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Matched

pair

Swag
makers

Healing
wounds

Page A7

Page A9

Page A15

COMPASS A day at Peter
Woytuk’s workplace
Page C6

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HUMAN RIGHTS DAY ~ LAKEVILLE ~© 2015
SALISBURY
~ SHARON ~ NORTH CANAAN ~ FALLS VILLAGE ~ CORNWALL ~ KENT
The Lakeville Journal Company, LLC Periodical Rate Postage Paid at Lakeville (Town of Salisbury), Connecticut 06039

VOLUME 116 NUMBER 22

THURSDAY, JANUARY 8, 2015

VOLUME 119 NUMBER 18

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2015

After 74 years, Pearl Harbor
memories still bring tears

Troop B
spruce-up tells
public, ‘We’re
here for you’

By Karen Bartomioli

By Karen Bartomioli

NORTH CANAAN — While
its vintage neon sign continues to
get a complete makeover, Troop
B commander Lt. Bill Baldwin
continues his crusade to spruce
up the barracks and boost morale there.
The three-story brick building was built in the 1940s and
includes a dormitory where state
troopers used to sleep during
shifts that spanned several days
in a row.
Baldwin, who was a rookie
trooper here 30 years ago, said
the building and grounds should
send a message to the community
that this is a place where public
safety is assured.
There has been some instability and anxiety surrounding the
troop in recent years. First came
rumors that the building would
be closed down, following the
transfer of dispatch services to
Troop L in Litchfield.
Then in September, former
civilian dispatcher Brian Johnson
was shot in his North Canaan
home during a domestic dispute.
Johnson worked at Troop B for
27 years before retiring in 2003
to care for his elderly parents.
In June 2013, Catherine
“Cappy” Tatsapaugh, also a
retired civilian dispatcher died
unexpectedly.
She is remembered as “mom”
by the troopers. She welcomed
them to her North Canaan home
and brought home-cooked meals
to the barracks. She worked there
for 22 years.
Two flowering fruit trees were
recently planted at the barracks
in honor of both Tatsapaugh and
See TROOP B, Page A14

PHOTO BY LIZETT PAJUELO

Under the lights
The annual Sharon Parade of Lights and Christmas tree
lighting on Saturday, Dec. 5, included music by the Salisbury
Band Christmas Brass and Hot Chocolate Society. Story,
another photo, Page 5.

Three area restaurants
are closing this month
By Cynthia Hochswender
MILLERTON — Two Millerton restaurants have closed
or are closing this month. And
Lakeville’s Pastorale has closed
(for that story, turn to Page A3).
On Main Street, No. 9
restaurant has closed. On
Route 44, the McDonald’s
restaurant will close as of Jan. 1.
Last fall, Four Brothers
restaurant chain co-founder
Peter Stefanopoulos purchased
the Main Street building that
has been home most recently
to the No. 9 restaurant and inn.
Stefanopoulos had said at
that point that Tim and Taryn
Cocheo, who owned No. 9,
would remain there as tenants.
Last month, however, the
Cocheos closed their business

and moved to Vermont.
Stefanopoulos, who also
owns The Boathouse in Lakeville, said he’s already hired “the
best chef ” and is mapping out
new architecture and design
for a replacement restaurant.
He hopes to open next
spring. So far, there’s no official
name.
As for the McDonald’s, it is
owned by the parent corporation, not a local franchise. A
request to the corporate public
relations department had not
been answered by press time.
According to a worker at
the restaurant, at this point
there is no new business expected to take the place of the
McDonald’s. The building
had previously been home to
a Burger King.

Part one of two
By Cynthia Hochswender

MILLBROOK — On the morning of Saturday, Dec. 5, an accident claimed the life of Millbrook School Athletic Director Edward
Allen, 32, and injured his two daughters, 3-year-old Codie and
1-year-old Tatum.
According to the Dutchess County Sheriff ’s Office, both children
were taken to Mid-Hudson Regional Hospital, then were airlifted
to Westchester Medical Center in Valhalla, one with life-threatening injuries. The accident occurred on Route 44, 4 miles from the
Millbrook School.
The car was traveling west on Route 44 when Allen’s 2006 BMW
X5 crossed the line and was hit head-on by a dump truck that was
headed east. The SUV was pushed off the road. The truck, driven

MILLERTON — For Sandy
Berger, the little village of Millerton was like the memory of
Rosebud in the film “Citizen
Kane.” It was a small but mighty
part of his life, the place that
shaped him into the man he
later became.
Berger died Dec. 2, 2015, at
home in Washington, D.C., from
a cancer of the bile duct that had
been diagnosed about a year ago.
He was 70.
Sandy was my cousin, so
even though it’s not newspaper
style, I’m going to refer to him
for the rest of this article by his
first name.
Sandy was an important person — important enough that
there were feature articles on
him in the New York Times and
Washington Post within hours
of his death. The announcement
of his passing came from his
business partner, Madeleine K.
Albright, the former secretary of
state. She and Sandy had served
together in the Clinton administration. Sandy was first the
deputy national security adviser
under Anthony Lake and then the
national security adviser during
Clinton’s second term. You can
read about that in the national
newspapers.
But what was important to
him was the little village of Millerton in Dutchess County, which

See MILLBROOK, Page A14

See BERGER, Page A14

By Judith O’Hara Balfe

PHOTO BY KAREN BARTOMIOLI

PHOTO BY KAREN BARTOMIOLI

Izzy Tadiello got a hug from one of his best buddies: 5-year-old
Erick Trotta, whose grandparents live next door to the Pearl
See PEARL HARBOR, Page A14 Harbor and World War II veteran in East Canaan.

Sandy Berger’s life is a
window into Millerton’s past

Millbrook School athletic
director dies in car crash

The blue call box outside
of Troop B now encourages
visitors to come inside.

NORTH CANAAN — The
crowd that gathered as the sun
set on the Doughboy Monument
in North Canaan on Monday,
Dec. 7, was appreciative of the
nice weather and the daylight
start to the ceremony.
But they would have been
there no matter what the conditions, as they have come in recent
years to honor the veterans of
the Dec. 7, 1941, attack on Pearl
Harbor. America’s involvement
in World War II followed the
surprise attack that killed more
than 2,000 Americans, most of
them Navy sailors.
It is especially poignant here,
where the town counts among
its residents one of those survivors: Isadore “Izzy” Tadiello.
He is 94, but still comes out to
the ceremony, with the help of
his son, Bill, and this year with

PHOTO BY DAN LOH

Laurie Gross and Sandy Berger at a bar mitzvah for Laurie’s
grandson, Jacob Klaff, in December 2014 in Livingston, N.J.

