool. CAUTION: Never leave melting wax unattended on you stove top, when heating as overheated was is flammable. **A candle will burn more slowly and evenly if it's refrigerated before using. Wrap the candle in plastic or foil before refrigerating to prevent wicks from absorbing moisture. Gel Candles Recipe
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Measuring Cup Scale Wooden Spoon Thermometer Stove Top Pot Fragrance Color Wick and base 25 Grams CP9000 Resin 2 Cups Mineral Oil Heat resistant glass container(s)

Mix Resin and Mineral Oil. Let mixed ingredients set at room temperature, approximately 1 hour. Heat that mixture to 200F - absolutely important DO NOT GO OVER THAT

TEMPERATURE. After approximately 1 hour the mixture will have the consistency of corn syrup. Add fragrance, not much, no more than 3%. Adding to much will make the gel more flammable. Add Color. Dip wick base in the gel. Place in bottom of container, hold in place until gel sets to the glass. Pour in gel. If the gel cools slightly before you pour, you will get bubbles. The cooler the more bubbles. If you do not want bubbles, then pour you gel immediately. After candle has set approximately 3 minutes you can drop in NON-FLAMMIBLE objects ie. artificial fruit pieces, sea shells, whatever. **Keep lit candles out of drafts, drafts create large flames, shortening the burning time. Making Pressed Flower Candles
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3" or 6" pillar candle-white or off white (3" diameter) Pressed herbs and flowers: (Petals of any flat pressed flowers) Votive candle - white or off-white Paint brush Old pot to heat wax in

Heat votive candle in the old pan until melted. Use a votive that is the same color as the pillar candle that is used. Arrange flower petals on table to a suitable design for your candle unless you will be placing them on the candle randomly. Take your small paint brush and dab a little melted wax onto candle where you plan on placing first flower. Quickly place flower on top of dap of wax. Do this with you whole design, making sure you get just a THIN layer of wax on the top of the flower candle. When finished with design, brush a THIN layer of melted wax over whole design. Allow the candle to cool either at room temperature or in a refrigerator.

Layered Candles Instructions Center your wick into a mold of the desired height. Layered candles are very easy to make. Pour the first color and allow to cool completely. Pour the second color hot. It needs to be poured hot so that the candle won't have repour lines. Allow the candle to cool completely and pour a third layer. Making Ice Candles Ice candles are easy to make. The idea is to by put ice into a mold layer by layer. First the wick is covered with wax then ice is added. You can also use a candle as your core base. The difference is that you will have a longer burning candle if you use the core candle. When you burn this type of candle it is very important to put a LARGE dish underneath it. To make your first candle you will need:Melting system. For this example I used a double boiler. 139-145mp paraffin wax Vybar Stearic Acid Candle Mold Mold seal / blue tack / plumbers putty Wick (type of wick depends on size of mold - check with your supplier) Colour block or liquid dye Candle fragrance oil Pouring jug Please make sure you have read the safety instructions before starting. STEP 1 Calculate the amount of wax needed by filling the mold with water and measuring it. 3 weighed ounces of wax are needed for every 3 1/2 ounces of water. STEP 2

2. Put the wax into the top of the double boiler and fill the bottom part approximately 1/3 full of water. Heat on a medium setting on your stove top. If the water begins to boil rapidly, reduce heat to a gentle boil to prevent water from splashing into the container. STEP 3 Melt the wax to the correct temperature. For this particular candle you want to aim for 180°F. Dip the thermometer into the wax to check the temp, but do not let the thermometer touch the bottom of the pan or you will obtain a false reading. STEP 4 Prime your wick. This is done by placing the required length of wick into the melted wax until it starts to release bubbles. This means that it has absorbed sufficient wax. Carefully remove it (not using your fingers - the wax is hot! I use an old knitting needle) and pull it tight then place it to dry flat. The reason for doing this is so that the top of the wick (top of the candle) is well waxed and will be easier to light. It also makes threading it through the wick hole in the mold much simpler. STEP 5 When the wick is hard (only takes a couple of minutes) insert it through the small hole at the top of the mold and pull it through. Secure it around a pencil or wick support at the open end and plug up the small hole with mold seal to prevent the wax from leaking out. STEP 6 When you have reached the desired temperature, add your additives. For a basic candle you will want 3TBS stearic acid and 1/2tsp vybar to 1lb wax, so if you have an 8oz mold, use 1.5TBS vybar and 1/4 tsp vybar. When the additives have completely dissolved, add your colour. If you are using colour blocks, shave a small amount off, stir it in and add more if required. It is easier to darken the colour than it is to take dye out! STEP 7 Just before you get ready to pour the candle add the fragrance oil. The typical usage for a strongly scented candle is 1 weighed ounce of scent to 1lb wax. Stir for at least two minutes, but do not stir too vigorously or you will only put too much air into the wax. STEP 8

