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COMM 103, Fall 2014, Syllabus, 1

COMM 103: Oral Communication Schedule!
Fall 2014
This syllabus is lengthy but contains important information about the custom
version of our textbook available only at the SDSU bookstore (includes the
McGraw-Hill access code) and registering your clicker, as well as due dates for
assignments. Please read thoroughly.
Large Lecture Instructor:
Small Section Instructor:

Michael Rapp
You will have a different Small Section Instructor—
Important information related to your Small Section Instructor can
be found on your course Blackboard sites.

Time/Day/Room:

The Large Lecture meeting times are as follows. You will attend
ONLY ONE of these large Lectures ONCE A WEEK—check your
schedule for correct Large Lecture:
Mon ENS 280, 10:00-10:50am
AL 201, 2:00-2:50pm
AL 201, 3:00-3:50pm
Wed ENS 280, 10:00-10:50am
AL 201, 2:00-2:50pm
You will also attend a SMALL SECTION TWICE A WEEK (M/W)
You must attend the Large Lecture on your schedule—your
clicker will not work in any other COMM 103 Lecture.

Large Lecture Instructor:
Michael Rapp

Office:
Office Hours:
E-mail:

Small Section Instructor:

Communication # 233
M/W, 11:30am-1:30pm
And by appointment
mrapp@mail.sdsu.edu

Office:
Office Hours:
Email:

School of Communication Main Office: Communication # 237, (619) 594-8512
Required Materials:

Floyd, K. (2014, 2nd ed.). Communication matters. New York: McGrawHill [custom version with McGraw-Hill Connect Access code—
available only at SDSU bookstore]
I>clicker classroom response pad (physical clicker, not web-based). You
must register your clicker through BlackBoard. If you do not, you
may not get points. Register by September 17th to ensure you receive
the maximum points.

Look us up on twitter (http://twitter.com/COMM103).
COMM 103 syllabus

©2012 SDSU School of Communication This syllabus cannot be copied or altered without the expressed written consent of the instructor.

COMM 103, Fall 2014, Syllabus, 2
Instructional Perspective:
COMM 103 Oral Communication combines an overview of communication concepts with
training in public presentations. The purpose of this combination is to equip students with the
knowledge and skills to communicate competently in enacting and critically consuming a variety
of contexts, including interpersonal, group, public, and mediated contexts.
The class is split into two parts, equally important: Large Lecture and Small Section. In the
Large Lecture, students get an overview of foundational communication theories and concepts.
Students are assessed on terms, theories, and concepts addressed in the Large Lecture. Students
are also required to integrate understanding of these concepts into presentations and other class
work completed in the Small Sections. Students will perform all presentations and activities
related to public speaking in the Small Sections.
Student Learning Outcomes: Students will learn to:
1) craft well-reasoned arguments for specific audiences;
a. Conduct thorough research on a topic
b. Create cohesive, coherent, and complete outlines for public
presentations
c. Employ effective language choices in the construction of public
presentations
d. Identify, analyze, and present credible, well-reasoned arguments in
a public setting
2) assess the relative strengths of arguments and supporting evidence;
a. Conduct thorough research on a topic
b. Synthesize relevant information about a topic or phenomenon into
an argument
c. Create cohesive, coherent, and complete outlines for public
presentations
d. Employ effective language choices in the construction of public
presentations
e. Identify and analyze the components of effective public
presentations
f. Identify, analyze, and present credible, well-reasoned arguments in
a public setting
g. Employ competent listening as audience members during
presentations
3) analyze a variety of texts commonly encountered in the academic
setting;
a. Conduct thorough research on a topic
b. Synthesize relevant information about a topic or phenomenon into
an argument
c. Demonstrate effective APA source citation skills
4) situate discourse within common, social, cultural, and historical
contexts.
a. Utilize effective and appropriate verbal and nonverbal
communication skills
b. Identify competent communication in a variety of communication
contexts
COMM 103 syllabus

©2012 SDSU School of Communication This syllabus cannot be copied or altered without the expressed written consent of the instructor.