Throwaways NATURE'S

S

olid waste disposal becomes
ever more of a problem as
our population increases.
Our earliest inhabitants generated little waste as they had
virtually no disposable goods.
Archaeologists are pleased if they
can scrape up even a few broken
clay pipe stems and occasional
pottery shards at Colonial sites.
Our open dumps of the 1950s
have given way to transfer stations from which truckers tote
our discarded cheese wrappers

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BERNARD A. DREW
and soup containers out of town
to be buried or burned.
Two recent books take different and interesting approaches
to aspects of waste disposal, and
particularly sanitation workers.
See NATURE, Page A14

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© Salisbury Bank and Trust Company

NOTEBOOK

Equal Housing Lender

11/6/15 11:26 AM

A2

THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL, Thursday, December 10, 2015

In The Journal this week
SALISBURY ............ A3 & A4
SHARON ......................... A5
CORNWALL .................... A6
KENT .............................. A7
NORTH CANAAN .......... A8
FALLS VILLAGE ............. A9
OBITUARIES ..... A10 & A11

FAMILY/FRIENDS........ A10
SPORTS .............. A11 & A16
OPINION ........................A12
VIEWPOINT ..................A13
HEALTH ........................ A15
LEGALS ......................... A16
CLASSIFIEDS ....... A16-A18

Three-day forecast

Friday......................Morning showers, high 54°/low 40°
Saturday ....................................... Partly cloudy, 56°/46°
Sunday .....................................................Cloudy, 58°/51°

Lakeville Weather History
by The Lakeville Journal

Date

Dec. 3
Dec. 4
Dec. 5
Dec. 6
Dec. 7
Dec. 8
Dec. 9

Min.
37
33
28
25
27
34
34

Max. Conditions
49
45
49
51
40
44
47

Partly Sunny
Mostly Sunny
Partly Sunny
Mostly Sunny
Partly Cloudy
Mostly Cloudy
Partly Cloudy

Regional

The following information
was provided by the Connecticut State Police at Troop B. All
suspects are considered innocent
until proven guilty in a court
of law.
Teen charged after
disturbance
A 17-year-old male was
arrested Nov. 25 after troopers responded to a 10:56 p.m.
report of a disturbance at a
Route 7 residence in Sharon.
The teenager was charged with
disorderly conduct. He was released on a written promise to
appear in Torrington Juvenile
Court Dec. 3.
Rear-end collision
Zhi Sheng Li, 53, of Flushing, N.Y., was driving south on
South Main Street in Sharon
Nov. 29. At about 1:18 p.m.,
the 2011 Lincoln Town Car hit
the rear of a 2014 BMW 328xi
driven by John Jolly, 66, of New
York City. Jolly was turning left
at the time of the collision. The
Lincoln was towed with frontend damage. Jolly was taken to
Sharon Hospital for a forehead
contusion. Sheng’s passenger,
Judith Roome, 61, of Riverside,
Conn., refused treatment at
the scene for chest pain. Li was

POLICE BLOTTER
charged with following too
closely.
DUI
Jonathan Wilson, 28, of
Southfield, Mass., was driving
north on Route 7 in North
Canaan Nov. 29. At about 6:03
p.m., his vehicle crossed into
the southbound lane. It continued off the road and into a
ditch. The vehicle was towed.
Wilson was not injured. He was
charged with driving under the
influence and failure to drive
right. Bond was set at $500. He
is to appear in Bantam Superior
Court Dec. 14.
Car hits guardrail
Melissa Valyou, 36, of Millerton was driving east on Millerton Road/Route 44 in Salisbury
Dec. 1. At about 1:10 p.m., near
Indian Mountain Road, she lost
control on a curve. The 2014
Chevrolet Tahoe hit a guardrail.
It was towed with left front
damage. Valyou was not injured.
She was given a written warning
for making an improper turn.
No right-of-way
Max Jenkins, 30, of New

BIRD WATCH

York City turned left from the
parking lot of the Citgo gas
station onto Route 4 westbound
in Sharon at about 5:11 p.m. on
Dec. 2. The rear driver’s side of
the 2004 Subaru Forester was
hit by a 1999 Jeep Wrangler
driven east on Route 4 by Carl
Hetzel, 60, of Warren, Conn.
Both vehicles were towed. There
were no injuries. Jenkins was
charged with failure to grant
the right-of-way.
Warrant arrest
Donald Simmons, 57, of
Sharon was served a warrant
Dec. 2 for his arrest at the Garner Correctional Institute in
Newtown, Conn., where he is
currently incarcerated. He was
charged with failure to register:
sexually violent offense. Bond
was set at $1,000. He was to
appear in Bantam Superior
Court Dec. 3.
Attempted strangulation
Robert Reed, 60, of Sharon
was arrested Dec. 2 at about 1:41
p.m. after a complaint that he
grabbed a victim by her throat.
The victim had redness to her
neck but declined medical
treatment. Reed was charged
with disorderly conduct and
second-degree strangulation.
He was held in lieu of a $5,000
bond. He was to appear in Bantam Superior Court that day.
Probation violation
Eric Lee Backes, 49, of Sharon was arrested Dec. 2 on two
warrants for failing repeatedly
to report to his probation officer
following his Aug. 7 discharge
from prison. He was charged
with two counts of violation of
probation. He was held in lieu
of a $2,000 bond. He was to be
presented in Bantam Superior
Court Dec. 3.
Propane tank stolen
State Police responded to 391
Norfolk Road in North Canaan
at 6:24 p.m. on Dec. 3 for a report of a stolen propane tank.
The tank is owned by C.A. Lindell Fuels Inc. in North Canaan.
The case is under investigation.
Stolen pocketbook recovered
Jason Tweed, 35, of North
Canaan was arrested Dec. 3 for

stealing a pocketbook from an
unsecured vehicle parked at a
Clayton Road residence. Victim
Cheryl Duntz called Troop B
in the early morning hours.
She found her pocketbook in
a cornfield on the north side
of Clayton Road. A wallet and
cash were missing. Based on
an investigation, Tweed was
interviewed at Troop B and subsequently confessed. He showed
a trooper where he had disposed
of the pocketbook and then
retrieved the $11 he took from
the wallet from his Allyndale
Road residence. He was charged
with third-degree burglary and
sixth-degree larceny. He was
released on a $1,500 bond. He
is to appear in Bantam Superior
Court Dec. 14. By permission of
the court, the victim’s property
was returned to her.
Illegally parked car hit
Leila Baroody, 61, of Sharon
backed out of the Lakeville Post
Office parking area on Porter
Street at about 2:30 p.m. on
Dec. 4. Her 2015 Subaru Legacy
hit the passenger side of a 2012
GMC Savana parked facing the
wrong way in a no-parking zone
by Sean Vincent, 31, of East
Hartford, Conn. There were
no injuries. Baroody was given
a written warning for unsafe
backing. Vincent was given a
written warning for a no-parking zone violation.
Unsafe movement
Stephan Chodorov, 80, of
Warren, Conn., turned left out
of a driveway on Kent Road/
Route 7 in Cornwall at about
1:09 p.m. on Dec. 6. His 2007
Toyota Highlander hit the front
passenger side bumper of a 2009
Toyota Tacoma driven north by
Craig Weiner, 56, of Goshen,
Conn. Weiner refused treatment at the scene for a minor
scrape to his left forearm. His
car was towed. Chodorov was
not injured. He was charged
with unsafe movement from a
driveway.
The Lakeville Journal will
publish the outcome of police
charges. Contact us by mail at PO
Box 1688, Lakeville, CT 06039,
Attn: Police Blotter, or send an
email, with “police blotter” in
the subject line, to cynthiah@
lakeville journal.com.

PHOTO BY ALEXANDER KEARNEY

Kent photographer Alexander Kearney journeyed north to Salisbury and spotted this fox sparrow at Mary V. Peters Park
on Long Pond (Lake Wononpakook) last month. “This is another one of those types of birds that is not a common bird to
be seen in this area of Connecticut, except during migration, and even then many people do not get an opportunity to enjoy
their presence,” he said.

