You are on page 1of 26

FORM B - BUILDING

MASSACHUSETTSHISTORICALCOMMISSION Office of t he Secretary, State House, Boston

2.

4.

J

ODD

Bosrl1 N

o

R

~@

T

d

F

'II

1\

Y

D

p o s r

RD.

p

SHo rriv»

C E tviE.~

o~

o f(

T

I

S

A

"

E.

o

DO NOT WRITE IN THIS SPACE USGSQuadrant -------

HC Photo no.

J UL

6 1978

o

(over)

MASS.~i_MM.

In Area no.

Form no.

4- i

1. Town j:·iarlborouAh

AST

Address 200 Boston

fW"n 0~ '2;J'

Yost Road

Name Capt. Jason

Howe Homestead Present use Residence

or Deacon Rufus

Present owner Kuhlmann Inc.

3. Description:

Date

2t Story

Brick End

Source Pub. Local Histories

Style Colonial

Architect None

---------------

Exterior wall fabric Wood Clapboard

Outbuildings (describe) None

---------

Other features Beverly

Ell.

and

origir

alone

room plan with

chimney

behit

the

added brick

end.

Altered

 

. Date

Moved

Date

5. Lot size: 2 acres

One acre or les s

Over one acre

Approximate frontage Right of way only

Approximate distance of building from street

150 Ft.

6. Recorded by Ernest

Ginnetti

Organization Marlborough

Historical

Commission

Date 6/9/78

.

Originaluse_F_·a_rm

Subsequentuses (ifany)and dates Residence

~

~

------------------------

8.

9.

Themes (checkas many as applicable)

Aboriginal Agricultural Architectural The Arts Commerce Communication Community development

Conservation

Education

Exploration/

settlement

Industry

Military

Political

x

x

_x

Recreation

Religion

Science/ invention Social! humanitarian -- Transportation --

--

-- .x.,

Historicalsignificance(includeexplanationof themes checked above)

This house and the William

Weeks house at 540 Concord Road repre-j

sent the only two houses of this type left in the city.

the original

it at this time, except that a leantoe

of the house, on the north side to form a lIBeverly ell or Jog", an

early archetectural feature.

and the rooms to accomodate them were built just prior

after the revolution, much to early for either jason or Rufus Howe.

I believe

\

section was built before

1700 although

1 can not prove J

extends beyond the east wa.L'l,

the brick end chimneys

to or just

I also believe

To make matters even more difficult

there were two Howe families,

.J

1

,

,

John Howe was in Marlborough in 1656, and Abraham Howe appears in

Marlborough

in 1660, they were not related

families have many descendants.

to each other and both

Capt Jason Howe was born June 8, 1774 and married Mary wayland

of

Cambridge, ~fter her death he married Isabella Hastings

in 1818, and.

he died Sept. 2, 1851 at 77 years of age. Jason was a Descendant of John Howe.

Rufus Howe was born April

15, 1802 and married

Sophia Taintor

in

1829. Both Rufus and Sophia were living when Charles Hudson wrote

10.

the History of Marlborough Abraham. Howe ,

Mass.

in 1862, Rufus was a descendant

Bibliographyand/or references(suchas localhistories,deeds, assessor'srecords, early maps, etc.j

of

Historical Reminiscences of Marlborough, Ella Bigelow, Marl. 1910.

History of Marlborough Mass. Charles Hudson, Boston, 1862.

1803 map, 1835 map.

~.

,

.

--:~-

-

)'

Originaluse_F_'a_m

Subsequentuses (ifany) and dates_R_e_s_i_d_e_n_c_e

8. Themes (checkas many as applicable)

Aboriginal Agricultural Architectural The Arts Commerce Communication Community development

Conservation

Education

Exploration/

settlement

Industry

Military

x political

--

_X_

Recreation

Religion

Science/ invention Social/ humanitarian Transportation ---

.x

_

~

1 ---

1

9. Historicalsignificance(includeexplanationof themes checked-above)

This house and the vli11iam ~:eeks house a~ 540 Cot;cord Road :-epre-)

\

sent the only two houses

the original

it at this time, except that a leantoe

of the house, _on the north early archetectural feature.

and the rooms to accomodate them were built just prior to or just

after the revolution,

of th~s type left ~n the Clty.

I bel~eve

section was built before 1700 although

1 can not prove J

extends beyond the east wall

side to form a "Beverly ell or Jog", an

I also believe

the brick end chimneys

much to early for either jason or Rufus Howe.

To make matters even more difficult

there were two Howe families,

John Howe was in Marlborough in 1656, and Abraham Howe appears in

Marlborough

in 1660, they were not related

families have many descendants.

to each other and. both

Capt Jason Howe was born June 8, 1774 and married. Mary Wayland

of

in 1818, and

Cambridge, ~fter her death he married Isabella Hastings

he died Sept. 2, 1851 at 77 years John Howe.

Rufus Howe was born April

of age. Jason was a Descendant

of

Sophia Taintor in

15, 1802 and married

1829. Both Rufus and Sophia were living when Charles Hudson wrote the History of Marlborough Mass. in 1862, Rufus was a 4escendant of Abraham Howe ,

10. Bibliographyand/or references(suchas localhistories,deeds, asseasorts records, earlymaps, etc.)

Historical Reminiscences of Marlborough,

History of Marlborough Mass. Charles Hudson, Boston, 1862.

Ella Bigelow, Marl. 1910.

1803 map,

1835 map.

)'

FORM B . BUILDING

Massachusetts Historical Commission 80 Boylston Street Boston, Massachusetts 02116

Assessor's number

USGS Quad

[58-21

I IMarlborough I

Town

Area(s)

AA

MarlborDugh

Place (neighborhood or village)

Form Number

41

_

Address

200 East Main Street

Historic Name John/Capt. Jason Howe Hous~ Dea. Rufus Howe House

Uses: Present

Original

oommercial/offiees

dwelling

Date of Construction 18th Cjca 1810's

maps; visual assessment

brick-ended Federal w. earlier leanto

chitect/Builder

l••.JD•••.k••

n•.•.•o

wn~

_

Exterior Material:

Sketch Map Draw a map of the area indicating propenies within it. Number each property for which individual inventory forms have been completed. Label streets, including route numbers, if any. Attach a separate sheet if space is not suffICient here. Indicate north.

