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Tom Bloom Karate and the

QI Newsletter
Present:

Basics of Karate
A Technical Manual
By Master Tom Bloom of

Tom Bloom Karate QI


A special thanks goes out to my parents
Leon and Renee. If we are blessed, our
children will look up to, admire, love and
respect us as we do you.

This e-Book is dedicated to my Family: Alyson, Bo, Ava, Jackson and


Charlotte Ray. You are my inspiration and example for everything I do, and
every decision I make. Thank you for providing me with the opportunity to
author this e-Book.
The information contained in this e-Book is for informational purposes only.
I am not a lawyer or a doctor. Any instruction or advice that I give is my opinion based on my own experience. You
should always seek the advice of a physician before acting on or participating in any physical activity
Please understand that there are some links contained in this e-Book that I may benefit from financially.
The material in this e-Book may include information, products or services by third parties. Third Party Materials are
comprised of the products and opinions expressed by their owners. As such, I do not assume responsibility or liability
for any Third Party material or opinions. The publication of such Third Party Materials does not constitute my guarantee
of any information, instruction, opinion, products or services contained within the Third Party Material. The use of
recommended Third Party Material does not guarantee any success and or safety related to you, your training or
person. Publication of such Third Party Material is simply a recommendation and an expression of my own opinion of
that material.
No part of this publication shall be reproduced, transmitted, or sold in whole or in part in any form, without the prior
written consent of the author. All trademarks and registered trademarks appearing in this e-Book are the property of
their respective owners.

Note: Karate is challenging, exciting, a sport, an art, but also dangerous. It is recommended that students
obtain a medical clearance if health is in question
practice under the supervision of an advanced rank
do not exceed their physical limitations!
By reading this e-Book, you agree that my company and I are not responsible for your health.
2011 Tom Bloom Enterprises. All Rights Reserved.

Basics of KARATE - Tom Bloom

Table of Contents

Historical Background ...

Important Terms ..

Belt Ranking System ..

Ke-I ...

Dress Code ...

How to Tie the Karate Belt

10

The Bow .

11

Opening and Closing Class .

12

Visualization and Relaxation

13

Rules and Regulations ..

14

Code of Ethics .

15

The Awarding of Belts

16

Stretching and Warm-Up ...

18

Basic Stances ..

19

Basic Hand Positions .

20

www.TomBloomKarate.com

Basics of KARATE - Tom Bloom

Table of Contents Continued

Basic Center Punch

...

21

Basic Blocks: Standing ....

22

Basic Kicks ...

26

Forms (Kata) ....

32

Falling ....

38

Flying Side Kick ..

40

One-Step Punching

41

Closing ...

48

www.TomBloomKarate.com

Training Karate Saved my Life.


Youve probably found your way to this e-Book from our website, studio, or maybe a friend passed it
along to you.
Either way, Im happy youre here.
I began my career as an instructor because when I started as a white belt back in 1974, Karate saved
my life. Not only did it help me bounce back from a life of dyslexia, but it opened my eyes to a new life,
a life of a martial artist."
The impact and opportunities that Karate training can provide in a persons life is invaluable.
Teaching people of all ages and abilities is my way of giving back for all of the fortunate things that
have happened to me since the first time I bowed and stepped on the mat.
This e-Book is a guide, and the purpose of this guide is to do just that - guide you. It is not our entire
system," and all of its concepts are not just specific to my style of teaching or studio etiquette; this
guide is universal to martial arts around the world. The guide will however, prepare you to begin your
training, and or help you as a parent, guide your child through the process of understanding the
basics of Karate.
I have put these basic concepts into an e-Book because if I can help just one person learn one thing
that will help them in life, then the 2 months I have spent writing this e-Book will have been totally
worth it.
To all of my students, followers, and friends out there, old and new, thank you for the gift of your
support.

Heres to you and your continued success!

Professor Bloom

Questions?
If at any point while youre reading this guide you have any
questions, please dont hesitate to contact me. You can best
reach me via e-mail tombloomkarate@aol.com . Even if you
dont have any questions, Id love to hear from you .

HISTORICAL BACKGROUND
The martial arts are the military or fighting arts which were developed largely by
those who were forbidden to bear arms. It is believed that a fighting art (called
vajramushti) was first practiced in India prior to 1000 B.C. The martial arts then
traveled from India to China where, in the Hunan Province during the Tang
Dynasty (approximately 650 A,D), monks practiced various exercises at the
Shaolin Temple.
Over a period of 2000 years, Buddhist monks in China, Japan, and Tibet first
developed Jujitsu as a weaponless system of self-defense. Judo, created in
1882, is a subsequent modification of the many jujitsu holds that were considered
too dangerous for sport competition. A further modification which emphasizes
blows with the side of the hand is known as atemi in Judo; as a separate
development it is called KARATE.
KARATE translates to China hand. After the Japanese occupied Okinawa
during the 1 500s, the Okinawan farmers were stripped of their weapons and
secretly practiced te (pronounced tay and meaning hand) as a method of selfdefense. Thereafter, the Japanese changed the translation of Kara-te to mean
open hand
There are now approximately 100 various styles of Karate. Differences can
generally be categorized by the following.
JAPANESE: employs linear patterns and straight-line techniques. Major style >
Shotokan.
CHINESE: uses soft style circular blocks, graceful movements, and low
stances. Major style > Kung-fu.
OKINAWAN: uses linear techniques plus circular blocks. Major style >
Shorin-ryu.
HAWAIIAN: uses linear and circular moves. Major style > Kenpo.
KOREAN: emphasizes kicks and linear techniques.
Major styles > Tang Soo Do and Tae Kwon Do

Korean Master Hwang Kee, after training in Northern


China where he learned the Tang style, developed TANG
SOO DO in 1945. Its influence now is approximately 50%
Korean, 25% Northern Chinese, and 25% American; equal
emphasis is placed on proficiency with hands and feet.

