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Central Coast

December 2015

Family
Inside
Child Development

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2

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4

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6

Library Voice
Family Life

Fun & Games
Money

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10

Local History

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12

Wordmonger

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Calendar

Family Events

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Local Resources
Alt Education

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Safe & Classic Toys / Gift Reading / Financial Resolutions / SLO Night Life History

Free! Central Coast Family

Child Development
December is

Safe Toy & Gift Month!
Skates, tricycles, toy trucks and
cars, wagons and balls are among
children’s favorite playthings.
But in one year, according to
U.S. Consumer Product Safety
Commission estimates, there
were 150,000 toy-related injuries
serious enough to require hospital
emergency room treatment.
Falls are the most frequent kind of
accident, but many serious injuries
result from children swallowing
small parts or placing tiny toys in
noses or ears, from exploding gaspowered toys, from flammable
products, and from sharp edges.
Each year, some 5,000 new toys
enter the market-place. The
holiday season finds over 150,000

different kinds of toys for sale
in approximately one million
stores. Despite the efforts of
manufacturers, retailers, safety
inspectors, and others, it is
impossible to examine every toy.
hazards. A dangerous toy
But it is possible for parents and • Watch out for toys that have
should be repaired immediately
sharp edges, small parts, or
other relatives to check every
or thrown away. Sharp or
sharp points. Avoid toys that
new toy they buy and every old
splintered edges on wooden
produce extremely loud noises
toy around the house for possible
toys should be sanded smooth.
that can damage hearing and
hazards.
Use only non-toxic paint on toys
propelled objects that can injure
The following suggestions can
or toy boxes. Check outdoor
eyes.
help you keep playtime a safe,
toys for rust and weak or
• Buy toys that suit a child’s age,
fun time.
sharp parts that could become
interest, and abilities. Avoid
SELECT TOYS WITH CARE
hazardous.
toys that are too complex for
young children. Many toys • Teach children to put their toys
• Choose carefully. Look for good
away so the toys do not get
have a suggested age range to
design and quality construction
broken and so that no one trips
help you choose toys that are
in the toys you buy.
and falls on them.
appealing as well as safe.
• Be a label reader. Look for • Toy boxes, too, should be
checked for safety. A toy chest
safety information such as “Not
© Nicole Boughton Photography
should have a lightweight lid
recommended for children
nicoleboughtonphotography.com
that can be opened easily from
under 3 years of age,” or “nonwithin. For extra safety, be sure
toxic” on toys likely to end up
there are ventilation holes.
in little mouths, or “washable/
Central Coast Family (805) 528-0440
Watch for sharp edges that
hygenic materials” on stuffed
PO Box 6424, Los Osos, CA 93412
could cut and hinges that could
toys and dolls.
Our goal is to connect Central Coast families with the resources they need to thrive!
pinch. Attach rubber bumpers
• Check with parents before you

to the front corners of a toy
buy a child a toy that requires
EDITOR
Associate EDITOR
chest so little fingers won’t be
close supervision - electrically
Claire Vogel
Patrice Vogel
caught by a slammed lid.
operated toys, shooting toys
ccfamilyae@gmail.com
ccfamilyed@gmail.com
and games, chemistry sets, and
the like. Remember, too, that
AssISTANT EDITOR
ADVERTISING
younger children may have
CC F
Jack Vogel
Inquiries:
access to toys intended for
ccfamilyae@gmail.com
ccfamilyad@gmail.com
older children once the toy has
been brought into the home.
GRAPHIC DESIGN
DISTRIBUTION MANAGER
• Look for the UL (Underwriters
Eric Woodards
Out of the Blue
Laboratories) seal on electrical
toys. It indicates the electrical
CONTRIBUTING WRITERS
parts have been safety tested.
Kristen Barnhart, John J. Cannell, Guy Crabb, Kerrin Edmonds,

Cover Photo:

TM

Renee Mosier, Molly Peoples, CS Perryess, Steven Smith

TEACH PROPER USE OF TOYS

Central Coast Family is published monthly with a readership over 40,000. Find FREE
copies throughout San Luis Obispo County and North Santa Barbara County.

• Check the instructions and
explain to your child how to use
the toy.
• Always try to supervise children
while they play. Learn to spot
“an accident about to happen.”
• Check toys periodically for
broken parts and potential

Visit our website: www.centralcoastfamily.com
Submission deadline: 15th of each month prior to publication
Information contained in advertisements and other submissions is accepted in good faith. Publication does not imply endorsement by Central Coast Family.
Opinions expressed by contributors do not necessarily reflect views of the publisher. We reserve the right to reject or edit all submissions for any reason.

Material published herein may not be reproduced in any manner without prior written permission. © Vogel 2008

Every issue is printed with soy ink on 100% recycled paper. Please recycle again!

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December 2015

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Page 2

Child Development
• Toy shelves are another storage
small pellets that also can be
possibility. Open shelves allow
swallowed or inhaled.
children to see favorite toys and
3. Loud noises: Toy caps and some
easily return them to the shelf
noise-making guns and other
after play. Be sure the shelf is
toys can reach noise levels that
sturdy and won’t tip over if the
can damage hearing. The law
child climbs on it.
requires the following label
on boxes of caps producing
SEVEN TOY DANGERS
noise above a certain level:
1. Sharp edges: Toys made of
“WARNING - Do not fire closer
brittle plastic or glass can break
than 1 foot to the ear. Do not
easily, exposing sharp points
use indoors.”
and edges. Wooden, metal,
and plastic toys sometimes 4. Sharp points: Broken toys can
expose dangerous prongs and
have sharp edges due to poor
knife-sharp points. Pins and
construction.
staples on dolls’ clothes, hair,
2. Small parts: Tiny toys and toys
and accessories can easily
with small, removable parts
puncture an unsuspecting
can be swallowed or become
child. Even a teddy bear or
lodged in a child’s windpipe,
stuffed toy can be assembled
ears, or nose. The squeakers
with wires that can cut or stab.
in some squeeze toys can
be removed and possibly 5. Propelled objects: Projectiles
swallowed. The seams of
- guided missiles and other
poorly constructed stuffed toys
flying toys - can be turned into
can break open and release
weapons and can injure eyes

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in particular. Children should
temperature, electrical wiring,
never be permitted to play with
and prominent warning labels.
adult lawn darts or other hobby
Electric toys with any heating
or sporting equipment with
elements are recommended
sharp points. Arrows or darts
only for children over the age
used by children should have
of eight. Children should be
soft cork tips, rubber suction
taught to use electric toys
cautiously
and under adult
cups or other protective tips to
supervision.
prevent injury.
6. Electric toys: Electric toys that 7. Wrong toy for the wrong age:
Toys that may be safe for older
are improperly constructed,
children can be extremely
wired, or misused can shock
dangerous in the hands of little
or burn. Electric toys must
ones. Check package labels for
meet mandatory requirements
recommended age range.
for the maximum surface

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December 2015

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Page 3

Library Voice
Gift Reading
by
Kristen
Barnhart

I received my first Christmas “gift”
early this year. It started with a
Facebook post from my daughterin-law: “What do you prefer....
Jane Eyre; To Kill a Mockingbird;
Alice in Wonderland; Bram Stoker’s
Dracula; Harry Potter; Chronicles of
Narnia; Wicked; The Secret Garden;
Wuthering Heights, or Grimm’s
Fairy Tales, and why? I know, one
person’s gift is another’s pop quiz.
So I shot back a comment: “OMG
- All except Wicked have had deep
defining impacts on my life.” She
immediately shot back: “Which has
THE MOST?” “The Secret Garden, I
answered back. I’ve read it at least
50 times. My favorite grammar
school teacher, Miss Moline, read
it to us in 4th grade. It is the first
book that described the feeling of
“other” in my life and empowered
me to make my own magic, believe
in listening to what the animals
say, and know that soul-mates
are deeply real at any age. Her
perfect poetic reply jumped on my
Facebook wall: “They are all such

amazing books and all of them
evoke such deep emotion. I was just
wondering if you connect with one
more than all the others. I would
agree about The Secret Garden. It
was the first non picture-book novel
I ever read, and I was feeling like
such an outcast at that time in my
life. It gave me hope that I would
find a deep soul connection at some
point. It allowed me to be grateful
for my family and kick-started my
love for books and the ability they
give you to live in another world for
a short time.” Such a family we are!
I, of course, could not get that list
out of my mind. Wicked: the Life
and Times of the Wicked Witch
of the West by Gregory Maguire,
is a book I really wanted to like,
but I was never able to fall into. I
can, however, probably perform
the entire musical Wicked based
(loosely) on it since my daughter
and I saw it four times and the cd
lived in my car stereo for several
years. I did finish the book, but

