HEAT FROM RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES

21 innovative projects for an energy-intelligent Europe

Status: December 2006

Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

Editorial Information Issued by the European Commission's Intelligent Energy Executive Agency (IEEA), this report presents a series of international projects supported by the European Union's Intelligent Energy – Europe (IEE) programme. The information contained in it may be reproduced. The responsibility for the content of this publication lies with its authors. It does not necessarily represent the opinion of the European Community. The IEEA is not responsible for any use that may be made of the information contained therein. The information contained is given for information purposes only and it does not bind legally any of the involved parties. This and other project compilations can be downloaded for free from http://ec.europa.eu/energy/intelligent/library/publications_en.htm. Intelligent Energy – Europe (IEE) is the European Union’s programme for promoting energy efficiency and renewables. It supports financially international projects, events, and local/regional energy agencies, which promote the smarter use of energy and the growth of renewable energy sources. The Intelligent Energy Executive Agency implements the IEE programme. With more than 40 staff, the IEEA is at the service of all IEE partners by managing the different projects and events funded under the IEE programme, and by disseminating the know-how and best practices which they produce. More details on the IEE programme and on the IEEA can be found on http://ec.europa.eu/energy/intelligent/index_en.html

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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

Table of contents
Introduction................................................................................................................................................. 5 Five European Res Heat Pilots (5 Eures)................................................................................................... 7 Establishment of regional biomass markets through plant partnerships (BIOMASS PARTNERSHIPS).... 9 BioEnergy Promotion (BioProm) .............................................................................................................. 11 Techno-economical assessment of the production and use of biofuels for heating and cooling applications in South Europe (BIO-SOUTH) ............................................................................................ 12 Boosting Bioenergy in Europe (BOOSTING BIO) .................................................................................... 14 Extend Accredited Renewables Training for Heating (EARTH)................................................................ 16 Solar thermal applications in EASTern Europe with Guaranteed Solar Results (EAST-GSR)................. 18 European Heating and Cooling market study (ECOHEATCOOL) ............................................................ 20 Establishing Local Value Chains for Renewable Heat (ELVA) ................................................................. 22 Efficient trading of biomass fuels and analysis of fuel supply chains and business models (EUBIONET II) .................................................................................................................................................................. 24 Green Energy Clusters ............................................................................................................................. 26 Key Issues for Renewable Heat in Europe (K4RES-H) ............................................................................ 28 Policy reinforcement concerning heat storage technologies (PREHEAT) ................................................ 29 Promotion of Biogas for Electricity and Heat Production in EU Countries Economic and Environmental Benefits of Biogas from Centralised Co-digestion (PROBIOGAS) ........................................................... 30 Promoting Automatic Pellet Heating Systems in the Market (PROPELLETS) ......................................... 32 Quality Management, Organisation, Validation of Standards, Developments and Inquiries for SRF (QUOVADIS) ............................................................................................................................................ 34 Enlarging Solar Thermal Systems in Multi-Family Houses, Hotels, Public and Social Buildings in Europe (SOLARGE).............................................................................................................................................. 36 Large open EU market for solar thermal products (SOLARKEYMARK-II) ............................................... 38 An integrated network on thermal biomass conversion for power, heat and transport fuels (ThermalNet) .................................................................................................................................................................. 39 Thermal Energy from Renewables – References and Assessment (ThERRA)........................................ 41 WasteWaterHeat ...................................................................................................................................... 42 New Projects (start 2007) ......................................................................................................................... 43 Integration of Geothermal Energy into Industrial Applications (IGEIA)..................................................... 44 Guideline for Safe and Eco-friendly Biomass Gasification (Gasification Guide)...................................... 44 GeoThermal Regulation - Heat (GTR-H) .................................................................................................. 44 Development and Promotion of a Transparent European Pellets Market - Creation of a European Realtime Pellets Atlas (PELLETS@LAS) ........................................................................................................ 45
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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

Dissemination, Education and Standardisation of Phyllis Database for Biofuels and Bioashes (PHYDADES) ........................................................................................................................................... 45 Business Opportunities in Biomass Sector for SMEs (BIOBUSINESS) ................................................... 46 European Network of Bioenergy Districts (RENEWED) ........................................................................... 46 Promotion and Education Tool-Kit on Renewable Energy Sources for Heating and Cooling (RESHEAT/COOL-TOOL)................................................................................................................................. 47 Increased Deployment of Firewood by Improving Fuel Quality and Low Emission Combustion (Quality Wood) ....................................................................................................................................................... 47 Regional Bioenergy Initiatives Increasing the market for Biomass Heating in Europe (REGBIE+).......... 47 Refund Individual Investments in Res Heating Systems through Direct Tax Measures (REFUND +) ..... 48

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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

Introduction
Background and relevant policy initiatives
The heating / cooling sector consumes 49% of the final energy in the EU, or almost as much as transport and electricity combined. Most of this thermal energy is produced from fossil fuels (oil, gas, coal). In 2004 renewable sources of energy such as biomass, solar and geothermal energy provided 49 Mtoe: 8.4% of total heat consumption. RES heating and cooling in the EU is dominated by biomass (>50% of which is household heat), which with the enlargement to EU-27 technically could provide for at least 133 Mtoe by 2020. As regards solar thermal, in the period up to the end of 2005 there have been over 16 million m2 of collectors installed in the EU, but over 70% of this capacity has been installed just in 3 European countries (Germany, Greece and Austria). In 2005, the share of geothermal energy sources (both deep and ambient sources) was below 0.5% of the overall consumption of thermal energy in the EU-25 providing around 1,8 Mtoe. However, in order to reach the RES targets for 2010 of the EU White Paper on Renewable Energy COM(97)599 final this production of heating/cooling from geothermal sources of energy in the EU-25 should grow to 3.2 Mtoe. The European policy framework clearly promotes renewable energy sources although unlike in the area of RES electricity or liquid biofuels for transport, the sector of renewable heating and cooling is not subject to dedicated European legislation. Difficulties with the development of EU legislation on RES heating and cooling are partly related to the fact that there is no common European market for heat as this commodity (or service) is by nature a local issue with major differences in heating/cooling demands, existing infrastructure, and availability of RES sources between EU countries and even between regions within the same Member States. The EU existing legislation that already promotes renewable energy heating includes Directive 2002/91/EC on the energy performance of buildings (OJ L1/65, 4.1.2003), which for example, imposes a requirement on Member States that technical, environmental and economic feasibility of alternative systems are made for any new buildings with a total useful floor area over 1000 m2 covering RES and district or block heating or cooling, if available. Another directive 2004/8/EC on the promotion of cogeneration (OJ L52/50, 21.2.2004) also indirectly promotes RES-H as it requires that analyses of national potentials referred to in Article 6 shall consider the type of fuels that are likely to be used to realise the cogeneration potentials, including specific considerations on the potential for increasing the use of renewable energy sources in the national heat markets via cogeneration. A recent initiative of the European Commission, which is directly relevant to RES heating and cooling, is the EU Biomass Action Plan (COM(2005) 628 final) that lists a number of measures to be taken by the European Commission from 2006 onwards, including: ‚ ‚ ‚ preparation of a proposal for Community legislation in 2006 to encourage the use of renewable energy, including biomass, for heating and cooling, encouragement of district heating scheme owners to modernise them and convert them to biomass fuel, encouragement of Member States to take into account, in their support systems, the fact that, in combined heat and power plants, biomass can provide heat and electricity at the same time.

Objectives and priorities of the key action
The key action “RES heat” (VKA6) is intended to encourage growth in the share of heating and cooling produced using RES, by developing appropriate solid biomass fuel standards and by improving the supply chains for biomass (including energy crops) and other RES heating and cooling products. It is also contributing to the development of well-functioning and non-discriminatory heat market structures, by stimulating the integration of solar heating and cooling applications in buildings, by stimulating the exploitation of geothermal heat sources via heat pump technologies and by providing best-practice examples. Activities supported under this key action contribute to the development of comprehensive EU as well as national/regional/local policies and legislation on RES heating and cooling. They also contribute to the implementation of already existing EU legislation and policies. The main priority areas of VKA6 include: ‚ ‚ ‚ Possible legislation, fuel standards and norms for RES heating and cooling systems Supply-chain and market structures for RES heating and cooling products Promotion and training

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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

The first priority area is related to joint European actions to promote good examples and facilitate development of local, regional or national support schemes, policies, legislation and action plans to boost the markets for RES heating/cooling, which could provide benchmarks or form the basis for similar EU-wide initiatives in the near future. An important issue covered also by this priority area is related to validation and promotion of standards and norms for biomass fuels and RES-H/C equipment. The second priority area aims at improved networking, collaboration and understanding amongst key market actors (public- and private-sector decision makers) that have a strong influence on the future growth of renewable heating and cooling markets in the EU. The focus on supply-chain and market structures for RES heating and cooling products is related to actions to tackle barriers to the creation of cost-effective, commercially attractive and efficient supply chains and market structures for (i) biomass fuels for use in heating and cooling applications – these actions should involve fuel producers, transporters and sales outlets, or (ii) manufacturers, installers and operation/maintenance service providers of biomass combustion systems, solar heating/cooling systems, or geothermal heating/cooling systems. The third priority area focused on promotion and training is related to actions aiming to improve skills and change the attitude and behaviour of substantial groups of decision-makers in local communities and/or leading to the implementation of more favourable local policies and/or regulations aiming to increase the use of renewable heating and cooling in clearly defined communities (municipalities, regions or Member States).

Involvement of key target groups
As regards the types of actors present in the projects supported under VKA since 2004, these have included both national and local energy agencies, consultancy companies, engineering companies, national and regional professional associations and some research institutes, which usually gave positive complementarities among the proposing consortia. A growing number of proposals have included local and regional authorities and other local public organisations (eg. dealing with unemployment and development of entrepreneurship). This is considered positive and, given the natural local/regional aspect of RES heating and cooling this type of participation should be further encouraged. Target groups, which have been under-represented in VKA6 projects (direct or indirect involvement in projects) have been district heating and CHP companies as well as housing associations. Moreover, there has been a low level of involvement of industries and businesses that could benefit from using renewable energy heating solutions.