IMPORTANT TERMS
Although there are hundreds of foreign language words that pertain to the martial
arts, only the ones that are commonly used in the studio are included in this
manual.
CI-JARRI OT: attention (Korean)
CHUMBAE: ready stance
DAN: Black Belt ranks; means rank or degree (Japanese & Korean)
DO: the way
DOCHINE: studio (Korean)
DOJO: studio (Japanese)
DOBAK: uniform (Korean)
GI: uniform (Japanese)
GUP: non-Black Belt rank; means grade or class (Korean)
HYUNG: formal exercises or forms (Korean)
KATA: forms (Japanese)
KE-I: means spirit meeting and is a loud shout for power
KWON: association (Korean)
KI: breath; spirit; body energy centralized through concentration;
KUMITE: fighting (pronounced KOO-mi-tay)
KUN YET: bow (Korean)
PEROW: return to Chumbae stance
SOO: hand (Korean)
TANG: Chinese dynasty
TE: hand (Chinese)

Spellings of Words
The spellings of Asian words used here
are produced phonetically, to conform to
the pronunciations that are currently
prevalent and may not be representative
of traditional spellings used in other texts.

THE BELT RANKING SYSTEM OF KOREAN-AMERICAN

TANG SOO DO
Belt levels begin at degree number 10 and progress in reverse sequence to
number 1; conversely, black belt status (signifying master of the basics) begins
at 1st degree and can advance (theoretically) to 10th degree.
There is no official ranking until the rank of purple belt; informally, belt color
designations differentiate the beginning ranks.

Beginning ranks:
white belt
yellow belt (children only)
purple belt (10th Gup)
gold (orange) belt (9th Gup)

Intermediate ranks:

blue belts (8th Gup) (7th Gup)


green belts (6th Gup) (5th Gup) (4th Gup)

Advanced ranks:

red belt (3rd Gup) (2nd Gup) (1st Gup)

Black Belt (1st Dan)


Progress culminates with the rank of Black Belt (1st Dan). Students may
subsequently test for 2nd and 3rd degrees (2nd Dan and 3rd Dan). Upper Black
Belt ranks are usually awarded by a higher rank for honor and achievement in
the martial arts;
the rank of 4th Dan is considered Master level status.
Promotional tests are given every 3 months to evaluate performance and
attitude. There is minimum wait of 6 months between testing for 1st red and 1st
degree Black, and at least two years must elapse between 1st and 2nd degree
Black Belt testing.
However, Students should only test when sufficiently ready to advance; there is
no disgrace or failure in waiting to test, no race to the finish. Less mature
practitioners of the art often view advancement from the perspective of
interpersonal rivalry, forgetting that proficiency in the martial arts is an individual
achievement that is measured by personal growth and accomplishment.

Ke-I
* (Pronounced kee)
Through proper training, breath control, and spirit, the martial artist sets in touch
with and develops i inner energy that radiates throughout the entire body and can
be tapped at any time. The degree that one can develop this energy is unlimited;
through proper cultivation, one can draw on boundless strength.
At a high level, Ki can be projected through the eyes and spirit to instill fear in or
drain the energy from an opponent. In its highest form, it can be used in a silent
attack referred to as Dim Mock; it attacks the nervous system of an opponent
and is thought to be fatal. (An interesting rumor: in martial arts circles, Bruce Lee
is thought to have died from a Dim Mock attack!)
Most commonly, Ki is physically expressed and cultivated as a loud, sharp yell,
the Ke-I.
There are 5 basic uses of Kl:
1) Power (believed to center in the lower abdomen);
2) Focus (of ones mind and technique);
3) Breathing (properly, from the diaphragm);
4) Paralysis (temporary immobility of an opponent, by fear);
5) Invulnerability (of the body to attack).
In class at Tom Bloom Karate, a loud, deep yell (from the diaphragm, not the
throat) is the most appropriate Ke-I, but sounds can range from a high squeak to
a growling noise.
To practice correctly:
Take a deep breath, exhale, then exhale again with a Ke-I. The extra breath
released on the second exhale is held deeper in the lungs and is forced out by
the diaphragm.
NOTE:

I am a third generation Master under


Grand Master Hwang Kee and Master Chuck Norris

Read my story at: http://tombloommartialarts.com/whos-who-promoted-master-bloom.html

UNIFORM
(also called dobak)

The Tom Bloom Karate uniform consists of loose,


draw-string pants and robe-like jacket of which the left lapel
is crossed over the right. (Ties are at the sides).

DRESS CODE
What do we wear?
You or your child may train in any comfortable attire including sweats
t-shirts and other workout wear to join in your FREE Introductory Lesson.
Often children joining in their first introductory Karate class feel a little self
conscious when they see other students wearing uniforms. This is why we
suggest our Two Week Introductory Program that
includes a FREE Uniform.
All students must have a white uniform affixed with the studios patch. A
small Tom Bloom Karate rectangular patch is worn on the left chest area of the
jacket;.

Blue uniforms are optional after the student participates in 3 or more


tournaments {forms (kata) or fighting (kumite )}. Blue uniforms should also have
the required patchesbut, in addition, the student may add decorative
monogramming on the back of the jacket displaying, for example, the name of
the studio, the students name, nickname, etc. Acquired tournament patches may
also be sewn on blue pants.

Red uniforms may only be worn once the rank of red belt is achieved.
Uniform colors must be the same for both jackets and pants; mixing of colors is
not allowed.

Black Belts may wear any combination of colors. Traditionally,


however, appropriate dress for Black Belts consists of black pants and white
jacket with black trim.
It is expected that students attend class in a clean uniform; therefore, it is
preferable that students own at least two uniforms.

10

HOW TO TIE THE KARATE BELT


HOW TO TIE A BELT
This is a common problem for all beginning Karate students!
a) Fold the belt in half so that both ends meet.
b) Place the center of the belt over your lower abdomen.
c) Bring both ends around your left and right sides, respectively, crossing over in
the back, and bring the ends to the front again. Then, cross both ends in an x in
front of the abdomen.
d) The belt end on top is brought under the 2 belt strands and over to the front.
e) The top belt strand is brought under and through the loop made with the
bottom belt strand (tied).
f) Grab both ends and tug until firmly knotted.

