You are on page 1of 1

5.5% Town Budget = 5.

5 Schools Open 
The budget vote is days away.  We have seen groups of citizens emerge as various issues have been 
discussed and debated.  Voices of pro and con for each topic – there are no perfect answers in this 
perfect storm of economic difficulties.  All compromises and cuts come with trade‐offs. 

Where are we at this point?  The BOE voted to have Chalk Hill open for only 6th grade next year if the 
budget passes on the first referendum.  If the budget goes down, all options are back on the table for 
consideration – including closing Chalk Hill entirely and sending 8th grade to Masuk, reducing music, 
larger class sizes, having 100% pay‐for‐play for sports, and the list of possible reductions goes on.   

Well meaning, independent voices in the community talk about mitigation strategies that are not 
educationally sound or make erroneous assumptions.  The notion that laying off one teacher will save 
90K is not real.  Laying off one teacher means that a less senior, less expensive teacher will be let go, at a 
savings of 59K after the district accounts for unemployment costs.  Laying off a secretary saves 23K, a 
custodian 52K, a librarian 37K, a nurse 41K, and a paraprofessional 6K each.  A budget cut in the range of 
hundreds of thousands requires a long list of layoffs to make up the difference.   

The suggestion to close Monroe Elementary next year is not feasible.  The other two elementary schools 
do not have the capacity to absorb all of the Monroe Elementary students. 

Sell Monroe Elementary and lease back?  Creative idea for short‐term, but critical long‐term limitations 
for the district.  Chalk Hill cannot be used as an elementary school based on fire regulations for young 
students.  Keeping Chalk Hill will force the district to structure its grade configurations for fire codes 
versus educational needs. 

The proposed budget includes a reduction of one assistant principal, increasing the ratio of students to 
building administrators to the high end of all CT schools.  Beyond the position of superintendent, there 
are only 5 full‐time and 2 part‐time administrators at Central Office who oversee 52M in district 
operations.   Staffing at all levels is lean, resources are lean.  But incorrect rumors abound; there must 
be places to cut this budget that would not matter.  These rumors are wrong.  Counting on reductions 
leaving the district unscathed is an inaccurate assumption. 

How can we objectively compare Monroe to other districts in terms of its educational spending and 
return on investment?  Notably, UConn just completed an analysis of all K‐12 school districts throughout 
the state, “Getting More From Less:  Measuring Efficiency in Connecticut High School Districts” 
published in its quarterly review of The Connecticut Economy.  [The full article is posted online at 
www.cteconomy.uconn.edu, Winter 2010.]  This independent review highlights Monroe as one of only 
21 districts in the state that earned top scores for being fully efficient with respect to the inputs 
[teachers, administrators, computers, and hours of instruction] and outputs [academic growth].   

Monroe Public Schools achieve highly competitive academic results while rated as one of the most 
efficient districts in CT. 

The 10‐11 proposed budget maintains 5.5 schools and all current programs of the district if accepted by 
voters.  The choice is yours on April 6th.