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Visayas State University

College of Engineering
DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING
Baybay, Leyte
GEng 112
General Surveying II
Name: Joycelyn H. Uy
13, 2012
Course and Year: BSCE-3
2013

Date Performed: December


Date Submitted: January 8,

LOCATION BY THREE-POINT RESECTION


Laboratory Exercise No. 6
I.

Introduction:
Three-point resection is a form of triangulation. This method
of determining the location of an instrument by measuring the
horizontal angles between three stations of known position and
location may be used in areas where existing control points cannot
be occupied or when the work does not warrant the time and cost of
occupying each station. Triangulation of this type should be
considered Fourth-Order, although Third-Order accuracy can be
obtained if a strong triangular figure is used and the angles are
accurately measured.

II.

Objective(s):
1. To determine analytically the position of an instrument
station by measuring the horizontal angles between
three stations of known position and location.

III.

Instruments and Accessories:


Engineers Transit or Theodolite, Range Poles, Hubs and
Flags or Markers.

IV.

Procedure:
1. From the unknown position of point P (instrument station),
the three designated control points whose positions (X & Y
Coordinates) are known were identified on the ground.
These stations were called A, B, and C. These stations were

easily visible from point P by the use of signals set up on


the ground.
2. The instrument was set up and levelled at point P and the
horizontal angles psi() and lambda() were measured in
four or more repetitions.
3. After the above observations are completed, the length
and direction of lines AB and BC were determined, and the
angle at ABC (or ). Then the values of Q, X, Y, , , BP,
AP, and CP were solved to determine the coordinates of
point P.
II.

Results and Discussion:


Table 1. Coordinates of A, B and C.
Station
A
B
C
P

Eastings
19808.60 m
20062.01 m
20029.71 m
20091.17 m

SAMPLE COMPUTATIONS:
a)

Length of AB and BC
Using distance formula: d =
AB =
AB = 262.853 m
BC =
BC = 95.959 m
Azimuth of AB and BC,
Using Tan Bearing or Azimuth of AB =
AB =
AB = 74O3545.43 from N

Northings
27373.95 m
27443.77 m
27353.41 m
27552.13 m

BC =
BC = 19O4011.6 from N
b) Angle ABC,
<ABC = (180 - 19O4011.6) + 74O3545.43
= 234o5533.83
c) Other required unknown elements in the figure:
Q = 360 (234o5533.83 - 2O730 - 95O1830)
Q = 27O3826.17

X=
X=
X = 25o0919.57
Y = 27O3826.17 - 25o0919.57
Y = 2O296.6
<ABP = 180 (95O1830 + 25o0919.57)
<ABP = 59O3210.43
<BPC = 180 (2O730 + 2O296.6)
<BPC = 175O2323.4

AP =

= 227.542 m

CP =

= 208.005 m

BP =

= 112.136 m

Coordinates of Point P;
Solve for latitude and departure of line CP;

= 19O4011.6 - 2O296.6 = 17o115, CP = d = 208.005


Lat = dcos = 208.005cos (17o115) = 198.7191 m
Dep = dsin = 208.005sin (17o115) = 61.4558 m
Latitude is added to Northing of station C, Departure is
added to Easting of station C.
Northings of P = 27353.41 + 198.7191 = 27552.1291 m
Eastings of P = 20029.71 + 61.4558 = 20091.1658 m
DISCUSSION:
A, B, and C are the main triangulation stations whose
locations are known. P is the intersected point whose location is to
be determined. Observations are made on P from A, B, and C, and
the angle alpha, beta and gamma are measured. The lengths a and
b of AB and AC, respectively, and the angle B are known as the
coordinates of A, B, and C are known. The angle B can also
computed from the known coordinates of A,B, and C as a check on
the observations. It is required to determine the distances AP, BP
and CP, so that P can be plotted by intersections.
III.

IV.

Conclusion:
Therefore, the position of an instrument station was determined
by measuring the horizontal angles between three stations of known
position and location. The coordinates of the station P is (20091.1658
m, 27552.1291 m).
Sketch:

V.

Reference(s):

http://140.194.76.129/publications/eng-manuals/EM_1110-11005_sec/EM_1110-1-1005_Sections/c-3.pdf

JunyPilapil La Putt, Higher Surveying