Click the You Tube


link below to watch
the video

please subscribe to
our Karate Channel

11

THE BOW
The bow is a symbol of respect
and is employed:
when addressing Black Belts;
at the beginning and ending of class;
when entering or exiting the mat;
before and after working with a partner (including sparring);
before and after demonstrating a form.

The correct way to bow at Tom Bloom Karate:


Starting from Chumbae stance, the left leg slides up to the right. As the feet
come together, the palms of the hands quietly touch the thighs. Bend at the waist
to show the crown of the head while the eyes remain forward. Then, raise to an
upright position. The left leg steps out to Chumbae stance.
What is the reason for
bowing?
An External Symbol of
Internal Respect....

Students & Instructors Bow:

Upon entering and leaving the studio.

Upon entering and leaving the training floor.

When beginning and completing workout.

By bowing, the student


is not acknowledging
the superiority of one
person over another.
Rather, the student is
showing respect to all
that the instructor,
fellow students or
opponents represent,
and thus to the art form
and everything that it
represents.
When done properly and
sharply, the bow reflects
a serious attitude about
training. The Karate
studio is a special place.

12

OPENING AND CLOSING CLASS AT TOM BLOOM KARATE


1) When class is ready to begin, the instructor calls, Line up! or Fall In!
Students then line up (facing the mirrors) according to rank and seniority. The
highest ranking students are at the right (facing the instructor).
a) Seniority is determined by the belt color. In cases of students with the same
belt rank, the student who has trained in the school for the longest period of time
is considered senior. If the training time is the same, then age becomes the final
determining factor for seniority.
b) Either the instructor or the highest ranking student will lead the rituals. Inline,
students are in Chumbae stance.* The instructor calls for attention (Charri ot).
Then: Face the flag, bow (Kun yet), Face forward (toward the instructor),
bow (Kun yet), then, Chumbae. The same sequence is followed at the close of
class.
Students of Black Belt rank line up next to the instructor (in front of the class, to
the instructors left). When the command, Face forward is given, Black Belt
students should face toward the instructor, not toward the other students in class.

2) During class
a) Proper respect and discipline should be maintained at all times.
b) If arriving late to class, the student should raise their hand until recognized by
the instructor and given permission to join the class.
Whenever a student enters or exits the mat, either during or before/after
class, they should bow to the flag first to signify respect for the studio and
the system.
c) If a student has a question, it should first be referred to a senior member of the
class. If they cannot answer the question, then the instructor should be
addressed.
d) There should be no unnecessary noise in the studio; all activities should relate
to training.
e) Students on the sidelines should either remain seated or practice quietly so as
not to disturb others on the mat.

13

VISUAL IMAGERY & RELAXATION

VISUAL IMAGERY
Visual imagery (or, imagining an event with your eyes closed) is a powerful
technique used in meditation, relaxation, and hypnosis. In Karate, it can be
combined with relaxation training and employed as a useful adjunct to regular
classes as an aid in achieving confidence and proper techniques.
First, sit in a straight-back chair and close your eyes. Breathing deeply,
concentrate on each muscle group (beginning with the head), tightening and
relaxing each muscle until the toes are reached.
Once the body is relaxed, visualize those aspects of training which you wish to
enhance; e.g., posture, stances, confidence, speed, flexibility, sparring
proficiency. Imagine yourself standing in a correct back stance or recoiling a
round kick, technique to target. If test anxiety is a problem, imagine yourself
standing in front of a panel of judges with a relaxed, confident, and strong
attitude.
If you begin to feel anxious (still keeping yur eyes closed), continue to breathe
deeply but focus on a pleasant activity (sunning at the beach, for example.) Once
you again feel relaxed, return to the stressful thought and visualize your success
in the situation. (Repeat the pleasant activity scenario as often as necessary).
After 10 to 20 minutes of visualization, begin to lighten your breathing. Since this
method may actually induce a form of self-hypnosis, it is important to count
from 1 to 5. saying. wide awake to yourself as you open your eyes (so
as to avoid hyper suggestibility).
If you can visualize a correct performance, you stand a greater chance of actually
performing the activity. Of course, visual imagery cannot replace the actual
practice of techniques, but it has proven to be beneficial to athletes in many
sports in achieving performance goals.

14

TBK RULES AND REGULATIONS


1) No profanity in the studio.
2) No smoking in the studio.
3) No shoes will be worn on the mat.
4) Everyone will bow before entering or leaving the mat and the
studio.
5) Head instructors will be addressed as "Mister", "Mrs.", or "Ms".
6) No student shall join or leave a class in progress without their
instructor's permission.
7) Students will always work out in a clean uniform.
8) Students will always keep their fingernails and toenails trimmed.
9) Students will not spar without protective gear.
10) No student shall ask or challenge a higher belt to free spar.
11) Students will not chew gum during class.
12) No jewelry will be worn during class.
13) No student will test for promotion if behind on lesson
payments or stripes on belt.
14) All students will treat each other with respect.
15) The karate belt is not to be worn outside the studio.
16) Karate is only for self-defense.
17) No students shall free spar without instructor supervision.
18) Students are responsible for keeping family and friends
quiet during class.
19) Students shall know how to tie their belts.
20) Students shall know all their rules for testing.

15

TBK CODE OF ETHICS


I will look for the good in all people, make them feel and let
them know they are important.
I will always be in a positive frame of mind and convey this
feeling to every person I meet.
If I have nothing good to say about a person, I will say
nothing.
I shall continually work at developing love, happiness, and
loyalty in my family and acknowledge that no other success
can compensate for failure in the home.
I shall have faith, and develop myself to the maximum of my
potential in all ways.
I will be as enthusiastic about the success of others as I am
about my own.
I will forget about the mistakes and limitations in the past,
and press on to greater achievements in the future.
As a martial artist, I understand the value of human life. I
am therefore committed to a drug free existence.