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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

Five European Res Heat Pilots (5 Eures)
Programme area: Status: Coordinator: ALTENER, Heat from renewable energy sources ongoing Asko Ojaniemi Jyväskylä Science Park, Finland E-mail: Asko.Ojaniemi@jsp.fi Tel +358144451123 Irradiare, Portugal IST, Portugal FOAL, Lithuania Aviridis, Lithuania DMAH,Spain FHE,Germany Cebra, Germany Finpro,Finland,Germany, Spain, UK VTT,Finland Metla,Finland NCP, Finland LUVA,Finland www.5eures.eu.com Transfer of know-how, development of five regional RES heat structures Working regional bioenergy market for each area serving as example for future projects Heat, Bioenergy, Market 01/2005 –12/2007 € 2,044,150 (EU contribution: 50%) EIE/04/086/S07.38582

Partners:

Website: Objective: Benefits: Keywords: Duration: Budget: Contract number:

Short description The project target is to develop functional bioenergy market for each area. The market shall preferably include several fuel suppliers and several heat producers. The means to achieve this target are training, feasibility studies and business development assistance. ‚ The first phase was to train the basics to some key persons from each area in order to be able to discuss all relevant matters with common terms and with common understanding. ‚ Next phase was general feasibility study for the areas. In the study the bioenergy potential is identified as well as existing and potential actors in the market. The study result is few identified project sites in each area for more detailed study. The work will continue by detailed case studies, training and assistance of identified actors at each area and identification of possible business opportunities and preparation of business plans together with local actors.

Expected and/or achieved results ‚ Main target is five functioning renewable heat markets ‚ ‚ ‚ ‚ General understanding of the feasibility of renewable heat on each area Identification of concrete projects, fuel suppliers, heat customers and development of full supply chains Each area has enough trained persons to develop further the renewable heat operations after the project Pilot areas serve as examples for other regions in EU, results are disseminated during and after the project

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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

Lessons learnt Although the project has not been completed it is possible to draw the following preliminary conclusions: ‚ Feasibility studies completed show that the bioenergy market is possible at each areas ‚ ‚ The public awareness and general interest among municipalities have already risen and different initiatives are born. Expert support made possible by the project will help to develop these initiatives correctly

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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

Establishment of regional biomass markets through plant partnerships (BIOMASS PARTNERSHIPS)
Programme area: Status: Coordinator: ALTENER, Heat from renewable energy sources Ongoing Sonja Ewerstein Swedish Energy Agency (STEM) E-mail: Sonja.ewerstein@stem.se Tel +46 16 544 2207 Motiva Oy, Finland O.Ö.Energiesparverband (ESV), Austria Severn Wye Energy Agency (SWEA), United Kingdom Agentur fur Zekunftsenergiesysteme (IZES), Germany Rhonalpenergie Environment (RAEE), France Vlamsee instelling voor technologisch onderzoe (VITO), Belgium Sofia Energy Centre (SEC), Bulgaria National Industrial Fuel Efficiency Service Limited (NIFES), UK www.biomasspartner.info To achieve at least one partnership created for each region (hence 9) To generate knowledge and experiences from “advanced countries” to “less advanced biomass countries” at local/regional level. Establish biomass markets 01/2005-02/2007 € 832,062 (EU contribution: 50%) EIE/04/095/S07.38583

Partners:

Website: Objective: Benefits: Keywords: Duration: Budget: Contract number:

Short description In order to expand the market for RES heating it is necessary to increase the supply and to stimulate the demand. This project will strive to support these issues by creating 9 partnerships, one in every partner’s home country, for delivery of heat from biomass and interact with national agencies to deliver policy objectives with respect to Inventory Meetings Pilot study reductions in greenhouse gas emissions through the commercial use of biomass fuel sources. In order to succeed in the project it is of vital importance to work with a bottom-up approach, i.e. have the practical Proposal Project planning market actors involved at the local/regional level at the same time as it is important to work with a top-down approach, i.e. policy makers, municipalities and regional decision makers. The establishment of the Contract regional partnerships will work with these two approaches. Expected and/or achieved results ‚ At least one partnership created for each region, hence 9 partnerships with at least 5 companies/organisations/persons involved in each partnership ‚ ‚ ‚ ‚ Increased sales of biomass and related equipment and services for local and regional market actors in the participating regions Increased market share of biomass in all participating regions Long term goal: at least 10 plants converting to biomass Long term goal: at least 180 GWh heat produced by biomass reducing the emissions of carbon dioxide with 47 000 tonnes compared to oil burning.

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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

Lessons learnt Although the project has not been completed, it is possible to draw the following preliminary conclusions: ‚ We have already by now noticed a great interest from market actors as well as policy makers to promote the building up of partnership establishments. 20 feasibility studies have been accomplished in Sweden only. ‚ There must be a lot of genuine interested farmers before the networks can be fully established. In Sweden, the steering committee initially decided to start the project with recruiting farmers to come around this barrier. It is also important that the farmers groups mentally work with more than one possible plant, if the first one isn’t successful. It was important that the Federation of Swedish Farmers in west Sweden, LRF, joined the Biomass Partner project. Because of the Biomass Partnerships LRF got additional 82 000€ from the county council. Most of the money was designed to feasibility studies.

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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

BioEnergy Promotion (BioProm)
Programme area: Status: Coordinator: ALTENER, Heat from Renewable Energy Sources ongoing Markus Siehr Stuttgart Region Economic Development Corporation, Germany (WRS) E-mail: markus.siehr@region-stuttgart.de Tel. +49 711 22835-35 RAEE, France ESV, Austria JSI, Slovenia URV, Spain IER, Germany www.bioprom.net Identification of non-technical barriers concerning bioenergy facilities in urban areas, and implementing biomass facilities in urban areas Job creation; advancement of renewable energies; new markets for service providers; fossil fuel savings Regional networks, bioenergy facilities, market penetration 01/2005 – 06/2007 € 717,942 (EU contribution: 49,7 %) EIE/04/100/S07.38585

Partners:

Website: Objectives: Benefits: Keywords: Duration: Budget: Contract number:

Short description The mission is to identify and to overcome non-technical barriers for the implementation of bioenergy facilities in urban areas. The project includes a survey and an analysis into five European regions with special focus on interregional knowledge transfer and exchange of experiences (best-practise-models). The overall aims are: ‚ Initiation of ten bioenergy projects – two per region ‚ ‚ External workshops to train farmers and public bodies in realizing bioenergy projects Communication of best-practise-examples, case studies and success factors, in order to stimulate a network and to accelerate the process and the development of renewable energy technologies, supported by the German Legislation (EEG-Gesetz) and the European Commission.

Expected and/or achieved results ‚ The results of a questionnaire, in the first phase of the project show, that the economic factors (e.g. public money) by implementing a biomass facility are considered the strongest barrier by experts like farmers, planers, engineers and public authorities. Pellets and biofuels can play the main role as a fuel for biomass facilities in urban areas. ‚ ‚ ‚ The project website informs stakeholders, farmers and public bodies and provides them with some new information from other areas and regions too. A series of lectures at the University Stuttgart, with experts from industry, research and government have taken place to inform interested people about the most recent activities and news in the field of bioenergy. Additionaly a new broschure lists up some examples and encourages new projects and intentions. Besides that the initialisation of new financial support programmes is expected.

Lessons learnt Although the project has not been completed it is possible to draw the following preliminary conclusions: ‚ The location of biomass facilities is a much more important barrier than expected. ‚ ‚ The information deficits are higher than expected, and there is a need for more objective information, especially in Austria, where the survey showed, that information deficits are considered the strongest barrier. The series of lectures at the University Stuttgart will be continued and they have to be complemented by an annual congress on biomass facilities in urban areas and by transferring the existing trade fair to a more suitable location. 11

Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

Techno-economical assessment of the production and use of biofuels for heating and cooling applications in South Europe (BIO-SOUTH)
Programme area: Status: Coordinator: ALTENER, Heat from renewable energy sources ongoing Inés Echeverria Goñi National Renewable Energy Centre - CENER, Spain E-mail: iecheverria@cener.com Tel + 34 948 25 28 00 Gestión Ambiental Viveros y Repoblaciones de Navarra, Spain Navarra de Medio Ambiente Industrial, S.A., Spain EHN CR Combustibles Renovables, S.A., Spain L.Sole, S.A., Spain Iniciativas Innovadoras, Spain Energia Trasporti Agricoltura Sr, Italy Region of Tuscany, Italy University of Florence: Departament of Energetics “S.Stecco” , Italy Municipality of Abetone, Italy Technical Research Centre of Finland/VTT Processes, Finland Energidalen I Sollefteà AB; Sweden Agencija za prestrukturiranje energetike d.o.o., Slovenia European Biomass Industry Association Organisation, Belgium www.bio-south.com Encourage the development of biofuel heating and cooling markets in southern Europe Increased use of forest biomass for energetic purpose; minimised fossil fuel consumption; reduced fire hazard Solid biofuels, forest biomass, heating and cooling 01/2005 – 02/2007 € 943,434 (EU contribution: 50%) EIE/04/255/S07.38609

Partners:

Website: Objective: Benefits: Keywords: Duration: Budget: Contract number:

Short description Contrary to the north of Europe and some central European countries, where the use of solid bio-fuels for heating is common, southern European countries make little use of this application and bio-fuel markets are underdeveloped despite important potentials in some regions. The BIO-SOUTH project aims to develop these potentials by transferring technologies, methods and experiences from more advanced countries and by adapting to the local market conditions in Southern Europe. The project partners assess technical and economical aspects of the whole bio-fuel utilisation cycle, from collection to heat production, in the Spanish region of Navarre and the Italian region of Tuscany, both with an important potential for forest bio-fuels. The project will identify key barriers to bio-heat development in these two regions and taking into account experiences from more advanced regions - define measures to address them and help build up thriving markets. Expected and/or achieved results ‚ Demonstration of the feasibility of forest biomass logistics and utilisation for heat generation in Navarre and Tuscany; ‚ To make local actors (governments, municipalities, forest land owners, forest companies, wood industries, associations and other relevant bodies) aware of the possibilities, benefits, technologies, methodologies and economics of the utilisation of forest biomass as fuel; Transference of Nordic biomass know-how to Navarre and Tuscany. To make citizens aware of the bio-fuel heating potential and benefits in Spain and Italy. Dissemination of results to the whole Mediterranean Area of the EU.