never read the rest of the series
despite their fabulous titles.
The rabbit hole book I did fall into
was Carroll’s Alice and Wonderland
(and Through the Looking Glass). I
so lived in my own little world as a
child, that it was the closest thing to
realistic fiction I read. In junior high,
I revisited it with my artsy friend
Cindy and we set out to memorize
all the poems. We would walk along
the beach arm-in-arm, our voices
raised, “The sun was shining on the
sea/ shining with all his might: / He
did his very best to make the billows
smooth and bright / And this was
odd, because it was / The middle of
the night.” That same year, we also
set to memory the musical Hair and
we would alternate the two on our
beach walks, a perfect snapshot of
a 1960s adolescence!
For my 13th birthday, John Selby
gave me Bronte’s Wuthering
Heights and Stoker’s Dracula. When
I was four-years-old, John was the
first soul-mate I recognized and we
have stayed heart-connected long
after his death from AIDS in the mid1980s when we had to limit our time
together to dreams. The tragedy of
lost love on the moors with the cold
wind howling filled my room as an
antidote to my suburban Southern
California home.
Hormones
assaulted me with no fewer furors
than a caped vampire and I was left
feeling changed forever and not
necessarily in a good way! In that
most awkward year, John gave me
more than books and the peace
sign button off his corduroy jacket.
He gave me the gift of feeling seen,
of being so much more than the
treacherous waters of 7th grade
could ever reveal. I still want to
send him new books that he would
have loved.
The Harry Potter series would have
been John and my favorite books
if they had been written as we
tried to navigate our teens. I love
them. I love talking with people
of all ages who love them. I am
somewhat suspicious of those who
haven’t read them or (gasp) did
not love them. J.K. Rowling gave
my generation of boomers the
happy childhood that Tom Robbins
promised we were never too old for.
She simultaneously gave people all
over the world a new landscape,
language, and community we could
share. Rowling tapped into our

Central Coast Family

December 2015

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805 543-WILD [9453]

dreams of flying, being invisible,
flexing our magic, and taking our
places in a non-muggle tribe. The
books themselves have the magic
of being new and a bit different
with each reading.
I think one of the qualities that all
the books on this list share is that
they beg to be re-read throughout
our lives.
Sharing To Kill a
Mockingbird with my daughter
by reading it to her turned a high
school assignment into a memory.
Jean Brody breathed life into Jane
Eyre and transformed it from the
Cliff Notes I read instead of the
book in high school into a beloved
friend. Grimm’s Fairy Tales continue
to call me with their archetypes and
I am looking to them to add to my
story-telling repertoire. Friendships
are tied into this list too, the friends
who lay between the pages ready
to come alive at each opening and
those who live on in our hearts.
So, gift your friends and family with
a list of favorite books this season.
If they haven’t read them yet, you
have the honor of becoming that
person forever connected to a book
that, perhaps, will change their lives
too. Have a great holiday season.

Kristen Barnhart has been telling stories,
recommending books, and stamping little hands
for over 30 years throughout SLO County. She is
currently a Youth Services Librarian at the San Luis
Obispo Library. Kristen can be reached at (805)
781-5775 or kbarnhart@slolibrary.org.
“Libraries will get you through times with
no money, better than money will get you
through times with no Libraries!”

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Page 4

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Camp will be held at
SLOCA / Teach campus

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4 Days: 9:00-12:30 $135 or 9:30-3:30 $200

Monart Birthday Party!
See website for pricing

Call 805.305.7400 to Register Now!
Like SLOMonart on facebook for discounts!
and check out our website:

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December 2015

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Page 5

Family Life

Classic Toys
by Debra Newby

When my three children were
small, we spent months reading
through every single one of Laura
Ingalls Wilder’s Little House series.
One winter, it looked as though
there would be no Christmas for
Mary and Laura Ingalls. A storm
was brewing, and to the children,
there just did not seem to be
anyway that Santa would be able
to make it that year. To their great
surprise and delight, the Ingalls’
good friend Mr. Edwards arrived,
and he brought treasures: a cup,
a penny, a heart-shaped cake, and
a peppermint candy stick.
These were simple gifts to be
sure, but they were welcomed
with gratitude and delight. As
I look back over many years of
raising children, the gifts that
had the most continued play

throughout the year were simple
classic ones.
My children had their share of
plastic toys, but there is a growing
concern that many plastic toys
for small children can be toxic.
The European Union has banned
the use of PVC (thermoplastic
resins) in children’s toys due to
health concerns. Although the
US banned Phthalates (a chemical
that makes plastics more flexible),
toys here are still made with PVC
plastics.
Electronic toys fill the holiday
catalogs, but Victoria L. Dunckley
M.D., author of Reset Your Child’s
Brain, believes that children are
“wired and tired,” and they need
a “fast” from “screen time”
stimulation. She believes that
spending a lot of time playing with

phones, tablets, and computers
can overload a child’s sensory
system, fracture attention, and
deplete mental reserves.
For generations, children have
enjoyed toys that encourage the
imagination and offer a longlasting experience. A toy that can
be played with in many different
ways provides value in that it is
familiar, and yet also has new
possibilities. Children enjoy classic
toys that encourage creativity,
socialization, and imagination.
The Gift of Building: Lincoln Logs
will be celebrating their 100 year
anniversary next year. These
notched miniature logs were
invented by the son of architect
Frank Lloyd Wright and provide
imaginative construction potential
for young builders. Regular wood
blocks come in various shapes
and colors. Pattern blocks include
rhombus and trapezoid shapes
providing extra math learning
opportunities. Children who like
to put things together often find
that the tracks and trains of a
Brio set provides hours of endless
creativity.
The Gift of Moving: A wood
wagon or metal Red flyer wagon
can become a spaceship, race car,
or clipper ship depending on the
imaginary needs of the day. For
those with excess energy to burn,
jumping rope can provide exercise
and coordination practice. Small
toys that are fun to watch include
spinning tops and a Slinky.
The Gift of Imagination: A
brightly colored silk scarf can
become a superhero cape when
a child is pretending. When
extra characters are needed for
the day’s activities, a cloth doll,

Central Coast Family

December 2015

sock money, or teddy bear can
provide companionship. Puppet
shows are fun and can include
the whole family. Some children
enjoy cutting out paper dolls.
Dover Catalog provides historic
paper dolls that add an element
of education to a play.
The Gift of Music: The first musical
instrument an infant receives is
often a rattle. As the child shakes
the small beads, he is introduced
to rhythm for the first time.
Tambourines and bells offer a
different sound. As a child’s ability
to coordinate his hands increases,
a percussion instrument, such as
a glockenspiel or xylophone, can
introduce tones, colors, and even
the alphabet when the notes are
marked on the keys.
The Gift of Art: One of our
family’s favorite gifts was a large
set of Prisma colored pencils.
They were used to illustrate
homemade books, make posters
to decorate the walls, and create
handmade birthday cards for
friends and relatives. For a rich,
tactile experience, we drew
pictures with pastel and oil chalks.
Tubes of watercolor paints were
a special treat and allowed us to
create a different style of art.
Classic toys are good for your
family’s health, your children’s
development, and for the
environment. When you offer a
classic toy, you are giving the gift
of endless possibilities.
Debra Newby is a longtime educator and
mother of two Suzuki violin teachers. She
has been listening, singing, playing, and
dancing with her family for over two decades.
Debra tutors math, teaches group dancing,
and writes music pattern song books for
xylophones. She can be reached at info@
UpadoUnlimited.com.

www.centralcoastfamily.com

Page 6

Futsal is a fast-paced version of soccer played throughout the world to develop skill and control
with dribbling, change of direction, passing, receiving, possession and small-sided games that
allow players to simulate real game situations and have fun while learning!
Week 1: Dec. 21st- 24th ( M-Th)
Super FUNdamentals (ages 6-12)
Little Skillsbuilders (ages 4-6)

Location: Atascadero Junior High, Atascadero
Time: 9 am to noon
Cost: $110
Time: 9:30 to 11 am
Cost: $75

Week 2: Dec. 28th- Jan. 1st (M-F)
Super FUNdamentals (ages 6-12)
Little Skillsbuilders (ages 4-6)

Location: Laguna Middle School, San Luis Obispo
Time: 9 am to noon
Cost: $145
Time: 9:30 to 11 am
Cost: $95

Week 3: Jan. 4th- Jan. 8th (M-F)
Super FUNdamentals (ages 6-12)
Little Skillsbuilders (ages 4-6)

Location: Paulding Middle School, Arroyo Grande
Time: 9 am to noon
Cost: $145
Time: 9:30 to 11 am
Cost: $95

For more information or to REGISTER TODAY go to

www.catal ystsoccer.com or call (831) 419-0347

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December 2015

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Page 7

Fun & Games

Jack’s Jokes
What do you call a musical elf?
What is Claustrophobia?

Christmas
Maze

Christmas Wrapper!
The fear of Santa Claus!

What is your parents favorite carol?

Silent Night!

Winter
Word
Search

Sudoku begins with some of the grid cells filled with numbers. The object is to fill
the other empty cells with numbers between 1 and 9 (1 number only in each cell).
A number should appear only once in each row, column, and region.

Central Coast Family

December 2015

S
U
D
O
K
U

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Page 8

25% off

New Students
first four weeks!