and the bookstore on campus should tell you this when you buy your textbook. including the grading policy—are expected to do the following: 1. . printed. See the i>clicker section in this syllabus for further instructions and information. When does my class meet? The schedule can be a bit confusing with separate Large Lecture and Small Sections times. including me COMM 103 syllabus ©2012 SDSU School of Communication This syllabus cannot be copied or altered without the expressed written consent of the instructor. and print required forms. WHAT IS EXPECTED OF ME IN CLASS? Course Expectations: Students agreeing to the terms for this class as set out in this syllabus— not dropping the class constitutes an agreement to the terms. but is required to complete all the quizzes and modules. but you must supply your own removable storage device (USB/Flash Drive). and submitted electronically. The address you supply to the university through the WebPortal site is the address to which you will receive all e-mails from your instructor and fellow students. Communication matters. 2nd ed. (2014. Given that you’ll be doing online quizzes and study modules. I>clicker response pad: This should be purchased at the same time as your textbook. Apply communication concepts to everyday scenarios to increase communication competence This course is one of three courses that you can take in the General Education area of Communication and Critical Thinking. download templates. You may not get points for those assignments if your connection goes down (the library’s internet access is usually reliable). be sure your internet access is reliable. K. New York: McGraw-Hill. You must register it through my Large Lecture BlackBoard site.  Reliable and stable Internet access and current browser software.  Working e-mail address. and if your e-mail address is incorrect. Please write down your schedule to avoid any confusion. you may miss important announcements.edu) for the Large Lecture and Small Sections to read assignment descriptions. Computers for student use are available at the library. There is the custom version available from the SDSU Bookstore  McGraw-Hill Connect access code: this code comes with the custom version.sdsu. Articulate class theories and concepts as they pertain to competent communication d. All course assignments must be typed. Syllabus. Small Sections will meet twice a week (MW) and your Large Lecture will meet once a week on M or W. Please register for a free SDSU student e-mail account at the Student Computing Center in Love Library. Fall 2014.). Be on time to class 2. review helpful resources. What are the required class materials?  Textbook: Floyd. If you choose to use a different e-mail address. be sure your e-mail is correct in BlackBoard. can be purchased separately.  Access to a dependable computer that runs a word processing program and is connected to a working printer. 3 c. You will need to regularly access BlackBoard sites (http://blackboard.COMM 103. Be respectful and let others talk without interruption. You will often receive messages from your instructors sent through BlackBoard.

economic. You will be speaking to the class about two (2) objects that best represent you. you will be introducing yourself to your classmates. Laptops are fine for you to use in the Large Lecture. Incorporating concepts from the textbook and Large Lecture about Intercultural Communication. This assignment asks you to explore a new culture in more depth in the format of a partner. Informative Speech and Outline (Partner Assignment) The ability to communicate and interact with different cultures is extremely important in this day and age due to the internet. This speech will include researched sources that support your arguments. you and your partner will inform the class about a mutually agreed upon topic regarding another culture. 9. 6. 7. interests. Do not use cell phones at any time during class These expectations hold for both the Large Lecture and the Small Section. The use of any other recording devices must be approved by me. Please pick a country or culture that you are interested in traveling to or learning more about so that you can present this information to your classmates. and/or passions. persuasion is used to educate and motivate. informative speech. your personality. see the assignment handouts and grading rubrics located on BlackBoard. The importance of becoming engaged in issues that affect us and the community in which we live is increasing as our communities become more diverse and fractured. Outline with APA-style References page due on date listed on schedule.3. social. Persuasive Speech and Outline Informing audiences about new ideas and concepts is all well and good. Outline with APA-style References page due on date listed on schedule. This is an individual speech. . this includes photos and audio and video recordings. The topic for this speech will likely address a controversy of a political. You will attempt to challenge our class to change or maintain a specific way of thinking or acting. Syllabus. or cultural nature. 5. COMM 103. WHAT ASSIGNMENTS WILL I HAVE TO COMPLETE? For complete details on assignments. From politicians to teachers to leaders of social movements. For this assignment. 8. This is a persuasive speech where you will argue in favor or against your topic. but for ages. Presentation aids are required. The goal of this speech is to choose a current events topic and deliver a persuasive presentation to your class. it is preferred that you pick a culture that is unique and different from your own culture. the cultural make-up of America. COMM 103 syllabus ©2012 SDSU School of Communication This syllabus cannot be copied or altered without the expressed written consent of the instructor. Presentation aids are required. 4 Read the assigned chapters/materials and engage in class discussions Treat others’ viewpoints and experiences with respect Make connections between the material and your own lives and experiences Complete assignments on time and follow instructions Communicate with the instructor in advance about potential attendance conflicts APA is the required citation format for outlines. 4. and our close proximity to another country. You should bring in the objects (or a representation of them) to class for your speech. public speaking has been used for another purpose: persuading audiences to take action. Fall 2014. values. All topics must be approved by the instructor before the presentation is given. Speech of Introduction and Outline For this assignment.