Foundation

Wallffrim

Roof

granite and mbble

brick, wood clapboard

asphalt shingle

Outbuildings/Secondary Structures _tw~o

_

o

o r@f~\

--,.--_0

~ 0 0

J

~ (~

~tI)

I

1_0

_

e-A-sr fhA-f}--l S T

(R.'lG. ~O)

Recorded by

Anne Fames

Organization

for MarJbom Hist Comm

Date

31] 5195

commercial bnildings to north

Major Alterations (with dates) I .ate 20th C'

facade was fOIDlerly four hays' facade fenes-

N -iration redesigned aml

rep1aced;

other win-

dow sash replaced. Shed dormer across rear.

Condition

fair

Moved [X] no [ ] yes

Date

N/A ;

Acreage

1 72 acres

Setting

Part of three-building complex at

end of dtble off East Main I Gcated at edge

of romme r cia1jmall district east of downtow.n.•

BUILDING FORM

ARCHITECTURAL DESCRIPTION

Describe architectural features. Evaluate the characteristics of this building in terms of other buildings

within the community.

[X] see continuation sheet

The earliest section of this house, said to date to the early eighteenth, and possibly the seventeenth century, is commonly believed to be the little one-room leanto at the north end. This assumption may be questionable, however, as the presence of another building at 540 Concord Road (see Form) with one brick end and a similar three-chimney configuration is likely to imply that this somewhat unusual arrangement, rather than representing an accommodation of an existing building, was planned from the start. Given that the facade was four-bays wide until the recent renovations, it might be more likely that it started out as a three-bay "half-house" with one end chimney, and that the building was lengthened by one bay, including the brick end,in the early nineteenth century.

Today this is a two-story gable-roofed house, two-rooms deep, with a prominent brick south end. The house has three chimneys; two, joined by a solid brick parapet, are integral to the end wall. The third stands just in front of the north end of the main roof ridge. (Cont.)

I

I

mSTORICAL NARRATIVE [ ] see continuation sheet Explain history of the building. Explain its associations with local (or state) history. Include uses of the ) building, and the role(s) the owners/occupants played within the community. )

Deed research will be necessary to verify the line of ownership of this property, which is confused by some errors in Ella Bigelow's Historical Reminiscences. It may be, as the 1978 inventory form suggests, that part of the house dates to at least the eighteenth century, and possibly the late

to at least the eighteenth century, and possibly the late seventeenth. The owner shown on the

seventeenth. The owner shown on the 1803 map was John Howe, a descendant

of original settler John

Howe. He died in 1818 at the age of 71, and would doubtless have been too old to build the stylish

brick-ended main house, whose characteristics

are typical of the 1810's. Also in 1818, however, his son,

Jason (1774-1851), whose first wife had died, married Isabella Hastings, and it is likely that the main

house was built around the time of their marriage. Jason Howe is referred to as "Captain" Jason, which could refer to either a role in the War of 1812 or the local early-nineteenth-century artillery company. In 1835 the owner is still shown as "J. Howe." This could mean Jason, or possibly his son, John W. Howe (b. 1806). The map of 1857 shows John Howe as the owner.

Shortly thereafter, the property was acquired by a descendant of the other main Howe family in Marlborough, the Abraham Howe line. That owner was Deacon Rufus Howe (1802-1894), who was, as Bigelow indicates, the son of Jonah Howe of 370 Bolton Street (see Form 73). He had spent many years away from Marlborough, first in Boston, then as superintendent of Mt. Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge from 1840 to 1856. Returning to Marlborough, he established himself here as a progressive farmer, planting new orchards, repairing the farm buildings, and saying that he intended to have "one of the handsomest places in Marlborough." (Bigelow). He was especially known for his greenhouses, where he cultivated both vegetables and flowers. In addition to this farm, Rufus Howe owned considerable land west of Prospect Hill, part of the former Tayntor family farm, which he apparently inherited from his first wife, Sophia Tayntor, who died in 1855. He became a Deacon in the "Union" Congregational church in 1858, and married Augusta Walker in 1859.

BIBLIOGRAPHY and/or REFERENCES [] see continuation sheet Bigelow, Ella. Historical Reminiscences of Marlborough. 1910. Maps and atlases: 1803, 1835, 1856, 1875, 1889, 1900. Sanborn maps from 1901. Ginnetti, Ernest. MHC Inventory Form for "200 Boston Post Road", 1978. Marlboro vital records Marlboro directories.

INVENTORY FORM CONTINUATION SHEET

Massachusetts Historical Commission 80 Boylston Street Boston, Massachusetts 02116

Community

Property

Marlborough John/J ason/Rufus Howe Homestead

Area(s)

AA

Form No.

41

ARCHITECfURAL DESCRIPTION. A long one-story shed-roofed section on a rubble foundation, probably dating to the early part of this century, spans the rear of the house. The four-bay brick end is typical of the flowering of the Federal period in Massachusetts' towns in the second decade of the nineteenth century. The windows, which have been changed from 6-over-6-sash, are now 1-over-1's. Most of the building's windows are entirely new, although the replacement sash of the brick end has been inserted in the existing wood-frame openings. A large three-part lunette under the south gable also formerly had multiple lights.

Several outbuildings formerly stood on this property. A huge stone foundation directly behind the house apparently remains from a bam or greenhouse.

FORM

B - BUILDING

MASSACHUSETTSHISTORICALCOMMISSION Office of the Secretary, State House, Boston

2

4. Map. Draw sketch of building location in relation to nearest cross streets and other buildings. Indicate north.

30M-5-77

o

(g)

o

o

i ItJ

i

fflONl

I

M

A

I

W

s

T

o

S,

~

E.

E.

r E.J,.,M

PI-.

f

'\

(over)

In Area no.