Redeem or mention this coupon at registration to receive your discount

November 24 & 25

December 21, 22, 23 Mon-Wed-Fri
December 28 & 29 Mon-Tue
Full Day 9:30 am-2:30 pm
Half Day 9:30 am-12:30 pm

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December 2015

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Page 9

Money
New Year’s

Financial
Resolutions
by Molly Peoples

The countdown to 2016 has
just about begun. If you’re like
many people, you might be
mulling over some New Year’s
resolutions, such as hitting
the gym more, learning a new
language or taking a cooking
class. All are worthy goals, but
why not add some financial
resolutions as well? For example:
Pay yourself first.
Even if
you aren’t living “paycheck to
paycheck,” you probably don’t
have much trouble spending
your money, because there’s
always something that you or a
family member needs, always a
repair required for your home
or your car, always one more
bill to pay. But if you are going
to achieve your long-term

goals, such as a comfortable
retirement, you need to invest
consistently. So before you
pay everyone else, pay yourself
first by having some money
automatically moved from your
checking or savings account
each month into an investment.
Take advantage of all of your
opportunities. If you have a
401(k) or similar plan at work,
take full advantage of it.
Contribute as much as you can
afford or at least enough to earn
your employer’s match, if one is
offered. Be sure to choose the
mix of available investments
that give you the potential to
achieve the growth you need at
a level of risk with which you are
comfortable.

Focus on the long term. In the
short term, you might be excused
for not wanting to invest. The
headlines are typically scary, the
financial markets are frequently
volatile and the future often
looks murky. Yet, if you can
look past the uncertainties
of today and keep your focus
on tomorrow, you will find it
easier to follow a disciplined
investment strategy that gives
you the opportunity to meet
your long-term goals, such as a
comfortable retirement.
Don’t be driven by fear. When
the market is down, investors
tend to react with fear.
Specifically, they rush to sell
their investments, afraid that
if they don’t “cut their losses,”
they might sustain even bigger
ones. If you can get past this
feeling, you may find that a down
market can offer you the chance
to buy quality investments at
good prices.
Forget about the “hot stocks.”
You’ll hear friends, co-workers
and talking heads on television

tout today’s “hot stocks.” But by
the time you might hear about
them, they may have cooled off
and, in any case, they might not
be appropriate for your needs.
Forget about “getting rich quick
in the market.” It probably
won’t happen. True investment
success requires patience and
persistence.
Cut down on your debts. It’s
easy to pile up debts, but a lot
harder getting rid of them. Yet,
if you can reduce your debt load
even moderately, you’ll free up
money you could use to invest.
So look for ways to conserve,
cut back and consolidate; it will
be worth the effort. Making
these resolutions, and sticking
to them, can help you as you
work toward achieving your
financial goals.
Edward Jones, its employees and financial
advisors are not estate planners and cannot
provide tax or legal advice. You should consult
your estate planning attorney or qualified tax
advisor regarding your situation.
Molly Peoples is a financial advisor at Edward
Jones in San Luis Obispo. She can be reached
at (805) 784-9013. © 2014 Edward Jones. All
rights reserved. Member SIPC.

Californians Don’t Waste
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December 2015

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Page 10

Central Coast Family

December 2015

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Page 11

Local History

SLO Night Life
by Guy Crabb

California became a state in 1850 and
the gold rush was a major factor in
attracting people to our great state.
The majority of people who came
to California during this time period
were hard-working men who came
to seek their fortune in the hills and
rivers of the Golden State. Towns
such as Angles Camp, Jamestown,
Jackass Hill, Volcano, and many
others started popping up all over
in the areas where gold was being
dug out of the dirt. These were the
towns where gold seekers went to
cash in their gold and stay for a few
days before they went back to their
claims in the hills.

money in the saloons in these small
towns. Some of these saloons
were nothing more than a tent with
a sign in front promising a strong
drink of whiskey for a cheap price.
It was a dangerous place for these
miners, because the alcohol took
away their common sense and soon
their money would be gone. They
would find themselves waking up in
the local jail or laying on the ground
behind the saloons after being
thrown out of the bars.
We seem to have our own issue in
San Luis Obispo with the number
of bars we have in the city. In
the old days, the saloons would
often outnumber the churches
and restaurants in a town. Some
towns didn’t have the level of law
enforcement needed to keep the
peace. Today, we will often see a
new bar that wants to be included
with the bars that line Higuera
Street or one of the cross streets.

These gold rush towns were small,
but they needed businesses and
entertainment to provide the
miners with supplies, haircuts, fresh
food, hot baths, and maybe a nice
soft bed to sleep on. In addition
to supplying miners with these
amenities, the towns also provided
the men with entertainment
that would include gambling San Luis Obispo was never a gold
and beverages, such as beer and town, but several of our founding
whiskey.
fathers came to our town after
trying to find their fortune in gold.
Many of these miners spent most, Some opened hotels, saloons,
if not all, of their hard-earned restaurants, stores, or bakeries. It
seems that if you have a growing
population, you also attract people
who want to indulge in alcoholic
beverages.
The history of San Luis Obispo
indicates that saloons were common
and patrons were plentiful. Most of
my research has to do with the last
100 years of businesses that popped
up in the downtown area of SLO. In
1904, there were over 20 saloons
in the downtown area. There was
the Branch Saloon at 789 Higuera,
Novelty Saloon at 875 Monterey,
St. James Bar at 877 Monterey
(next door to the Novelty), Whisper
Saloon at 775 Higuera, The Yosemite
at 1015 Chorro, and the McCaffrey
Bros at 710 Higuera. There were
only about 8 restaurants, 4 banks,
3 bakeries, and 1 mining company
called Chorro Gold Mining at 1133
Chorro. In 1912, we had around 20
saloons in town, 10 doctors, and 2
undertakers.

Central Coast Family

December 2015

Monterey Street is getting a makeover.
Buildings are being renovated and the
parking lots are being dug up.
Buy your copy of Monterey/Marsh Sts
100 Year Book. Remember the past, as
the future is right around the corner.

Enjoy Your Memories!
Get an autographed copy at:

w w w. slo100years.com
Also available at Barnes and Noble, Crushed Grape, Antiques of Monterey,
GUY CRABB PUBLISHING
History Center, Apple Farm, and Boo Boo Records.

Let’s jump to 1949, when we find
that bars are no longer called
saloons, but cocktail lounges. Cal
Poly was growing and so was the
population of the city. There were
around 17 cocktail lounges in town.
There was the Budweiser Tavern
at 1032 Chorro. The cool history of
the Budweiser Tavern is that it later
became known as Bull’s Tavern,
because it was owned by Albert
“Bull” Tognazzini, who renamed his
tavern after himself. Some other
lounges of the time were Berta’s
at 869 Monterey, Fountain Inn at
South 101 Highway, Jim’s Inn at 1025
Morro, and the Gold Room at 897
Monterey. Of course, other towns
started growing and their cocktail
lounges started popping up, such
as Happy Jack’s in Morro Bay and
Lyle’s Mid-Nite Cocktail Lounge at
1215 Spring Street in Paso Robles.

it cheaper to make drinks at your
own home. McCarthy’s Cocktail
Lounge was at 1019 Court Street,
Dan’s Cocktail Lounge was at 999
Monterey, and Floyd’s Cocktail
Lounge was at 1011 Higuera. The
Anderson Hotel had its own lounge
at 955 Monterey, which made it
convenient for its guests to have a
drink without leaving the hotel.
By 1980, bars were spread out in
hotels, pool halls, private clubs, and
other venues. The bars listed in
the yellow pages were the Gaslight
Lounge at 2143 Broad, Sully’s at
1000 Higuera, and McCarthy’s still
at Court Street. You could also go
down to Golden West Beer/Pool at
676 Higuera and have a drink and
shoot some pool, or you could go
to McLintocks Saloon and have a
drink and some good food with the
family, just as you can today. In
1980, you could go to Delite Bakery
or Swenson’s Ice Cream to have
some treats. Today both of these
businesses have turned into bars.
You could also go into a few places
and taste wine, such as Wine Street
Wines.