16

THE AWARDING OF BELTS

At Tom Bloom Karate, you should train only to master yourself. You are graded
on your own effort and ability and are not compared to anyone else, Sometimes it
becomes apparent that a lower ranked student has superior physical ability in
comparison to a student who is wearing a higher level belt. The lower ranked
student may feel that they should be wearing the higher belt rank if they are able
to perform various techniques better than other, advanced rank students.
This is rarely true!
Students need to respect each other for weaknesses as well as strengths. The
effort, knowledge, and amount of time put into the art are essentials for belt rank
advancement. Consistent attendance is a must; even the student who quickly
learns the physical aspects of Tang Soo Do will lack the mental components
required unless regular attendance and practice are exhibited.
With this in mind, the awarding of belts serves four purposes:
1) it is a sign of progress;
2) it is encouraging to the student;
3) it is an incentive to fellow students; and
4) it establishes seniority.
The awarding of belts should not, however, serve to create rivalry or jealousy
among students, an inflated ego, or a false sense of achievement.
Instructors, therefore, grade students on:
1) character development;
2) personal achievement;
3) a display of physical and mental ability! control; and
4) written knowledge (required for upper belt tests).

17

STRETCHING AND WARM-UP


At TBK practice begins with stretching. The purpose is to gain the flexibility needed to perform the art.
There are three kinds of flexibility:
1. Dynamic flexibility --- "performing dynamic movements within a full range of motion in the
joints" ... an example is alternately swinging the arms up and down as far as they'll go
2. Static passive flexibility --- "assuming and maintaining extended positions using your weight
(splits), or using strength not coming from the stretched limbs" ... examples include side split and
lifting and holding a leg with your arm
3. Static active flexibility --- "assuming and maintaining extended positions using only the
tension of the agonists and synergists while the antagonists are being stretched" ... an example is
lifting your leg and keeping it high without any support
Younger people have more natural flexibility than older people if they are healthy. Body type and
physical condition also dictate what stretches are best for you.
We recommend you stretch several times a week, not just when it's time to practice Tang Soo Do.
Stretching will prepare your body to be ready for your practice sessions. A good regimen is to do
dynamic stretches each morning and rotate static passive, static active and isometric stretches on the
afternoons or evenings when you don't have a Tang Soo Do workout.

Loosen up --Rotate your joints. Start with your fingers, hands and wrist. Rotate your elbows, shoulders and neck.
You may be stiff at the beginning, so don't move your joints too hard or fast. Give your body time to
loosen up.
Move on to the trunk of your body by slowly twisting from side to side while swinging out your arms.
Bend your body forward and backward carefully as you increase the length of motion. Continue to
twist and bend through your hips, knees, ankles and toes. This will probably take you about 5
minutes.

Warm up --Now it's time to get your blood flowing faster through
your muscles. You can jog, jump rope or any other aerobic activity
that works. This will probably take you about 5 minutes.

18

Stretch statically --Sit on the floor with legs stretched out comfortably. Slowly bend and place your chin down towards
the floor. Hold it for a few seconds.
Next, bring your feet together in butterfly position and slowly bend forward and reach your nose to the
floor. Hold it for a few seconds.
Then have a seat on your knees, put your hands behind you and push your hips forward to stretch
the top of your quadriceps, hold for a few seconds and repeat.
Sit on the floor with your legs straight out in front of you with your feet together, grab your ankles an
slowly pull your chin down toward your knees, hold for a bout 10 seconds and repeat.
Lay on your stomach and place your hands in front of you, arch your back, look up and twist your hips
from side to side.
That should complete a basic stretching warm-up to practice Tang Soo Do. Again, develop a warmup that works well for your body.
Warming up and stretching with:

THE DAILY DOZEN

19

BASIC STANCES

CHUMBE

BACK

FRONT

STRADDLE

CHUMBAE STANCE (ready position):


Feet are one shoulder width apart and are pointed straight ahead. Knees are
slightly bent, and fists are in front of the students belt with arms extended and
eyes straight ahead. There is no moving in Chumbae stance.
BACK STANCE:
Starting from Chumbae stance, turn the right foot out to a 90 degree angle, step
back 1 1/2 shoulder widths, while keeping the stance one shoulder width wide
(apart). The left leg is forward. Both knees are bent and bowed over the feet. The
left shoulder is forward, and the right fist is in front of the solar plexus. The left fist
is in front of the jaw, with the elbows sinking over the ribs. Hips and shoulders
are facing a 45 degree angle; the head is facing forward, and the back is straight.
75% of the body weight is shifted onto the back leg.
FRONT STANCE:
Starting from Chumbae stance, the left leg steps forward 1 1/2 shoulder widths
(while keeping the stance one shoulder width wide). The front (left) knee bends
so the shin is perpendicular to the floor. The rear leg is completely extended, but
both heels e down. The back is straight, and the hips are forward. The knees,
hips, shoulders, and eyes are facing forward (parallel the front wall). 75% of the
body weight is shifted over the front leg. When practicing, pull both fists back
to the hips (to monitor the hips being straight).
STRADDLE LEG STANCE:
Starting from Chumbae stance, put fists on hips.* The left leg steps out 2
shoulder widths apart. Both feet are pointing straight ahead. Knees are bent and
bowed toward the feet; the back is straight, and weight is evenly distributed on
both legs.
hips refers to the area between the hip bone and the lower rib. (This protects the
area in which there is no bone). Elbows are back, shoulders are moved forward,
and arms are ready to punch. Wrists are straight.

20

BASIC HAND POSITIONS


FIST:
a) Start with the hand open.
b) Clench the fingers;
c) Roll and tuck the knuckles.
d) Place the thumb on top of the fingers, between the first and second joints of
the first two fingers.

COMMONLY USED FOR


PUNCHING, BLOCKING, HAMMER
FISTS, BOTTOM FISTS AND
BACK-KNUCKLES

KEEP THUMB JOINT


PROTECTED
AND WRIST STRAIGHT

KNIFE HAND:
a) Start with the hand open, palm up.
b) Squeeze the fingers together, slightly curving inward, and tuck the thumb
across the palm to support the outer blade of the hand.

COMMONLY USED FOR


BLOCKING, CHOPS AND
SPEAR-HANDS

21

BASIC CENTER PUNCH


BASIC RULE:
When demonstrating basics in Tang Soo Do, unless otherwise stated, the
student always steps out with the left foot first and always steps back to
Chumbae Stance.