Honors for efforts of trooper, other police
Troop B State Police and Winsted Police Department officers
were recently commended for
outstanding service.
Trooper First Class Christopher
Sorrell, the Salisbury resident state
trooper, received the Medal for
Outstanding Service for tenacity
and dedication in the investigation of a theft and the fire set to
cover it up.
Three days after a March 2014
fire at a Salisbury home, according to the press release about the
award, the homeowner contacted
Sorrell about a coin and cash collection missing from the attic area
where the fire occurred. The collection was worth nearly $30,000.
Sorrell called in an investigative
team of local firefighters, the fire
marshal and the state fire marshal’s
office. It was determined the fire
had been set to cover up the theft.
Sorrell then uncovered a scenario of three workmen who were
working for a contractor at the
home, had drug addictions and
had access to the stolen items. He
was able to locate and recover a
portion of the stolen items that
had been sold by the head of the
contracted company,and to obtain
a full confession of the theft and
arson from him.
The owner also consented to a
search of two company vehicles,resulting in the seizure of heroin and
the arrest of two of his employees.
Unit Citation Awards were
given to troopers and officers at
Troop B in North Canaan and
the Winsted Police Department
(WPD) for their apprehension
of a murder suspect who was
attempting suicide.
On May 7, 2014, State Police
troopers and WPD officers responded to a report of a vehicle
parked at the former KFC restaurant in Winsted, with plates that
matched those of a car driven by
a wanted man.
He was believed to be armed

and responsible for the murder
of his wife and serious wounding
of his mother-in-law earlier in the
day in Oxford.
Troopers and officers approached the vehicle and found a
lone male occupant in the driver’s
seat with a hat pulled down over
his face and an item completely
covering his hands. The vehicle

engine was running, the doors
were locked and a hose led from
the exhaust pipe into the passenger
compartment.
The front and rear passenger
windows were smashed to gain
access. The suspect was alive and
taken into custody. The murder
weapon was recovered.
— Karen Bartomioli

Correction
An article in the Dec. 3 Lakeville Journal incorrectly said that
Skintastic in Lakeville will close at the end of this month. Owner
Colleen Kopec said it will close at the end of January.

SHARON OPTICAL

Insert Listing House Ads - December 10, 2015

Email reporter
Karen Bartomioli at
karenb@lakevillejournal.com

Lakeville Journal 1x2

Millerton
26 Hospital
Rd. News 1x2
Sharon, CT. 06069
Tel: 860-364-0878
Fax: 860-364-2284

Carl Marshall
Proprietor
Licensed Optician
Your full service optician

Visit sharonopticalct.com and like us on Facebook

Check them out inside.
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Present
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for a great Holiday gift
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non-prescription

RAY BAN
SUNGLASSES
exp 12/31/15

“VCP” “Veuve”
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“The Widow”
“Yellow Label”

Thank You to all of Skintastic’s loyal
clients. I will be retiring on January
30th and closing the door at 336 Main
Street. I have thoroughly enjoyed providing skin and nail care and products
to everyone who has visited but have
been looking forward to easing into
retirement, and it is now time.
“”Retirement is wonderful. It’s doing nothing
without worrying about getting caught at it.”

336 Main Street
Lakeville, CT 06039
860-435-0546

Any way you say it
in December

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Salisbury

THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL, Thursday, December 10, 2015

A3

Bright lights, holiday songs as town gathers to celebrate

PHOTOS BY PATRICK L. SULLIVAN

The only thing missing was snow. The Salisbury Band Christmas Brass and Hot Chocolate
Society (above) provided the instrumentation, the public (right photo) did the singing, led
by Joanna Seaton, in front of The White Hart inn on Sunday, Dec. 6, for the annual Christmas tree lighting.

SALISBURY — The tree
lighting, Christmas caroling and
Parade of Lights were focused on
The White Hart this year.
Parents and children began
congregating inside the inn
around 4:30 p.m., to visit with
Santa Claus.
As darkness fell, the youngsters amused themselves with
an improvised game involving
a stuffed animal toy and a lot
of running in circles, while the
grownups worked out the lighting of the Christmas tree.
Things got going in earnest a
little after 6 p.m. The Salisbury
Band Christmas Brass and Hot
Chocolate Society wound up
playing from The White Hart
porch. Joanna Seaton led the
singing with the easy grace of
the seasoned professional.
During the caroling, the Parade of Lights came through on
Main Street, and doubled back
south on Undermountain Road,

giving everyone two chances to
look at the festively decorated
fire and rescue vehicles.
It was a smaller parade than
in previous years, and some of
the entries had their own mu-

sic — the theme from the film
“Ghostbusters” came from one
vehicle, and Chuck Berry’s “Run
Run Rudolph” from another. It all
made for a cheerful cacophony.
— Patrick L. Sullivan

Bake sale, tractor rides Dec. 19
LIME ROCK — Join the Lime Rock Citizens Council for a bake
sale on Saturday, Dec. 19, from 2 to 4 p.m. at Trinity Church.
Enjoy a ride with your family through the fields behind Trinity
Church on Santa’s tractor-drawn wagon and then join neighbors
and home-bakers in Walker Hall for hot cider, egg nog and cookies.

Pastorale has closed

A Service
of

LAKEVILLE — The Pastorale restaurant in Lakeville closed
Saturday, Dec. 5, after 13 years in business.
Owner Karen Hamilton was at the building Monday morning, sorting out what had to be done to vacate the premises at
223 Main St.
She said business has been good, but she has been thinking
about closing for some time.
“It’s time for a change.”
Hamilton has two children, ages 5 and 10, and she wishes
to spend more time with them.
She plans to remain a resident of Salisbury.
“I loved my job, and I love my customers.”
— Patrick L. Sullivan

Su n d ay , D ecem ber 13, at 10: 00 a.m .
O ne Servic e F or A l l
F ol l ow e d by P
a r i s h C hr i s t m a s P a r t y
A l l are W el c om e

SALISBURY CALENDAR
Monday, Dec. 14 — Conservation Commission at Town
Hall, 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Dec. 16 — Transfer Station Building Committee at Sharon Town Hall, 5:30 p.m.; Transfer Station Recycling
Advisory Committee at Sharon Town Hall, 6:30 p.m.; Salisbury
Fire Commission at firehouse, 5:30 p.m.
Thursday Dec. 17 — Affordable Housing Commission at
Town Hall, 5:30 p.m.

St. Joh
12 M

n ’ s Ep i scop al Ch u rch
a i n S t r e e t , S a l i s bur y
860435920
s t j ohns
s a l i s bur y .or g

Praising God, Serving Neighbor

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A4

Salisbury

THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL, Thursday, December 10, 2015

Planting plans shown
for new town greenery

PHOTOS BY PATRICK L. SULLIVAN

Midori Fitzgerald and Reka Ladanyi, left, showed their origami cranes to the Rev. Diane
Monti-Catania during the Salisbury Artisans Group show on Saturday, Dec. 5.

Holiday gifts from area artisans
SALISBURY — The White
Hart hosted the Salisbury Artisans Group over the weekend.
A steady stream of customers
picked up gift baskets from the
Friends of the Scoville Library,
admired the new wool necktie
from Undermountain Weavers,
and stocked up on David Davis’
Texas Pickles.
Midori Fitzgerald and Reka
Ladanyi, members of the sixthgrade class at Salisbury Central
School, were selling origami
cranes — part of the 1,000 Cranes
of Hope project, with proceeds
going for cancer research.
The Rev. Diane Monti-Catania quizzed the pair, admired the
workmanship of the cranes and

PROPERTY
TRANSFERS
SALISBURY — The following
property transfers were recorded
at Town Hall.
Residential under $500,000
July 20, 12 Wells Hill Road
from Kevin Vetter to Stephanie
Comfort, $389,000.
Sept. 4, 31 Falls Mountain Road from Lance Herold
(trustee) to Jeffrey Rosenblum,
$225,000.
Sept. 30, 70 Race Track Road
from Leila Baroody to Raydin
Neary, $491,250.
Oct. 2, 254 Housatonic River
Road from Longmeadow Knoll
LLC to Theodore McGhee,
$240,000.
Nov. 9, 468 Wells Hill Road
from Lawrence and Lynn Hoage
to Ryan and Robert Cooper,
$90,000.
Residential $500,000 to
$1 million
Aug. 10, 13 Westmount Road
from Laurie and Mark Grusaski
to Jane Ross, $705,000.
Residential over $1 million
Oct. 7, 263 Wells Hill Road
from Tara Kelly to Anne Lindley,
$1,225,000.