By 1970, San Luis Obispo continued
to grow, but the number of cocktail
lounges declined.
Something
interesting was happening. The
number of bars reduced but the
number of liquor stores increased
dramatically. Also, more hotels and
motels included bars in their own
establishment. There were about 10 Today, we have many bars in town.
liquors stores in town, which made Is that a good thing? I’m not sure.
How many bars should a town have?
Ultimately, it is a decision that our
city leaders will make. Personally,
I would like to have a few more
bakeries and ice cream stores in
town to attract new families that
are moving into the area. Happy
holidays, and be careful if you
have a drink or two at your holiday
parties.
Guy Crabb teaches at Charles E. Teach
Elementary School in San Luis Obispo. He
graduated from Cal Poly SLO and has been
teaching for 30 years. Guy was a Teacher of
the Year in 2006 and currently teaches at a
National Blue Ribbon School. Reach him at
crabbx5@charter.net.

www.centralcoastfamily.com

Page 12

Make a Difference!
(805) 781-3226

www.slobigs.org

Central Coast Family

December 2015

www.centralcoastfamily.com

Page 13

Education
CS Perryess
writes

about words
Bad Boys

a powerful gang in fourteenth
century India known for brutally
travellers
and
Fiction often depends on the strangling
villainy of the villain, and there passersby.
are so many great terms to refer
to those villains. Here are some of The term rascal comes from the
early 1500s, from a word meaning
my favorites:
outcast, rabble, or the lowest
Hooligan – Though there is class. Many etymologists suggest
definitely some disagreement that the original term comes from
among the etymologists on this an older form which was the
one, most seem to lean toward grandmother of the term rash,
the theory that hooligan is one meaning mud, filth, scab or dregs.
more slur against the oft-maligned Those early fifteenth century
Irish. It’s likely that a family by the rascals really had it bad. Since the
name of Houlighan (one of the late 1500s, the term has meant
spellings of Hoolihan) was giving dishonest, unprincipled, and/or
the police a tough time in London lazy, which may be negative, but
before the 1890s, about the time at least it doesn’t involve nasty
the derogatory term we now skin conditions.
know first appeared in print.
A miscreant, on the other hand, is
Hoodlum – Though a theory lacking in spiritual understanding
exists that hoodlum is actually (or so suggest those applying
another Irish name, Muldoon, the label). Miscreant comes
flipped backward (noodlum) and form mes- meaning wrong and
mistakenly read by a San Francisco -creant meaning believe, defined
typesetter, most etymologists originally in English as infidel,
lean toward a Bavarian root unbelieving, or heretic. Early on in
for this word. One possibility its life as a French word, it simply
is huddellump, a ragamuffin. meant heathen. Today in English,
Another contender is the term miscreant has the broader
hydelum, meaning disorderly. meaning, evil or immoral.
The Bavarian argument generally
wins out, since in 1870s San Villain, like rascal, was originally a
Francisco, Germans were one of term used to define someone of
the larger non-English speaking the lower class, someone base,
groups in the City by the Bay, and low-born or rustic. The word
it’s no secret that, whether right villain is related to villa, or country
or wrong, those who don’t fit in house (which, interestingly, now
tend to be suspected of evildoing. carries a high class tone). Though
starting out meaning inhabitant
Thug – The oldest (and possibly of a farm, the term morphed into
most honest) of these three meaning peasant, churl, boor,
villainous terms, thug showed up clown, knave or scoundrel. It
in English about 1810, originating wasn’t until 1822 that villain was
in Hindi (thaq, meaning cheat associated specifically with the
or swindler), which may have bad boys of literature.
come from a Sanskrit word
meaning cunning and fraudulent. So, my trusty followers, consider
The moniker was adopted by the class warfare reflected by

Central Coast Family

December 2015

these etymologies. Also, can you behavior. Since then, it’s been
suggest some other synonyms for downhill for the word hussy.
rascals, miscreants and villains?
When the business of women
A Stab at Equality
exhibiting casual or improper
behavior was “managed” by a
All badness does not belong to man, that man was referred to in
the boys. Though a quick survey Middle Latin as a ruffian, or pimp.
of Disney movies suggests that Interestingly (and frighteningly)
nearly all antagonists are women enough, the term ruffian appears
(generally stepmothers), the to share some etymological
language itself clearly leans more roots with words meaning lover,
toward male malefactors. This brother, and bully. We can still see
final installment of antagonistic a tiny part of this odd history in the
labels include two that initially phrase Bully for you, in which the
referred to bad gals and one term bully maintains its positive
that referred to bad guys who meaning.
employed women and soiled their
reputations. Oddly, usage for all Life can be pretty weird and
three has leaned over the years language reflects life’s weirdness.
toward the boys.
What thoughts do you have, good
followers, regarding ruffians,
Rapscallion is a term now hussies and rapscallions?
associated with males, but
it appears to have started
thanks to sources: Hugh Rawson’s book
with the Middle English term My
Wicked Words, etymonline.com, thesaurus.
ramp, or ill-behaved woman. com, and the OED.
Many etymologists believe the
grandmother word for ramp is
romp, a rude, awkward, boisterous,
untaught girl. The similarity with
rascal is probably responsible for
this word’s gender identity shift.
The term hussy has maintained
its gender-associations, though
somewhere along the way, this
perfectly upstanding word moved
to the dark side. In the 1500s
Hussy was a respectable synonym
for housewife or goodwife and
had no negative connotation. The
term shameless hussy originated
in these times, with shameless
modifying the perfectly upright
term hussy. By the 1600s, though,
hussy began to mean a woman or
girl who shows casual or improper

CS Perryess writes for teens, narrates audio
books, and ponders the wonder of words
in a foggy little town on California’s central
coast. Find more at http://csperryess.
blogspot.com, or reach him at csperryess@
gmail.com.

www.centralcoastfamily.com

Page 14

Central Coast Family

December 2015

www.centralcoastfamily.com

Page 15

Central Coast Family

December 2015

www.centralcoastfamily.com

Page 16

December 2015 Free Ongoing Events
SUNDAY
29
FARMERS MARKET:

11:30-2:30pm Nipomo: Monarch Club
3:00-6:00pm Grover Bch Ramona Pk

December is:
Universal Human Rights Month
Hi Neighbor Month
National Stress Free Family
Holiday Month
Read A New Book Month
Safe Toy and Gift Month
Write to a Friend Month

6
FARMERS MARKET:

11:30-2:30pm Nipomo: Monarch Club
3:00-6:00pm Grover Bch Ramona Pk

MONDAY

TUESDAY

30
FARMERS MARKET:

2-4:30pm Los Osos: 2nd & Santa Maria

Birthstone:
Blue Topaz / Turquoise

1
FARMERS MARKET:

3:00-6:00 pm in Paso Robles City Park
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:10 SLO
DOC BURNSTEIN’S READING LAB
3:30-4:15pm AG

WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
2
3
FARMERS MARKETS:
FARMERS MARKETS:

8:30-11am AG Spencers Market
12:30-4:30pm Santa Maria Town Ctr
3:00-6:00pm AT Sunken Gardens
3:00-6:00pm Pismo Beach Pier
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 AT,
10:30 AG, 11:00 NI

7
FARMERS MARKET:

2-4:30pm Los Osos: 2nd & Santa Maria

8
FARMERS MARKET:

3:00-6:00 pm in Paso Robles City Park
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:10 SLO
DOC BURNSTEIN’S READING LAB
3:30-4:15pm AG

special
education day

9
FARMERS MARKETS:

8:30-11am AG Spencers Market
12:30-4:30pm Santa Maria Town Ctr
3:00-6:00pm AT Sunken Gardens
3:00-6:00pm Pismo Beach Pier
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 AT,
10:30 AG, 11:00 NI

Holiday card day

NATIONAl
brownie day

Hanukkah begins

11:30-2:30pm Nipomo: Monarch Club
3:00-6:00pm Grover Bch Ramona Pk
INTERNATIONAL
children’s day

14
FARMERS MARKET:

2-4:30pm Los Osos: 2nd & Santa Maria

15
FARERS MARKET:

3:00-6:00 pm in Paso Robles City Park
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:10 SLO
DOC BURNSTEIN’S READING LAB
3:30-4:15pm AG

south pole
discovered
(In 1911)

16
FARMERS MARKETS:

8:30-11am AG Spencers Market
12:30-4:30pm Santa Maria Town Ctr
3:00-6:00pm AT Sunken Gardens
3:00-6:00pm Pismo Beach Pier
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 AT,
10:30 AG, 11:00 NI

NATIONAL
COcoa day

11:30-2:30pm Nipomo: Monarch Club
3:00-6:00pm Grover Bch Ramona Pk

LIBRARY STORYTIME: 11:00 AG

NATIONAL ROOF-OVERYOUR-HEAD DAY

10
FARMERS MARKETS:

3:00-6:00pm Old Porte Fisheries AG
2:30-5:00pm Spencers Morro Bay
6:00-9:00pm Downtown SLO
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:00 MB,
10:10 SLO, 10:15 CAM,10:30 AT, 10:30
AG,10:30 LO, 11:00 CAY, 11:30 SMG

SLO CO GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY
1st SAT 12:30am IOOF Hall SLO

WALT DISNEY’S
BIRTHDAY (Born in 1901)

11
FARMERS MARKETS:

9:00am-12:30pm Paso Robles Wal Mart
2:30-5:30pm Cambria Main St Vets Hall
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 LO

unicef Anniversary
(Established in 1946)

emily dickinson’s
birthday(Born in 1896)

NEW MOON

3:00-6:00pm Old Porte Fisheries AG
2:30-5:00pm Spencers Morro Bay
6:00-9:00pm Downtown SLO
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:00 MB,
10:10 SLO, 10:15 CAM,10:30 AT, 10:30
AG,10:30 LO, 11:00 CAY, 11:30 SMG

8:00-10:30am SLO Promenade
9:00am-12:30pm Templeton City Park
9:00am-1:00pm Paso Downtown Park
12:00-2:30pm AG Village Gazebo
2:30-6:00pm Morro Bay 800 Main St

Poinsettia day

Nobel Prize awardS

17
FARMERS MARKETS:

12
FARMERS MARKETS:

LIBRARY STORYTIME: 11:00 AG

Human Rights Day

bill of rights day
(Adopted in 1791)