theft is still theft. Whether by ignorance. fraud is still fraud. Go to: http://connect. It is unfair. The 2008-2009 SDSU Graduate Bulletin policy1 states: 1 San Diego State University Graduate Bulletin. and corruption is still corruption. The second exam is NOT cumulative. status and achievement. Fall 2014. Some common occasions are weddings and funerals. a scholar’s words. not the ideas and abilities of others. accident. but it is easy to imagine similar events like award ceremonies and dinner toasts. you should receive a code to use for registering online. and creative products represent essential intellectual property. See the syllabus for the due dates of each quiz and study module.org/ Online Quizzes and Study Modules Our publisher provides a variety of online learning tools. which are the primary measures of scholarly identity. . It is corruption. and is treated as such. Syllabus. It introduces bias and inequity in the assessment process. For this speech. You will also be asked to provide the email addresses of two people who know you well enough for them to fill out a briefer version of the survey about you (about 15 minutes). is still serious. Each exam will consist of 50 multiple choice questions. Be sure you have a stable internet connection when completing these assignments. It undermines the credibility of higher education by misrepresenting the meaning of university grades and degrees to the rest of the public. Students should be assessed on their own ideas and abilities. WHAT IS PLAGIARISM? SHOULD I BE WORRIED ABOUT IT? Plagiarism is one of the highest forms of academic offense. you will choose the occasion and deliver a speech appropriate to the situation. and the second exam will be held on a Saturday afternoon the week before finals. you may not be able to make up points if your connection goes down. or the Interactive Media Package for the Assessment of Communication and Critical Thinking. producing grades for fellow students based on disadvantaged standards and expectations. 35.com/ and follow the instructions. IMPACCT Survey IMPACCT. Therefore. we may be asked to speak at an event or gathering. as you perceive them and as people who know you perceive your skills. inequity is still inequity. 5 Special Occasion Speech At some point in our lives. You can find the survey at: http://impacctassess. Later in the semester. or intent. The first exam will be held on a Friday afternoon. ideas.mcgraw-hill. you will take the self-report portion of the assessment again. It represents several ethics violations. is a multi-stage online assessment of your communication skills. registering yourself. the offense. It is fraud. providing some basic information. and then responding to items regarding how skilled you are in applying reasoning and communication abilities across a wide variety of situations. COMM 103 syllabus ©2012 SDSU School of Communication This syllabus cannot be copied or altered without the expressed written consent of the instructor. It is theft of intellectual property. No outline is required to be turned in for this speech. Examinations You will be required to take two exams. no matter how minor in quantity. p. 2008-2009.COMM 103. In your textbook bundle. In academe. Successful completion of this involves you linking to an online survey.

Work shall be deemed plagiarism: (1) when prior work of another has been demonstrated as the accessible source. visual information such as models. written. those ideas should be duly noted.COMM 103. if one purports to present an original piece but copies ideas word for word or by paraphrase. This is done by (a) providing quotation marks around text. students guilty of such an offense must be liable for an appropriate penalty. COMM 103 syllabus ©2012 SDSU School of Communication This syllabus cannot be copied or altered without the expressed written consent of the instructor. Such an objective is therefore threatened by students who commit plagiarism. and crafted pieces. when directly quoted. students suspected or accused of disregarding. videos. One of the primary objectives of higher education is to advance humanity by increasing and refining knowledge. aiding. In short. Fall 2014. to deny the purpose of formal education. course lectures and recordings of lectures. THE ACADEMIC DISHONESTY POLICY OF THE SCHOOL OF COMMUNICATION In any case in which an instructor identifies evidence for charging a student with violation of academic conduct standards or plagiarism. Likewise. Proper source attribution: Proper attribution occurs by specifying the source of content or ideas. and (b) clearly designating the source of the text or information relied upon in an assignment. even severance from the University and in some cases revocation of an advanced degree. Intellectual contents: Intellectual contents include all forms of ‘text’ produced by another person or persons. Plagiarism and Originality) The 2008-2009 Graduate Bulletin continues by stating: San Diego State University is a publicly assisted institution legislatively empowered to certify competence and accomplishment in general and discrete categories of knowledge. in which the evidence of the student’s knowledge is not genuine. and to fail the public trust. It includes: writings. The president and faculty of this university are therefore obligated not only to society at large but to the citizenry of the State of California to guarantee honest and substantive knowledge in those to whom they assign grades and whom they recommend for degrees. (Lindey. and (3) when the work lacks sufficient or unequivocal citation so as to indicate or imply that the work was neither a copy nor an imitation. or committing plagiarism must be assured of thorough. matter denoting qualitative format or style). This definition comprises oral. Wittingly or willfully to ignore or to allow students’ ascription of others’ work to themselves is to condone dishonesty. etc. . concealing. Once confirmed. software. course syllabi. the student will be informed and presented with the evidence. the presumption will be with that instructor’s determination. …. impartial and conclusive investigation of any such accusation. competence or accomplishments. The instructor(s) will confer with the School of Communication Director to confirm the evidence. lyrics. 6 Plagiarism is formal work publicly misrepresented as original. 1952. Given the gravity of the offense. Syllabus. Some conditions and terms below clarify the School policy and procedure. should the demonstrated plagiarism clearly call into question a student’s academic ethics. (2) when substantial or material parts of the source have been literally or evasively appropriated (substance denoting quantity.