Holiday shop
SALISBURY — Sweethaven
Farm has opened a Holiday Pop
Up Shop at 7 Academy St.
After nearly 30 years in business, owner Noreen Driscoll
Breslauer continues to grow the
design aspect and the community connection of Sweethaven
Farm. Also returning will be
her DIY workshops. The full
schedule can be found at www.
sweethavenfarmct.com.With a
minimum of four participants,
the Wine and Workshop evenings can be scheduled as well.
The Holiday Pop Up Shop will
be open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. every
day, except Thanksgiving and
Christmas, until Dec. 30.
For more information contact
the farm at 860-824-5765, the
shop at 860-671-7760 or email
sweethavenfarmct@gmail.com.

Drum circle
MILLERTON — There will
be a family drum circle at 4:30
p.m. followed by a dance with
the Berkshire Stompers from 5
to 6 p.m. every Sunday evening
during the winter months at the
North East Community Center
in Millerton.
For more information call
Chsarlie Keil at 860-435-0717.

Heidi Lindy used a foot loom to spin wool.
left a donation.
E m i l y Tr o w e r - Yo u n g ,
whose organic personal products line was formerly under
the Sustainable Shanti banner,
but is now Em & El Organics,
was working on two hours’
sleep Saturday morning, but
didn’t look it — which she
attributed to her Anti-Aging
Facial Elixir.
Heidi Lindy was spinning
wool on a foot-operated loom, to
the fascination of small children.
And on Sunday morning,

Davis was kept busy handing
out samples of his Texas Pickles.
Someone came along and,
with no preliminaries, said, “I
need two jars” and forked over
$20.
“You must be a repeat customer,” said Davis.
“Oh yeah,” said the man,
moving right along.
The artisans will be at the
Center on Main, 103 Main St.
in Falls Village, on Saturday, Dec.
12, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
— Patrick L. Sullivan

SALISBURY — The Board of
Selectmen convened on Monday, Dec. 7, at Town Hall for an
information meeting about the
Lakeville Community Conservancy’s proposal to renovate park
space in the village of Lakeville.
The group’s plans to date include five areas: the green space
at the junction of Routes 41 and
44 (next to the former firehouse);
the small park across Route 41,
next to Community Field and the
Patco convenience store; Bauer
Park, the grassy area on the Holley Street end of Factory Pond;
Bicentennial Park, at Route 44
and Holley Street; and the area
around the old railroad depot on
Ethan Allen Street.
After some discussion, the
selectmen and the conservancy
representatives, including Susan Galluzzo, agreed to confine
discussion at the Dec. 7 meeting
to the first two areas on the list.
First Selectman Curtis Rand
expressed reservations about the
proposals — including concerns
about damaging tree root systems, the dam at Factory Pond
and the idea of putting steps in
Bicentennial Park — but also
said, “None of us are against
anything to make Lakeville look
better.”
There is a set of plans on
display at Town Hall.
Other news
• Rand asked the selectmen
if they agreed with the idea
of resubmitting a request for
a state Small Town Economic
Assistance Program grant for
construction of the new transfer station. Both Salisbury and
Sharon asked for the maximum
amount, $500,000, last year and
were turned down. Selectmen
Jim Dresser and Kitty Kiefer were
both in favor of reapplying.
• Rand said there should be a
decision on a request for a federal
grant for the new transfer station

by the end of the year. He noted
the Transfer Station Building
Committee meets next week to
consider proposals for lowering
the cost of construction for the

new transfer station, and said
the matter will be ready to go
to town meetings in January or
February 2016.
— Patrick L. Sullivan

Vigil of mourning
SALISBURY — In observance of the third anniversary of the Sandy
Hook Elementary School tragedy, as well as in remembrance of the
90,000 victims of gun violence in America since December 2012,
the Northwest Corner Committee for Gun Violence Prevention is
joining with the Newtown Foundation and Faiths United to Prevent
Gun Violence to participate in a nationwide vigil of mourning and
remembrance for all those who have fallen victim to gun violence
in America.
The vigil will take place on Saturday, Dec. 12, from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m.
in front of The White Hart inn. The event will take place regardless
of the weather. If possible, attendees should bring their own candles.

A Service
of

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PHOTO BY PATRICK L. SULLIVAN

A bird in a hand, at firehouse
The art work that appeared on one of the garage doors at the
former firehouse at 9 Sharon Road over Thanksgiving is a
temporary installation, according to owner Jennifer Thomas.
The work is by Danielle Mailer (see story in Compass).

The

Salisbury

Forum

Where Ideas Come Toge t her

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Paul Goldberger
Preeminent architecture critic,
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7:30 p.m.
Walker Auditorium,
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Sharon

THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL, Thursday, December 10, 2015

A5

Lights on, Sharon parades
By Lizett Pajuelo

PHOTO BY JENNIFER L. K. CLARK

Chelsea Ambrozaitis, a member of the Silver Lake Board of Directors, presented Silver
Lake’s outgoing executive director, Tim Hughes, with a playful gift that was both punny
and chocolatey.

With puns and chocolate, Silver
Lake says farewell to Tim Hughes
By Jennifer L. K. Clark

SHARON — The Silver Lake
community gathered Sunday,
Dec. 6, to bid farewell to the
conference center’s longtime
director, Tim Hughes.
Hughes has been executive
director of the camp and conference center since 2014. Prior
to that, he spent 11 years as
co-director with his wife, Anne
Hughes. Anne left that position
in 2014 to pursue a career in
social work.
Silver Lake Conference Center in Sharon is owned by the
Connecticut Conference of
the United Church of Christ.
The conference purchased the
property in 1957 to use as an
outdoor ministry site for youth
programming. Over the past 58
years, the operation has grown
from a summer camp to a conference center offering off-season retreats to church groups,
schools, hobbyists and other
groups. The camp has both high
and low ropes courses, as well as
meeting spaces for day retreats,
and serves meals in the dining
hall to retreat participants.
Friends, board members,
colleagues and former summer
staff members offered tributes
in word and song. Recurring
themes were Hughes’s work to
develop leaders and his and his
wife’s efforts to improve the
camp, both financially and in
the physical plant.
“Tim has worked so hard to
put church in church camp,” said
Charlie Kuchenbrod, executive
assistant conference minister
for the Connecticut Conference.
“There is no doubt that Silver
Lake is in a much, much better place today [than when he
started].”
Kuchenbrod spoke both as a
colleague and as a parent of Silver
Lake campers. He said how grateful he was for Hughes’s guidance
of his own children, who were
campers and then summer staff
members. “When we say our
mission is to develop leaders for
the world and the church, I think
he got that.”

Over their tenure at Silver
Lake, the Hugheses have balanced the budget, reduced incidences of bullying, upgraded a
number of buildings, overseen
the construction of a new basketball court, new cabins and a
new health and welcome center,
and completed the renovation of
the oldest retreat building. They
have reached out to neighboring
states and now see campers coming in growing numbers from
Rhode Island, Massachusetts and
New York.
In addition to heartfelt tributes, the afternoon included a

lot of playfulness, capturing the
spirit of Hughes’s leadership
style. There were camp songs,
puns, a little bit of chocolate and
a lot of laughter.
“When Tim started as director, some people said, ‘How can
someone carry on the spirit who
has never been a camper here?’”
said Whendi Cook, a longtime
Silver Lake volunteer and personal friend of Hughes. “I can attest
that Tim has been a camper here
every day of his tenure.”
The new director has not been
named yet but an announcement
is expected soon.