If you are using a metal mold, preheat it before pouring the wax. This can either be done in a low temp oven (seamless molds only) or the method I use is giving it a blast all over with my blow torch / heat gun. Then use the pouring jug to pour into your mold. STEP 9 Before the wax sets, tap the sides of the mould several times. This is done to release the trapped air bubbles that will marr the surface of your finished candle. STEP 10 10. When wax has set to a tacky consistency, poke small holes in the candle around the wick. This will help to prevent great big air pockets inside the finished candle that can be a fire hazard. STEP 11 11. Leave to set for a few hours. You can place the candle in a water bath to cool quicker, but if you do this, make sure that the water is deep enough to go all the way up the mold or you will find a water line around your candle. Also ensure not to get any water in the setting wax. STEP 12 Your candle will need a repour because wax retracts and shrinks as it cools. Melt your left over wax if you have any, otherwise melt and colour some more and top up your mold. That's it! When it is set, remove it from the mold. You may want to level off the bottom of your candle to make it smooth and even. This is easily done by heating the top part of your double boiler or your top saucepan and carefully placing the candle in it. Move it around a few times so that the bottom is nice and even and then carefully remove. Be careful of the steam from the boiling water as you can easily be burned doing this. Leave for at least one hour before lighting because I know you will be dying to test it out!! You should really allow 48 hours before lighting, especially for scented candles as it allows the candle to "cure" and the scent to bind in with the wax, but I will forgive you for being impatient with your first! YOU CAN MAKE APPLE STRUDEL BABY POWDER BABY POWDER BERRY BLASTER BY ADDING Macintosh Apple Rose Lavender Blueberry, Cherry AND

Vanilla / Cinnamon Vanilla Vanilla Rasperry, Strawberry

BLUEBERRY MUFFINS BOUQUET CARMEL APPLES CINNABERY DEWBERRY FRENCH COFFEE FUZZY NAVEL INCENSE LIMEADE MINT CHOCOLATE ORANGE CLOVE PINA COLADA PINK CHAMPAGNE PINK LEMONADE ROOTBEER

Scratch Cake Lilac, Rose, Carmel Cinnamon Mulberry Coffee Georgia Peach Lavender, Cinnamon Lime Chocolate Fresh Squeezed Oranges Pineapple Champagne Lemon Wintergreen

Blueberry Honeysuckle Macintosh Apple Bayberry Honeydew French Vanilla Fresh Squeezed Oranges Patchouli, Sandalwood Lemon Candy Cane Cloves

Coconut Strawberry Strawberry French Vanilla 1 part each Cranberry, Fresh Squeezed SEX ON THE BEACH 4 parts Georgia Peach Oranges SUGAR COOKIE 2 parts Vanilla 1 part each Almond, Cinnamon Gel Wax & Making Gel Candles Gel melts at approximately 180-200°F and has a flash point of 360°F. It melts much slower than paraffin so you will need to melt it over a direct heat source rather than in a double boiler, and you will need to watch it like a hawk. Never leave melting gel wax unattended. Trust me on this one and don't ask how I know! You can purchase premade gel or you can make your own. For those new to gel candle making, the pre-made gel is a much better option. See the links page for suppliers of gel wax and under the resources section in the links page you can find links to formulas to make your own gel. Penreco Candle Gel Grades ** LD - Low Density - This is the easiest grade for the new gel candlemaker to use. It holds about ½ oz of fragrance oil to a pound of gel. It melts quickly and