STANDING CENTER PUNCH:


Start from a straddle leg stance and extend the left fist, solar plexus level, palm
down. The right hand pulls back to the hip, palm up.

To punch:
switch arm positions while keeping the elbows close to the body.

Timing:
starting with the left arm extended, feel as though the hands are connected by a
pulley; punches are pulled out, and the hands work together.

Start to switch:
when both elbows reach the body, the hands should remain in the original
position. As the punches continue, both fists are in a vertical position but
continue to move and SNAP into final position at the completion of the punch.

22

BASIC BLOCKS: STANDING


General Rules:
1) Unless instructed otherwise, always assume the left leg is forward, and the left
hand blocks. (Whichever leg is forward, the same side hand blocks; the
opposite hand pulls to the hip and is ready to punch).
2) Blocks end with wrist snaps. Both wrists show a snap rotation from the folding
position; however, wrists dont rotate until the completion of the block.
3) Geared to Ke-I, or exhale, all movements finish (lock out) at once.
4) When executing blocks, students should realize that they are demonstrating
their STANCE as well. Be aware of complete body posture!
5) Blocks are executed in two moves, the fold and the block.

LOW BLOCK
a) fold:
the right fist extends in front of the solar plexus with palm down. The left fist folds
to the ear (with the palm facing the ear). Folds are done simultaneously; the left
elbow and right elbow bends are nearly touching.
b) block:
the right fist pulls back to the hip while the left hand blocks. The left fist is 6 to 8
inches above the knee, parallel to the thigh.

LOW BLOCK FOLD


LOW BLOCK

Wrists snap to the opposite position:


right wrist palm up, left wrist palm down. The left arm (fist to elbow)
protects against an attack to the lower part of the body.

23

HIGH BLOCK
a) fold:
the left fist (blocking hand) folds in front of the right hip, palm up. The right fist
folds palm clown over the left wrist. Wrists are touching but not resting on each
other and are at right angles.
b) block:
the right fist pulls back to the hip, palm up, at the same time the left fist blocks
upward, palm facing outward. The arm is in an arc; the wrist is above the head
with the forearm at a 45 degree angle to protect the head against attack.

HIGH BLOCK FOLD


HIGH BLOCK

KNIFE HAND BLOCK


a) fold:
the right fist extends in front of the solar plexus, palm down. The left hand is in a
knife hand position with the palm facing toward the right ear. The left elbow and
right elbow bend are nearly touching.
b) block:
the right fist pulls back to the hip, palm up. At the same time, the knife hand (left
hand) blocks across the face to protect the face from attack. Note: The left elbow
bends over the left knee, and the left fingertips are at eyebrow level. In a knife
hand, the left palm is facing forward, and the outer blade of the hand is at a slight
angle to the body.

24

KNIFE HAND FOLD


KNIFE HAND BLOCK

INSIDE BLOCK
a) fold:
the fight fist extends palm down in front of the solar plexus. The left hand folds to
the left ear, with the fist nearly touching the ear with the palm facing forward.
b) block:
the fight fist pulls back to the hip, palm up. The left fist blocks past the right side
of the face, palm facing inward with knuckles at eyebrow level. The left arm,
forearm to fist, thus protects the upper right side of the body and face against
attack.

INSIDE BLOCK FOLD


INSIDE BLOCK

25

OUTSIDE BLOCK
a) fold:
the left fist (blocking hand) folds in front of the right hip, palm down. The right fist
folds palm down over the left wrist. The wrists are touching but are not resting on
each other.
b) block:
the right fist pulls back to the hip, palm up, at the same time the left fist blocks in
an outward motion past the left side of the face. The left palm is facing inward
with the knuckles at eyebrow level. The left elbow sinks toward the knee and is
slightly forward. Therefore, the left arm, forearm to wrist, protects the upper left
side of the body and face against attack.

INSIDE BLOCK FOLD


INSIDE BLOCK

At first glance an outsider looking into a Karate studio would view a group of
people throwing punches, kicks, and flipping each other to the ground. It
would probably appear to the outsider that the main focus of Karate is
destruction. While it is true that Karate is a very effective form of self- defense,
the real focus of the art is harmony. If these techniques are examined a little
closer, the outsider would see the patience and concentration that these
potentially dangerous maneuvers require. With practice, various movements
are executed with a great deal of power but total control.
Professor Bloom, Tom Bloom Karate

26

BASIC KICKS: FRONT- ROUND- SIDE


FRONT KICK:
The foot is pointed with the toes pulled back; the ball of the foot is extended with
the hips faced forward.

Primary targets: knees, groin, solar plexus, ribs.

FRONT KICK
FOOT
POSITION

STANDING FRONT KICK


a) Beginning in a back stance, b) the back knee lifts, toes are flexed toward the
knee, and c) the kick thrusts forward. d) Recoil with the knee raised; e) return to
a back stance. (Use a count of 4: knee up, extend, recoil, and recover).
BACK STANCE

KNEE UP

EXTEND

RECOIL

RECOVER

27

SLIDE-UP FRONT KICK


a) Beginning in a back stance, b) the back leg slides up to the front foot while
turning the feet, hip, and shoulders forward. c) The front knee raises, then
d) extend the kick, e) recoil, and f) step down in front while the rear foot
pivots to a back stance position. (Use a count of 5: slide up, knee up.
extend, recoil, and recover forward).
BACK STANCE

SLIDE-UP

KICK

KNEE UP

RECOIL

BACK STANCE

STEPPING FRONT KICK


a) Beginning in a back stance, b) the rear knee raises, c) the kick extends, d)
recoils, and then e) steps forward while the rear foot pivots and recovers to the
back stance position. (Use a count of 4: knee up, extend, recoil, and recover
forward).
BACK STANCE

KNEE UP

EXTEND

RECOIL

RECOVER

28

ROUND KICK (foot position):


The toes are pointed so that the instep of the foot protrudes. The strike is with the
instep, and the knee is pointed toward the striking area. Hips are sideways.
(Traditionally, the ball of the foot is also used to strike the target).