‚ ‚ ‚

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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

Lessons learnt Although the project has not been completed it is possible to draw the following preliminary conclusions: ‚ In Navarre, it can be highlighted that although the forest residue potential is about 480.000 ton/year, only a share of them can be collected in a mechanical way to do the process economically feasible, 100.000 Ton/ha (on a 30% moisture content basis). This corresponds to 1.11% on the primary energy consumption. ‚ In Tuscany, the data obtained is that the total forest residues potential biomass reclaimable can covers about the 1.56% of total energy consumption in Tuscany (579.455 Tons of forest residues), that is an important part of the necessary energy. Currently, in the regions under study, due the forest characteristics, the forest biomass harvesting operations could be quite expensive. Therefore, to overcome this barrier, nowadays the Bio-South project it is focus on the development methodology for this kind of forest, in which the forest residue collection has to be optimized.

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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

Boosting Bioenergy in Europe (BOOSTING BIO)
Programme area: Status: Coordinator: ALTENER, Heat from renewable energy sources ongoing Jossart Jean-Marc European Biomass Association – AEBIOM, Belgium E-mail: jossart@aebiom.org Tel : + 32 10 47 34 55 Austrian Biomass Association (ABA) Belgian Biomass Association (VALBIOM) Energy Utilization Biomass Association (EUBA), Bulgaria The Bioenergy Association of Finland (FINBIO) International association of bioenergy professionals (ITEBE), France German BioEnergy Association (BBE) Swedish Bioenergy Association (SVEBIO) Central Agricultural Raw Material Marketing and dEvelopment Network (C.A.R.M.E.N. e.V.), Germany www.aebiom.org/article.php3?id_article=34 To boost bioenergy in Europe through targeted actions in 2005 and 2006 Development of a vision for bioenergy in 7 EU Member States and consultation with policy makers and private companies Bioenergy vision, decision makers, market actors 01/2005 -12/2006 € 720,029 (EU contribution: 50%) EIE/04/132/S07.38592

Partners:

Website: Objective: Benefits: Keywords: Duration: Budget: Contract number:

Short description During 2005 a strategy was worked out with detailed objectives for EU for the markets for heat, electricity and liquid biofuels, using outstanding sources of information. Objectives were compared with the potential. At a national level a detailed analysis of the national objectives and trends was realised for Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Germany, Finland, France and Sweden, using national sources of information. Financial steering instruments were compared among countries and especially detailed for the countries listed above. The strategy is available as a printed brochure of the executive summary and a pdf version for the strategy report (available on project web site). In 2006 this strategy will be confronted through interviews with the views from national decision makers and market actors, allowing to evaluate this strategy. This work also intends to initiate a debate on how to boost bioenergy in the considered countries. The European Biomass Days have been organised in September 2005 and are planned for September 2006. It is mainly consisting of open doors to biomass plants and companies working in the biomass sector. A web site is available for registration (www.biomassdays.org). Expected and/or achieved results ‚ A printed Brochure (20 pages) presenting the executive summary of the strategy report is available on request. A pdf version can be downloaded from the project web site. ‚ A strategy report (200 pages) presenting the vision for bioenergy and detailed objectives and proposal of new steering instruments for 7 countries (Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Finland, France, Germany, Sweden). A pdf version can be downloaded from the project web site. Organisation of European Biomass Days to sensibilize the public towards bioenergy. These are open doors organised the last week of September (www.biomassdays.org). 14

Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

Lessons learnt Although the project has not been completed it is possible to draw the following preliminary conclusions: ‚ Work out a clear vision for bioenergy is a challenging but very interesting exercise. Often existing national objectives are absent or unclear (mixing for example the biomass as primary energy source with the final energy after conversion). Also the best financial steering instruments to reach the objectives are difficult to identify as they are manifold, complicate and closely intertwined.

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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

Extend Accredited Renewables Training for Heating (EARTH)
Programme area: Status: Coordinator: ALTENER, heat from renewable energy sources ongoing Rolf Oldach IT Power E-mail: rolf.oldach@itpower.co.uk Tel:+44 1256 392 733 Agencija za prestrukturiranje Energetike (ApE), Slovenia Black Sea Regional Energy Centre (BSREC), Bulgaria Centre for Renewable Energy Sources (CRES), Greece Fraunhofer-Institut System und Innovationsforschung (FhG-ISI), Germany Intiam Ruai SL, Spain ISPQ-Europe Ltd. UK Lithuanian Energy Institute (LEI), Lithuania Österreichische Energieagentur (Austrian Energy Agency, AEA), Austria Österreichisches Forschungs- und Prüfzentrum Arsenal Ges.m.b.H (arsenal research), Austria; Solpros Avoin Yhtiö, Finland; WIP-KG, Germany www.earth-net.info Developing training courses for installers of solar water heating, ground-source heat pumps and biomass heating systems The project will help to provide a qualified, skilled workforce for the installation of renewable energy heating systems Installer training; renewable energy; heating 01/2005 – 12/2006 € 1,500,000 (EU contribution: 50%) EIE/04/038/S07.38559

Partners:

Website: Objective: Benefits: Keywords: Duration: Budget: Contract number:

Short description The EARTH project is developing training courses and training infrastructure for installers of three renewable energy technologies for heat production: solar water heating, ground-source heat pumps, and biomass energy. In order for these technologies to be successfully implemented, appropriate installer training must be available to develop a qualified, skilled workforce. In many countries, such training opportunities are currently very limited, which is a factor inhibiting the use of these technologies across Europe. Under EARTH, suitable training programmes are being created to disseminate the skills required to install simple biomass, ground-source heat pumps and solar water heating systems. The work commenced with a survey and review of relevant training programmes and frameworks in participating countries. Training programmes are being developed within the existing national vocational training frameworks in the relevant countries. Pilot courses will be implemented to test the training programmes. Assistance will be provided to training organisations, including training of trainers. Pilot courses will be audited to defined quality standards. Expected and achieved results ‚ Training programmes for biomass, GSHP and SWH installers (course definitions including task analysis, syllabus, entry requirements, and requirements for practical training) ‚ ‚ ‚ ‚ Training materials for both trainers and students Training of trainers Assistance with pilot courses Overview of relevant training programmes and frameworks in participating countries

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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

Lessons learnt Although the project has not been completed it is possible to draw the following preliminary conclusions: ‚ Any training programme should consider the needs of the industry, of consumers (e.g. high quality installations), but also the needs of the installers themselves (e.g. duration of training course). ‚ Training courses should become part of the national training infrastructure, to ensure that they continue on an ongoing basis beyond the lifetime of the project.

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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

Solar thermal applications in EASTern Europe with Guaranteed Solar Results (EAST-GSR)
Programme area: Status: Coordinator: ALTENER, small-scale applications ongoing Stéphane POUFFARY ADEME (Agence de l'Environnement et de la Maîtrise de l'Energie), France E-mail : stephane.pouffary@ademe.fr Tel: +33 (0)4.93.95.79.55 ARSENAL Research (Österreichisches Forschungs und Prüfzentrum Arsenal Ges.m.b.H), Austria CRES (Centre for Renewable Energy Sources), Greece DENA (Deutsche Energie-Agentur GmbH), Germany KAPE (Krajowa Agencja Poszanowania Energii SA), Poland OVM-ICCPET (Oscar Von Miller-Institut de Conceptie, Cercetare si Proiectare Echipamente Termoenergetice), Romania SEA (Slovenska Energeticka Agentura), Slovakia SEC (Sofia Energy Centre), Bulgaria TECSOL SA, France UL FME (University of Ljubljana), Slovenia www.solareast-gsr.net Encourage the emergence of a sustainable solar thermal market with the GSR quality approach Development of local industries and distribution networks Solar thermal market, guaranteed solar results, telemonitoring equipment 01/2006– 12/2008 EUR 1,082,394 (EU contribution: 50%) EIE/05/208/SI2.420214

Partners:

Website: Objective: Benefit: Keywords: Duration: Budget: Contract number:

Short description EAST-GSR is a 36-month project based on the “Guarantee of Solar Results” concept. Austria, France, Germany and Greece, which already successfully implemented this contract, will transfer their experience to Bulgaria, Poland, Romania, Slovak Republic and Slovenia. After the analysis of the national situations in the Eastern partners' countries (present solar thermal market state breakdown and requirements study for a wide dissemination), the GSR Charter will be adapted to each country according to their own needs. Then, the GSR concept will be promoted through proactive networking and training activities. Besides, several existing sites will be identified and selected as pilot projects, in order to implement a telemonitoring system. Pre-feasibility studies will be realised on new potential sites. Moreover, to encourage the GSR concept as an added value for collective solar thermal market development, important promotion and dissemination actions will be organised. Expected and/or achieved results ‚ Transfer the GSR Charter, ‚ ‚ ‚ ‚ improve solar thermal equipment quality and installation by training local professionals to increase know-how as for design and functioning of collective solar thermal applications, implement one complete telemonitoring system per partner country on an existing collective solar thermal installation with an aim of showing reliability and enhancing the confidence in solar thermal technologies, accomplish feasibility studies on new potential sites and present results to potential investors, network and implement a wide dissemination of the GSR concept to demonstrate that the collective solar thermal market is safe and trustworthy in order to attract potential new clients and new investors. 18

Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

Lessons learnt This project has just started. It is therefore too early to draw lessons.