reliability of scholarly activity is made more difficult to assure and enforce. (e) By masking the actual sources of ideas. it can present similar ethical challenges. Some suggestions that assist with this principle:  When the ideas Jones discusses are clearly attributed to. this is part of developing expertise and the reputation of being a scholar on a topic. There are several reasons for these policies: (a) Authors sometimes commit citation errors. (d) By relying on only a few sources of review. Jones is sometimes merely using Smith to back up what Jones is saying and believes. or (b) by percentage of assignment length. . COMM 103 syllabus ©2012 SDSU School of Communication This syllabus cannot be copied or altered without the expressed written consent of the instructor. a new writing assignment. readers must second guess which sources come from which citations. assume that there is an article by Jones (2006) in the student’s hands. or portions of images. Scholars. citing Jones is sufficient. making the readers’ own research more difficult. but there is a problem with double-dipping exact and redundant text. in which there is a discussion or quotation of an article by Smith (1998). Any time that a writer simply ‘cuts-and-pastes’ exact text from former papers into a new paper without proper attribution. the student should always try to locate the original Smith source. if an idea is important enough to discuss in an assignment. and reproduce the reference list without actually going to look up what those references report—the only guarantee that claims are valid is for a student to read the original sources of those claims. will result in assignment of an “F” in the course in which the infraction occurred.  Never simply copy a series of citations at the end of a statement by Jones. however. there is nothing wrong with double-dipping topics or sources. paragraph. then find the Smith source and citation. and is independently qualified to claim. the actual source of ideas is misrepresented. Assume further that what Smith seems to be saying is very important to the student’s analysis. In general. and a report to the Center for Student Rights and Responsibilities (CSRR2). whether represented by: (a) multiple sentences. In general. requiring new composition on the student’s part. which might be replicated without knowing it.  In contrast. the learning process is short-circuited. or even sentences. or large portions of unattributed materials without proper attribution. in such a case. a given paper should never be turned in to multiple classes. and the student’s own research competencies are diminished. Syllabus. Smith. Specific exemplary infractions and consequences:  Course failure: Reproducing a whole paper.COMM 103.  When the ideas Jones is discussing are historically associated more with Smith than with Jones.’ in which they write on a given topic across more than one course assignment. should not be repeated word-for-word across course assignments. Entire paragraphs. as this wastes precious intellectual space with repetition and does a disservice to the particular source of original presentation by ‘diluting’ the value of the original presentation. which in turn cites source B. Self-plagiarism: Students often practice some form of ‘double-dipping. Each new writing assignment is precisely that. then find the Smith source and citation. A secondary citation is citing source A. whether or not Smith would have also said it. it is a form of self-plagiarism. but it is source B’s ideas or content that provide the basis for the claims the student intends to make in the assignment. which might be ignorantly reinforced (c) Therefore. are not permitted to repeat exact text across papers or publications except when noted and attributed. Fall 2014. (b) Authors sometimes make interpretation errors. In such a situation. images. or unique to. which are integral to any liberal education. but in blatant forms. it is important enough to locate and cite the original source for that idea. For example. Consequently. (f) By masking the origin of the information. 7 Secondary citations: Secondary citation is not strictly a form of plagiarism. It is common for scholars to write on the same topic across many publication outlets.