Primary targets: outer thigh, groin,


kidneys, solar plexus, ribs, throat, face, head.
ROUND KICK
FOOT
POSITION

STANDING ROUND KICK


a) Beginning in a back stance, b) the front knee raises (so the hips remain
sideways), and the foot is tucked toward the buttocks; foot and knee are
aligned. c) Extend the kick, d) recoil with the knee raised, return the foot
forward, and e) end in the back stance position. (Use a count of 4: knee
up, extend, recoil, and recover).

BACK STANCE

KNEE UP

EXTEND

RECOIL

RECOVER

29

SLIDE-UP ROUND KICK


a) Beginning in a back stance, b) the rear leg slides up to the front leg (feet are
heel to heel in perpendicular position), c) the front knee raises, d) the kick
extends, e) recoils, and then f) steps forward to a back stance. (Use a count of 5:
slide-up, knee up, extend, recoil, and recover forward).
BACK STANCE

SLIDE-UP

KNEE UP

KICK

RECOIL

BACK STANCE

SPINNLNG ROUND KICK


a) Beginning in a back stance, b) pivot the feet, hips, and shoulders & switch
your hand positions. c) Re the rear knee, and d) extend the kick. Then e) recoil
and f) step forward to a back stance. (Use a count of 5: pivot, knee up, extend,
recoil, and recover forward).
BACK STANCE

PIVOT

KNEE UP

KICK

RECOIL

BACK STANCE

30
SIDE KICK (foot position):
The toes and foot are flexed with the heel protruding. The foot is bladed and
positioned so that the heel is higher than the. toes. The hip rotates, and the
support foot pivots to allow a greater extension of the kick. Remember to keep
the knee raised while recoiling.

Primary targets: knee, ribs, solar plexus,


chest, face, throat.
SIDE KICK
FOOT
POSITION

STANDING SIDE KICK


a) Starting from a back stance, b) raise the front knee, flex the foot and toes, and
raise the hip. Simultaneously c) pivot the back foot and extend the kick; d) recoil,
and e) recover to a back stance. (Use a count of 4: knee up, extend, recoil, and
recover).

BACK STANCE

KNEE UP

EXTEND

RECOIL

RECOVER

31

SLIDE-UP SIDE KICK


a) Starting from a back stance, b) slide up heel to heel (in a perpendicular
position), c) raise the front knee, and d) extend the kick while pivoting the support
foot. e) Recoil the leg and supporting toot simultaneously, and f) return to a back
stance. (Use a count of 5: slide-up, knee up, extend, recoil, and recover forward).
BACK STANCE

SLIDE-UP

KNEE UP

KICK

RECOIL

BACK STANCE

SPINNING SIDE KICK


a) Starting from a back stance, b) pivot, c) raise the back knee, and d)
extend the kick while pivoting the support foot further. e) Recoil both the
kick and the supporting foot, f) step down forward, and recover to a back
stance. (Use a count of 5: pivot, knee up, extend, recoil, and recover
forward).
BACK STANCE

PIVOT

KNEE UP

KICK

RECOIL

BACK STANCE

32

FORMS (KATA)
A GUIDE FOR PRACTICING
One must develop an understanding of each form, for individual moves as well
as pattern and flow.
Focus on the varying speeds and rhythms of the form.
Practice correct breathing throughout the form.
Maintain a consistent energy level throughout the form.
Always train with full effort and concentration.
Remember: a Ke-I is a reflection of your power and attitude.
Each strike should be executed with power equal to that in a self-defense
situation.
When you finish a form, check your mark; the finishing mark should be the
same as the starting point.
When executing forms or basics, focus points are determined by your own
height in working with an imaginary opponent. So, if your stance is lowered (e.g.,
straddle leg) and youre punching temple level, then punch at the level of your
temple in the lowered stance.

BASIC RULES AS TAUGHT AT TOM BLOOM KARATE:


Always look before you fold and fold before you step.
Following any block with a stepping hand strike or kick, one must extend the
blocking arm (in front of the solar plexus) at the instant one starts to step forward.
Exception: when a stepping double strike follows a block (such as> side
kick/bottom fist, as found in Pyong-An Sa Dan and Bassai).
Each form is a foundation for the one following. Thus, intermediate and advanced
forms cannot be executed properly unless the beginning forms are perfected.
Instructors often warn students who are preparing for their Black Belt test that
one is able to judge whether or not a student will pass by the very first move of
Giecho Hyung II Bu!

33
CAUTION: One should aim to be a well-rounded student. In pursuit of fighting
expertise, students often tend to neglect their forms. Conversely, a student may
prefer forms and avoid the combat of sparring.
In Tang Soo Do, the perfection of forms can be used to train distance, balance,
flow, timing, power, focus, speed, and techniques expressed in fighting.

MORE BASIC RULES:


In the forms Giecho Hyung II Bu through Giecho Hyung Sam Bu, when turning
with blocks: whichever direction you look, you fold, step, and block in the same
direction.
All blocks are followed by punches.
Moves number 8 and 16 are executed with Ke-ls.
After every Ke-l, there is a 3/4 turn to the left (the left hand folds). This rule
applies to the basic forms, advanced forms are not as consistent in this regard.
In forms executed in an I formation, the center moves consist of 3 steps, 3
strikes, and a Ke-l on the third strike (which is followed by a 3/4 turn to the left;
left hand folding). (An aerial view of the form would look like the capital letter I).
Similarly, K formation refers to moves that would look like the letter K if
observed from an aerial perspective and are evident in Pyong-an Cho Dan and
Pyong-an Yi Dan.
Following a low block, the hand that blocked raises to solar plexus level to
prepare for the next step. (This arm also serves as a defense and sets you up for
the reverse motion of your striking hand).
With the exception of Bassai, all forms can be executed on an instructional
count of 20.
Click the You
Tube link below
to watch the video

please subscribe
to our Karate
Channel

34

GIECHO HYUNG IL BU
Basic Form 1
All forms begin in Chumbae stance.
1) Look to the left, fold for a left low block, and step with the left foot 1/4 turn to
the left, pivoting on the balls of the feet to a front stance: the left leg is forward,
and the block and step are completed simultaneously.
2) Raise the left hand solar plexus level, step forward, and punch in front of the
solar plexus:
the right leg is forward, and the right arm is out in center punch position.
3) Look to the right, fold for a right low block, and step with the right foot 1/2 turn
to the right, pivoting on the balls of the feet to a front stance: the right leg is
forward, and the block and step are completed simultaneously.
4) Raise the right hand, solar plexus level. Step forward and punch in front of the
solar plexus: the left leg is forward and the left arm is out in (stepping) center
punch position.
Chumbae