18
FARMERS MARKETS:

9:00am-12:30pm Paso Robles Wal Mart
2:30-5:30pm Cambria Main St Vets Hall
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 LO

NATIONAL
ugly christmas
sweater day

19
FARMERS MARKETS:

8:00-10:30am SLO Promenade
9:00am-12:30pm Templeton City Park
9:00am-1:00pm Paso Downtown Park
12:00-2:30pm AG Village Gazebo
2:30-6:00pm Morro Bay 800 Main St
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 11:00 AG

21
FARMERS MARKET:

2-4:30pm Los Osos: 2nd & Santa Maria

22
FARMERS MARKET:

3:00-6:00 pm in Paso Robles City Park
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:10 SLO
DOC BURNSTEIN’S READING LAB
3:30-4:15pm AG

oatmeal
muffin day

NATIONAL MAPLE
SYRUP DAY

23
FARMERS MARKETS:

8:30-11am AG Spencers Market
12:30-4:30pm Santa Maria Town Ctr
3:00-6:00pm AT Sunken Gardens
3:00-6:00pm Pismo Beach Pier
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 AT,
10:30 AG, 11:00 NI

24
FARMERS MARKETS:

3:00-6:00pm Old Porte Fisheries AG
2:30-5:00pm Spencers Morro Bay
6:00-9:00pm Downtown SLO
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:00 MB,
10:10 SLO, 10:15 CAM,10:30 AT, 10:30
AG,10:30 LO, 11:00 CAY, 11:30 SMG

25
FARMERS MARKETS:

9:00am-12:30pm Paso Robles Wal Mart
2:30-5:30pm Cambria Main St Vets Hall
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 LO

26
FARMERS MARKETS:

8:00-10:30am SLO Promenade
9:00am-12:30pm Templeton City Park
9:00am-1:00pm Paso Downtown Park
12:00-2:30pm AG Village Gazebo
2:30-6:00pm Morro Bay 800 Main St
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 11:00 AG

roots DAY

boxing DAY
national
chocolate day
NATIONAL
egg nog day

humbug day

solstice

Christmas eve

FIRST day OF WINTER

11:30-2:30pm Nipomo: Monarch Club
3:00-6:00pm Grover Bch Ramona Pk

LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 LO

8:00-10:30am SLO Promenade
9:00am-12:30pm Templeton City Park
9:00am-1:00pm Paso Downtown Park
12:00-2:30pm AG Village Gazebo
2:30-6:00pm Morro Bay 800 Main St

Wright Bros. day
(1st flight @ Kitty Hawk 1903)

go caroling
day

27
FARMERS MARKET:

9:00am-12:30pm Paso Robles Wal Mart
2:30-5:30pm Cambria Main St Vets Hall

Beethoven’s
birthday (Born 1770)

edison patents the
phonograph (In 1877)

20
FARMERS MARKET:

FARMERS MARKETS:

INTERNATIONAL day OF
THE DISABLED PERSON

Rosa Park’s Day
National pie day

SATURDAY

4
5
BINGO VETS HALL MB - 1st FRI 5:00pm FARMERS MARKETS:

NATIONAL
COOKIE day

WORLD AIDS day

Flower: Poinsettia

pearl harbor DAY
(Attacked by Japan in 1941)

13
FARMERS MARKET:

3:00-6:00pm Old Porte Fisheries AG
2:30-5:00pm Spencers Morro Bay
6:00-9:00pm Downtown SLO
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:00 MB,
10:10 SLO, 10:15 CAM,10:30 AT, 10:30
AG,10:30 LO, 11:00 CAY, 11:30 SMG

FRIDAY

28
FARMERS MARKET:

2-4:30pm Los Osos: 2nd & Santa Maria

visit
the
zoo
day

29
FARMERS MARKET:

3:00-6:00 pm in Paso Robles City Park
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:10 SLO
DOC BURNSTEIN’S READING LAB
3:30-4:15pm AG

30
FARMERS MARKETS:

8:30-11am AG Spencers Market
12:30-4:30pm Santa Maria Town Ctr
3:00-6:00pm AT Sunken Gardens
3:00-6:00pm
Pismo Beach Pier
\
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 AT,
10:30 AG, 11:00 NI

bowling
ball invented
(In 1862)

31
FARMERS MARKETS:

3:00-6:00pm Old Porte Fisheries AG
2:30-5:00pm Spencers Morro Bay
6:00-9:00pm Downtown SLO
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:00 MB,
10:10 SLO, 10:15 CAM,10:30 AT, 10:30
AG,10:30 LO, 11:00 CAY, 11:30 SMG

kwanza begins

christmas
FULL MOON

1
FARMERS MARKETS:

9:00am-12:30pm Paso Robles Wal Mart
2:30-5:30pm Cambria Main St Vets Hall
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 LO

2
FARMERS MARKETS:

8:00-10:30am SLO Promenade
9:00am-12:30pm Templeton City Park
9:00am-1:00pm Paso Downtown Park
12:00-2:30pm AG Village Gazebo
2:30-6:00pm Morro Bay 800 Main St
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 11:00 AG

new year’s
eve

Card playing day
Chewing gum
patented (In 1869)

Central Coast Family

December 2015

www.centralcoastfamily.com

Page 17

Family Events
THU NOV 19-THU DEC 31 (days & times
vary): HOLIDAY EXTRAVAGANZA at The
Great American Melodrama, 1863 Front
St, Oceano. Scrooge finds his Christmas
spirit in this magical holiday musical.
The Vaudeville Revue follows each show
with song, dance, and comedy. Cost:
$19-25, discounts for groups, seniors,
students, military, and children. The inhouse snack bar serves great food and
drinks. Contact: americanmelodrama.
com or 489-2499.
THU NOV 26 at 8:30 am: TURKEY TROT
FUNDRAISER at Avila Beach Community
Park on San Juan St. Start Thanksgiving
day (rain or shine) having fun jogging or
walking as a community to raise funds
for the food bank. Cost: $10 donation.
Contact: southcountyturkeytrot.com.
THU NOV 26 at 8:30 am: TURKEY TROT
FUNDRAISER at Pismo Beach Pier. Start
Thanksgiving day (rain or shine) having
fun jogging or walking as a community
to raise funds for the food bank. Cost: $1.
Contact: southcountyturkeytrot.com.
THU NOV 26 at 9:00 am: THANKSGIVING
DAY SERVICE at St. Mark’s-In-The-Valley
Episcopal Church, 2901 Nojoqui Ave, Los
Olivos. Enjoy an Interfaith Thanksgiving
Service with your whole family. Cost:
free. Contact: 688-4454 or http://smitv.
org.
THU
NOV
26
12:00-2:00
pm:
THANKSGIVING FOR PASO ROBLES at
Centennial Park, 600 Nickerson Dr, Paso
Robles. A free Thanksgiving dinner is
available for all who wish to attend. This
will be the 31st year of serving the North
County Community. Cost: free. Contact:
423 358-0249.
FRI NOV 27 5:30-7:30 pm: PASO ROBLES
DOWNTOWN LIGHTING CEREMONY
at City Park, 11th & Spring Sts, Paso
Robles. Community candlelight caroling
with hot chocolate and cookies. Mrs.
Claus and the Elves will lead a sing-along to get ready for Santa’s arrival.
Careful, the Grinch may try to steal our
Christmas! Cost: free. Contact: 238-4103
or pasoroblesdowntown.org.

FRI NOV 27 & SAT NOV 28 (times
vary): CENTRAL COAST CRAFT FAIR
AND BOUTIQUE at Veterans Memorial
Building, 801 Grand St, San Luis Obispo.
Enjoy over 130 vendors from all over the
US. Free cookies and cider bring out the
holiday spirit as you shop for the perfect
gift. Door Prizes every hour. Cost: free.
Contact: 466-0191.
FRI NOV 27-THU DEC 24 (times vary):
SANTA’S HOUSE at Mission Plaza, Chorro
and Monterey St, San Luis Obispo. Cost:
$5 for photo with own camera; $7.50
for a souvenir framed photo; $11 to take
own photo and souvenir framed photo.
Contact: 541-0286 or downtownslo.com.
FRI NOV 27 & SUN NOV 29 8:00 am-4:00
pm: HOLIDAY CRAFT FAIR at Mission
San Miguel, 775 Mission St, San Miguel.
Enjoy lots of handmade items and baked
goods for holiday parties. Cost: free.
Contact: 467-2131.
FRI NOV 27-THU DEC 31 (times vary):
ARTFUL HOLIDAY GIFT SHOW at Gallery
at the Network, 778 Higuera St, San Luis
Obispo. A variety of handcrafted works
from Central Coast artists available for
purchase. Cost: free. Contact: 788-0886.
FRI NOV 27-THU DEC 31 (times vary):
SLOMA CRAFT ART MARKET at San
Luis Obispo Museum of Art, 1010 Broad
St, SLO. Shop for gifts of handmade art
and crafts. The Nybak Wing transforms
into a high-end art gallery boutique
of treasures created by local artisans.
Contact: 543-8562 or sloma.org.
FRI NOV 27-THU DEC 31 (times vary): HAVE
A HART at Pewter Plough Playhouse, 824
Main St, Cambria. Enjoy this delightful
holiday musical. Cost: $17-22. Contact:
927-3877 or pewterploughplayhouse.
org.
SAT NOV 28 11:30 am-12:30 pm: SANTA’S
DOGGIE PARADE at Front Street
Promenade, 380 Front St, Avila Beach.
Enjoy this annual event with over 100
dogs. Fun for all ages! Pre-registration
required. Cost: free. Contact: 627-1997 or
avilawinterholiday.com.