or other sanctions. average performance on class assignments is rewarded with a “C. you are responsible for both your exam copy (they are numbered and turned in at the end of the exam) and your PARScore sheet. is increased with a greater: (a) number of infractions. expulsion. If you don’t. etc. it was obtained illegally and constitutes academic dishonesty for anyone in possession of it. but your name will be reported to the Center for Student Rights and Responsibilities. (b) distribution of infractions across an assignment.com: All outlines and written assignments will be uploaded to Turnitin. but with source citation.com via BlackBoard. Plagiarism. So. you will likely be caught and punished to the full extent of the course. If. Exacerbating conditions--Amount: Evidence of infraction.) you will receive a zero for the exam and may possibly be recommended to Judicial Affairs for additional action. where you will face academic probation. or (c) proportion of the assignment consisting of infractions. given out old exams to students from which they can study. . Faculty may use additional methods to detect plagiarism. and never have. as well as sample exam questions from past exams on the study guides and via clicker questions. depending factors noted below. IS THAT TRUE? Yes. it is true. If you forward it and all accompanying information to me immediately. and only under exceptional circumstances. you will not be punished. Fall 2014. you may receive not only an F in the class.” In other words. 8     Assignment failure: Reproducing a sentence or sentence fragment with no quotation marks. HOW DO YOU HANDLE CHEATING? I’VE HEARD STORIES ABOUT SEVERAL STUDENTS GETTING Fs. a COMM 103 syllabus ©2012 SDSU School of Communication This syllabus cannot be copied or altered without the expressed written consent of the instructor. your instructor does not receive both of these at the end of the exam period (you forgot to turn it in. I do not. If you cheat on an exam.’ still qualifies as plagiarism—it is all students’ responsibility to make sure their assignments are not committing the offense. Syllabus. for any reason at all. including a report to the CSRR. AND EXPULSION FROM CHEATING ON AN EXAM. Ultimately. will minimally result in an “F” on the assignment. ACADEMIC PROBATION. or subsets of visual images without source attribution. Turnitin. and university policies contained in this document. HOW WILL I BE GRADED ON ASSIGNMENTS? You will better understand your grades on speeches and outlines if you remember that a “B” is not average. we’ve caught many students cheating. if a friend tells you or gives you what he or she says is an old exam copy. school. I provide study guides for each chapter of the textbook. Exacerbating conditions--Intent: Evidence of foreknowledge and intent to deceive magnifies the seriousness of the offense and the grounds for official response. and may result in greater penalty. Exceptions: Any exceptions to these policies will be considered on a case-by-case basis. In the past. even if fragmentary. Trust me. you gave it to a classmate to turn in. whether ‘by accident’ or ‘by ignorance.COMM 103. we have ways of finding out.

visual aids) and is ready for presentation on the assigned date.. 9 “C” means that you have simply met the minimum requirements for a particular assignment.g. Contains disfluencies. C = Satisfactory performance. language choice. Specifically. a “C” presentation:  Conforms to the type of speech assigned. B = Praiseworthy performance. body. D = Minimally passing. polished manner that strengthens the impact of the speaker’s message. All exams. and other verbal and nonverbal characteristics that may be distracting to an audience. nonverbal displays.  Is delivered in a fluent. This grade signifies outstanding work that demonstrates an in-depth understanding of skills and material far surpasses the minimum expectations of a student in the class. nonverbal displays. verbal stumbles.  Illustrates a mastery of organization. relevant to the topic. This grade signifies work in which the student has demonstrated an understanding of skills and material that exceeds the minimum requirements. RETURNING EXAMS AND OTHER ASSIGNMENTS Please note that exams in this class will not be returned. and visual aid use (where appropriate). This grade signifies work in which little or no effort seems to have been expended by the student.  Includes a clear thesis and an identifiable introduction. and visual aid use. you are welcome to make an appointment to see and review your exam.  Illustrates proficiency in organization. an “A” speech is one that satisfies all the requirements of a “B” speech and:  Constitutes a genuine contribution to the knowledge and thinking of the audience. and visual aid use. F = Failing. This grade signifies work in which the student does not meet the minimum expectations for a given assignment.  Is delivered in a way that does not distract attention from the speaker’s message. language choice. However. and other papers not picked up by the student will be destroyed at the end of the following semester. This grade signifies work in which the student has met the minimum requirements and expectations. language choice. Specifically. fulfills all requirements of the speech (e. Fall 2014. nonverbal displays.COMM 103. The grade descriptions COMM 103 Small Section Instructors abide by are as follows: A = Outstanding achievement. a “B” speech is one that satisfies the requirements of a “C” presentation and:  Supports main points with more than the minimum amount of evidence required and is accurate. Specifically. and sufficient to aid in the audience’s understanding of that topic. Syllabus. WHAT’S THE GRADING SCALE FOR THIS CLASS? COMM 103 syllabus ©2012 SDSU School of Communication This syllabus cannot be copied or altered without the expressed written consent of the instructor. and conclusion where appropriate   Illustrates a basic understanding of organization. .