4) Punch

3) Low Block

1) Low Block

2) Punch

5) Look to the left, fold for a left low block, and the left foot steps 1/4 turn to the
left, pivoting on the balls of the feet to a front stance: the left leg is forward, and
block and step are completed simultaneously.
6) Stepping center punch with the right hand (front stance).
7) Stepping center punch with the left hand (front stance).
8) Stepping center punch with the right hand (front stance) / *Ke-I as the stance
and punch lock out together.

35
5) Low Block

6) Punch

7) Punch

8) Ke-l

Karate Kids testing from White Belt Yellow Belt are required
moves 1 - 8 of GIECHO HYUNG IL BU Basic Form 1
9) Look to the left, the left hand folds for a low block, and the left foot steps 3/4
turn to the left, pivoting on the balls of the feet to a front stance: the left leg is
forward, and the step and block are completed simultaneously.
10) Stepping center punch with the right hand (front stance).
11) Look to the right, fold for a right low block, and the right foot steps 1/2 turn to
the right, pivoting on the balls of the feet to a front stance: the right leg is
forward, and the block and step are completed simultaneously.
12) Stepping center punch with the left hand (front stance).

36
9) Punch

10) Low Block

11) Low Block

12) Punch

13) Look to the left, fold for a left low block, and the left foot steps 1/4 turn to the
left, pivoting on the balls of the feet to a front stance: the left leg is forward, and
the block and step are completed simultaneously.
14) Stepping center punch with the right hand (front stance).
15) Stepping center punch with the left hand (front stance).
16) Stepping center punch with the right hand (front stance) / *Ke-l as the
punch and stance lock out together.
13) Low Block

14) Punch

15) Punch

16) Ke-l

37
17) Look to the left, the left hand folds for a low block, and the left foot steps
3/4 turn to the left, pivoting on the balls of the feet to a front stance: the left leg
is forward, and the step and block are completed simultaneously.
18) Stepping center punch with the right hand (front stance).
19) Look to the right, fold for a right low block, and the right foot steps 1/2 turn to
the right, pivoting on the balls of the feet to a front stance: the right leg is
forward, and the block and step are completed simultaneously.
20) Stepping center punch with the left hand (front stance).
Wait for the perow command, & step back with the left foot to Chumbae stance.
The student should finish on the same mark and face in the same direction
as in the beginning of the form.

20) Punch

19) Low Block

17) Low Block

18) Punch

Chumbae

IMPORTANT RULES AND HELPFUL HINTS


This form is in I formation and should take approximately 20 seconds to
perform.
The focus is on front stances, low blocks, & center punches
(at solar plexus level).
Keep shoulders square.
Show good head snaps before folds and turns.
Maintain concentration; dont allow eyes or mind to wander.
(For example, if a noise suddenly occurs in another part of the studio,
the student should not react to it).
Ke-I loudly on moves # 8 and #16.
Keep the upper body posture straight and eyes straight ahead (dont look
downl)
When folding for a low block, be sure the palm of the blocking hand is
completely turned toward the ear, and the other hand is palm down.

38

FALLING
It is inevitable that a student will fall or get knocked to the ground during practice
exercises, sparring, or a street confrontation. Unnecessary injury can be avoided
if the student falls properly; otherwise, the student may lose consciousness,
sustain a concussion, fractures, sprain, or bruises just from hitting the ground
incorrectly! Therefore, practice of correct falling is imperative and is one of the
first lessons taught to a White Belt.

FALLING FORWARD
Practice from a kneeling rather than a standing position to avoid injury, a) Place
your hands (palms forward, fingers together) in front of you, extended from the
shoulders. Turn your head to the side (to protect the eyes, especially) and slowly
fall forward. b) As your hands and forearms simultaneously hit the mat, protect
your head and Ke-I (keeping it turned to the side) and body (holding it as far from
the ground as possible) from the blow. Then, look behind you and prepare to kick
your attacker.
Hands Up

Fall - Ke-l

Back Kick

39

FALLING BACKWARD
From a standing position, tuck your chin into your chest to avoid head injury, a)
Fold both arms parallel (horizontally) to each other, in front of your face, with
palms facing outward. Bend your knees to bring you closer to the ground, then
fall backward (sit down, roll back, slap the mat with your palms, and Ke-I).
b) Arms are extended out to the sides but the body is in a well-tucked position
(knees and chin tucked into the chest). Prepare to kick your attacker.

Ready

Bend Knees

Tuck Chin

Fall-Slap- Ke-l

Fold Arms

Double Kick

The practice of forms is not only valuable as a learning tool, it is the practice
of tradition and instills respect for the art. It is the glue that holds the system
together. For me, it is a form of meditation that no other type of exercise or
training can provide, It is like the bodys prayer in response to the minds
discipline.
Professor Bloom, Tom Bloom Karate

40

FLYING SIDE KICK


1) Get spring in your legs by taking a short jump (-land and rock on the ball of the
back foot, and step forward with the front foot to start your momentum forward).
2) Run evenly (staying light on your feet).
3) Judge your distance so as not to kick your partner.
4) The opposite leg that is kicking turns outward and plants forward firmly on the
ground
5) With a pole vaulting motion, both knees drive upward towards the chest
6) Upon maximum elevation the kicking leg drives a side kick forward as the
opposite leg tucks and slaps the inner thigh of the kicking leg.
7) Technique and recoil should be quickly performed to give maximum hang time
in the air.
9) Land in a slightly backwards and then correct into a fighting stance: the kicking
leg ends forward.
A hand technique is never practiced after a flying side kick because it is
assumed the opponent is left helpless.