FRI NOV 27 & SAT NOV 28 10:00 am4:00 pm: HOLIDAY CRAFT BAZAAR
at City Park, 11th & Spring Sts, Paso
Robles. Handmade arts, crafts, and
handmade items for sale. Visit a variety
of booths and search for that hard-tofind gift. Cost: free. Contact: 238-4103 or
pasoroblesdowntown.org.

SUN NOV 29 9:00 am-5:00 pm: HOME
FOR THE HOLIDAYS STREET FAIRE
at Morro Bay Blvd & Main St, Morro
Bay. This family event features holiday
festivities,
music,
dancing,
kids’
activities, shopping, food & gifts. A good
time for everyone!. Cost: free. Contact:
morrobay.org.

FRI NOV 27 & SAT NOV 28 10:00 am-4:00
pm: HOLIDAY DECORATORS WANTED at
San Luis Obispo Railroad Museum, 1940
Santa Barbara Ave, San Luis Obispo. Help
decorate the SLO Railroad Museum for
the holidays. Cost: free. Contact: 5481894 or http://slorrm.com.

SUN NOV 29 at 11:00 am-Dusk: CLIMATE
FEST at Back Bay Inn, 1391 2nd St,
Baywood Park/Los Osos. Enjoy great
live music, and be part of photo and
video messages sent to world leaders
re: climate change. Cost: free. Contact:
baywoodclimatefest.org.

Central Coast Family

December 2015

Morro Bay High School &
Los Osos Middle School
Bands & Choirs
present a variety of seasonal music
at their annual

winter concerts
Christopher Cohan Center

Performing Arts Center
Cal Poly San Luis Obispo

Choirs:
TUE, December 15 at 7:00 pm
Bands:
WED, December 16
at 7:00 pm

SUN NOV 29 at 5:00 pm: ARROYO
GRANDE CHRISTMAS PARADE at Short
& Branch Sts, Arroyo Grande. Bring the
whole family for this fun annual event.
Cost: free. Contact: agchristmasparade.
com.
MON NOV 30 at 7:30 pm: 42ND STREET
at Cohan Center, PAC, 1 Grand Ave, San
Luis Obispo. Musical comedy about a
chorus girl who becomes a star. Contact:
756-6556 or calpolyarts.org. Cost: $6090. Contact: 756-6556.
MON NOV 30-SAT DEC 19 9:00 am-5:00
pm: SEE’S CANDY FUNDRAISER at Los
Osos Post Office, 1189 Los Osos Valley
Rd. The Kiwanis Club of Bay-Osos is
selling See’s Candy for the holidays. All
profits support children, local schools,
scholarships, the Special Olympics, and
Tolosa Children’s Dental Center, to name
a few. Don’t forget friends & colleagues!
Cost: varies. Contact: 801-8793.
TUE DEC 1 4:00-5:30 pm: SANTA YNEZ
CHRISTMAS TREE LIGHTING at 3568
Sagunto St, Santa Ynez. Bring the
whole family for visits from Santa, live
music, and snacks. Cost: free. Contact:
santaynezchamber.org.
TUE DEC 1 6:00-9:00 pm: CAMBRIA
FESTIVAL OF TREES at Vet’s Hall, 1000
Main St, Cambria. This annual decorated
tree auction features gourmet food and
fine wines. Cost: $25. Contact: 927-3624

or cambiachamber.org.
TUE DEC 1 at 6:30 pm: LIGHT UP A LIFE
at First United Methodist Church, 311
S Broadway, Santa Maria. Join Dignity
Health Hospice for a candlelight
celebration of loved ones including
music, reflections, and lighting of a
memorial tree. Cost: free. Contact: 7393595.
TUE DEC 1 at 7:30 pm: TEN TENORS HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS at Cohan
Center, PAC, 1 Grand Ave, San Luis
Obispo. Australia’s The Ten Tenors
present a magical holiday performance.
Cost: $40-90. Contact: 756-6556 or
calpolyarts.org.

WED DEC 2 at 5:00 pm: LIGHT UP A LIFE! at
Coalesce Bookstore, 845 Main St, Morro
Bay. Join us for a “heartfelt” ceremony
with Hospice of San Luis Obispo honoring
our lost loved ones. After the ceremony,
there will be refreshments served. Cost:
free. Contact: coalescebookstore.com.
WED DEC 2-MON DEC 7 (times vary):
TALL SHIPS IN THE HARBOR in Morro
Bay Harbor. Every year the excitement
builds to the time of year when the Lady
Washington visits the harbor in Morro
Bay. This year, their visit comes in the
midst of the holiday season. There are
public tours and programs for all ages!
Cost: $3-75. Contact: morro-bay.net/
events.htm or 800 200-5239.

www.centralcoastfamily.com

Page 18

Family Events
SAT DEC 5 at 2:00 pm: FAMILY MOVIE at
Los Osos Library, 2075 Palisades. Take a
journey to the North Pole. G rated. Call
for movie title. Popcorn provided. Cost:
free. Contact: 528-1862.
SAT DEC 5 at 4:30 pm: LIGHTED BOAT
PARADE at South T-Pier & Embarcadero,
Morro Bay. Bring the family to watch
a procession of some of the most
beautifully-decorated Christmas skiffs,
yachts, fishing boats, cutters, sailboats,
and kayaks. 4:30 pm: Pre-Parade
Festivities (White Caps Band, Strolling
Carolers, and free photos with Santa &
Mrs Claus). 6:30 pm: Boat Parade. Cost:
free. Contact: morrobay.org.
SAT DEC 5 at 7:00 pm: CHRISTMAS LIGHT
PARADE in Downtown Paso Robles.
11th and Spring St, Paso Robles. The
theme is A Christmas Wish List. Entry
forms available at the Paso Robles
Main Street office, 238-4103. No fee,
prizes for winners. Contact: 238-4103 or
pasoroblesdowntown.org.

THU DEC 3 5:00-8:30 pm: HOSPITALITY
NIGHT at Main St & Burton Dr, Cambria.
Share the warmth and camaraderie
of the holiday season at the annual
village open house. Enjoy a tree lighting
ceremony, carolers, decorations, food,
and family fun. Cost: free. Contact: 9273624.
THU DEC 3-SUN DEC 6 (times vary):
REFRIED ELVIS at Cuesta College CPAC,
CA-1, San Luis Obispo. A white hot twist
in the night. A jamboree. A revival with
an irreverent shake of the hips. This new
slicked-backed thrill ride reimagines
the origins of Rock and Roll and thrusts
the audience center stage. Cost: $5-15.
Contact: 546-3100 or cpactickets.cuesta.
edu.
FRI DEC 4 5:15-6:30 pm: TREE LIGHTING
CEREMONY at Hobbs Civic Center,
Santa Maria. Enjoy holiday displays
from around the world, youth activities,
refreshments,
entertainment,
and
the lighting of Santa Maria’s 24-foot
Christmas tree. Cost: free. Contact: 9250951 or cityofsantamaria.org.
FRI DEC 4 at 5:30 pm: HOLIDAY
HARMONY & TREE LIGHTING at Pismo
Beach Pier, 100 Pomeroy Ave, Pismo
Beach. The evening will include fresh
snow, bounce houses, crafts, music,
and cookie decorating. In addition, kids
will have the chance to visit and take
a picture with Santa. 6:00 pm: tree

Central Coast Family

SAT DEC 5 at 8:00 pm: CAL POLY CHOIRS’
A CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION at Harman
Hall, PAC, 1 Grand Ave, San Luis Obispo.
Featuring
Polyphonics,
University
Singers, Early Music Ensemble, Brass
Ensemble, Susan Azaret Davies, Paul
Woodring, and a cappella groups That’s
the Key, and Take It SLO. Cost: $9-14.
Contact: 754-4849 or music.calpoly.edu.

lighting. Cost: free. Contact: 773-7063.
FRI DEC 4 6:00-7:00 pm: ANNUAL
HOLIDAY LIGHTING CEREMONY at
Sunken Gardens, 6505 El Camino
Real, Atascadero. This family event
features live music, hot chocolate, and
visits with Santa. Cost: free. Contact:
atascaderochamber.org.
FRI DEC 4 7:00-9:00 pm: 40TH ANNUAL
HOLIDAY PARADE in Downtown SLO,
San Luis Obispo. This year’s theme is
“There’s no place like SLO.” The parade
starts at the corner of Palm & Chorro
Sts. Cost: free. Contact: 541-0286 or
downtownslo.com.
FRI DEC 4-FRI JAN 8 (times & locations
vary): JULEFEST at Mission Santa
Ines, 1760 Mission Dr, Solvang. DEC 4:
Community Tree Lighting Ceremony;
DEC 4-6: Shop, Mingle, and Jingle; DEC
5: Parade; DEC 12-13: Wine and Beer
Walk; DEC 12: Nativity Pageant; DEC
15: Christmas Lights and Sights, JAN 2:
Christmas Tree burn. Cost: free. Contact:
709-2221 or julefestsolvang.com.
SAT DEC 5 8:00-11:00 am: REINDEER RUN
at Mitchell Park, 1445 Santa Rosa St, San
Luis Obispo. Benefit Food Bank Coalition
while staying fit with the family! Enjoy
a fun morning 5k with the family. Cost:
$25-30 includes T-shirt and Breakfast
with Santa! Contact: slocity.org.