Fall 2014.COMM 103. Syllabus.930= 929-900 899-870 869-830 829-800 799-770 A = = = = = AB+ B BC+ COMM 103 syllabus 769-730 729-700 699-670 669-630 629-600 599-000 = = = = = = C CD+ D DF ©2012 SDSU School of Communication This syllabus cannot be copied or altered without the expressed written consent of the instructor. in which your final letter grade is based on your total points earned in the class over the course of the semester. The grading scale for this class is as follows: 1000. 10 This course uses a total point grading system. .

Please do not ask your instructor to “bump” you up. If extra credit opportunities are made available. which could be the entire value of one quiz or activity. 60 individual points) 100 points 50 points 150 points (15% of grade) 50 points 50 points 50 points 300 points (30% of grade) 100 points  you can miss up to three lectures and still get the full points (the rest are not extra credit) 200 points total—See breakdown below  10 points x 10 activities = 100 points  70 points total My Score . you will not get bumped up even if you’re 1% or 2% away from the next highest grade. however. 1% equals 10 points. students can receive 2 points for each half-hour of research participation (maximum 14 points). So. You may look at your final grade and see that you’re 1% away from the next highest grade. Extra credit cannot be guaranteed as it is dependent on the NEED of research participants in departmental research.DO YOU CURVE GRADES OR BUMP UP TO THE NEXT GRADE? Final grades are just that: final. regardless of how close you are to the next grades. To find out about studies in which you are eligible to participate: https://sites. In this grading scale. Grades are not curved for any assignments.com/site/commsdsuresearch/ HOW MANY POINTS IS EACH ASSIGNMENT WORTH? Assignment Individual and Partner Presentations Speech of Introduction Informative Speech—(Partner Presentation on an Intercultural topic) Persuasive Speech Special Occasion Speech Written Assignments Speech of Introduction Outline Informative Speech Outline— (Partner) Persuasive Speech Outline Participation Large Lecture Participation (“clicker” points) Small Section Participation (see below) In-Class Activities Online Study Modules (through McGraw-Hill LearnSmart) Point Values 300 points (30% of grade) 50 points 100 points (40 partner points.google. DO YOU OFFER EXTRA CREDIT? Students may obtain extra credit from participation in departmental research if research opportunities are made available.

or medical paperwork). Small Sections Since you’ll be presenting your speeches in your Small Section. so you must attend Large Lecture to know the material. the exams will be primarily comprised of lecture material. Some of the topics covered in lecture are not in the textbook nor addressed in your discussion section. sports. you will learn about communication theory. IMPACCT Assessment Completion Exams and Quizzes Online Quizzes (through McGraw-Hill Connect) Exam #1 (50 multiple choice questions x 2 points each) Exam #2 (50 multiple choice questions x 2 points each) Total Points Study Module 1 (Exam #1) = 7 Chaps x 5 pts each= 35 points  Study Module 2 (Exam #2) = 7 Chaps x 5 pts each= 35 points  30 points total (10 points for peers. Failure to attend a scheduled speech day on which you are scheduled to present means you will receive a zero on that speech—absolutely no make-ups are allowed unless you contact your instructor before the class and provide documentation for an excused absence (this means a University activity. and competent communication in a variety of contexts. you will also miss participation points garnered through the use of the clickers. In Small Section meetings. communication contexts. You’ll be asked to apply in your presentations certain concepts addressed in the large lectures. NOTE: We will offer more than 100 possible points to ensure that students who experience technical glitches with their clickers get ample opportunities to get the full participation points. 10 points Time # 2) 250 points (25% of grade)  10 points x 5 quizzes = 50 points 100 points 100 points 1000 points WHAT IS THE ATTENDANCE POLICY FOR THE LECTURE AND DISCUSSION SECTION? Large Lectures It is essential that you attend lecture and discussion sessions for this course every week. In Large Lecture. If you do not attend Large Lecture. Additionally. attendance is mandatory. Attendance on speech days is mandatory. you will receive important instructions about assignments and work closely with your instructor and classmates to increase your communication skills. . 10 points Time # 1.