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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

European Heating and Cooling market study (ECOHEATCOOL)
Programme area: Status: Coordinator: ALTENER, heat from renewable energy sources ongoing Norela Constantinescu Euroheat & Power, Belgium E-mail: norela.constantinescu@euroheat.org Tel + 32 740 21 10 Chalmers University, Sweden Capital Cooling, Sweden Danish DH Association (DFF), Denmark Finish Energy Industries, Finland German DH Association (AGFW0, Germany Italian DH Association (AIRU), Italy Association of Gas and DH Supply Companies (FGVW), Austria Swedish DH Association, Sweden EREC, Belgium Norwegian DH Association, Norway, CEWEP, Belgium French DH and Cooling Association, (SNCU), France www.ecoheatcool.org Assess the European heating/cooling markets, evaluate possibilities for more district heating/cooling and related benefits Comparable data; identified actions and policy tools; energy savings potentials and use of renewables in heating/cooling sectors European, heating, cooling 01/2005 – 12/2006 € 641,556 (EU contribution: 50%) EIE/04/110/S07.38586

Partners:

EJ 90,0 80,0 70,0 60,0 50,0 40,0

Losses in the energy transformation sector Losses in end use Combustible Renewables and Waste Solar/Wind/Other Geothermal Hydro Nuclear Natural Gas

30,0 Petroleum Products 20,0 Coal and Coal Products 10,0 Transportation 0,0
Total Primary Energy Supply Total Final Consumption Total End Use (estimated)

Electricity Heat

70

65

60

55

50

45

40

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35 -20 -15 -10 -5 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35

Short description ECOHEATCOOL describes and analyses the European heating and cooling markets and demands. Furthermore it provides a tool for policy makers to assess different heating and cooling supply options. Possibilities for more district heating and cooling in Europe are evaluated. Available potentials for various heat and cooling generation sources (including renewables) as well as deriving benefits in terms of energy efficiency, energy savings are assessed. Recommendations for strategies on how to further develop sustainable and cost effective heat and cooling supply options and how to improve the use of local sources are provided. It’s the fist action of its kind. It uses a demand side approach and enables a quality check of data in the international statistics in these sectors. It provides an aggregate and comprehensive picture of the heating and cooling markets and of the district heating and cooling sectors in Europe 32. Expected and/or achieved results ‚ Develop a framework for assessing comparable magnitudes of European heating and cooling demands ‚ ‚ ‚ ‚ Identify possibilities with more district heating and cooling and available potential for combined heat and power, renewables, waste heat, waste to energy etc in Europe Asses the implications from more district heating and cooling in terms of energy efficiency, savings, and lower carbon dioxide Develop a tool for assessing the energy and environmental performance of district heating and cooling systems Raise the awareness of district heating and cooling benefits in Europe

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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

Lessons learnt Although the project has not been completed it is possible to draw the following preliminary conclusions: ‚ International heat and cooling statistics can be improved ‚ ‚ Heat dominates the energy end use and Europe wastes more heat in transforming energy than it consumes; huge heat losses are to be retrieved Cooling demand grows much faster than earlier indications

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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

Establishing Local Value Chains for Renewable Heat (ELVA)
Programme area: Status: Coordinator: ALTENER, heat from renewable energy sources Ongoing Hans Jacob Mydske New Energy Performance AS (NEPAS), Norway E-mail: Mydske@neaps.no Tel: +47 92 60 03 07 Austrian Energy Agency (AEA), Austria The Edinburgh Centre for Carbon Management (ECCM), Scotland The Energy Saving Trust (EST), UK Centro da Biomassa Para a Energia (CBE), Portugal Centre for Renewable Energy Sources (CRES), Greece SWS Group Ltd. (SWS), Ireland Agenzija za Prestrukturanje Energetike (ApE), SLovenia www.ieeprojects.net To facilitate the establishment of local value chains for renewable heat Methodology for local communities to create business around the development of heating from renewables Renewable Heat, Value Chains, Training the trainers 01/2005 – 06/2007 € 581,940 (EU contribution: 50%)

Partners:

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Short description This project contributes to the development of local value chains for heat from renewable energy sources by transferring the extensive know-how of Austria in this field to Norway, Ireland, England, Scotland, Portugal, Greece, and Slovenia, which have less experience. The target countries lack appropriate tools and know-how for developing the often, interlinked value chains at local level which requires in-depth theoretical knowledge and practical experience with economics and local politics. This project aims to study existing, successful experiences and design an optimised market model. Furthermore the project will use the model in concrete feasibility studies in pilot markets with the aim of a public-business-citizen partnership in the partner countries. Both local authorities – which play a key role in this effort – and energy advisors - in charge of developing the technical side of heating projects using renewables - will be trained directly by Austrian experts. Expected and/or achieved results ‚ A management model of how to establish effective local value chains that can be used as blueprint for the development of heating with renewable energy sources. ‚ ‚ ‚ Make local policy actors aware of the opportunities created by local value chains for renewable heating and educate them in how to establish public-business-citizen partnerships Educate energy advisors in the respective countries in a way that enables them to assess and develop projects in interested communities Analyse the requirements regarding legislative conditions that would support market development both on national and on EU level. Particular emphasis will be given to assessing the potential benefits and to analyse, compare and examine successful local and national legislative and financial initiatives and propose new ones for the EU 5 points maximum, starting with the most important

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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

Lessons learnt Although the project has not been completed it is possible to draw the following preliminary conclusions: ‚ Stimulating business opportunities and job creation seem to be the major driving force for the development of heating with renewable energy sources at local level ‚ ‚ Further legislative initiatives on local energy planning could enhance the development of heating with renewable energy sources. Local value chains within different categories (technology-driven, product-driven and service-driven) are often closely interlinked, and significant synergies can be found.

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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

Efficient trading of biomass fuels and analysis of fuel supply chains and business models (EUBIONET II)
Programme area: Status: Coordinator: ALTENER, Heat and electricity from renewable energy sources ongoing Eija Alakangas, VTT, Finland E-mail: eija.alakangas@vtt.fi Tel. +358 20 722 2550 or +358 400 542 454, fax.+358 20 722 2749 SLU, Sweden SenterNovem, Netherlands DTI, Denmark FNR, Germany CRES, Greece FJ-BLT, Austria SWS Group Ltd., Ireland CRA-W, Belgium Andalusian Energy Agency, Spain University of Manchester, UK CBE, Portugal AEBIOM, Belgium CEPI, Belgium NKUAS, Finland ADEME, France www.eubionet.net To increase the use of biomass fuels by analysing trade, supply chains, national legislation and directives Better knowledge of trends in solid biofuels trade, solid biofuel supply chains, and implementation of directives biomass trade, legislation, fuel supply 1/2005 – 12/2007 € 1,238,466 (EU contribution: 50%) EIE/04/065/S0.7.38628

Partners:

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Short description EUBIONET II gives a clear outlook on the current and future biomass fuel market trends, collects feedback on the CEN 335 biofuel standards from different market actors and analyses techno-economic potential of the biomass fuel volumes until 2010. Co-operation is done with forest industry stakeholders to find proper balance between industrial raw material and bioenergy use. 30 different solid biofuel supply chains will be analysed, and the most suitable trading and business models for small- and large-scale biofuel supply chains for heat and power production will be selected by taking into account the environmental aspects and sustainability. Implementation of EU Directives in the member states, analysis on legislative differences and the major driving forces related to biomass markets is analysed in EU25. Target groups are biomass fuel traders and users, fuel producers and suppliers of different scales, policy makers. Key associations, i.e. AEBIOM and CEPI, are participating in the project and disseminating information to various groups. Expected and/or achieved results ‚ To give a clear outlook of current and future biomass fuel market trends in Europe (summary report under preparation and national reports soon to be published) ‚ ‚ To give feedback on the suitability of CEN 335 biofuel standard for trading of biofuels (31 interviews carried out, preliminary results will be presented at CEN/TC 335 meeting in UK in October 2006) To analyse, select and describe the most suitable trading and business models for small and large scale biofuel supply chains for heat and power production by taking into account the environmental aspects and sustainability (fact sheets of 30 chains, guide with recommendations (work will start in November 2006)

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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

To analyse the current European trends in bioenergy policies related to electricity and heat production. The focus is on European legislation and its implementation in the Member States (summary report and national reports published and one workshop organised) To enhance biomass use and biomass fuel trade and technology transfer by co-operation and information dissemination with different market actors in the fuel-utilisation chain (events, articles, papers in conferences, articles in journals, training programmes, study tours, listing technology providers, traders). Project flyer published (7000 copies), web page established, 7 published articles, one international event organised and 2 planned, several national events and training seminars organised and one international training course organised in Finland and one planned to be held in Germany, one study tour organised in Finland and second planned to Russia.

Lessons learnt ‚ It seems to be clear that the international biomass trade will increase in the future, especially with pellets, for which the traded volumes are estimated to be 10 million tons in 2010. The greatest potentials lies in increased use of forest residues, but for economical reasons they are typically utilised locally, unless refined in to more compact form. It is important to create rules for sustainable and fair trade in international biomass business. For this purpose, technical specifications for solid biofuels have been created within the framework of CEN TC335 standardisation. These specifications include e.g. quality requirements, fuels specifications and classes, quality assurance, as well as determination of physical, mechanical and chemical properties. To ensure the use of these standards, lot of information dissemination and training is needed. Increased use of biomass fuels may lead to competition with forest industry, because of the restricted availability of raw material in some regions. It is important, that the energy production would first concentrate on those wood fuel fractions which cannot be used to produce industrial products with higher added value. This necessitates research and development to improve the techno-economical efficiency of the production chains. In the near future it may become feasible to produce liquid biofuels from wood and wet biomass that is currently used to generate heat and electricity or pellets. In that case even greater competition will emerge between biofuel policies and bioenergy policies. ‚ Biomass is an important topic for European energy, climate and waste policy. The recently published European Biomass Action Plan promotes the use of biomass for heat and power generation and biofuels for transport. As for climate policy, generating useful energy from biomass limits the greenhouse gas emissions associated with fossil fuel use. In addition, municipal waste contains a varying fraction of biogenic products and can also be considered a source of bioenergy. EUBIONET II has analysed current European trends in bioenergy policies as they relate to electricity and heat production. The focus is on European legislation and its implementation in the Member States. European legislation and biomass use with regard to European legislation, the Renewable Energy Sources (RES) Directive and the Landfill Directive are currently giving a significant incentive to bioenergy projects across the EU. Under the RES directive most Member States have adopted policies supporting bioenergy generation. The nature and level of this support varies among Member States from 0 to 21.5 € ct/kWhe and there has consequently been similarly wide variation in the growth of biomass use. In Germany, with the highest support tariffs, bioenergy use doubled between 2000 and 2004, while in certain other countries there was no increase at all. Because of these policy differences, within Europe today there is subsidy-driven biomass transport to countries with relatively generous support systems. In the future, two other directives may have an increasing impact on the use of biomass: the CO2 Emission Trading Scheme (ETS) Directive and the Biofuels Directive. The first of these directives encourages generation of bioenergy in installations covered by the ETS. Bioenergy policy gives rise to policy competition among Member States, one result of which may be higher biomass prices, which would have a negative impact on the cost-efficiency of bioenergy policy. Member States should therefore coordinate their bioenergy support regimes. It is not necessary to introduce a uniform system of supports throughout the EU, for each country can take its natural endowments into due consideration when designing an appropriate support regime. However, it is necessary to avoid wasting subsidies.