is easy to use, but it may not be suitable for serious "gellers" who plan on shipping their gel candles as it does not stand up to being tipped or tilted. ** MD - Medium Density - This is the most popular grade of gel amongst "gellers" because it holds ¾ oz scent to 1lb gel wax, so it holds more fragrance and will give a stronger scent when burning. It has a slightly thicker consistency than the LD and is suitable for shipping finished candles. ** HD - High Density - This holds a full ounce of scent to a pound of gel. It is very thick and suitable for embedding after pouring as it will solidify quicker than the other grades. For a simple gel candle however, this is where you want to start as it will hold a lot more fragrance and hold its shape better than other densities. Melting and pouring gel candles Don't even attempt to melt gel wax in a double boiler as it will take forever! You must also be careful not to get steam or water in the gel. The recommended method is an eletrical pot with a temperature control such as a presto pot (Available in Walmart) The alternative method is in a pan on direct heat. If you use this method it is essential to watch the gel closely as it melts and keep an eye on the temperature. If it gets too hot and begins to smoke it has the possibility of bursting into flames. NEVER leave melting wax unattended A good temperature to work with for adding colour is between 215°F, then cool to around 203-210°F for pouring. Add the scent just before you pour the gel and stir it in well. Do not allow the temperature to exceed 230°F - the gel will not burn, but it has the possibility of igniting if you heat to extreme temperatures. Melt the gel, then add your colour and scent. It is entirely up to you whether you do all of this in your melter or in a pouring pot. A pouring pot can be anything from a glass jug, plastic jug or old coffee can. I recommend using a clear jug as you can see exactly the colour that you are achieving as you add your dye. Pour the gel carefully into the container and leave approximately 1/2" at the top to protect the flame from drafts. The hotter the pour, the fewer bubbles your candle will have. Any gel left in the pan can be peeled off and re-used ... there is no waste!!

MINIMISING BUBBLES
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When you pour the gel, pour it as hot as you can safely do so (210°F) and pour it carefully. Don't try to be hasty as you will create air bubbles as you pour. Heat your glassware for a couple of minutes in a 175°F oven immediately before pouring. If you are embedding things like glass miniatures or shells, make sure they are clean and dry, and dip them into gel before placing them in the glass. Shells have tiny crevices where the air can get trapped and result in air bubbles. Don't stir the gel with a wooden spoon. Aside from the risk of wood splinters in your candle, it will also create more bubbles. Embedding in gel

One of the aspects that makes gel candles so stunningly appealing is the ability to embed objects into the candle that are visible through the transparent gel. From glass, to wax, to ceramic and plaster; embedded items can increase not only the attractiveness of your candle, but also it's perceived value. The most important thing to remember is to only embed items that are non flammable - plastic, wood, resin and fabric etc are all extremely flammable and should not be used. Another important thing to remember is to place your embedded items right up against the edge of the glass. This not only gives your items better visibility, but keeping them away from the wick will mean your candle will be safer and burn for longer. If you are embedding wax, my recommendation is to pour the gel first and then embed the wax items. This gives you the least chance of the embeds melting. Make sure the wax embeds are clean and do not have any wick. Coat them with warm gel before placing into the candle right up against the edge of the glass. This will help to prevent air pockets. As always, before making a large batch of anything …. Test, test, test!!!!!! Tips for embedding wax Refrigerate wax embeds for an hour before using. This will make sure that the wax is as hard as possible before it is embedded. Pour the gel first, and then embed the wax shapes. Pour the gel hot around 210°F, but leave to cool until at least 185°F before embedding. DO NOT embed wax shapes above this temperature as this can cause the wax to melt and the colours to bleed. Darker colours are more prone to bleeding. Pay particular attention to the temperature of the gel when embedding dark coloured wax shapes. Test in a small amount of gel for best temperature with your particular gel wax before making a large batch!