PHOTO BY LIZETT PAJUELO

Mike from “Monsters, Inc.” commandeered this fire truck for
Sharon’s Parade of Lights on Saturday, Dec. 5.
in the sidelines.
Following the parade, the
public was invited to the Sharon
Historical Society for hot cider
and homemade goodies.

down Main Street. There were
traditional characters such as
Frosty the Snowman and Santa,
and less traditional ones such as
cows, giraffes and “Mike,” the
small one-eyed green monster
from Pixar’s “Monsters, Inc.” and
“Monsters University.”
As the vehicles made their
way toward the firehouse, some
played Christmas songs and others threw candy to the children

HousaTonics sing
holiday tunes
SHARON — The Sharon
Woman’s Club will host the
HousaTonics on Thursday,
Dec. 17.
The Salisbury-based barbershop singing group, famous for
its old-fashioned harmonies, will
sing holiday songs in addition
to its regular offerings. All are
welcome to this free event at
1:30 p.m. at the Congregational
Church.

SHARON CALENDAR
Thursday, Dec. 10 — Sewer & Water Commission at Town
Hall, 7 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 14 — Sharon Center School Board of Education
at school library, 6 p.m.; Inland Wetlands Commission at Town
Hall, 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Dec. 16 — Transfer Station Building Committee
at Sharon Town Hall, 5:30 p.m.; Transfer Recycling Advisory
Committee at Sharon Town Hall, 6:30 p.m.; Conservation
Commission at Town Hall, 7 p.m.

Santa on Dec. 12

Closing the window on new transfer station ideas
SHARON — The Salisbury
Sharon Resource Recovery Authority and the Transfer Station
Building Committee had a special meeting at Sharon Town Hall
on Wednesday, Dec. 2.
Adjustments continue to be
made to the plans for the new
transfer station, which will be
built on property near Dimond
Road in Salisbury, near the Millerton/town of Northeast border.
The new transfer station must
be ready for use by Jan. 1, 2021.
“The gates on the present
facility, in Lakeville, are going to be closed and the keys
turned over on Dec. 31, 2020,”
said Bob Palmer at the Dec. 2
meeting. Palmer is a member of
the Transfer Recycling Advisory
Committee (TRAC).
At a recent informational
meeting in Sharon at which
(almost) final plans for the new
facility were presented, several
people asked if The Hotchkiss

School would relent and allow
the station to remain where it is.
Salisbury First Selectman
Curtis Rand had said adamantly
at that meeting that Hotchkiss
will not change its mind. He reiterated that at the Dec. 2 meeting.
Several specific suggestions
had been made at the Sharon
informational meeting on ways
to reduce the cost of building
the new transfer station. Builder
Mike Dignacco in particular had
offered a detailed list of possible
savings.
The committee members are
in the process now of meeting
with members of the public and
hearing their requests. Accommodations are being made when
possible. The building committee will meet in Sharon on Dec.
16 at Town Hall. The building
committee will meet first, at 5:30
p.m.; a TRAC meeting will follow.
After that, the committee
members plan to move forward

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with a final plan, so that work
can begin.
“We have to close the window
to new input pretty soon,” Rand
said. “We can’t have people coming to us in January and saying,
‘Let’s try this and let’s try that.’
We’ve looked at a lot of options.
Now it’s time to move.”
“We don’t have the kind of
time anymore that we had when
this process started,” Palmer said.

SHARON — There will be
cookies, cocoa and Santa at
Sharon Health Care Center on
Saturday, Dec. 12, from 10 to
11:30 a.m. The community is
invited to come for a visit and
some holiday refreshments.

“We are already coming very
close to the edge.”
— Cynthia Hochswender

Small artworks, big ideas at SHS
SHARON — A juried exhibition and sale of small artworks is
running at Sharon Historical Society & Museum through Dec. 18.
Called “What’s the Big Idea,” it is an exhibition of small-scale artworks. Sharon residents Carl Chaiet and Lynn Kearcher will judge
entries. Cash prizes of $100, $75 and $50 will be awarded.

We Know Kids.

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SHARON — The annual holiday tree lighting and the Parade
of Lights were held on Dec. 5 on
the Green.
The festivities began at the
Hotchkiss Library, before sunset,
with cookies, cider and Santa.
Even though it was a chilly
evening, dozens of people then
gathered on the Green to see the
lighting of the evergreen tree. The
creche and the menorah were on
the Green already (Hanukkah
began this year on Dec. 6).
Before the lights went on,
everyone sang holiday carols and
enjoyed a musical performance
by the Salisbury Band Christmas
Brass and Hot Chocolate Society.
The tree came to life as the
crowd sang “O Christmas Tree.”
There were plenty of admiring
oohs and ahs as the lights came
on.
After the tree lighting, the
festivities continued with fire
trucks and tractors — decorated
with Christmas lights and inflatable ornaments — parading

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A6

Cornwall

THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL, Thursday, December 10, 2015

Concerns about survey at school
By Karen Bartomioli

CORNWALL — Several
weighty issues will be on the
agenda of the Cornwall Board
of Education’s Dec. 16 meeting.
Another may or may not.
A survey taken Nov. 23 by

seventh-graders at Cornwall
Consolidated School (CCS) has
sparked anger among parents,
according to board member
Rachel Matsudaira. She said the
survey included questions about
sex, drugs and alcohol; and that
it was mandatory and parents