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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

Green Energy Clusters
Programme area: Status: Coordinator: Altener, heat from renewable energy sources Ongoing Mats Rydehell KanEnergi Sweden AB, Sweden E-mail: mats.rydehell@kanenergi.se Tel: +46 511 34 76 64 O.Ö. Energiesparverband, Austria GreenPartner, Norway Norsk Enök & Energi (NEE), Norway South West Wood Fuels Ltd (SWWF), UK Rhônalpénergie-Environnement (RAEE), France Chambre de Commerce et d'Industrie de Lyon (CCI Lyon), France www.greenenergycluster.info To strengthen regional markets for renewable heating and to develop business by establishing regional SME clusters Business cooperation between SMEs in the clusters, capacity building and exchange of experience and know-how. Cluster, SME, cooperation 01/2005 – 02/2007 € 517,754 (EU contribution: 50%) EIE/04/101/S07.38.584

Partners:

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Short description Most actors in the markets for heating from renewable energy sources are small. This project organises several SMEs in regional clusters and joins their efforts to increase their visibility and enhance the knowledge transfer and co-operation between the companies involved. Each cluster sets its own strategy and action plan for the deployment of green energy in its region and market, including ‚ Training in entrepreneurship, management, marketing, export activities etc. ‚ ‚ ‚ ‚ Development of information tools, e.g. websites, brochures and seminars. Facilitate the exchange of experience and knowledge through cluster workshops and joint resources for marketing, business development, export activities etc. Facilitate new business contacts and co-operation between the SMEs through bi- or multi lateral partnering meetings. Production of a booklet on regional green energy cluster initiatives to support the formation of similar clusters within other European regions.

Expected and/or achieved results ‚ Establishment or strengthening of 5 Green Energy Clusters, one per region involved, resulting in increased sales figures, new partnerships and cooperation between participating SMEs ‚ ‚ ‚ ‚ The raised knowledge, new contacts and utilisation of joint resources. Information dissemination activities for raised awareness amongst end-users. The potential import/export of products between the members of the different clusters which will broaden the range of technologies and products on the regional markets. In total more than 200 companies/organisations will be involved in the clusters and 40 cluster activities implemented.

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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

Lessons learnt Although the project has not been completed it is possible to draw the following preliminary conclusions: ‚ Most actors in the markets for heating from renewable energy sources are small SMEs with limited resources for marketing, business development and capacity building. Although interested in participating in the clusters, they experience difficulties in allocating sufficient time and resources to do that. ‚ Clustering is a long process that requires a lot of human resources in the initial stages to gain trust and to achieve the first actual outcomes and results. Cluster coordinators have to have a good knowledge of the market and technologies. Continuous communication and animation of the cluster members is a must. Thus public bodies and/or funding are a necessity in the initial stage. Involvement of one or a few larger companies that has resources also facilitates the cluster development. When the cluster has been initiated lot of opportunities for cost effective activities are identified and competition between the cluster members is less prominent.

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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

Key Issues for Renewable Heat in Europe (K4RES-H)
Programme area: Status: Coordinator: ALTENER, heat from renewable energy sources ongoing Uwe Brechlin European Solar Thermal Industry Federation (ESTIF), Belgium E-mail: info@estif.org Tel: +32-2-546 19 38 WIP, Germany AEBIOM – European Biomass Association, Belgium EGEC – European Geothermal Energy Council, Belgium EREC – European Renewable Energy Council, Belgium EC-JRC – European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Italy Agencia d’Energia de Barcelona, Spain Energie 2000 – Energieagentur m Landkreis Kassel, Germany IDAE – Instituto para la Diversificacion y Ahorro de la Energia, Spain www.erec-renewables.org/projects/proj_K4_RES-H_homepage.htm Development of a comprehensive Action Plan for Renewable Heating and Cooling in Europe Increased uptake of renewables in heating and cooling, reduced dependency on fossil and nuclear energy Renewable heating/cooling, Support policies, Best practice 01/2005-06/2007 € 1,396,766 (EU contribution: 50%) EIE/04/240/S07.38607

Partners:

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Short description Renewable energies for heating and cooling must play a key role in any future oriented energy policy in Europe. For the short to medium term, support policies will remain vital to the development of strong RES-H markets, but policy makers often struggle with identifying effective policies. The K4RES-H project analyses 5 Key Issues, in order to develop clear and practical guidelines, which can be used to implement best practice RES-H support policies on local, regional and European level. The current political discussion of a European Directive to promote Renewable Heating and Cooling highlights the need for the answers developed within the K4RES-H project. Member States will be able to use the results to implement the future Directive. Expected and/or achieved results A comprehensive Action Plan for Renewable Heating and Cooling in Europe, consisting of best practice guidelines on 5 Key Issues: ‚ Setting verifiable targets for renewable heating and cooling ‚ ‚ ‚ ‚ Quantifying the energy delivery of individual renewable heating and cooling installations Regulatory measures to support renewable heating and cooling Financial incentives to renewable heating and cooling Supporting innovative renewable heating and cooling applications (such as cooling technologies)

Lessons learnt The project is currently evaluating the analyses performed so far: Detailed guidelines for the Key Issues “Innovative RES-H applications” and “Financial incentive schemes” will be published in summer 2006, guidelines on the remaining three Key Issues in autumn of 2006.

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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

Policy reinforcement concerning heat storage technologies (PREHEAT)
Programme area: Status: Coordinator: ALTENER, small-scale applications Ongoing Marco Bakker ECN, Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands email: m.bakker@ecn.nl phone: +31 224 56 8079 fax: +31 224 56 8966 Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems, DE Ellehauge & Kildemoes, DK Building Research Establishment, UK Centre Scientifique et Technique du Bâtiment, FR www.preheat.org Increase visibility of heat storage and funding possibilities for development and implementation of improved heat storage technologies Coherent European approach to heat storage development and implementation, and a more efficient use of renewable heat. Heat storage, market potential, promotion. 01/2006 – 06/2008 € 579,538 (EU contribution: 50%) EIE/05/036/SI2.420010

Partners:

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Short description Without heat storage, renewable heating would not be possible. Although heat storage itself is rather invisible, its impact on the amount of renewable energy generated in your house, city, and country is huge. By improving the effectiveness of heat storage, we can improve the effectiveness of all renewable energy technologies that use heat storage. Because of the large diversity in heat storage technologies and systems, development is fragmented and there are no possibilities for long-term investments. And because it is difficult to express heat storage in terms of policy goals, there is currently no long-term European strategy. To effectively develop and improve heat storage technologies, a coordinated and programmed international approach is required. By analyzing the decision making process and describing the technology, markets and potential of heat storage, PREHEAT will help European industry and decision makers to maximize the environmental, commercial and economic benefits of heat storage. Expected and/or achieved results ‚ Increased awareness and funding possibilities for heat storage development and implementation. ‚ ‚ ‚ ‚ Reference framework about heat storage technologies for industry and policy makers. Description of the potential impact of heat storage to renewable energy generation. Overview of present and future markets for heat storage. Overview of heat storage technologies.

Lessons learnt Although the project has not been completed it is possible to draw the following preliminary conclusions: ‚ A compact and efficient heat storage is essential for a very broad range of renewable energy systems. ‚ ‚ There is a strong need for more information on heat storage technologies, including market potential and best practices. Although there are European and national programmes to promote renewable energy, heat storage is not supported explicitly. A strategic and programmed approach would greatly stimulate the development and implementation of improved heat storage, and thereby the effectiveness of renewable energy generation.

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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

Promotion of Biogas for Electricity and Heat Production in EU Countries Economic and Environmental Benefits of Biogas from Centralised Co-digestion (PROBIOGAS)
Programme area: Status: Coordinator: ALTENER, heat from renewable energy sources ongoing Teodorita Al Seadi University of Southern Denmark, Denmark E-mail: tas@bio.sdu.dk Tel: +45 6550 4168 University of Southern Denmark, Denmark Danish Research Institute of Food Economics, Denmark Risoe National Laboratory, Denmark Danish Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Denmark Danish Agricultural Advisory Centre, Denmark Association Solagro, France Centre for Renewable Energy Sources, Greece SenterNovem, The Netherlands University of Barcelona, Spain Methanogen Ltd, Ireland Agricultural Research Centre of Wallonia - ValBiom Asbl, Belgium websrv4.sdu.dk/bio/probiogas.htm Promote biogas technologies in Europe by quantifying its environmental and economic benefits and by clarifying incentives and barriers Establishing a platform for initiation of future policy initiatives for the development of biogas Centralised co-digestion, environmental benefits, economic benefits 01/2005-06/2007 € 887,178 (EU contribution: 50%) EIE/04/117/S07.38588

Partners:

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Short description Many biogas projects are abandoned at an early stage as the potential investors and promoters are often unaware of the business opportunities and economic and environmental benefits associated with biogas systems. The results from Denmark proved that centralised biogas production is a multifunctional technology, providing quantifiable environmental and economic benefits for agriculture, industry, energy and the overall society and is extremely competitive as tool in GHG reduction. Similar quantification results are much in demand in many other European countries, showing the need to share and further develop this knowledge at European level. This project aims to transfer and apply this knowledge to six selected case study regions in EU countries and to disseminate the obtained results to the regional target groups and to the overall European level. Expected and/or achieved results ‚ To establish a biogas target group network in each region, which will assist the data collection process, the dissemination of results and will function as a platform for the initiation of future policy initiatives in that region ‚ To elaborate six national assessment reports quantifying environmental and economical benefits of centralised co-digestion in the respective case study area. The reports will be translated into national languages and will also include assessment of the non-technical barriers To elaborate a generic assessment report including overall results of the national assessment reports, in English. To organise a European biogas seminar, for the dissemination of the project results and the promotion of the newest biogas knowledge in Europe.

‚ ‚

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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

Lessons learnt Although the project has not been completed it is possible to draw the following preliminary conclusions: ‚ There is a great difference between European countries concerning the kind and amount of data available for the calculation of biogas externalities as well as the difficulties in getting it. ‚ Taking this into consideration, some unexpected problems and delays may occur during the data procurement process, thus it is a good idea to set aside a reserve of time in the project time schedule.