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Placing your newly embedded gel candles in the fridge will help the gel to set quicker and minimise melting. This will also produce extra bubbles in the gel, but these can easily be reduced by sitting the candles in a sunny window for a few days. Other Embed Ideas Anything glass... pebbles, figurines, hearts, fish etc. Ceramic ornaments like cats, dogs, snowmen. Gem stones and tumble stones Metal and foil cake decorations Sand, gravel, sea shells Bright coins Cosmetic grade glitter. Do not use craft glitter. It is not safe. Wicks for gel candles

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Because gel wax burns between 4-6 times slower than paraffin wax, all the rules you have learned about selecting a wick size now change when you are talking about gel candles!!! Confused?? Let me try to explain. For example, you make a paraffin container candle that is approximately 4" in diameter. A quick referral to the wicks page will tell you that a cored 51-32-18 wick is suitable for use in 3" to 4" diameter containers. BUT if we were to make a gel candle in that same container using the same wick, we would find it leaves excess gel at the sides of the container because the gel burns that much slower. The general rule of thumb is to go up a wick size, so refer back to the wicks page and we see that the cored 60-44-18 is the next size up and a suitable wick for the gel container. Cotton and paper core wicks are not recommended because they do not have the rigidity of zinc cored wicks. You want your wick to stand up and stay central during the making and burning of the candle. My wick of choice would be a pre-tabbed zinc core wick. The tabs are excellent to centre your wick and the neck of the wick tab ensures that the customer cannot burn all the way down to the very base of the glass. This is a great safety feature. To secure the wick to the base of the glass, use a little hot glue. Many people dip the base in gel to secure it to the glass, but this can still mean the wick will slide about as the candle burns down. When you have the candle finished and ready, trim the wick down to a tiny little stump. You really do not need a large wick and excess wick will cause the gel to

smoke terribly. Trim your gel wick after it has burned by turning the *cooled* candle upside down and trimming with a pair of baby scissors or toenail clippers. This will prevent wick debris from getting into the sticky warm gel.

Wicks for gel candles Because gel wax burns between 4-6 times slower than paraffin wax, all the rules you have learned about selecting a wick size now change when you are talking about gel candles!!! Confused?? Let me try to explain. For example, you make a paraffin container candle that is approximately 4" in diameter. A quick referral to the wicks page will tell you that a cored 51-32-18 wick is suitable for use in 3" to 4" diameter containers. BUT if we were to make a gel candle in that same container using the same wick, we would find it leaves excess gel at the sides of the container because the gel burns that much slower. The general rule of thumb is to go up a wick size, so refer back to the wicks page and we see that the cored 60-44-18 is the next size up and a suitable wick for the gel container. Cotton and paper core wicks are not recommended because they do not have the rigidity of zinc cored wicks. You want your wick to stand up and stay central during the making and burning of the candle. My wick of choice would be a pre-tabbed zinc core wick. The tabs are excellent to centre your wick and the neck of the wick tab ensures that the customer cannot burn all the way down to the very base of the glass. This is a great safety feature. To secure the wick to the base of the glass, use a little hot glue. Many people dip the base in gel to secure it to the glass, but this can still mean the wick will slide about as the candle burns down. When you have the candle finished and ready, trim the wick down to a tiny little stump. You really do not need a large wick and excess wick will cause the gel to smoke terribly. Trim your gel wick after it has burned by turning the *cooled* candle upside down and trimming with a pair of baby scissors or toenail clippers. This will prevent wick debris from getting into the sticky warm gel.

Colouring gel candles The dyes I have found to work best with gel candles are liquid dyes. Some gel candlemakers claim success using colour blocks but I found they did not mix in well with the gel, caused clumps in the candle and clouded the gel. Most suppliers will stock liquid dyes and they are very easy to use. The amount of drops you add will depend on the look you are trying to achieve with the gel. My experience is that I have needed less than a quarter of a drop to colour a 1lb batch of gel wax. I achieve this by using a toothpick in the dye bottle and swirling it into the gel. It is much easier to add extra colour if it is too pale, but if you add too much colour you will need to add extra clear gel to dilute it. I have found paler colours work much better with gel wax and allow the beautiful bubbles to show through.