Form no.

90

Name ,!ilLLa-::l 0tetG0l1 ~:oDe.::;t;~ad

Present use 2 Tena:-.lent

Present owner B. B. Realty

Corp.

3.

Description: 2t Story \load Frame

 

Date 1830

 

Source ~;'ub. Local rlis tories

 

Style Greel~ lzevi val

 

Architect Uone

Exterior wall fabric '.food ':::::lapboard

Outbuildings (describe) None

 
 

---------

 

Other features 2* Story

ell

to

the

south

'Hi th porch.

Altered

Date

Moved

Date

5.

Lot size:

One acre or less

Over one acre

Approximate frontage

80 Feet

 

Approximate distance of building from street

30 Feet

6.

Recorded by Ernest

Ginnetti

 

Organization Nar1borough

Historica~

ComrrlI. S S a.on

Date 7/21/78

.'

7.

Original owner (if known) h,'3.·~on .iilliam

'::;LC tson

Or-iginal use

~

.

n"";

'_"".'.'-'_IL '-.

,

,-!,

"'\,

,

Subsequent uses (if any) and dates 'I'eriamcnt

-----------------------------

8. Themes (check as many as applicable)

Aboriginal

Conser vation

Recreation

Agricultural

Education

Religion

x

Architectural

Exploration/

Science/

The Arts

settlement

invention

Commerce

Industry

Social!

Communication

Military

humanitarian

Community development

Political

Transportation

9. Historical significance (include explanation of themes checked above)

{

\

Deacon Stetson

move.d into

t own the

day

Rev. Hr.

Goodhue. ,::,as mec t i.ng s

the

vale

or- he o f poverty

,

dained.

served

For nearly

a ge.neration

in chuz.oh and. social He passed. though

the people of !·:arlborough.

but rose

by his

ene:cgy to good. fortune,

never

swe r-v Lng fro::l the path

 

of honesty,

honor

or duty.

It wa s le36

when Deacon Stetson

of Jackson

Florida,

wa s choir director

and tenor vocalist

of

the

8prin~

Eill

Church, Deacon ,stetson

married. and. had. three

sons before

coming to l-lar-Lbo r-o ,

His

second. "",ife was Hrs.

Daria Clark,

and. had six child.ren

by her.

Hr. Stetson

built

this

place

about

1830,

and lived.

here

for many

years but subsequently

sold

and. moved to Spoon Hill

Ave.,

and from

there he returned.

to Florida.

10. Bibliography and/or references (such as local histories, deeds, assessor's records, 'early maps, etc.)

Historical

Reminiscences

of Marlborough,

Ella

Bigelow, Marl.,

1910.

History

of Marlborough

Mass.,

Charles Hudson,

Boston,

1862.

FORM B - BUILDING

Massachusetts Historical Commission 80 Boylston Street 50ston, Massachusetts 02116

Assessor's number

USGS Quad

I 57-125

I I Marlborough

Town

I

Area(s)

I

Marlborough

Form Number

90

 

Place (neighborhood or village)

_

'~~

 

60 East Main Street

 

ric. Name

\Villiam Stetson How:e

Present

two-family dwelling

Original

dwelling

of Construction

ca 1840

 

Maps; style

Greek Revival

unknown

 

Exterior Material:

Sketch Map Draw a map of the area indicating properties within

Foundation

granite

it. Number each property for which individual inventory forms have been completed. Label streets,

WallfTrim

synthetiC' siding

including route numbers, if any_ Attach a separate

Roof

asphalt shingle

sheet if space is not sufficient here. Indicate north.

Outbuildings/Secondary

Structures

_

none

Major Alterations (with dates)

"bed dormers

N & S

,

stone retainio<Y

-

wall under portico

}

some trim removed or covered--20tb C

N

Condition

fair

Moved [X] no [ J yes

Date

N•

•.T••••••/A.o

-

 

Acreage

less than one acre

.cecorded by

Anne Forbes

Setting

00 rise above busy Rte 20 in

Organization

for Marlboro Hist Camm

residential/commercial

 

area

Spring Hill Ceme-

 

Date

8/30/94

teT)' to rear-1ate-J9th.C

 

homes

N & S

BUILDING FORM

ARCHITECTURAL DESCRIPTION

[

] see continuation sheet

Describe architectural features. Evaluate the characteristics of this building in terms of other buildings within the community.

Although altered, this house is significant as one of several examples of the Greek Revival "temple- front" house-type that were built in the 1830's and 1840's in the east part of Marlborough center. It is a large 2 1I2-story building with a tetrastyle Doric portico and a two-story south wing that formerly connected to a large cupolaed carriage house. (Demolished after 1889.) The main facade has two large widely-spaced 6-over-6-sash windows at both stories, and two smaller ones in the pediment. The main entry of the house is in the south side of the main house, sheltered by a porch on two short Doric columns. It has a 4-paneled door, with a slightly pedimented, sidelighted surround.

Typical of the Greek Revival, the cornice is molded and boxed, with a wide frieze with architrave molding. In spite of its synthetic siding, the house retains its very wide comer pilasters.

HISITORhICAL~AhRb~lTd!VEE[XlJ .se~ contin~at.ion sh~hetl l (

xp ain

E

istory OJ t e UI mg.

xp am Its associations wzt oca

or state

) h

istory.

I

I d

.e I

nc u e uses oj t ie

J

(

(

building, and the rale(s) the owners/occupants played within the community.

This bouse was the home of at least two of Marlborough's more prominent nineteenth-century citizens. It was built in about 1840 for William Stetson, who came to Marlborough in 1836. He apparently tried his hand at shoe manufacturing in the early days of the industry in Marlborough, as he is shown as the owner of both a house and shoeshop on Howe Street in 1853. He was extremely active in the Congregational Church, as choir director, tenor vocalist, and Deacon. After living here for many years, the Stetsons moved to Spoonhill Avenue, and eventually relocated to Florida.