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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

Promoting Automatic Pellet Heating Systems in the Market (PROPELLETS)
Programme area: Status: Coordinator: ALTENER, Heat from renewable energy sources Ongoing Francisco Puente Salve ESCAN, Spain E-mail: escan@escansa.com Tel: +34 91 323 26 43 JSP, Finland ESV, Austria RHPL, England ETA, Italy www.escansa.com/propellets.htm Promotion of European Pellet Heating Systems in the Market Overcome market barriers and increase the use of pellet heating systems in the EU Pellet, Market, Heating System 01/2005 – 01/2008 789,906 € (EU contribution: 50%) EIE 04 040 S07.38560

Partners:

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Short description The PROPELLETS project promotes automatic pellet heating systems, within different regional scenarios from the European Market, through both the demonstration of the technical-economic feasibility of pilot heating facilities and the integration of acquired experiences. The regions selected to implement the project are Asturias (Spain), Central Finland, Upper Austria, Southwest England and the Province of Florence (Italy). These regions have a strong tradition on forest processing and/or an increasing interest in biomass related business. Every region has created its own working group, integrating interested end-users, local and regional organisms, boilers and biomass suppliers, biomass related associations and engineering firms, providing the adequate focus to the initiatives to reach the objectives. The specific objectives are: market stimulation by means of assessing and disseminating best practices to targeted groups; involving and increasing the actors' experience through the demonstration of pilot heating unit's feasibility; stimulating European technology transfer to other markets. Expected and/or achieved results ‚ Wood/agro pellets market stimulation in EU regions through a network constituted by the partners and actors. Each country has constituted a regional network in the first year of the project to achieve the results (e.g.: In England, one pellets plant is in commissioning by Propellets actor; e.g.: Spanish companies began to install Austrian pellet boilers in Spain; Two Finnish Municipalities are studying to install in new neighbourhoods pellets heating systems) ‚ Installation of demonstrative pilot heating systems to involve the market's actors and to favour the demand. (e.g. in year 2005, it was installed a 500 kW demonstrative PROPELLETS heating system in an events facility in Southwest England). Integration of experiences and promotion of the EU pellet market at regional level. Technology of pellets transfer from Europe to other markets inside and outside Europe. (e.g. Italian partner is in contact with Russian Federation for boilers and pellets business) It is expected a new total installed capacity of 5MW, which will substitute 34.000 t/year of coal and will avoid the emission of 14.000t CO2/year. (e.g. in the first year of the project, 2005, almost 1 MW was in development in the five PROPELLETS regions). The results of these UE selected regions will be representative of a great part of Europe.

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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

Lessons learnt Although the project has not been completed it is possible to draw the following preliminary conclusions: ‚ Since the start of the PROPELLETS project there is a clear demand coming from target groups in the use of pellets heating systems and boilers for the substitution of traditional coal, oil and electric heating systems. The project has provided a working framework to key actors creating working groups, but also awareness and confidence. ‚ Main barriers found are the need of information and advising for the installation of biomass heating systems, and sometimes the lack of subsidies and financial incentives. Also transfer of technology seems to be necessary among countries, and information systems for market (updated prizes) may help its development. There are several ways of using a biomass heating system different than managing everything by the own enduser, avoiding worries. In some cases, Energy Services Companies (ESCOs) could be a good choice if it is wanted to avoid initial investment costs, as they could finance the installation of the biomass heating system. In some other cases, Energy Entrepreneurships could provide the pellets and the system maintenance, so the end-user only has to buy the system by him/her-self.

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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

Quality Management, Organisation, Validation of Standards, Developments and Inquiries for SRF (QUOVADIS)
Programme area: Status: Coordinator: ALTENER, heat from renewable energy sources ongoing Giovanni Ciceri CESI RICERCA, Italy E-mail: giovanni.ciceri@cesiricerca.it Tel. +39 02 3992 4667 Centro Elettrotecnico Sperimentale italiano “Giacinto Motta” SpA, Italy Comitato Termotecnico Italiano, Italy European Commission - DG Joint Research Centre TAUW – BW, Netherlands Institut fuer Verfahrenstechnik und Dampfkesselwesen, Germany Institute for Waste, Waste Water and Infrastructure-Management, Germany Enel Produzione SpA ; Italy Centre de Recherche pour l'Environnement, l'Énergie et le Déchet, France Green Land Reclamation Ltd, UK Scoribel, Belgium Stratene E u.r.l., France VTT - Technical Research centre of Finland, Finland REMONDIS, Germany Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet, Sweden Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche - Istituto di Ricerche sulla Combustione (IRC), Italy quovadis.cesi.it To validate the specifications of the CEN standard CEN/TS 343 for Solid Recovered Fuels; to recognise the Solid Recovered Fuel potential in the enlarged EU To give common rules for Quality Management; Classification and Characterisation of Solid Recovered Fuels in the enlarged EU Solid Recovered Fuels, validation of standard, Quality Management 01/2005 – 12/2007 € 2,103,978 (EU contribution: 50 %) EIE/031/S07.38597

Partners:

Solid Recovered Fuel (SRF)

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Short description Solid Recovered Fuels (SRF) are prepared from non-hazardous waste. Their use is regulated under EU legislation and implies specifications for commercial or regulatory purposes. SRFs are seen as important contribution to a sustainable EU waste management. Directive 2001/77/EC includes in its scope the production of electricity from biomass, being defined as the biodegradable fraction of products, waste and residues from agriculture, forestry and related industries, as well as the biodegradable fraction of industrial and municipal waste. In this context the European Commission gave a mandate to the European standardisation body CEN to develop and validate Technical Specifications (TS) concerning SRF for energy recovery and to transform these into European Standards. To meet these requests, QUOVADIS adopts a holistic validation programme covering quality management and the validation exercises for the pre-standards of CEN TC 343. Results dissemination and knowledge exchange in the enlarged EU is also taken in due account by collecting data on production and potential of SRF.

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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

Expected and/or achieved results ‚ Full documentation (including Round Robins and ruggedness) on validated TS for 19 TS for chemical, physical, biological, and sampling to be submitted to CEN; so as to cover: sampling, (sampling and sample reduction; preparation of test-portion) ‚ ‚ ‚ A validated classification system for SRF Documentation on the application of QM to selected plants, including cost/benefit analysis (CBA) A comprehensive database on SRF in Europe, based on the classification system necessary for the validation of the TS

Lessons learnt Although the project has not been completed it is possible to draw the following preliminary conclusions: ‚ SRF seems to be a valid way for a proper and environmental acceptable use of non hazardous waste, mainly for waste fraction difficult to be recycled; this is particularly evident in small Countries where relatively low waste streams are produced ‚ ‚ A common classification system of SRF thoroughly Europe is essential to improve the market giving the same rules in all the EU Member States The availability of common EN standard for the SRF characterisation and the development of an agreed Quality Management System can contribute to the Public acceptance of SRF for energy production

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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

Enlarging Solar Thermal Systems in Multi-Family Houses, Hotels, Public and Social Buildings in Europe (SOLARGE)
Programme area: Status: Coordinator: ALTENER, Heat from renewable energy sources ongoing Bodo Grimmig target GmbH, Germany E-mail: grimmig@targetgmbh.de Tel: +49 511 96599706 ADEME, France Ambiente Italia srl, Italy Berliner Energieagentur GmbH, Germany Bundesverband Solarwirtschaft (BSW), Germany Ecofys B.V., Netherlands Ecofys S.L., Spain Enerplan, France European Solar Thermal Industry Association (ESTIF), Belgium Ramboll A/S, Denmark University of Ljubljana, Slovenia www.solarge.org Supporting the market rollout for collective solar thermal systems Fossil fuel savings, climate protection, job creation, regional economic development CSTS (collective solar thermal systems), good practice database, campaign 01/2005 – 12/2007 € 1,367,243 (EU contribution: 50 %) EIE/04/082/S07.38178

Partners:

Website: Objective: Benefits: Keywords: Duration: Budget: Contract number:

Short description Taking national and European energy and climate protection policies into account, the development and implementation of collective solar thermal systems (CSTS) is getting an important role. The project SOLARGE is incorporating all relevant aspects for multi-family houses, hotels, public and social buildings. Existing projects and general conditions are and will be analysed and shown in a good practice database on the 8-languages project website. From this, advice and recommendations will be derived for the demand side as well as information and assistance concerning argumentation for the supply side. A campaign will publish the conclusions as well as training courses for the different target groups. SOLARGE is based on existing project results in the participating countries and develops these approaches further. For the first time, a systematic and international comparison will take part. Expected and/or achieved results ‚ Analysis of the current situation with the aid of detailed market reports, compilation and communication of European good practice projects and solutions in a online database and identification of market obstacles and opportunities ‚ ‚ ‚ ‚ Factors for success concerning technology, project development and realisation Information and sensitisation of the target groups in Europe, which are: housing and hotel industry, public authorities, manufacturers of solar thermal equipment, planner, architects and engineers Development of proposals to improve existing political framework conditions for CSTS applications and support of national and European energy policies Europe-wide dissemination of results

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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

Lessons learnt Although the project has not been completed it is possible to draw the following preliminary conclusions: ‚ Collective solar thermal systems become more important, especially for the housebuilding sector. ‚ ‚ At present, there are still market obstacles for the widely spread application of large solar thermal systems, like investors’ lack of information or qualification deficits at the supply side. Nevertheless, there is definitely potential for further implementation of CSTS in all partner countries, especially when the increasing level of energy prices in several countries is considered.

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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

Large open EU market for solar thermal products (SOLARKEYMARK-II)
Programme area: Status: Coordinator: ALTENER, small-scale applications ongoing Uwe Brechlin European Solar Thermal Industry Federation (ESTIF) Email: info@estif.org Tel: +32-2-546 19 38 Solar Key International, DK University of Stuttgart ITW (Institut für Thermodynamik und Wärmetechnik), DE Centre Scientifique et Technique du Bâtiment, FR Swedish National Testing and Research Institute, SE GREENoneTEC Solar industrie GmbH, AT Solahart Industries Pty Ltd, NL THERMOMAX LTD., UK Österreichisches Forschungs-und Prüfzentrum Arsenal Ges.m.b.H, AT National Center for Scientific Research “DEMOKRITOS”, GR Instituto Nacional de EngenhariaTecnologia e Inovação, I.P., PT Canary Island Institute Of Technology, ES www.estif.org/solarkeymark/skii.php To open up the European market for solar thermal quality products Consumers will have better access to these products Market, solar thermal, products 01/2006 – 12/2008 € 784,616 (EU contribution: 50%) EIE/05/052/2005

Partners:

Source: S.O.L.I.D. / ESTIF

Website: Objective: Benefits: Keywords: Duration: Budget: Contract number:

Source: VELUX / ESTIF

Source: ZENSOLAR / ESTIF

Short description This project aims at opening up the European market for solar thermal quality products. Currently the market is still fragmented due to different national and regional requirements in (buildings) regulation and financial incentive schemes. By removing current barriers to trade, consumers will have improved access to solar thermal quality products resulting in a higher uptake of solar thermal energy in the EU. Recently European Standards for solar thermal products were established, and the CEN ‘Solar Keymark’, which certifies conformity with these standards has been introduced. However the acceptance of these standards is not yet universal, and some conflicts remain between the EN Standards and national regulations and requirements in national/regional subsidy schemes. Products, which are Keymark’ed but do not meet the national/regional requirements are still not eligible for financial support and cannot compete with eligible products. Furthermore, the EC Directive 2002/91/EC on the Energy Performance of Buildings – while generally being positive towards solar thermal – could actually increase fragmentation of the market, as differing implementations introduce new trade barriers. Expected and/or achieved results ‚ Removal of trade barriers within the EU ‚ ‚ More transparent information on product quality, resulting in higher trust of all actors involved Higher integration of EU market, resulting in more competition at European level, economics of scale, cost reductions and transfer of know-how (technical, marketing, integration in heating system) within the EU

Lessons learnt This project has just started. It is therefore too early to draw lessons.