The Saed brothers take
their show on the road
CORNWALL — Danny Saed nior centers, where he will seek
donned a suit, tie and his interviews in exchange for his
great-grandfather’s fedora for a performances.
“Bar mitzvah means I am a
one-man variety show at Geer
Village in North Canaan on man,” Danny told The Lakeville
Journal prior to his performance.
Nov. 19.
Residents enjoyed his piano “I’m not so sure about that, but I
PHOTO BY KAREN BARTOMIOLI
Body care products, and quirky little books are big sellers at playing and stand-up comedy, like that I am doing this project.
with both standards and original I will go to as many places as my
The Wish House in West Cornwall.
material performed for both. mom can take me and interview
They sang along to “Consider people about stories from their
Yourself ” and “Somewhere Over past, or whatever they want to
the Rainbow,”laughed at his talk about.”
Meanwhile, his brother will
corny jokes and were intrigued
by his recitation of the lyrics of be bringing songs, stories and
puppets to children.
Tom Lehrer’s, “Who’s Next?”
Danny’s project is called A
Danny and his twin brother,
CORNWALL — Shopping
Arieh, are Cornwall residents and Kinder’s Gift to the Elders. It
local is not so difficult, especially
the sons of Leslie Elias and Larry is also part of his eighth-grade
if one heads for The Wish House
Saed. They were bar mitzvahed Explorations program project,
in the center of West Cornwall.
on Nov. 14. and are beginning a sponsored by the Cornwall
Owner Bianca Griggs spends
year-long extension of their mitz- Consolidated Fund for Excela lot of time searching out
vah project of traveling through lence. Toward the end of the
unique items in a wide variety of
Connecticut and Massachusetts school year, he will present to
categories, while always striving
spend some time exploring its to entertain.
the community his collection
for quality and affordable prices.
riches. Among the choices are
Arieh will go to child care of elder stories.
“A lot of my customers are
clothing, socks in argyle and centers. Danny will go to se— Karen Bartomioli
looking for stocking stuffers
other patterns, scarves, hats and
and last-minute gifts,” she
other handmade apparel.
said. “I look for products that
There are lots of toys, games
are made in the area and body
and clothes for children, as well
products that are good and
as lighting and other decorative
wholesome.”
items for kids’ rooms and the
Those who come for converest of the home, including
nience should be convinced to
lanterns of all sorts, from those
made of paper to others forged
of metal for the outdoors.
Items for the kitchen are both
practical and fun. There is lots
of glazed crockery and jewelry
in a wide range of prices.
Bath salts are big, Griggs said.
CORNWALL — A proposed She sells various kinds, includsurveillance policy, to be added ing a selection from Kneipp that
to the Safe School Climate Plan includes eucalyptus for natural
in the 5000 policy series, was re- cold and sinus relief.
viewed at the November meeting
“One of my big sellers right
of the Board of Education. A final now are little books on mindfulversion will likely be put to a vote ness, on how to be less self-centhis month.
tered and use more common
The goal is to make it clear sense. I’m not sure if people buy
how the cameras and recorded them for themselves, or others,”
PHOTO BY KAREN BARTOMIOLI
DVRs can be used, who has access she said, with a mischievous
Danny
Saed
entertained
at
Geer
Village
in North Canaan
to that data and what the storage smile.
in November as part of his bar mitzvah and school project.
protocol will be. It will also define
There are also greeting cards,
how surveillance can apply to picture postcards and everydisciplinary cases.
thing a host or hostess could
ORNWALL ALENDAR
The proposed policy is the one want for entertaining, such as
currently used by the Region One napkins and candles.
Monday, Dec. 14 — Park and Recreation Commission at
school board at the high school,
Town Hall, 7:30 p.m.
Whimsical gift wrapping is
which states that cameras should offered at no extra charge.
Tuesday, Dec. 15 — Board of Selectmen at Town Hall, 7:30 p.m.
be installed only where there is“no
Wednesday, Dec. 16 — Board of Education at CCS, 4 p.m.;
There are also paintings by
reasonable expectation of privacy.” local artists both in the shop
Board of Finance at CCS, 7:30 p.m.
It also sets guidelines that and below, at the Souterrain
require there be a demonstrat- Gallery, which is open Thursed need; that surveillance is day through Sunday, 11 a.m.
appropriate and effective; that to 5 p.m.
CORNWALL — The traditional Boxing Day Reading will be held
alternative measures have been
Wish House hours are Saturday, Dec. 26, at 4 p.m. at the North Cornwall Meeting House.
considered; as well as expense. Wednesday through Friday, 11
Signs must be posted that cam- a.m. to 6 p.m., and from 11 a.m. Tom Walker will read from Marcel Pagnol’s “Memories of Childhood,” with heartwarming stories filled with optimism and delight.
eras are in use.
to 5 p.m. on weekends.
Admission is free, but donations for the Cornwall Library are
Currently, videos are recorded
— Karen Bartomioli welcomed.
on a loop. When the DVR is full,

Making Christmas
wishes come true

HOLIDAY
GIFTS

Use of cameras,
DVRs at CCS is
discussed

C

C

were not given notice or an opportunity to give consent to allow
their children to be exposed to
mature content.
She said the survey came from
the Housatonic Youth Service
Bureau (HYSB) and has been
given in recent years at many
of the regional schools and at
Housatonic Valley Regional High
School. See story, below.
Matsudaira, who has a seventh-grader at the school, said
she was hearing daily from parents, and she was advising them
to write to the school board,
contacting all of the members.
She said she was receiving resistance about putting the issue
on the meeting agenda, based on

Why there is an assessment survey
FALLS VILLAGE — Nick Pohl, executive director of the
Housatonic Youth Service Bureau (HYSB), offered some clarification about the survey, in a phone interview on Dec. 8.
The survey is not actually put out by the Youth Service Bureau,
he said. It is an initiative of the Northwest Corner Prevention
Network, which is made up of several area agencies and individuals, including the HYSB.
The survey is not prepared locally. It comes from an organization in Minnesota called the Search Institute, which also
tabulates the results.
There are about 160 questions directed at young people
in middle school and high school. Many of them assess how
young people see themselves; how they relate to their parents
and families and the larger community; how they assess risky
behaviors such as taking drugs or engaging in sexual activity.
This is the third time the Prevention Network has sent the
survey out to the Region One schools. The first time was in
2009/2010; the second was in 2011/12.
The Youth Service Bureau offers to administer the survey
but, Pohl said, the elementary schools have chosen so far to
administer it themselves.
“We give them the surveys and they decide how they want
to handle it.”
The surveys have been completed and turned in from all six
elementary schools, including Cornwall Consolidated, where
Pohl estimated that there are fewer than a dozen students in
the seventh grade.
The results are used to help the prevention network and the
Youth Service Bureau try to help youngsters who are in danger
of engaging in risky behaviors of any kind, up to and including
taking prescription drugs illegally. There is a heroin epidemic
nationwide and in the Northwest Corner; there were 16 heroin
deaths in Litchfield County in the first six months of 2015.
The HYSB offers free counseling to students in Region One
and their families. It also runs prevention programs on everything
from drugs and alcohol to sexual harassment and date rape.
Pohl said that there is a great need for such services in the
area and very little funding. The surveys can also help with
getting grants.
“When you’re doing anything prevention related, it’s helpful
to have data; it guides your interventions community wide and
helps you do strategic prevention work. You always want to start
with an assessment of what’s happening in your community.
“It’s also valuable to have a baseline so you can measure
whether your interventions and programs are working.”
For more on the HYSB, go to www.hysb.org. There is also
information at the HYSB website about the Northwest Corner
Prevention Network.
— Cynthia Hochswender

HOLIDAY
SALE
HOLIDAY
SALE
HOLIDAY SALE

Boxing Day at Cornwall Library

tapeover begins, according to
Cornwall Consolidated School
Principal Michael Croft. There
are two different systems, as well,
with some only recording when
motion triggers the camera.
— Karen Bartomioli

Democratic
annual caucus
CORNWALL — The Democratic Town Committee will hold
its annual caucus for electing
members to the committee on
Sunday, Jan. 10, at 3 p.m. at the
Cornwall Library. All registered
Democrats are encouraged to
attend and to vote.

o ing

en s a

an opinion from Superintendent
Patricia Chamberlain that it is
not a school board matter.
Principal Michael Croft confirmed the situation.
“The survey is one that, for
the past seven years, has been
given to Region One seventh-,
ninth- and 11th-graders every
other year. It is part of an effort
by HYSB and the Northwest
Corner Prevention Network,”
Croft responded in an email.
“Because of an error, it was given
to students this year before parents were made aware and given
the chance to opt out.
“There are questions related
to sex,” he confirmed.

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Kent

THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL, Thursday, December 10, 2015

A7

Jingle, jingle, clop, clop, clop, ho ho ho
By Lizett Pajuelo

PHOTO BY CYNTHIA HOCHSWENDER

The evergreen near Town
Hall is now lit for the holiday
season.