If you are given a postponement and your speech has not been made-up after two (2) weeks. Make-up exams are permitted only for reasons recognized by the university. CAN I TAKE THE FINAL EXAM AHEAD OF TIME? CAN I MAKE-UP THE EXAM I’M GOING TO MISS? As per university policy. a documented illness. you may miss participation points. Trading speech days with a classmate requires instructor approval in advance. such as participation in a university-sponsored activity. Previously purchased airline tickets or family vacations/gatherings do NOT meet these standards. Written work not turned in on the day it is due will result in a zero on the assignment unless you have proper documentation. Written Work It is your responsibility to complete and submit all written work. But it is your responsibility to keep track of grades and to be sure that your scores have been posted correctly. official course grade has been posted. You will also receive your graded assignments handed back to you in a timely manner. A doctor’s note must include a phone number. typed and according to assignment guidelines at the beginning of the specified class period. If you are late. the final exam must be administered on the official final exam date for the discussion section. If you have questions or concerns about your grading. or prior understanding with the small section instructor. HOW WILL I KNOW HOW I’M DOING IN CLASS? CAN I PERIODICALLY CHECK MY GRADE? All assignment scores will be posted on your Small Section BlackBoard site. This date is determined by the university and based on the “Group Final Schedule”. Absolutely no make-ups of in-class activities are allowed. participation in a university-sponsored activity. or prior understanding with the Small Section Instructor will result in a zero on the assignment. a university-sanctioned absence. Students should retain all graded assignments until the final. IS LATE WORK ACCEPTED? There are no make-ups for speeches or written work unless the student provides documented proof of an emergency or illness. You can keep track of your Large Lecture participation on the Large Lecture BlackBoard site. or prior understanding with the Small Section Instructor. feel free to contact your instructor during office hours. Speeches Failure to give your presentation on the day assigned to you without proper documentation. If you are given a postponement and your written work has not been made-up after two (2) weeks.com and it is your responsibility to complete that process in a timely manner. You will also be required to submit outlines to turnitin. or serious emergency. Don’t be surprised if your instructor calls this number to verify your absence. you may receive a zero on that assignment. .Please arrive to class on time. you may receive a zero on that assignment. a university-sanctioned absence. see the online SDSU final exam schedule for details. IMPORTANT QUESTION: MY PARENTS WANT TO BUY MY PLANE TICKET TO GO HOME.

Buy a clicker in the bookstore. If you do not see both. 5. the clicker points for the Large Lectures are as follows: 15 meetings x 9 = 135 points. Please also remember: 1. Be sure to see 1) a success message and 2) a registration date. Do not register it with i>clicker. do NOT remove the old clicker from BB when you reregister your new clicker. Go to your Large Lecture BlackBoard site. then click on the link that says “i>clicker student registration”. if you haven't already. Continue to register your clicker again and again until you see both messages. please see me—we don’t want to penalize you for a technical glitch that isn’t your fault). If you forget your clicker. you will not receive any points. Additional instructions will be posted on BlackBoard. 6. If you buy a new clicker. b) understand the material better. Follow the appropriate set of directions below to register your clicker. If your clicker batteries run out. then you are not registered. 3. and c) feel more engaged with class. but do make sure to change them when the battery meter indicates that they are low. 4. 2. 2. A clicker should show up on the class materials list if an instructor requires you to use a clicker. If your clicker breaks. click on “Tools”. 4. Be sure that you see 1) a success message and 2) a registration date. 3. What does this mean? This means that you get 3 free absences. you will not receive any points. you must purchase a new one and re-register your clicker before you receive points (if there’s a technical difficulty. You must register your i>clicker remote by using the BlackBoard link in the Large Lecture BlackBoard site. it is your responsibility to contact Student Disability Services at (619) 594-6473. You can buy a used i>clicker online rather cheap if you are so inclined. NOTE: Batteries are supposed to last at least a year.sdsu. Remember that the total points for i>clicker participation are 100 points. you should contact Student Disability Services as . How do I award clicker points? Unless otherwise noted. To avoid any delay in the receipt of your accommodations. Talk with me first! Students with Disabilities If you are a student with a disability and believe you will need accommodations for this class. If you forget your clicker. 3 times you can miss Large Lecture or forget your clicker with no penalty. What should I do? 1.WHAT’S THIS CLICKER FOR? DO I NEED IT? HOW WILL WE BE USING IT IN CLASS? We’re using i>clicker 2 for in-class participation in the Large Lectures. you will not receive any points (you can always see your battery level in your clicker window).edu/ for instructions on getting started. See http://clicker. My hope is that this will help you: a) study for the exams. I'm in a class which uses clickers.

Please note that accommodations are not retroactive. and that accommodations based upon disability cannot be provided until you have presented your instructor with an accommodation letter from Student Disability Services. .soon as possible. Your cooperation is appreciated.