December 2015

SAT DEC 5-SUN DEC 6 9:00 am-5:00 pm:
CHRISTMAS CRAFTS FAIR at Mission
Plaza, 989 Chorro St, San Luis Obispo.
Enjoy arts and crafts and fun for the
whole family, including Santa’s house
and a carousel. Cost: free. Food will be
for sale with tamales benefitting the
mission. Contact: 559-288-6614.
SAT DEC 5-SUN DEC 20 (times vary): A
CHRISTMAS STORY at SLO Little Theatre,
888 Morro St, San Luis Obispo. Based on
the motion picture of the same name, A
Christmas Story follows Ralphie Parker
in his quest to get a Red Ryder BB Gun
for Christmas. Cost: $15-33. Contact: 7862440.
SUN DEC 6 at 5:00 pm: HANNUKAH
DOWNTOWN in Mission Plaza, 989
Chorro St, San Luis Obispo. Bring the
family for candle lighting, followed by
a party including a Schmooze Zone and
Kid’s Zone, songs, games and treats.
Candlelighting continues 8 nights until
DEC 13. All events begin at 5:00 pm,
except SAT at 6:00 pm. Cost: free.
Contact: jccslo.com.
SAT DEC 12 10:00 am-7:00 pm: NEEDS ‘N
WISHES Fundraiser at So Bay Community
Center, 2180 Palisades Dr, Los Osos. A
day of Holiday fun for everyone! Cost:
free. Contact: 528-5800.
SAT DEC 12 6:00-9:00 pm: VICTORIAN

CHRISTMAS SHOWCASE at Vine Street
between 8th & 21st Sts, Paso Robles. This
29th annual event features decorated
homes, music, hot drinks, cookies, snow,
Scrooge, Santa, elves and more. Cost:
free. Contact: 238-4103.
TUE DEC 15 at 7:00 pm: WINTER
CONCERT at Cohan Center, PAC, 1 Grand
Ave, San Luis Obispo. MBHS and LOMS
Choirs perform seasonal favorites with
special alumni guests and SLO Youth
Symphony. Cost: $12. Contact: 756-4849
or pacslo.org.
WED DEC 16 at 3:00 pm: MAKE’N’TAKE at
Los Osos Library, 2075 Palisades. There
will be a holiday themed craft for school
age children. Cost: free. Contact: 5281862.
WED DEC 16 at 7:00 pm: WINTER
CONCERT at Cohan Center, PAC, 1 Grand
Ave, San Luis Obispo. MBHS and LOMS
Bands perform seasonal favorites. Cost:
$11. Contact: 756-4849 or pacslo.org.
SAT DEC 19 at 2:00 pm: FAMILY MOVIE at
Los Osos Library, 2075 Palisades. Watch
how “midnight changes everything” in
this PG film. Call for movie title. Popcorn
provided. Cost: free. Contact: 528-1862.
SAT DEC 19 at 7:30 pm: HANDEL’S
MESSIAH at Cohen Ctr, PAC, 1 Grand
Ave, San Luis Obispo. Enjoy this singalong, and holiday carols, and other
musical treats with SLO Master Chorale
and orchestra. Bring your Messiah score.
Cost: $5. Contact: 756-4849 or pacslo.
org.
SAT DEC 19-SAT JAN 2 (times vary):
HOLIDAYS AT MUSEUM OF NATURAL
HISTORY at 20 State Park Road, Morro
Bay. Family-oriented activities every day.
Most are in the Museum auditorium,
some are just outside. The majority are
at 2:00 pm. Suitable for ages 3 and up.
Cost: adults $3, children under 17 are
free. Contact: 772-2694.
THU DEC 31 10:00 am-3:00 pm: NOON
YEAR’S EVE CELEBRATION at SLO
Children’s Museum, 1010 Nipomo St, San
Luis Obispo. Ring in the New Year well
before bedtime at our 8th annual Noon
Year’s Eve Celebration. Make crowns
and enjoy noisemakers and an apple
juice toast with cookies. You won’t want
to miss the big countdown and balloon
drop at NOON SHARP! Cost: free with
admission. Reservation recommended.
Contact: 545-5875.
THU DEC 31 5:00 pm-Midnight: NEW
YEAR’S EVE CELEBRATION at Madonna
Inn, 100 Madonna Rd, San Luis Obispo.
Enjoy dancing, live music, a prix fixe
menu, champagne, party favors, and a
midnight balloon drop. Cost: $75-125.
Children 2 and under free. Contact: 5433000 or madonnainn.com.

www.centralcoastfamily.com

Page 19

Local Resources
“drop-in” support group to share
dreams and the relationship between
dreams and spiritual path, using
Jungian interpretive assumptions
and language and Robert Johnson’s
book Inner Work. Cost: free. Contact:
bobpelfrey@charter.net.

Recurring Events
& Resources
Every WED 3:00-4:00 pm: PAWS
TO READ at Los Osos Library, 2075
Palisades Ave. Read to Berkeley, a
golden retriever, who loves to listen
to children read. Cost: free. Contact:
528-1862.

3rd WED of every month at 6:30 pm:
Prepared & Natural Chidlbirth Classes
at Twin Cities Community Hospital,
1220 Las Tablas Rd, Templeton. This is
a six-series class addressing all matters
of childbirth in the form of a lecture as
well as hands-on demos and practice
techniques. Cost: free. Contact: 4344654.

Every THU 6:30-9:30 pm: SLO CHESS
CLUB meets at Carl’s Jr on Santa Rosa
St, one block W of Foothill, across
from Cal-Poly. All ages welcome. Cost:
free. Contact: 441-7210 or slochess.
com.

2nd THU of every month at 6:30 pm:
Breastfeeding Basics at Twin Cities
Community Hospital, 1100 Las Tablas
Rd, Templeton. In this introduction
to breastfeeding class you and your
family will learn about the practical
aspects of feeding your newborn from
an Internationally Board Certified
Lactation Consultant. Cost: free.
Contact: 239-4443.

Every SAT 10:00 am-2:00 pm: SLO
CHESS CLUB meets at the big board
on the Morro Bay Embarcadero at the
west end of Morro Bay Blvd (down the
stairs). Cost: free. Contact: 441-7210 or
slochess.com.
The Mankind Project men’s support
group meetings: all issues welcome.
Find purpose, mastery, healthy
autonomy, and your life’s mission and
purpose. Gain skills to change your
life or to become a better husband or
dad. Call ahead to confirm. 1st & 3rd
TUE 6:00-9:00 pm in San Luis Obispo.
Contact: 459-7808. 1st & 3rd THU
6:30-9:30 pm in Cayucos. Contact: 4719342. 2nd & 4th THU 6:30-9:00 pm in
Atascadero. Contact: 235-2774. Cost:
free. Info: www.mkp.org.

San Luis Obispo Special Education
Local Plan Area (SELPA) and
Community Advisory Committee
(CAC) offer parent orientation to
special education programs in SLO
County. Contact: 782-7301 or www.
sloselpa.org/pro_dev.htm.
Twin Cities Community Hospital
Volunteers, a non-profit org providing
support to patients, doctors, and
nurses of the hospital, seek volunteers
to work in the gift shop and Obstetrics
Dept. AM and PM 4 hour shifts are
available. Contact: 434-4524.

3rd SAT every month 3:00-6:00 pm:
Interactive Indonesian Music at
Grandma’s Frozen Yogurt, 307 Morro
Bay Blvd, MB. Instruments available
for all. Play along with “Ëru” and
Anna! Endang “Ëru” Rukandi is a
master of the regional music of West
Java. Cost: free. Contact: 704-9866.
1st & 3rd THU every month 7:008:30 pm: Drop-in Dream Group at St.
Benedict’s Episcopal Church, 2220
Snowy Egret Ln, Los Osos. This is a

Last FRI every month at 6:00 pm:
Family Fun at Unity Church, 1165
Stubblefield St, Orcutt. Contact: 9373025.

2nd THU of every month 6:00-7:00
pm: Grief Support Group at Central
Coast Hospice, 253 Granada Dr, Ste
D, San Luis Obispo. This free group
is for anyone suffering the loss of a
loved one who is in need of support.
Contact: 540-6020.

Every THU-FRI 12:00-5:00 pm & SAT
11:00 am-5:00 pm: Exploration Station
Interactive Science Center welcomes
families at 867 Ramona Ave, Grover
Beach. Cost: $2-3. Contact: 473-1421
or http://explorationstation.org.