Scenting gel candles All good suppliers will list whether their fragrances are suitable for gel candlemaking. If they do not have a flashpoint or compatibility indication next to the fragrance oil then I would not recommend buying from them if you plan to use the fragrances in gel. To be safe to use in gel wax, a fragrance oil needs to have a flashpoint of 170°F or higher and when there are problems with gel candles, the usual culprit is the fragrance oil. For a list of the recommended amount of scent to use in gel candles, please see the main gel page. If you want to test whether the fragrance will cloud your gel, you can do the "mineral oil test" which involves adding a little scent to a small amount of mineral oil. Shake or mix it up and leave to stand. If the mineral oil stays clear then your gel should stay clear. This is because mineral oil is one of the major ingredients in gel wax. As with paraffin candles, add your scent just before you are ready to pour the candle and make sure it is well mixed in so you do not have pools of fragrance oil in the finished candle that could cause it to ignite.

Candle Additives Stearic Acid Stearic acid, or stearine, is an animal fat byproduct, but you can find a vegetable

(palm oil based) substitute available. It acts as a hardener for low melt point waxes, and lowers the melt point of higher temperature waxes. Over-use will cause the candle to mottle. Recommended amount is 3 TBSP per lb of wax and it can be used in any amount from 1% to 100%. Vybar There are two types of vybar:- vybar 103 which is used for wax with a melt point of 131 or higher, and vybar 260 which is used for wax with a melt point of 130 and lower. Vybar will harden the wax, impart a creamy texture to the wax and help with scent throw. It also helps to combine the scent and the wax to give a better scent throw and reduces mottling and tiny air bubbles. Adding too much vybar can bind the fragrance, giving a poor or non existant scent throw. Recommended amount is between ½ tsp. to 1 tsp. per pound of wax. Luster crystals A manmade wax polymer. Your colours will come out brighter, your candle will burn longer, and the wax will be opaque. Great for making white candles. Clear Crystals Clear crystals are another polymer that hardens the wax like luster crystals but makes the wax more transparent for a glowing effect Plastic additives These additives are used to give a transparent effect to hurricane and embedded candles whilst hardening the wax due to their high melt point. Plastic additives require heating over a direct heat source before adding to the correct temperature wax. Microcrystaline wax There are many grades of microcrystaline wax that are used for different purposes. One grade can be used as a hardener and another grade can be added to container candles to soften the wax and help reduce wet spots. Microcrystaline soft is also used for hand molding candles. UV inhibitor You will need to add UV inhibitor if your candles will be displayed in a sunny window or if you plan to do outdoor craft shows. Purple is the biggest culprit for fading under UV light followed by red. UV inhibitor will only help to protect the candle; it cannot guarantee that they will not fade eventually. Recommended use 1/8 tsp to 1lb wax. Mineral oil Add approx 2-3 TBSP mineral oil to 1lb wax if you wish to achieve the mottled look.

Wicks explained! A source for an endless battle for many weary candlemakers ... which wick do I use???? Answer = the only way to know for definite is to test, test, test! What works for one person may not necessarily work for you. Below are some guidelines. 1. Flat braid cotton wick These wicks are used primarily for pillar candles as the flat plait in the wick allows it to curl and bend as the candle burns. This virtually eliminated carbon build up (mushrooming) in pillar candles. Cotton braid wick is not suitable for gel, container or votive candles as it will go limp and not stand up. 18 ply - use for 1" to 2" diameter pillars 24 ply - use for 2½" to 3" diameter pillars 30 ply - use for 3½" to 4" diameter pillars 2. Square braid Wicks Commonly used in beeswax candles. This wick will also curl and bend as the candle burns and the process by which these wicks are made allows the beeswax to be drawn up through the wick for a better burn. #1 - use for 1" to 2" diameter pillars #2 - use for 2" to 3" diameter pillars #3 - use for 3½" to 4" diameter pillars 3. Cored Wicks (zinc, cotton, paper and tin) Cored wicks have a thin piece of metal running through the middle of the wick which enables it to stand up without flopping over in the container or votive candle. 36-24-24 - use for votives, small containers 44-24-18 - use for votives, 2" to 3½" diameter containers 51-32-18 - use for 3" to 4" diameter containers 60-44-18 - use for 4" to 5" diameter containers 4. HTP Wicks (Coreless) These wicks are very new on the market (beginning of 2001) and combine the rigidity from cored wicks with the benefit of being "self trimming". I have not experimented with these wicks yet but have an order in with a supplier to test some!! The apparent benefits of these wicks are that they require less trimming, virtually eliminate carbon build up (mushrooming) but do not contain a metal core.