From at least 1869 through 1888 this property, which by then still stretched nearly to Francis Street, was owned by farmer Samuel E. Warren. Although he lived here, he apparently also had charge of part of his family's farm on Boston Post Road, just past the intersection with Concord Road, which, after his death, became the city Poor Farm.,

BIBLIOGRAPHY and/or REFERENCES [] see continuation sheet Bigelow, Ella. Historical Reminiscences of Marlborough. 1910. Maps and Atlases: Walling: 1853, 1857, 1871; Beers: 1875; Bailey & Hazen: 1878; Walker: 1889; Sanboms. Marlborough Directories.

[ ] Recommended for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. If checked, a completed

National Register Criteria Statement 101m is attached.

FORM B - BUILDING

MASSACHUSETTSHISTORICALCOMMISSION Office of the Secretary, state House I Boston

.~~ -

I

1

2.

4.

Map. Draw sketch of building location in relation to nearest cross streets and other buildings. Indicate north.

H

o

s

M

E

R. n o o@

30M-S-77

".

- ~.-

"

,

~ i

«r e ;)

I

,.

".,

C

o

(J

~

A- "

N E.

0

(over)

In Area no.

1. Town j

3.rl Co::'o1.v:h

Form no.

Address 33L~ -=ast hain ':;tl~cet

Name .lillia8

Sto~"e ; louse

Present use Offices

---------------

Present owner Kenneth A. Fries

3.

Description: 2t Story Hood. Frame

Date 1796

Source Pub. Local histories

Style Greek Revival

Architect None

--'---------------

Exterior wall fabric ·

food Clapboard

Outbuildings (describe) None

----------

Other features Extremely

larg;e

t

could

be a converted

Georgian?

Altered

Date 1972

Moved

Date

---------

 

-----

Lot size:

One acre or less

x

Approximate frontage

Over one acre

90 Feet

Approximate distance of building from street

40 Feet

6. Recorded by Ernest

Ginnetti

Organization Marlborough

Historical

.

Commission

Date 9/21/78

7. Originalowner (ifknown) .~i11ia-'1-Stoue

7. Originalowner (ifknown) .~i11ia-'1-Stoue Originaluse .~csidenc(~ Subsequentuses (ifany)and dates Offices 1972

Originaluse .~csidenc(~

Subsequentuses (ifany)and dates Offices 1972

---------------------------

8. Themes (checkas many as applicable)

Aboriginal

Agricultural

Architectural

The Arts

-X-

Conservation

Education

Exploration/

settlement

Commerce

Industry

Communication

Military

Community development

X

Political

Recreation -X Religion Science/ invention -- Social! -- humanitarian -v- .• • Transportation -- '--
Recreation
-X
Religion
Science/
invention
--
Social!
--
humanitarian
-v-
.•
Transportation
--
'--

9. Historicalsignificance(includeexplanation of themes checked above)

'\.JilliamStowe, who married Phebe 1I10rsein 1796 built this house and here Truman St.owe was born and lived. several years after his marriage

to Hannah Banson. ansas in 1857.

Later on he

moved. south and died

in Jacksport, Ark-

a daughter

After he left, Mr. James Draper who married

of William Draper of Marlborough

lived here in 1832.

The 1·ridowof

William Rice then purchased

the place but sold. it to Judge Israel

E.

Eames in 1835, and he sold it to William

F. Barnard in the same year.

,

i

~

Israel Eames married William Barnards sister, Elizabeth and the

two families were easily accommodated

in the large old mansion.

vlilliam Barnard was educated in the district

school and old Gates

Academy, and. he later taught in the district schools

Warren and North districts for twelve years.

ching he directed his energies to farming, improving

and tilling the adjoining 90 acres of land.

had never shown inclination

the confid.ence of his fellow citizens, serving as assessor, overseer of the poor, and a member of the school board. He was one of the

on the Farms,

Tiring of school tea-

Although Mr. Barnard

the Holden place

with

to hold public office, he was honored

first stock holders of the Fitchburg

of this and the South road the greates

borough.

a frugal and temperate

road, and deemed the construction

events in the history

of Marl-

He had united with the Union church in 1852 and had lived.

life which ended. in 1903 in his 94th year.

10. Bibliographyand/or references(suchas localhistories,deeds, assessor'srecords, -ear ly maps, etc.)

Historical Reminiscences of Marlborough, Ella Bigelow, Marl., 1910.

History of Marlborough Mass., Charles Hudson, Boston, 1862.

INVENTORY FORM CONTINUATION SHEET

Community

Property

Marlborough

John Stow House

Massachusetts Historical Commission 80 Boylston Street Boston, Massachusetts 02116

Area(s)

AA

Form No.

94

Additional information by Anne Forbes, consultant to Marlborough Historical Commission,

6/19/95:

ASSESSOR'S #58-41

less than one acre

PHOTO

#95-18: 16

ARCHITECTURAL DESCRIPTION. One of Marlborough's larger Greek Revival "temple-front" mansions, with the attic story overhanging a tetrastyle facade colonnade, this house is either an early-nineteenth-century replacement for an earlier house, or a radical update of a an earlier building. If the latter is the case, it may have begun as a 2 1/2-story, five-bay, side-gabled, eighteenth-century house, possibly built as early as the 1760's. The building has been altered by the installatiion of synthetic siding, an exterior chimney on the west side, and a pair of "picture" windows on the first story facade. The shutters are also modem. The house retains many of its details, however, including its wide main entry, which has divided 2/3-length sidelights, flat pilasters with echinus caps, and a high, molded frieze and projecting lintel. The main roof cornice is molded and boxed, with a dentil course below. One massive chimney remains on the east slope of the roof. Several 12-over-12-sash windows may be twentieth-century replacements.

A sketch from ca. 1910 shows the house with what appears to be a second-story gallery across the

portico.

HISTORICAL NARRATIVE, cont. Some apparent errors in the statement from Ella Bigelow cited on the 1978 inventory form were partially corrected by James Bigelow, although the comments in his 1927 scrapbook contain a few errors, as well.