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Week 1 (8/25-8/29) Chapters Textbook Introduction Monday Small Section Meeting Introductions to class and each other: Icebreakers Wednesday Small Section Meeting Introduce Speech of Introduction Activity # 1 LO1 = Articulate important assignments. APA style LO1 = Identify necessary elements of APA style LO2 = Demonstrate APA citation style LO3 = Define plagiarism & consequences of it 3 (9/8-9/12) 9/9 Last Day to Add/Drop Classes 4 (9/15-9/19) 12 13 L L h L m c Preparation for Speech of Introduction Outline Speech of Introduction Outlines Due Activity # 2 Activity # 3 LO1 = Identify main components of a formal outline LO2 = Distinguish formal outline from speaking notes LO1 = Identify ways to manage stage fright LO2 = Demonstrate effective visual and vocal delivery skills Preparation for Speech of Introduction Speech of Introduction Activity # 4 LO1= Demonstrate effective public speaking skills Deadline for registering clickers to still earn the maximum points Deadline for registering for McGraw-Hill Connect L c L c L c L c L L e L in L a L s L a L a Q 5 (9/22-9/26) 11 Speech of Introduction Speech of Introduction LO1= Demonstrate effective public speaking skills LO1= Demonstrate effective public speaking skills Assign Partners for Info Speech IMPACCT Time 1 Survey completed and Peer E-mails sent L a L in L s L a . Outlining. 9/1—Labor Day LO1 = Articulate goals of Speech of Introduction APA citation style. and due dates for the class LO2 = Begin speaking in front of classmates 2 (9/1-9/5) 1 No class Monday. policies.

7pm 6 (9/29-10/3) 14 Introduce Informative Speech Preparation for Informative Speech Outline Topic brainstorming Activity # 5 LO1 = explain effective informative speaking skills LO2 = Identify types of support LO3 = Identify cultural awareness LO1 = Demonstrate effective outlining LO2 = Identify types of support LO3 = Define cultural awareness L s L a L y Q 7 (10/6-10/10) 8 (10/13-10/17) 2 4 Informative Speech Outlines Due Preparation for Informative Speech Activity # 6 Activity # 7 LO1 = Identify ways to manage stage fright LO2 = Demonstrate effective visual and vocal delivery skills Informative Speeches LO1 = Identify ways to manage stage fright LO2 = Demonstrate effective visual and vocal delivery skills Informative Speeches LO1= Demonstrate effective informative speaking skills LO1= Demonstrate effective informative speaking skills L c L C L A L la L p L la Q 9 (10/20-10/24) 5 Informative Speeches LO1= Demonstrate effective informative speaking skills Introduce Persuasive Speech Preparation Persuasive Speech LO1 Identify important components of persuasion LO2 = Brainstorm topics L C L N L d E F C S F M a 10 (10/27-10/31) 15 Preparation for Persuasive Speech Activity # 8 Preparation for Persuasive Speech Outline LO1 = Demonstrate persuasive L L . 9/22.by Monday.

11/26—Early Thanksgiving Holiday Special Occasion Speech LO1 = Demonstrate knowledge of course concepts and theories LO2 = Articulate image management theory LO3 = Demonstrate effective vocal and visual delivery elements r L L s L o L S G A L a L d L f L t L r L f L p L p L t .LO1 = Demonstrate persuasive speaking skills 11 (11/3-11/7) 6 Persuasive Speech Outlines Due outlining skills LO2= Identify components to Stock Issues format Preparation for Persuasive Speech Activity #9 Activity #10 LO1 = Identify ways to manage stage fright LO2 = Demonstrate effective visual and vocal delivery skills 12 (11/10-11/14) 13 (11/17-11/21) 14 (11/24-11/28) 17 (Appendix on Media Literacy) 7 8 Persuasive Speech Persuasive Speech LO1= Demonstrate effective persuasive speaking skills LO1= Demonstrate effective persuasive speaking skills Persuasive Speech Persuasive Speech LO1= Demonstrate effective persuasive speaking skills LO1= Demonstrate effective persuasive speaking skills Persuasive Speech LO1= Demonstrate effective persuasive speaking skills 15 (12/1-12/5) 3 LO1 = Demonstrate persuasive speaking skills Introduce & Prepare for Special Occasion Speech LO1 = Demonstrate knowledge of course concepts and theories LO2 = Demonstrate effective vocal and visual delivery elements No large Lecture or Small Section Wednesday.

A.B. 7pm S S M a c LO1 = Demonstrate knowledge of course concepts and theories .16 (12/8-12/12) Special Occasion Speech T. 12/8. LO2 = Articulate image management theory E S T C ( LO3 = Demonstrate effective vocal and visual delivery elements IMPACCT Time 2 Survey due by Monday.