5. Specialty Wicks Specialty wicks are used for floating and tealight candles, food warmers and liquid lamp oils. Different wicks will give different results in your candles. You will notice differences in the height of the flames, the size of the melt pool and the speed with which the candle melts down (the burn time). The bigger the flame, the bigger the melt pool and the quicker the candle will burn. You ultimately want to opt for a wick that burns evenly, cleanly, has minimal mushrooming and maximum burn time. The only way to be completely sure of this is to test. If you are unsure about whether you have the right wick or not, read below. Candle smoking - Wick is too big. When the wick is too large for the candle it will try and consume more melted wax so it can burn better. This results in soot or smoke. Candle leaving a large portion of unmelted wax - The wick is probably too small. When it is too small, it cannot burn right out to the edges of the candle which causes it to tunnel down the middle. The candle will eventually fizzle out where the wick drowns in the melt pool. Single wicks are inexpensive and very light to post so it will cost you practically nothing to test your wicks properly to be sure that you are getting the very best burn possible for your candles. Waxes 127mp wax Specifically for use in container candles due to it's soft consistency and low melt point.It holds scent in until the candle is burned. No additives are required. 128mp wax Specially blended for use as votive style candles and containers. May require additives 130mp wax Primarily used votive style candles and containers. This wax requires the use of additives. 139/140mp wax These two waxes are good general purpose waxes used to

make molded candles and hand dipped tapers. Both will require the use of additives. 145mp wax It is a specially blended wax, which lends itself to carving and shaping. It is also excellent as a molding wax. This wax may require additives Other higher mp waxes For creating hurricane candle shells. Microcrystaline wax Hard micro is used at a ratio of 1% to paraffin wax. It strengthens candles and increases burn time. It can also be used as a dip to produce mottled candles. Soft micro is a low melting point wax that is combined with paraffin wax at about 10% to make modelling wax. Adding the same ratio to paraffin wax for container candles helps the wax stick to the container better. Beeswax Used either in sheets to make rolled beeswax foundation candles or as pillar candles. Beeswax can be used alone for a pure beeswax candle or by adding 5-10% to paraffin wax. It will improve a candle's colour and burn time.

Wax Formulas

The following is a collection of other people's formulas for pillar, container and votive candles. Feel free to use this as a guide for your own use, but as with anything in candlemaking, always test, test, test first before making a batch of 50! Formulas are based upon a weighed pound of wax. TSP=teaspoon, TBSP=tablespoon

VOTIVE CANDLES Formula:-

130 MP wax 1/2 tsp vybar 1/2 tsp stearic 1 oz scent

1 oz scent Formula:130 MP wax 1/4-1/2tsp vybar 1oz scent Formula:140 MP wax 1 tsp universal vybar 1 oz scent Formula:15 oz mobil 130 mp wax 1/2 - 1 tsp vybar 260 1 oz microwax 1 oz scent. Formula:130 mp wax 1 TSP Vybar 260 1oz scent

PILLAR CANDLES Formula:135 MP wax, 2 TBSP Stearic 1 TSP vybar 1 oz scent Formula:139 MP wax 1/2 TSP vybar 1 TBSP stearic 1 oz scent Formula:140 MP wax 1/4 TSP vybar 3 TBSPstearic 1oz scent CONTAINER CANDLES Formula:1lb preblended container wax 1oz scent Formula:130 MP wax 1 oz micro wax 1/2 tsp vybar 1/2 tsp stearine

NOVELTY CANDLES (2 piece plastic molds) Formula:Any pillar formula FLOATING CANDLES Formula:140 mp wax 2 tsp Vybar 103 1oz scent TEALIGHT CANDLES Formula:140 mp wax 2 tsp Vybar 103 1oz scent

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