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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

An integrated network on thermal biomass conversion for power, heat and transport fuels (ThermalNet)
Programme area: Status: Coordinator: ALTENER, Electricity and heat from renewable energy sources Ongoing Tony Bridgwater Bio Energy Research Group, Aston University, United Kingdom E-mail: a.v.bridgwater@aston.ac.uk Tel: +44 (0) 121 204 3381 TNO - Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research, Netherlands TUV-ICE, Vienna University of Technology, Institute of Chemical Engineering, Austria VTT – Technical Research Centre of Finland, Finland Rural Generation Limited, United Kingdom Mitsui Babcock Energy Limited, United Kingdom TPS Termiska Processer AB, Sweden Universita degli Studi di Napoli “Federico II”, Italy ECN - Energy Centre of the Netherlands, Netherlands University of Manchester, United Kingdom JOANNEUM RESEARCH Forschungsgesellschaft mbH, Austria CREAR, Univeristy of Florence, Italy CIRAD – Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement, France www.thermalnet.co.uk Supporting implementation of thermal processing of biomass for fuels and electricity by combustion, gasification and pyrolysis Bringing together industry and academia to exchange practical information and experience (on technical and non-technical issues) Biomass, Renewable Energy, Thermal conversion 01/05/2005 – 31/12/2007 € 2,835,190 (EU contribution: 50%) EIE/04/159/S07.38647

Partners:

Website: Objective: Benefits: Keywords: Duration: Budget: Contract number:

Short description The ThermalNet network covers the three thermal conversion technologies Combustion, Gasification and Pyrolysis and addresses these through twelve technical and non-technical work packages (Further details can be found on the project website). The matrix structure helps to maximise interactions between all the technologies and the various topics which are discussed. In addition to the project partners, a range of experts from industry and academia participate and contribute to meetings, presentations, newsletters and reports. Meetings of the network are held approximately every 6 months and each meeting aims to cover approximately half of the work packages in a detailed workshop. A newsletter containing updates on technical progress within the technologies, new projects and information about events and conferences is produced every 6 months and circulated as widely as possible. Expected and/or achieved results ‚ Integrated newsletter on thermal biomass conversion ‚ ‚ ‚ 4 inter-related websites Workshop meetings with active involvement of industry Successful interaction with IEA Bioenergy Tasks

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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

Lessons learnt Although the project has not been completed it is possible to draw the following preliminary conclusions: ‚ There are valuable synergies between different thermal conversion technologies ‚ ‚ Interaction between complementary networks and organisations provides a very beneficial contribution to the more effective development of bioenergy systems Synergistic interaction of technical and non-technical barriers contributes significantly to improving the uptake and success of bioenergy schemes

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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

Thermal Energy from Renewables – References and Assessment (ThERRA)
Programme area: Status: Coordinator: ALTENER, evaluation and monitoring ongoing Lex Bosselaar SenterNovem Netherlands L.Bosselaar@SenterNovem.nl Tel +31 30 2393 495 Ademe, France Adene, Portugal A.E.A., Austria CRES, Greece KAPE, Poland BEA, Germany www.therra.info To develop and disseminate a methodology for monitoring the total amount of renewable heat produced in the EU The project results will allow setting targets for renewable heat and evaluating whether they are reached Renewable heat, monitoring, statistics 01/2006 – 12/2008 €468,490 (EU contribution 50%) EIE/05/129/SI2.420023

Partners:

Website: Objective: Benefits: Keywords: Duration: Budget: Contract number:

Short description The definition of, and the methodology to measure, “renewable heat” are currently subject to debate. For instance, should heat pumps be included into the renewable heat statistics, and is heat from biomass and solar collectors properly accounted for? How should heat from waste be treated? Each country approaches these issues of definition and measurement differently, and methods to collect renewable heat statistics differ widely. The overall picture on the use of renewable heat in Europe is therefore unclear. This makes it impossible to know to what extent renewable heat contributes to an EU target according to which 12% of the total energy used in 2010 should be from renewables. It is also disturbs plans to create a European Directive on renewable heat. In order to overcome this situation, the ThERRA partners will develop and disseminate a method to monitor the amount of renewable heat used in the EU. The project team will test this method in 7 representative EU countries with the aim of creating an approach which key actors from across Europe will agree to. Expected and/or achieved results The main result of the project will be a methodology that can be used to monitor the renewable heat production in Europe. This will include: ‚ A definition of renewable heat ‚ ‚ ‚ A protocol describing the methodology to monitor renewable heat, which complements the Eurostat methodology. Figures of the production of renewable heat in the participating countries A report describing the foundations of the methodology and the link with measured values.

Lessons learnt This project has just started. It is therefore too early to draw lessons.

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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

WasteWaterHeat
Programme area: Status: Coordinator: ALTENER, small-scale applications Ongoing Sabine Piller Berliner Energieagantur GmbH, Germany E-mail: piller@berliner-e-agentur.de Tel: +49 (30) 29 33 30 - 34 Norconsult AS, Norway Energy Agency for Southeast Sweden (ESS), Sweden Grazer Energieagentur Ges.m.b.H. (GEA) Austria www.wastewaterheat.net Main objective is to provide targeted information to encourage the development of wastewater heat projects Reduction in fossil fuels consumption via increased utilization of quasi-renewable energy out of sewage. Energy Efficiency – Heat-pumps – Waste heat 01/2006 – 12/2007 € 471,908 (EU contribution: 50%) EIE/05/145/SI2.420228

Partners:

Website: Objective: Benefits: Keywords: Duration: Budget: Contract number:

Short description The aim of the project WasteWaterHeat is to provide specific information for European and national key actors about technology, economics and potential energy saving if heat energy is taken from wastewater. We do so by cooperating closely with producers, planers, experts, local authorities and operators of existing facilities. The objectives behind are to develop the necessary steps to overcome existing barriers in the energy market, to disseminate the knowledge about wastewater heat utilisation and to increase the use of wastewater heat in Europe. It is attractive to accomplish a wastewater heat project due to economic reasons and the potential high efficiency of decentralised energy systems in general. The usage of wastewater heat is particularly interesting for implementation in urban areas where high pollution values especially ask for the implementation of energy supply solutions with low CO2-emissions. Expected and/or achieved results ‚ Overview about the market situation in each partner country ‚ ‚ ‚ ‚ Overview about the existing heat pump and heat exchanger technology and systems in Europe Project development guideline with best practice analyses in each partner country Pilot projects and pre-feasibility studies in each partner country Strategy of a market rollout in Europe

Lessons learnt Although the project has not been completed it is possible to draw the following preliminary conclusions: ‚ The accomplished market analysis in the four partner countries has shown that Wastewater heat has the potential to supply thousands of household with heat energy. ‚ ‚ For cost effective reasons it is particular important to coordinate the necessary installations for wastewater heat projects with the local infrastructure planning. Good cooperation with the local company who operates the waste water system is essential for a successful realisation of wastewater heat projects.

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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

New Projects (start 2007)
The projects outlined in this part of the document were submitted under the 2005 call for proposals of the Intelligent Energy – Europe programme and have successfully passed the evaluation. They are therefore very likely to start later in 2006 or in early 2007. The information provided is of a provisional nature and given for information purposes only. It does not bind legally any of the involved parties.

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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

Integration of Geothermal Energy into Industrial Applications (IGEIA)
Geothermal technology provides power, heating and cooling for single households, cities, for tourism, industry and agriculture. Geothermal energy may be used in a number of ways in the industrial field. Potential applications could include drying, process heating, evaporation, distillation, washing, desalination, and chemical extraction. While there are many potential industrial uses of geothermal energy, the number of European applications is relatively small. However, a fairly wide range of uses are represented : large retails and leisure, vegetable dehydration, fish processing and drying, chemical recovery... Some large industrial applications exist in Europe : in Germany, in France and in Sweden. These systems provide the best present examples of industrial geothermal energy use. These examples have to be replicated in Europe. We need firstly to understand the needs of the industry in order to provide an answer with a geothermal installation taking into account local aspects. The next step is to customise the answer, for disseminating the ‘geothermal’ products all over the EU industrial sector. Contact Details Saunier & Associes (Saunier & Ass.) Mr Philippe Dumas +322 223 63 74 pdumas@saunier-associes.com Participating Countries France, Germany, Sweden, Portugal, Estonia

Guideline for Safe and Eco-friendly Biomass Gasification (Gasification Guide)
The main objective is to accelerate the market uptake of biomass gasification technology by developing a guideline on Health, Safety and Environment (HSE) issues that is accepted by relevant target groups and key market actors. Biomass gasification is a promising technology, that is energy efficient, safe, environmental friendly and that can contribute significantly to renewable energy generation. The technology is close to commercialisation but largescale implementation is hampered by various reasons. Leading gasification experts joined in the EU and IEA Task 33 Gasification Network identified HSE issues as an important barrier to technology deployment. Due to poor awareness and lack of understanding of HSE issues authorities tend to impose unrealistic and costly requirements on gasification plants. A broadly accepted HSE guideline would effectively tackle this barrier. Contact Details BTG biomass technology group BV (BTG) Mr Harrie Knoef +31 53 486 1186 knoef@btgworld.com Participating Countries The Netherlands, Austria, Germany, United Kingdom, Denmark, Bulgaria

GeoThermal Regulation - Heat (GTR-H)
The GTR-H project will review and establish the regulatory barriers and deficiencies of four, unregulated EU target countries through a process of discussion and consultation with key target actors and stakeholders at a national level. A review of the current best practice regulatory frameworks in three ‘example’ countries will be carried out. These will provide the necessary expertise through key, national stakeholder interviews and study tours for the unregulated target countries.