A holiday gift:
warm weather
for tree lighting
KENT — For the third year in
a row, holiday revelers gathered
around the petite but handsome
tree on the Green next to Town
Hall. The sun had already set by
the time the crowd of about two
dozen adults and young children
came together to see the holiday
lights turned on.
First there was cocoa and
cookies. Then First Selectman
Bruce Adams welcomed everyone and shared a bit of the
tree’s history.
It was planted three years ago,
by the Kent Garden Club and
Bruce Bennett of Kent Greenhouse and Gardens.
The first Christmas after the
tree was planted, the weather
was perfect, with a light snow
creating the appropriate holiday
ambience.
The second year, Adams recalled, the ceremony had to be
canceled because the weather
was so bad.
This year, the temperature
was unseasonably mild and
there was no precipitation to
speak of. Although it didn’t exactly scream out “white Christmas,” it made for a pleasant
evening for all who had gathered
together to celebrate the season.
Adams thanked Rob Giampietro of the Bull’s Bridge Golf
Club and electrician John Gleason for running an electrical
conduit out to the tree, at no
cost to the town (a savings of
about $2,000).
And then the tree was lit and
a few holiday carols were sung,
with the help of musician and
singer George Potts.
More holiday lights are on
the menu for this Sunday, Dec.
13, when the Kent volunteer
firefighters will host their annual
Parade of Lights. It will begin at
around 5:30 p.m., when participants will meet in the parking
area near Town Hall The festooned vehicles will process at
around 6 p.m. to the firehouse
on Maple Street.
The fire volunteers will also
host their annual stuff-a-truck
event that day, from 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. Unwrapped toys and
non-perishable food will be
collected for the Kent Santa
Fund and the Kent Food Bank.
Anyone with questions or
who would like to be a part of
the parade is asked to contact
Jessie Rundall, 845-416-1873.
— Cynthia Hochswender

KENT — Children and adults rode through town on an oldtime carriage drawn by horses decorated with Christmas garlands
on Sunday, Dec. 6.
The carriage departed from Kent Greenhouse at 20-minute intervals, and stopped at the entrances of all participating businesses:
Kent Village Barns, Kent Wine and Spirit, Kent Pizza Garden and
Pantages Gems. Some businesses greeted riders with a special treat,
such as hot chocolate or candy.
The children’s faces lit up at the sight of horses wearing jingling
bells. They couldn’t wait to mount the carriage.
“Kids love it, and they love the horses,” said Audrey King of Kent
Greenhouse.
Coachman Stephen Podhajecki and his horses came for the event
from Loon Meadow Farm in Norfolk. The business — which is run
by Podhajecki’s wife — has provided its services to similar events for
roughly 30 years, he said. Horse-drawn carriages are very popular
for Christmas-related events, he added.
The carriage rides ran from noon to 4 p.m.

Kahn pastels at 25 Main St.
KENT — The Morrison Gallery is no longer open at its
former Old Barn Road location. Its temporary location is at 25
Main St., across from Kent Wine and Spirit.
There will be a show there of pastels by Wolf Kahn, from
Dec. 12 to Jan. 31, with an opening reception on Saturday, Dec.
12, from 5 to 7 p.m.
Gallery owner William Morrison is planning to build a new
space in town.
— Cynthia Hochswender

At senior center:
forever (egg foo) yong
By Cynthia Hochswender

KENT — The lunch options for Kent seniors just expanded.
Three restaurants in town will now contribute one meal a year to the
weekly senior meals, offered for $2 per person at noon on Fridays
at the Senior Center.
The Kent longterm care facility, which used to help provide food
for the weekly meal, has essentially closed, and a new provider was
needed to fill the gap. Other meals are provided by the private schools
in town (Kent, South Kent and Marvelwood).
First Selectman Bruce Adams approached some of the many
restaurants in town and got commitments from three of them to
provide one meal a year. On Dec. 11, there will be a meal from the
Shanghai Chinese restaurant; on April 1 the meal will come from
the Villager; and on May 27 the meal will be provided by the Fife
‘n’ Drum.
The program is open to Kent seniors with a suggested donation
of $2. The doors of the red barn at Templeton Farms on Swifts Lane
open at 11:30 a.m., and the meal is served at noon. The meals offer
a chance for seniors to get out, socialize and have a hot meal.
For more information on how to take part in the weekly meals,
call Park and Recreation Director Lesly Ferris at 860-927-1003.

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–GROCERY–

KENT CALENDAR

BRAWNY
PAPER TOWELS

Thursday, Dec. 10 — Planning and Zoning Commission
Incentive Housing Zone Study Subcommittee special meeting
at Town Hall, 6 p.m.; Planning & Zoning Commission at Town
Hall, 7 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 12 — Kent Village Center Streetscape Committee at Town Hall, 8 a.m.
Monday, Dec. 14 — Inland Wetlands Commission at Town
Hall, 7 p.m.; Historic District Commission at Town Hall, 7 p.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 15 — Board of Finance at Town Hall, 7 p.m.

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Wismar’s art
is on display
KENT — Pentimento, a
collection of abstract acrylic
paintings created by local artist
Kathy Wismar, will debut at the
Gallery at Naples Studio on Saturday, Dec. 12, from 6 to 9 p.m.
Wismar began her career
working in clay, building what
she calls “functional art.” Her
pieces are colorful and beg to
be held and used as well as
being displayed. Her paintings
extend her love of color and are
reflective of experiences living
in several U.S. cities as well as
her permanent home in Falls
Village.
Pentimento will run from
Dec. 12 to Jan. 12. The Gallery
at Naples Studio is open on
weekends and by appointment
at 3 Landmark Lane in the Kent
Green. Preview of the work is
on-line at www.naplesrestoration.com/gallery.

PHOTO BY LIZETT PAJUELO

Coachman Stephen Podhajecki from Loon Meadow Farm in Norfolk took visitors on carriage
rides in Kent on Sunday, Dec. 6.

Christmas Eve Service 4PM
A service of Holy Communion,
Candlelight and carols
Children Most Welcome
St. Thomas Episcopal Church,
40 Leedsville Road, Amenia Union
(Hitchcock Corners)
Any questions? Call Rev. Betsy Fisher

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A8

THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL, Thursday, December 10, 2015

North Canaan

Bringing a historic theater up to date,
without ruining the good memories
By Karen Bartomioli

NORTH CANAAN — A live
concert scheduled for Dec. 19 at
the Colonial Theatre will mark
the reopening of the historic
landmark on Railroad Street.
The art deco decor and the
dinner theater-seating that
slopes down to a small stage
make it an ideal venue for live
concerts, plays and other events
that call for a more intimate
setting.
The upstairs ballroom, currently a second movie theater,
remains a large, open and flexible
space.
The theater closed in the mid1990s. Soon after, a group came
together to study how the theater
could thrive going forward. The
primary obstacle was the three
screens needed to make a profit
on first-run films.
And there was a valid concern
that trying to recreate what it had
been would only prove that “you
can’t go home again.”
The property was later pur-

chased by David Ohler and Phil
Ghi, who refurbished the ceiling
paint and period wall sconces.
Old theater seats were replaced
with banquettes and dinner
tables on a series of platforms
above the stage to allow for
dinner and a movie. The movie

‘We need to give people a reason to come
here, and offer tie-ins
with other businesses,
so we can all benefit.’
— John Lannen
screen was added to the upstairs
ballroom. There is a full kitchen
and catering facilities.
New owner Ben Wohlfert gave
careful consideration to how the
theater can be reincarnated as a
financially stable business and
an asset to the town.
He had marketing sur-

veys done and invested about
$150,000 in a new heating system,
plumbing and other upgrades
and repairs.
He has hired John Lannen,
who has been coordinating the
annual Railroad Days festival, as
project manager.
Lannen agreed it seems
Wohlfert has hit just the right
note of keeping the old-time
movie house feel, without the
movies. They believe that live
events, such as the offerings at
Infinity Hall in Norfolk, will not
only attract locals but also people
from out of town.
“You can’t expect a business
like this in a small town to be
solely supported by the residents,” Lannen said. “We need
to give people a reason to come
here, and offer tie-ins with other
businesses, so we can all benefit.”
That said, Wohlfert envisions
including in a future schedule
of happenings things like graduations, recitals, parties and
wedding receptions, much like
the old days.