Click the You Tube link


below to watch the
video

please subscribe to our


Karate Channel

41

ONE-STEP PUNCHING
In one-step punching, two students are paired in a demonstration of defensive
techniques. The student who is attacking steps forward into a right center punch;
the student who is defending counters the punch and then follows up with a
series of moves that could disable the opponent.
At lower belt ranks (white through green /5th Gup), all opponents come forward
in a right hand attack. Commonly, the two students face each other in Chumbae
stance, and the attacker folds for a left low block, steps back with his right foot to
a front stance, blocks, and Ke-Is, thus signaling that he is ready to attack. After
the defender measures his distance, folds for his defense, and Ke-Is, the
attacker extends his left arm and steps forward into a right center punch (focused
at the defenders face, at the nerves below the nose and above the upper rip).
Students above the rank of white belt may Ke-l and then fold, or may fold
and Ke-l simultaneously.
At higher belt ranks (green /4th Gup through Black Belt), one-steps are divided
into right and left hand attacks. In addition, the attacker steps back from
Chumbae stance into a fighting stance (left leg forward for a right hand attack),
extends the left arm, and steps forward into a right center punch (for a right hand
attack). The reverse is true for a left hand attack.
After completion of the one-step, students should remain in their last stance
and wait for the command (perow) by the instructor before returning to ready
position (Chumbae stance). When practicing, be sure your partner has
completed his technique before returning to Chumbae stance, so as to avoid
injury.
When being judged in a test situation, if the defender misses his block (or doesnt
block properly), the one-step is automatically failed, regardless of the skill
displayed on the follow-up techniques.
Timing, distance, focus, the sharpness, and the appropriateness of the moves
are judged when the effectiveness of a one-step is considered.
The defender is responsible for the correct distance, timing, control, and
execution of the technique.
The attacker is responsible for consistent stances, focused punches, and
locked out stances and punches. In addition, the attacker must remain in
position until the defender completes his techniques and the instructor
commands the return to ready
position. The attacker then steps back to Chumbae stance.

42

How to Attack for One-Step Punching

Chumbae

Attacker Folds for


Left Low Block

Attacker Waits for


Defender to Ke-I

Attacker Steps Back


Blocks and Ke-Is

After Ke-I - Attacker


Steps and Punches

43

ADULT WHITE BELT ONE-STEPS


Note: One - Steps are not a Requirement
for Karate Kids until Yellow Belt
1) PUNCHER
a) Chumbae stance.
b) The defender steps back to attack and Ke-I's.
c) Fold for a left knife hand block (right fist on hip)/ *Ke-I.
d) The right leg steps out to a 45 degree straddle leg stance: block with the left
hand and simultaneously punch to the jaw with the right hand/ *Ke-I

CHUMBAE

DEFENDER
FOLDS

2UNCHER

THE ATTACK

BLOCK STRIKE
AND KE-I

44

2) 3-D
Chumbae stance.
a) Fold for a left knife hand block *Ke-I.
b) The right leg steps out to a 45-degree straddle leg stance and block.
c) The right hand punches to the jaw.
d) The left hand punches to the solar plexus.
e) Right ridge hand to the temple/ *Ke-I.

DEFENDER
FOLDS

DEFENDER
BLOCKS

LEFT PUNCH
LOW

RIGHT PUNCH
HIGH

RIGHT RIDGEHAND KE-I

45

3) IBU
Chumbae stance.
a) Fold for a left inside block/ *Ke-I.
b) The left leg steps out to a back stance (by the outside of the attacker's right
foot). Block with the left hand, then
c) Left back fist (across the attacker's face).
d) Upper cut (with the right hand) to the solar plexus while shifting to a scoot
stance**/ *Ke-I.
**A scoot stance is a short front stance with the rear knee bent.

DEFENDER
FOLDS

LEFT BACK FIST

DEFENDER
BLOCKS

RIGHT UPPER
CUT KE-I

46

4) FOOTBALL THROWER
Chumbae stance.
a) Fold for a left knife hand block/ *Ke-I.
b) Step out to a right 45 degree front stance and block with the left hand, while
the right hand pulls to the right ear in a fold for a right chop. Simultaneously:
c) Pivot to a left front stance/ right chop to the throat;
d) Pivot to a right front stance/ left uppercut to the solar plexus;
e) Pivot to a left front stance/ right forearm to the jaw. *Ke-I

DEFENDER
FOLDS

DEFENDER
BLOCKS & FOLDS

UPPER CUT

CHOP

FOREARM
KE-I

47

5) KICKER
Chumbae stance.
a) Fold for a right knife hand block/ *Ke-I.
b) Step to a left 45 degree front stance and block with the right hand. The right
hand grabs the attacker's right wrist, and:
c) right round kick to the face
* recoil and fold for right elbow:
d) Step down to a straddle leg stance and right elbow to the kidney/ *Ke-I.

DEFENDER
BLOCKS

DEFENDER
FOLDS

*FOLD

GRAB
ROUND KICK

RIGHT
ELBOW

48

This e-book was designed as a technical manual to help guide the student step
by step through the 1st level of Tang Soo Do basic requirements. For some that
insist on mystifying every aspect of the martial arts, the disclosure of such
information may come as a shock. For those who understand that the sharing of
knowledge is the martial artists way of life. I, myself, have known no other way.
Through my experience it has given me strength, courage, self-respect,
discipline, self-control, sincerity, and dedication. It has taught me humility,
harmony, freedom, and respect for others. It has given me the ability to laugh at
myself, cry, forgive, participate, and love. It has let me enjoy and endure all the
eventualities of my life.
I am a teacher: therefore, I have a great love in my heart.
I am a warrior; therefore, I have none.
I am a Master of Tang Soo Do; yet, I am a white belt.

Consequently, I have balance, good judgment, and control.


Train to master yourself, not others.
With love and sincerity,
Professor Bloom, Tom Bloom Karate

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