Maps corroborate his assessment that this house was owned in 1803 not by William, but by John Stow(e) (1740-1828). He was the grandson of Samuel Stow (1645-1721) who had returned to

Massachusetts from Connecticut sometime before 1684 and started a farm in this part

Marlborough. At least three other of Samuel's grandsons, brothers Josiah (see Form #12, 33 Spoonbill Avenue) and Samuel Stow, (see Form #94, 91 Boston Post Road), and another cousin Simon, also had farms nearby. John Stow married Grace Newton in 1766, and among their children were William (1773-1808), who married Phebe Morse in 1796, and Mary, who married Daniel Williams in 1804. Although Ella Bigelow says Daniel Williams built the house formerly

just east of this one, that is the house shown under William Stowe's name on the map of 1803. William Stowe died in 1808, and Daniel Williams in 1810. Mary Stowe Williams inherited the eastern house, and William Stowe's son, Truman Stowe (b. 1796) was apparently the next owner

of

of #334, as it is shown under his name by 1830. He had married Hannah Manson in 1815. It was

probably in the early 1830's that they moved to Arkansas, where, as Ella Bigelow says, he died in

1857. (Cont.)

INvENTORY FORM CONTINUATION SHEET

Community

Property

Marlborough

John Stow House

Massachusetts Historical Commission 80 Boylston Street Boston, Massachusetts 02116

Area(s)

AA

Form No.

94

HISTORICAL NARRATIVE, cont. The next several occupants and owners are evidently as Ms. Bigelow describes them. William Barnard was indeed noted for developing a progressive farm here. By 1871, however, he was living at 83 East Main Street (see Form #195). Aaron Holden, who apparently purchased the property from Mr. Barnard, is shown here by 1875, and was still here in1889. M.E. Holden, evidently his son, succeeded him as owner by 1900. By 1927 the property was owned by Margaret B. Fowler.

ADDITIONAL BIBLIOGRAPHY. Maps and atlases: 1803, 1830, 1835, 1853, 1856/57, 1875, 1889, 1900. Marlboro vital records Marlboro directories and tax valuations. Bigelow, James. "Photographs and Descriptions of Some Old Houses in Marlbrough, Mass." 1927.

[ J Recommended for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. If checked, a completed

National Register Criteria Statement form is attached.

. "'." \~~

FORM

B - BUII:DING

l\lASSACHUS'E1'TS HISTORICAL COMMISSION

r:\.&&:"-

---

L-A-C, ,,

o."n

.••,,,.

_r_ ct-l::J+O U nil CD _ "Q.n.c:::.tnn

-1. Map. Draw sketch of building location

in relation to nearest cross streets other buildings. Indicate north.

.J

J7?-~7-77

SPJ/,1.)/J (

:T,":

l

/If

and

(over)

e

In Area no.

Form no.

114

Marl borQugh

15 East

Dacey's

Vacant

Main Street

Garage

on

first

floor

In probate

Source

zle

Architect

1882

PlaQue

Exterior wall fabric

--=

stucco

;:;

Outbuildings (describe)

=.: =-=-------

_

Other features -------------

Altered

Date

Moved

Date

--------- -----

5. Lot size:

One acre or less

-X

Approxi mate frontage

-

Over one acre

40'

Approximate distance of building from street

6. Recorded by

Organization

Date

15'

'oj]. Gibbons

J

2rlboro

6/29/79

fl c nnin2

:::"ept.

7. Original owner (if known)

Original use

subsequent uses (if any) and dates

(·':bQm8f

Livery stable and resiue~ce

C;arage,

Cas StatiQn 1900's

8. Themes (check as many as applicable)

Aboriginal Agricultural Archi tectural The Arts Commerce Communication Community development

x

x

x

Conservation

Recreation

Education

Religion

Exploration/

Science/

settlement

Industry

Military

political

invention

Social!

humanitarian

Transportation

x

9. Historical significance (include explanation of themes checked above)

This building has a flat roof and stUCCQ exteriQr, features reminiscent Qf the Spanish Revival architecture as fQund in

~ew Nexico and ArizQna during

cQnstructed circa. 1882 under the direction of ThQmas Dacey, owner. ~r. Dacey Qperated his business here, a livery stable. Horses and carriages were the primary business concern at that time. Hacks and horse-drawn hearses were also housed here.

Dacey's wagons traveled tQ the two depots within the city, ana transpQrted mail frQm Boston to the Post Office in ~arlborough.

In later years, William Dacey, the owner's son, kept the business go ing until he passed away several years ago. IV;r.Dacey lef t no heirs, resulting in the property being held in probate.

The building is in need of repair, and generally run-down appearance.

the

late 1800's. It was

in

J

"

I

'.

,

,

10. BIbliography and/or references (such as local histories, deeds, assessor's records, early maps, etc.)

Interview: Mr. Earlson - former employee of Dacey's Garage On site inspection. Marlborough D.irectory - 1900 (Marlborough Public Library)

FORM B - BUILDING

Assessor's number

USGS Quad

Area(s)

Form Number

Massachusetts Historical Commission 80 Boylston Street Boston, Massachusetts 02116

57-183

I I Marlborough

I

J

195

 

Town

MarlbofOlloh o

Place (neighborhood or village)

· Address

Historic Name

Uses: Present

Original

Date of Construction

·

Source

· StylelForm

83 Fast MaiD Street

Samuel Chipman HOllse

Dwe11ing

Dwe]]jng, shoe factOTy

ca 183~-40

Maps; style

Greek Revival

_

 

Architect/Builde r

IIl_l k_l_10_W_l_l

_

Exterior Material:

Sketch Map

Foundation

granite and brick

Draw a map of the area indicating properties within it. Number each property for which individual inventory forms have been completed. Label streets,

Wall/Trim

synthetic siding aDd flllshboard

including route numbers, if any. Attach a separate sheet if space iii not sufficient here. Indicate north.