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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

The project will provide a national framework document in the four target countries aimed at aimed at increasing overall sectoral investment in geothermal energy for the exploration and exploitation of heat across the EU. This will also build on previous projects such as K4RES-H in the renewable energy sector. In addition to the national framework documents, guidelines for the establishment of geothermal regulation in other EU countries will be provided and disseminated to a broader international audience. Contact Details CSA Group Ltd (CSA) Mr Nick O'Neill 00 353 1 2964667 noneill@csa.ie Participating Countries Ireland, UK, Belgium, Hungary, Poland, France, Germany, the Netherlands

Development and Promotion of a Transparent European Pellets Market Creation of a European Real-time Pellets Atlas (PELLETS@LAS)
The project PELLETS@LAS will contribute to the development of a transparent European pellets market through the creation of a real-time European Pellets Atlas. This will be achieved by the direct involvement of major stakeholders such as pellets associations as well as pellets producers, traders and consumers. The core of the proposed action is a data and information collection in all EU 25+4 countries for wood and mixed biomass pellets (MBP) and the identification of international pellets trade opportunities. The data are up-dated quarterly and will include regional prices, available qualities and quantities, the locations of stakeholders as well as a detailed description of logistics systems. The permanent provision of reliable pellet market data to all pellet actors in Europe will contribute largely to overcome current market barriers. Moreover, it will contribute to the implementation of future European legislation in the heat sector which according to the Commission’s Biomass Action Plan is currently hindered by lack of market confidence and transparency rather than costs. Contact Details WIP - KG (WIP) Mr Rainer Janssen 49 89 720 12743 rainer.janssen@wip-munich.de Participating Countries Germany, Denmark, Austria, the Netherlands, Belgium, Italy, Poland, Estonia, Hungary, France, UK

Dissemination, Education and Standardisation of Phyllis Database for Biofuels and Bioashes (PHYDADES)
Rapid growth of biomass as a sustainable fuel requires standardized analysis methods of fuels and ashes. Reliable information is vital for key players in biomass trade, such as biomass producers, traders, users, equipment manufacturers and legislative bodies. The Project will make this kind of information available by means of a public database and education in the use of standards. For the new database, based on the existing PHYLLIS database, partners will collect and screen data of biomass fuels and ashes. A lot of information exists at various locations, but it is dispersed and not directly comparable. The database and simple calculation tools will be accessible through the Internet. The education will be provided as workshops for target groups and as on-job training for laboratory staff. The workshops will be held in regions where it is expected that education is most needed. Partners experienced in standardized analysis (involved in the projects BIONORM) will provide training. The overall result will be faster penetration in the use of standardized methods for biomass analysis, also in new member states, resulting in a faster growth of the EU biomass market.

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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

Contact Details Energy research Centre of the Netherlands / Energieonderzoek Centrum Nederland (ECN) Mr Jan Pels +31-224-564884 pels@ecn.nl Participating Countries The Netherlands, Finland, Sweden, Poland, Estonia, Spain, Italy, Austria

Business Opportunities in Biomass Sector for SMEs (BIOBUSINESS)
Analysis of the business and market opportunities within biomass sector, specially aiming at entrepreneurs and SMEs. BIOBUSINESS will focus on the creation and growth of biomass related enterprises as the basis for economic regeneration of the regions concerned, including its most depressed rural areas. Partners of the project, regional industrial development agencies, energy management agencies and Public Administrations will work also alongside existing renewable energy related SMEs to develop scenarios for creating a critical mass of new enterprise. In parallel an inventory of biomass resources, a study of trends in biomass related enterprises, a technology transfer and market opportunities investigation, and a state-of-the-art investigation on legal frameworks, will assess the situation for a recommendation paper to be done. The project outcome should be a replicable methodology for the deployment of biomass as one of the most important renewable energies, as well as a blueprint for biomass-related industrial development in other European areas. Contact Details Asociacion para la Gestion de CEI-Burgos (CEEI-Burgos) Mr Juan Carlos Martinez Barrio +34947244332 jcmartinez@ceeiburgos.es Participating Countries Spain, Finland, Germany, Hungary, Slovenia

European Network of Bioenergy Districts (RENEWED)
The main barriers to wide scale biomass energy production are the difficulties to guarantee the economic sustainability of the energy chain and a fair distribution of the value added along the chain. These barriers will be addressed and aimed to be removed within RENEWED, which will establish a European network of at least 7 bioenergy districts. Three organisational levels are foreseen: Bioenergy Districts at sub-provincial level; Coordinated Directions at regional level, European Network at central level, conceived in such a way that the “higher” levels support the “lower” ones. The project foresees a common methodological approach to the identification of bioenergy districts, the involvement of all concerned actors, the realisation of in depth feasibility studies and the definition of development projects at local level. Furthermore, support actions will include a survey on bioenergy knowledge, setting up of bio-energy chain Framework Agreements, financial and certification schemes. The regions involved are: Emilia-Romagna (IT), Burgenland (AT), Tolna (HU), Central Macedonia (GR) and Comunidad de Madrid (ES). Contact Details C.R.P.V. (Centro Ricerche Produzioni Vegetali) Società Cooperativa Mr Nicola Stanzani +39 0547.347164 stanzani@crpv.it Participating Countries Italy, Hungary, Greece, France, Austria, Spain

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Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

Promotion and Education Tool-Kit on Renewable Energy Sources for Heating and Cooling (RES-HEAT/COOL-TOOL)
The overall objective is to develop, test and demonstrate the RES-HEAT/COOL-TOOL-kit, which as a key element has early stakeholder involvement, knowing that the lack of stakeholder involvement is a barrier for implementation. The tool-kit comprises: 1)18 new regional case stories on successful implementation of RES-heating/cooling systems in small-medium sized towns and villages using the tool-kit in Poland, Slovakia, Hungary, Slovenia and Bulgaria 2)Technical-economic key figures 3)Organisational guidelines 4)Information and promotion programmes for using the tool-kit 5)Education programmes for using the tool-kit. The tool-kit will focus on the Baltic Sea, the Central European and South European Regions including RES-technologies as: Biomass (straw, wood pellets/chips, biogas, bio-fuels) and solar heating for district heating/individual buildings, heat pumps and passive heating and cooling. Contact Details Samsø Energi- og Miljøkontor (SEM) Mr Søren Hermansen +45 86592322 semk@veo.dk Participating Countries Denmark, Austria, Spain, Poland, Hungary, Slovenia, Bulgaria, Poland, Slovakia, Denmark

Increased Deployment of Firewood by Improving Fuel Quality and Low Emission Combustion (Quality Wood)
In domestic use firewood heating plays a major role in fulfilling the EU targets of increased share of renewables in the Community’s energy balance. Difficulties in firewood utilization are the management of the firewood quality, undeveloped production technologies, market structures and supply chains, as well as differing national standards of combustion emissions. Objective of the project is to enhance a significant increase of the actual energy produced from firewood in the EU by promoting better fuel quality management, to improve firewood production and supply chains and to promote the use of more efficient combustion appliances with less environmental impacts. Work will be done in co-operation by 8 partners from 6 Member States and Norway. The expected results include analysis and understanding on firewood resources and quality, markets, production and combustion equipment, firewood, and the status of standards in the firewood market. Contact Details Technical Researc Centre of Finland (VTT) Mr Arvo Leinonen +358 40 582 9477 arvo.leinonen@vtt.fi Participating Countries Finland, Norway, France, Austria, Spain, Slovenia

Regional Bioenergy Initiatives Increasing the market for Biomass Heating in Europe (REGBIE+)
The main renewable energy source used for heating in the EU is biomass in its various forms. The objectives of REGBIE+ are to: ‚ support the targets of the EU Biomass Action Plan ‚ ‚ ‚ ‚ support regional initiatives to increasing the share of biomass heating remove technical and non-technical market barriers stimulate regional market development raise the general awareness on biomass opportunities 47

Renewable Energy Heating and Cooling: 21 Innovative Projects supported by the IEE Programme

REGBIE+ strengthen the regional level and clearly focuses the uptake of biomass heating technologies, small scaled heating plants fired by pellets, heating plants from 150kW up fired by wood-chips, sawing by-products, biomass-based CHP. Related to the technology approach and the wp`s the activities are addressed at: ‚ policy, investors and key market actors on the regional level ‚ ‚ ‚ installing business and fuel suppliers general public, private households, schools The partnership covers twelve EU countries and represents some of the most ambitious regions for the implementation of bioenergy in Europe.

Contact Details Target GmbH Mr Bodo Grimmig +49 (0)5119096883 grimmig@targetgmbh.de Participating Countries Germany, Poland, Slovakia, Czech Republic, Sweden, Austria, France, Spain, Italy, UK, Ireland, Sweden, Lithuania

Refund Individual Investments in Res Heating Systems through Direct Tax Measures (REFUND +)
The main obstacle to the development of RES heating systems in private households is related to the high investment cost of these installations. Direct tax measures (income tax credits, income tax reductions and tax allowances) are being used today by four Member States to reduce this initial outlay: Austria, Belgium, France, and Portugal. The effects of these measures are not well known. REFUND + will evaluate the four on-going experiences through a bottom-up economic investigation of impacts and a qualitative study among consumers and installers of concerned technologies. Overall cross-country analysis will determine best practises, success or failure factors. Implementation of such instruments will be simulated in two case studies on Lithuania and Poland. The consortium will devise operational recommendations directed to policy makers so as to enable them to optimise their tax policies and to facilitate adoption of such support policies in the countries where such do not exist. Findings will be disseminated through four national workshops, two regional conferences in CEECs, presentations to the IEA and Council of Europe and a closing conference. Contact Details Observatoire des énergies renouvelables (Observ'ER) Mr Yves-Bruno CIVEL 00 33 1 44 18 00 80 yves-bruno.civel@energies-renouvelables.org Participating Countries France, Belgium, Portugal, Austira, Lithuania, Poland

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