2nd SAT of every month FEB-NOVat
9:00 am: the Santa Maria Recreation
and Parks Dept offers free docent-led
nature walks in Los Flores Ranch, 6271
Dominion Rd, Santa Maria. Cost: free.
Contact: 925-0951 x 263.
2nd MON every month 6:30-8:00 pm:
Caregiver Support Group at Cayucos
Community Church, Ocean Ave & S
3rd St. free support for caregivers
and family dealing with long-term
illness, memory loss, dementia, and
Alzheimer’s. Contact: 458-7484.

Women’s Shelter

of San Luis Obispo County
crisis line: 781-6400
business phone: 781-6401
email: info@wspslo.com
www. womensshelterslo.org

Central Coast Family

Every MON 10:00 am-2:00 pm: Remain
Independent Despite Vision Loss at
Santa Maria Terrace, 1405 E Main St.
New ways of doing daily tasks are
taught by the Braille Institute, such
as home management, traveling, and

December 2015

using talking library books. Contact:
462-1225.
2nd & 4th MON every month at 6:30
pm: MOPS (Mothers of Preschoolers)
meet at Pacific Christian Church,
3435 Santa Maria Way, Santa Maria.
Childcare is provided. Contact: 9343491 or www.pacificchristian.net.
Every TUE 3:00-6:00 pm & FRI 3:005:30 pm: Teen Wellness Program at
Arroyo Grande EOC Health Services
Clinic, 1152 E Grand Ave. Health
services,
including
reproductive
health, in a safe environment with
staff trained to screen, assess, and to
provide intervention. Appointments
are preferred. Contact: 489-4026.
1st WED every month at 9:00 am:
Community Action Partnership Senior
Health Screening at First United
Methodist Church, 275 N Halcyon
Rd, Arroyo Grande. free and lowcost services are offered for people
50 and older: blood pressure, pulse,
weight, total cholesterol, screening
for anemia, diabetes, and fecal blood,

www.centralcoastfamily.com

Page 20

nutritional counseling, and medical
referrals. Contact: 481-2692 or 7880827.
1st WED every month at 12:00 pm:
Disabled American Veterans luncheon
at Veterans Memorial Bldg, 313 W.
Tunnell St, Santa Maria. Contact: 3450402.
Every WED 5:30-7:00 pm: Widowed
Support Group at New Life Church,
990 James Way, Rm 14, Pismo Beach.
Arrive 10 min early for 1st meeting.
Offered by Hospice of SLO Co.
Contact: 544-2266 or hospiceslo.org.
Every TUE at 7:00 pm: Al-Anon Family
Support Group at Luis OASIS Senior
Center, 420 Soares Ave, Orcutt.
Contact: 937-9750.
3rd WED every month at 7:00 pm:
How to Survive Divorce seminar
at the San Luis Obispo Women’s
Community Center, 1124 Nipomo St,
#D in SLO. Practical tips, pointers, and
suggestions for handling family law
issues. $10.00 donation requested for
handout materials and book. Contact:
544-9313 to register.
4th TUE every month at 5:30 pm: Legal
Clinic for Self-Represented Litigants at
the San Luis Obispo County Courthouse
Law Library, 1050 Monterey St in SLO,
#125. SLO County Bar Assn Family
Law Section & Women’s Community
Center provide one-on-one legal
advice for persons filing divorces w/o
an attorney, and a document preparer
to assist in completing court-required
forms. Min. $40.00 donation. Limit: 12
participants. Contact: 544-9313.
RISE (formerly Sexual Assault
Recovery and Prevention Center of
San Luis Obispo Co) offers: Weekly
Drop-In Support Groups for Sexual
Assault Survivors; 24 Hour Crisis Line;
Advocacy and Accompaniment; Peer
Counseling; Individual Counseling;
Prevention and Education, and
Women’s Empowerment and Self
Defense Workshops. Contact: 5458888 or www.sarpcenter.org.
Every SAT 11:00 am-3:00 pm: ADOPT
A PET at Petco, 2051 Theater Dr, in
Paso Robles. Cats are available for
adoption through NCHS. Dogs are
available through Short n’ Sweet Dog
Rescue. Contact: 466-5403.
Every MON 2:00-4:00 pm & WED 3:005:00 pm: Jacks’ Adaptive Toy Lending
Library-Jack’s Helping Hand at Central
Coast Gymnastics, 21 Zaca Lane, #100,
San Luis Obispo. Traditional and
adaptive toys for children with all

Central Coast Family

types of disabilities to check out. Inhome appointments available. Cost:
free! Contact: 547-1914 or www.
jackshelpinghand.org.
Every TUE 2:00-5:00 pm & FRI 4:007:00 pm: Jacks’ Adaptive Toy Lending
Library - Jack’s Helping Hand at
Pat’s Place in Nipomo Recreation
Community Rm, 671 W Tefft St, Ste
2, Nipomo. Toys for children with all
types of disabilities to check out. Inhome appointments also available.
Cost-free! Contact: 547-1914 or www.
jackshelpinghand.org.
Every FRI at 7:00 pm: Senior Ballroom
Dancing at Madonna Inn. If you are
a senior (single or attached) and like
ballroom dancing, this is the place!
Look left of the bandstand for sign:
Senior Dancers. Dance, chat and listen
to good music. No fees; no dues; just
fun! Contact: 489-5481 or dg17@juno.
com.

organizations. Contact: 788-3406.
Every WED 11:00 am-12:00 pm:
Growing With Baby, an infant feeding
office for breastfeeding moms and
babies (0-10 mos), offers a free class
on feeding, crying, and sleep at 1230
Marsh St, SLO. Nurse and lactation
consultant Andrea Herron answers
questions. Dads welcome! Call to
reserve. Contact: 543-6988.
Morro Bay Museum of Natural History
offers Adventures With Nature & Mind
Walks. Find the schedule at: www.
ccnha.org/naturewalks.html.

Literacy Council for San Luis Obispo
County has an ongoing and urgent
need for volunteer tutors and offers
free training in SLO. Contact: 541-4219
or www.sloliteracy.org.

Central Coast Commission for Senior
Citizens offers many free services:
Senior Connection - connecting callers
with local resources; HICAP (Health
Insurance Counseling and Advocacy
Program) one on one Medicare
assistance, advise and referrals for
long term care, and help with billing
/ appeals; Vial of Life magnetized
containers with medical information;
a Senior Resource Directory for
SLO and SB counties, and much
more. Contact: 925-9554 or www.
centralcoastseniors.org.

1st THU every month at 6:15 pm:
Commission on the Status of Women
meets at Coast National Bank, 500
Marsh St, SLO. This official advisory
group to SLO County Board of
Supervisors identifies issues of
concern to women that are not the
focus of other advocacy or advisory

Hospice of San Luis Obispo County
provides free grief counseling,
group support, counseling, crisis
intervention, and wellness education
to those with a life-limiting illness, their
families, and the bereaved. This nonprofit agency offers free counseling,
community education and volunteer

December 2015

support to those grieving a death
or dealing with potential end-of-life
issues. Offices in San Luis Obispo and
Paso Robles. Contact: 544-2266.
Volunteer as a Good Neighbor! Make
a difference in the life of an older or
disabled adult. Trained volunteers
choose services to contribute and
schedule hours at their convenience.
Training is monthly at Wilshire
Community Services, 285 South St, Ste
J, SLO. Contact: 547-7025 x 17.
Volunteer at San Luis Obispo Museum
of Art! Stop by at 1010 Broad St
(Mission Plaza) or email volunteer@
sloma.org.
San Luis Obispo Senior Center offers
health screening, legal services, meals,
exercise, bridge, and bingo at 1445
Santa Rosa St. Contact: 781-7306.
Central Coast Astronomical Society
sponsors a Dark Sky Star Party every
month at Santa Margarita Lake
KOA Campground at sunset. CCAS
sponsors guest speakers and public
programs.
Find events, weather
updates, and resources at: www.
centralcoastastronomy.org.
San Luis Coastal Adult School’s Parent
Participation Program offers Core
Parenting and Enrichment classes in
San Luis Obispo, Morro Bay, and Los
Osos. Bring your child to a parent and
child activity class, or find peer support
and education just for parents. Cost:

www.centralcoastfamily.com

Page 21

Central Coast Family

December 2015

www.centralcoastfamily.com

Page 22

EL MORRO CHURCH
OF THE NAZARENE

Thursday, December 24
5:00 pm & 7:00 pm

NOW OPEN FOR Lunch!

Christmas Eve
Candlelight Service
Nursery care during the 5:00 pm service

Sunday

Regular Worship

8:00 am - Acoustic Contemporary
9:30 am - Traditional Piano, Hymns & Choir
11:00 am - Full Band Rock Contemporary

A Place for New Beginnings
1480 Santa Ysabel Ave, Los Osos
(805) 528-0391 www.elmorro.org

Central Coast Family

December 2015

www.centralcoastfamily.com

Page 23

Central
Coast

Family

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Central Coast Family is published monthly online and in print with a readership over 40,000!
FREE copies are available throughout San Luis Obispo and North Santa Barbara Counties at all libraries

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