Roof

asphalt shingle

Outbuildings/Secondary

Structures

small 2-story house at rear

Major Alterations (with dates)

_

some window

replacement: Dew concrete and slate portico

Ooor

Condition

fairloood

'0

Moved [X] no [ ] yes

Date

N_I_A

_

 

Acreage

less than one acre

Recorded by

Anne Forbes

Setting

On 19tb-C residential

block of mixed

Organization

for Marlboro Hist Comm

residential/commercial

area

Parking in front;

 

Date

4130i94

bllnga)ow to south

BUILDli~G FORM

ARCHITECfURAL DESCRIPTION

[

] see continuation sheet

Describe architectural features. Evaluate the characteristics of this building in terms of other buildings within the community.

This house is significant as one of several examples of the Greek Revival "temple-front" house-type that were built in the 1830's and 1840's in the east part of Marlborough center. Along with the William Hall House at 24 Stevens Street (see Form #198), it is the only one of the group built in the tristyle, as opposed to the somewhat more common tetrastyle, form. Like the John Chipman j House at 17 Stevens Street (see Form #85), it retains its flushboarded facade. It is a tall 2 1/2-story building with a two-story side wing extending south from the rear comer. A one-story hip-roofed ell in front of the wing appears to be a later addition, and may represent the enclosing of an open porch. At the main facade, the pedimented gable is supported on fluted Doric columns, with a square-balustered railing across the second-story balcony. While tbe first two story facade stories are flushboarded, the pediment is clad in wood clapboards or synthetic siding. The facade is arranged in three bays, with a side-hall entry at both stories. The main door has four panels with raised octagonal fields. It is surrounded by full-length divided sidelights and flat pilasters, a high frieze, and a molded, projecting horizontal lintel. The door above it at the second story is an eight- light "French" door. The windows are 6-over-6-sash with flat surrounds; the slight flare of the window crowns, reminiscent of the Fderal Period, suggests an early date for tbe bouse, probably in the 1830's.

Typical of the Greek Revival, the cornice is molded and boxed, with a wide frieze with architrave molding. The corners of both the house and wing are trimmed with wide flat pilasters. The paired sawcut brackets at the cornice lines are a later Italianate touch, probably added during the 1870's.

HISTORICAL NARRATIVE [X] see continuation sheet

Explain history of the building. Explain its associations with local (or state) history. Include uses of the building and the roleis) the owners/occupants played within the community.

In the mid-nineteenth century some of Marlborough's early shoe factories were concentrated on East Main Street, including the shop of Elijah Dickinson in 1842, and in 1851, those of Charles G. Whitney and Thomas J. Howe. The earliest substantial shoe manufacturer in the area was John Chipman, who in 1836 began in the shop formerly used for custom work by Amory Cotting (which stood a short distance south of this property). In 1842 John's brother, Samuel, joined him, and they remained in partnership for several years. Further research will be needed to trace the subsequent history of the company, but the map of 1853 shows the "S. &. J. Chipman Shoe Factory at this location. As this house is of a type characteristic of the 1830's-'40's, it is thus possible that some shoe manufacturing was taking place here at that time. John Chipman was by then living at 17 Stevens Street, and the house of a Samuel Chipman, (whether this Samuel, or John and Samuel's father, cabinetmaker Samuel Chipman, Sr., is not known for certain), is shown further south, opposite #60 East Main at about the location of the Cotting property. It is most likely that at that time Samuel Chipman, Jr. (b. 1817) was living here, and that the house had been built for him several years earlier, possibly at the time of his marriage to Martha Rice in 1838. (Cont.)

BIBLIOGRAPHY and/or REFERENCES [] see continuation sheet Bigelow, Ella. Historical Reminiscences of Marlborough. 1910. Hurd, D. Hamilton. History of Middlesex County. Mass. 1890. Maps and Atlases: Walling: 1853, 1857, 1871; Beers: 1875; Bailey & Hazen: 1878; Walker: 1889; Sanboms. Marlborough Directories. Vital Records of Marlborough.

Marlborough Directories. Vital Records of Marlborough. [ X] Recommended for listing in the National Register of

[ X] Recommended for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. If checked, a completed

National Register Criteria Statement form is attached.

INVENTORY FORM CONTINUATION SHEET

Community

Property

Marlborough

Samuel Chipman House

Massachusetts Historical Commission 80 Boylston Street Boston, Massachusetts 02116

Area(s)

Form No.

J 195

HISTORICAL NARRA TIVE t cont. In 1862 Samuel Chipman, Charles Whitney, and Lewis Felton joined to form the firm of Whitney, Felton & Chipman. They built a factory on the southeast comer of Middlesex Square (the intersection of East Main and Lincoln Streets,) where they operated for four or five years, when they were bought out by Rice & Hutchins, a company which grew over the next four decades to become one of the largest in Marlborough.

By 1871 the house had been acquired

the century. William Barnard, (1809-1903), who lived at several locations in Marlborough and Hudson during his long life, had been a teacher for twelve years in the "Farms", "Warren", and North district

schools, before turning to farming at 334 East Main Street (see Form #94). He served as an assessor, overseer of the poor, and member of the school board, and was one of the first stock-holders of the Marlborough Branch of the Fitchburg Railroad in the early 1850's. He ran a dairy business for many years, and apparently moved here after he retired from farming.

by William F. Barnard, who remained here through the tum of

Massachusetts Historical Commission 80 Boylston Street Boston, Massachusetts 02116

Community

Marlborough

Property Address

83 East Main Street

Area(s) Form No(s).

J

195

National Register of Historic Places Criteria Statement Form

Check all that apply:

[x] Individually eligible

[ ] Contributing to a potential historic district

[ ] Eligible only in a historic district

[] Potential historic district

Criteria:

[x] A

[]

B

[x] C

[] D

Criteria Considerations:

[] A

[] B

[] C

[] D

[]

E

[]

F

[] G

Statement of Significance by

F_o_r_b_e_s~/_S_c_hu_l_e_r

_

The criteria that are checked in the above sections must be justified here.

The Samuel Chipman House meets Criteria A and C of the National Register individually. The property is important for its association with one of the earliest shoe manufacturing companies in Marlborough, the industry which would become the base of the local economy. Also this dwelling is in an area of town where early shoe factories were concentrated. The property is significant architecturally as an example of a temple-front Greek Revival house type. It retains integrity of location, design, setting, materials, workmanship, feeling, and association.

FORM B - BUILDING

Assessor's number

USGS Quad

Area(s)

Massachusetts Historical Commission 80 Boylston Street Boston, Massachusetts 02116

I 57-379

I I Marlborough

I

J

 

Town

Marlborough

Place (neighborhood or village)

Form Number

200

Address

Historic Name

"Chipman's Corner"

138 Fast 1\·1a;n Street

J ewis Felton House

Uses: Present

Original

Date of Construction

Dwell;nu o

Dwelling

ca 1845

_

Source

Maps' , style' , deeds

Style/Form

Greek Revival/QlIeen Anne

. Architect/Builder

unknown

Exterior Material:

Sketch Map

Foundation

granite

Draw a map of the area indicating properties within it. Number each property for which individual inventory forms have been completed. Label streets,

WalIffrim

wood clapboard and shjn~le

including route numbers, if any. A ttach a separate sheet if space is not sufficient here. Indicate north.

Roof

asphalt shingle

Outbuildings/Secondary

none

Structures

_

Major Alterations (with dates)_------

Radical updating ca 1890 (see P 2); shed

dormer

aD west side, ?Otb C

Condition

Moved (X] no [ J yes

Date

fair/good

N~/A

_

 

Acreaze I::>

less than one acre

corded by

Anne Forbes

Setting

In small c!Jlster of mid- to late-

Organization

for Marlboro Hist Comm

19th-century

houses at "Chipman's

corner '1

Date

4/30i94

Concrete

steps at front

BUILDING

FORM

ARCHITECfURAL

DESCRIPTION

[ ] see continuation sheet

Describe architectural features. Evaluate the characteristics of this building in terms of other buildings within the community.

138 East Main, with its 2-over-1-sash windows, pattern-shingled

pediment, diagonal southwest

corner bay, lathe-turned

superficially like a Queen Anne cottage of ca. 1890. Deed records, along with the building's

proportions, pedimented facade, and granite foundation, however, reveal that it probably began as

a 2-story, temple-front

front

main entry, which is at the east end of the facade, may remain in its original position, or mayhave

been relocated at that time. The house today has

the main section, with a long rear wing extending to an attached barn/garage.

frieze screens and turned post at the southeast

corner, looks at least

cottage similar to its neighbor to the east

at 1.40 East Main, and that the

columns were removed and the center of the portico filled in sometime in the 1890's. The

two

1 If2-story, cross-gabled

ells at the rear of

Although the architectural trim dates to several periods, two of the most character-defining

elements are the pattern-shingled,

a frieze, embellished with large saw-cut scallops, that may be original to the house.

shed-roofed Queen Anne hoods over the first floor windows, and

HISTORICAL NARRATIVE

[] see continuation sheet

Explain history of the building. Explain its associations with local (or state) history. Include uses of

the building, and the role(s) the ownersloccupants played within the community.

This house, like many otbers in the vicinity, is intimately

"Chipman's Corner" and the East Main Street area.

the nine daughters of Thankful Stowe (cf. Form #197, 16 Stevens Street), and her husband Lewis

Felton.

Chipman. In

House next door at 140 East Main,

Holyoke in 1869.

acquired the the former Luther (and/or Leonard) Whitney which they sold to Mr. Felton's half-brother William W.

connected with the development of

It was the home of Mary L. (Stowe), one of

They were married

in 1847, the same year that they purchased

the house from Samuel

about 1860 the Feltons

Lewis Felton (1824-1877), was one of the early shoe manufacturers in the East Main Street area. With his neighbor, Samuel Chipman, 2nd, he formed the firm of Felton & Chipman in 1858. In 1862 they were joined by his wife's brother-in-law ca. Whitney, to become Whitney, Felton, &

of

East Main and Stevens Street was then called. Sources indicate that they were bought out by Rice

Chipman, and built a factory at the southeast side of "Chipman's

Corner," as the intersection

& Hutchins in 1867, although according to directories

operating

there as Felton & Chipman as late as 1875.

and map evidence, the company was still

\

)

Mrs. Felton, who survived her husband, apparently lived here until her death in 1895, although she sold the property to her son, Fred Felton, in 1889. In 1903 Fred and his wife, Minnie Felton, sold

it to Thomas A. Pellett.

BIBLIOGRAPHY and/or REFERENCES

Bigelow. Hurd, D. Hamilton. Historv of Middlesex County, Mass. 1890.

Maps and Atlases: Walling:

1889; Sanborns. Marlborough Directories. Vital Records of Marlborough. Middlesex County Registry of Deeds.

[] see continuation sheet

1853, 1857, 1871; Beers: 1875; Bailey & Hazen:

1878; Walker:

[ X]

Recommended

for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. * If checked, a

National Register Criteria Statement is attached. * (see NR Statement for Area Form J.)

Massachusetts Historical Commission 80 Boylston Street Boston, Massachusetts 02116

Community

Marlborough

Property Address

138 East Main Street

Area(s) Form No(s). J 200
Area(s) Form No(s).
J
200

National Register of Historic Places Criteria Statement Form

Check all that apply:

[ ] Individually eligible [ ] Eligible only in a historic district [x] Contributing to a potential historic district [] Potential historic district

Criteria:

[x] A

[]

B

[x] C

[] D

Criteria Considerations:

[] A

[] B

[]

C

[] D

[] E

[]

F

[] G

Statement of Significance by

F_o_r_b_es~/_S_ch_u_l_e_T

_

The criteria that are checked in the above sections must be justified here.

The Lewis Felton House meets Criteria A and C of the National Register as part of an East Main Street district. The property is significant for its association with one of Marlborough's early shoe manufacturers. In 1858 Felton joined one of the first and leading shoe manufacturers, Samuel Chipman to form Whitney, Felton & Chipman. Chipman's Corner (later Middlesex Square) and the East Main Street area were the location of many of the early shoe shops and housing for shoe manufacturers. The dwelling is one of the one examples of a modest side hall Greek Revival which was updated in the late 1800s with Queen Anne features. The property retains integrity of location, design, setting, materials, workmanship, feeling, and association.

FORM B - BUILDING

Assessor's number

USGS Quad

Arears)

Form Number

Massachusetts Historical Commission 80 Boylston Street Boston, Massachusetts 02116

I 57-160

I I Marlborough

I

J

201

 

Town

Marl borough

:~

j

Sketch Map Draw a map of the area indicating properties within it. Number each property for which individual inventory forms have been completed. Label streets, including route numbers, if any. Attach a separate sheet zf space is not sufficient here. Indicate north.

Recorded by

Anne Forbes

Organization

for Marlboro

Hist Comm

Date

4130/94

ace. (neighborhood or village)

\ <~:

··t<';·;X·~ldress

\'>{ll"~v

161:\ Fast Main

Street

_

l ••.•

".1'

';Y':';St011C Name

C 1. Bliss HOllse

 
 

Present

Dwelling

Original

Dwelling

 

'j~ te of Construction

c~a~1~8~88~

_

Exterior Material:

Maps: style

Qlleen Anne

Jlnknown

Foundation

brick

\Vall(frim

wood clapboard

Roof

asphalt shinole o

Outbuildings/Secondary

Structures

none

_

Major Alterations (with dates),

_

l-storv addition

.

at rear SF- wood

.

on F : porch balustrade

replaced

fjre escape

Condition

aood

o

Moved [X] no

] yes

Date

N/A

Acreaze t»

less than one acre

Setting

In line of mostly 1860's wood-frame

hOIlses

Flanked by two mansard

_

cottaoes

0

BUILDING FORM

ARCHITECfURAL DESCRIPTION

Describe architectural features. Evaluate the characteristics of this building in terms of other buildings within the community.

[ J see continuation sheet

One of the most well-preserved of the late-nineteenth-century houses on East Main Street, this is an excellent example of the relatively simple Queen Anne with embellishments continuing from the earlier Stick Style. In contrast to the Brigham House at 10 Stevens Street (see Form #197), for instance, the walls of this building are all clapboarded, with a decorative and textural emphasis concentrated mainly in the skirted pediments of its gable ends. It is a tall, 2 112-story, gable-front building with a 2 112-story shallow wing on each side. A 1 1I2-story ell extends to the rear, with a long, later I-story addition behind it. A large open porch wraps around three sides of the building, from wing to wing. It has turned posts, pierced, sawcut brackets, and retains one short section of turned balustrade. Horizontal banding separates the stories, and a sill board and cornerboards are

narrow and unadorned, as are the :flat surrounds of the 2-over-2-sash windows. The gables, the most elaborate area of the house, are embellished with diagonal, horizontal, and vertical " s tickwork", and the main facade gable has the fanned-clapboard "sunburst" design that was the hallmark of the Queen

Anne. The main, sidehall entry has a double-leaf door, presently covered by a vertical-board door.

storm

\,

J

HISTORICAL NARRATIVE [J see continuation sheet Explain history of the building. Explain its associations with local (or state) history. Include uses of the building, and the role(s) the owners/occupants played within the community.

Although the house here apparently dates to about 1888, this property represents several decades of combined residential and industrial activity on East Main Street. In 1851 CiG. Whitney began J manufacturing shoes in a barn on the property (see Form #197, 16 Stevens Street), and in 1853 Hiram Fay had his carpenter's shop here (possibly in the same barn) from which he produced some of Marlborough's most beautiful Greek Revival houses (ct. e.g. the Loring House, Form #113). By 1871 the property, with the old house and ane-two outbuildings on it, belonged to HKW Andrews. He was a builder, and constructed many houses in Marlborough, as well as some sections of the I.A. Frye Shoe factory (see Form #116).

By 1879 C. Linus Bliss owned the property, and was using the outbuildings to manufacture cigars, a business which he began in 1870. Over the years his two sons, Benjamin and Charles, were also involved in the business, and it was Charles Bliss who inherited or acquired both the cigar business and the property, probably with this newer house on it, upon his father's death. He was still here in 1909, advertising the production of the "famous B & H Cigar."

After a period of use as an auto repair shop early in this century, the barn and other outbuildings were tom down, but the property still has its long, narrow dimensions, extending nearly through to Vine Street.

BIBLIOGRAPHY and/or REFERENCES [J see continuation sheet Bigelow. Maps and Atlases: Walling: 1871; Walker: 1889; Sanborns. Marlborough directories. Marlborough Enterprise. 2/21/1889.

[ X] Recommended for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. If checked, a completed National Register Criteria Statement form is attached.

Massachusetts Historical Commission 80 Boylston Street Boston, Massachusetts 02116

Community

Marlborough

Property Address

165 East Main Street

Area(s) Form No(s). J 201
Area(s) Form No(s).
J
201

National Register of Historic Places Criteria Statement Form

Check all that apply:

[ ] Individually eligible

[x] Contributing to a potential historic district [] Potential historic district

[ ] Eligible only in a historic district

Criteria:

[x] A

[]

B

[x] C

[] D

Criteria Considerations:

[] A

[] B

[]

C

[] D

[] E

[]

F

[] G

Statement of Significance by

F_o_r_b_es_I_S_ch_u_l_e_r

The criteria that are checked in the above sections must

be justified here.

_

The C. Linus. Bliss House meets Criteria A and C of the National Register as part of an East Main Street district. Although the house is of ca. 1888 date, new for this area, the property has an long association with manufacturing beginning with an early shoe shop located on the property followed by a carpenter shop and later the manufacture of cigars by Bliss. The East Main Street area is significant for its association with early shoe manufacturing. Chipman's Corner (later Middlesex Square) and the East Main Street area were the location of many of the early shoe shops and housing for shoe manufacturers. The property retains integrity of location, design, setting, materials, workmanship, feeling, and association.