Considine reviving storefronts
NORTH CANAAN — Three
new businesses are in the works
in the town center and are expected to fill empty storefronts
in the coming weeks.
All will be owned by John
Considine, in conjunction with
various business partners. He
will continue to operate his
Country Classic Homes and
painting businesses.
Considine offered a tour
last week of the former Brewer
Bros. car dealership on Railroad
Street (Route 7), where work is
underway to transform it into
two businesses. The property is
owned by Riga Construction, a
new company Considine formed
with Roger Hedman.
The north end of the building
will be home to Northwest Auto
Sales and Service, where a new
main entrance will allow customers to avoid walking on the
narrow state highway shoulder.
The former Chrysler dealership closed in June after more
than a century in business. It
was purchased two years prior
by Jim’s Garage owner Bill
Hower, who consolidated the
two businesses.
Considine purchased only the
Brewer Bros. property.
“It will pick up where Jim’s
Garage left off,” Considine said.
“We will be selling used Subarus
and any other good cars we can
find, and we will be servicing any
make of vehicles.”
That includes quick oil changes.
The facade will transformed
with new siding and service bay

Warm winter
clothing at CCCC
NORTH CANAAN — The
Canaan Child Care Center was
awarded a $1,000 grant from
the Community Foundation of
Northwest Connecticut, Inc. toward its warm apparel program.
The grant will ensure that the
children who attend the center
will have a winter coat, hat,
mittens and boots this winter.
If funding allows, items will be
provided for other children in
the community as well.
For more information, or to
make a donation, call Frances
Chapell at 860-824-0597.

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doors. Considine, who has done
restoration work on numerous
commercial buildings, envisions
a gray barn door replica replacing
one of the large entryways on the
main road.
Inside, the old service garage
area is being remodeled to make
it more comfortable. There will
be a waiting room with coffee
and a glass wall for a view of the
garage interior.
On the south end, the former
car showroom will be remodeled,
with a new entrance just off the
municipal parking lot, for a millwork shop owned by Considine’s
Canaan Valley Group.
It will include a showroom
with a mix of wood and metal
custom cabinetry and other
pieces. A new picture window
will be lit up at night, adding

vitality to the town center.
Considine noted they are
getting rid of the old, bangedup metal guardrail at that end
of the building and replacing it
with more attractive posts that
will be encased in wood.
All of that is expected to be
completed within the next six
weeks.
Meanwhile, a couple of blocks
away on Church Street (Route
44), the recently closed Canaan
Tile and Stone (formerly S. J.
Masters) will re-open as Berkshire Design, with Considine and
partner Thomas Ball.
It will be a kitchen and bath
showroom, with tile and stone
they will sell and install.
Considine bought the two
buildings there two years ago.
— Karen Bartomioli

“I found the program from
my grandfather Fred Wohlfert’s
graduation that was held on the
theater stage,” he said. “That was
the Class of 1939, the last one to
graduate from the old Canaan
High School.”
He is also looking into licensing to be able to show old films,
or marathons of “really good”
TV series. “Had we been open
already, we might be showing old
Star Wars films or TV shows to
celebrate the new movie release.”
Another program being offered there is the Music Lab,
now open in one of the theater
storefronts. It offers jam sessions,
free lessons and a place for paid
lessons to be offered.
Lannen has been busy sorting
through memorabilia to hang on
the lobby walls, and working on
details of the upcoming concert.
It will be a fundraiser for the
restoration of Canaan Union Station and feature The Steve Dunn
Band (Dunn is a North Canaan
native), Molliekate Dionne (a
rising star from town) and the
Winsted-based Belle of the Fall.
Tickets are $20 and include a
snack buffet. Wine and beer will
be sold. Doors open at 7:30 p.m.
The show begins at 8 p.m.
Purchase tickets at C.A. Lindell’s, Mahaiwe Jewelers, Olde
School Deli, North Canaan Town
Hall, the Fuller building, Print
Masters and The Cordial Shop.
Anyone interested in booking
the theater or seeking more information can call 860-824-7723.

NORTH CANAAN
CALENDAR
Thursday, Dec. 10 —
Board of Education at NCES,
7 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 14 — Planning and Zoning Commission at Town Hall, 7 p.m.

PHOTO BY KAREN BARTOMIOLI

The historic Colonial Theatre on Railroad Street is about to
reopen as a live venue for concerts and other gatherings in
its refurbished art deco surroundings.

plantin seeds farm kitchen

99 Main Street, North Canaan, Connecticut

Make a rustic toy at FYI workshop
NORTH CANAAN — Learn to make an old-fashioned toy at a
free FYI Workshop of the Housatonic Youth Service Bureau. This
workshop will be held Saturday, Dec. 12, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., at the
Canaan firehouse.
Children ages 8 and up, accompanied by an adult, are invited
to work together to craft their own rustic toy in time for the holiday season. This program is hosted in conjunction with Lost Art
Workshops.

DECEMBER CALENDAR OF EVENTS
***

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FRIDAYS: DECEMBER 4, 11, 18
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Soup’s on
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Paused: December 28th through January 15th
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Falls Village

THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL, Thursday, December 10, 2015

A9

Faces wreathed with smiles at annual FFA wreath night
By Patrick L. Sullivan

FALLS VILLAGE — Wayne
Jenkins and Tracy Atwood,
members of the Class of 1962
at Housatonic Valley Regional
High School (HVRHS), were reunited at the wreath-tying table
on Wednesday evening, Dec. 2.
The occasion was the first of
two “production nights” at the
high school, sponsored by the
Housatonic Valley FFA chapter.
FFA President Shelby Jacquier (of North Canaan) said the
turnout was the highest she had
experienced in her four years at
the school.
She was shuttling around between the cutters, the bunchers
and the people tying the wreaths;
weighing in the boxes of clippings; and checking out clippers.
The students get points based
on production. The top producers earn a trip, destination to be
determined.
The wreaths are sold in the
FFA holiday store, which opened
Thursday, Dec. 3, and remains
open through Wednesday, Dec.
23 (hours are 10 a.m. to 4:30
p.m.).
The store also has Christmas
trees, poinsettias and other holiday decorations.
Last year, the store grossed
about $63,000. Jacquier said
this year’s goal is a little higher,
at $65,000.
FFA Treasurer Kevin Massey
(of Sharon) said the break-even
point is $56,000.
The FFA donates some of the
proceeds from the holiday store
to four area food banks.
Ryan Washburn, a sophomore
from Salisbury, was in charge of
the hot chocolate. Using a 100cup coffee maker, he poured
instant cocoa mix into the hot
water, and stirred carefully, trying to avoid any slopping over.
It wasn’t a very precise recipe.
He finished with the second of
two 25-ounce cans, and eyed
the third.
“They told me to put in at
least two cans,” he said.
Someone came over for a taste
test, and advised him to add a
little more.
Cricket Jacquier, an HVRHS
alumnus, clearly had not lost his
wreath-tying touch. Clad in just
a T-shirt and jeans despite the
chill, he swiftly and efficiently
attached bunches of white pine
and red and white cedar clippings
to the wire wreath frame.
Asked his personal best time,
he said, “Seven minutes.”
Jenkins and Atwood were not
moving quite as fast. Atwood was
taking care to alternate different
bunches, for a pleasing effect.
“It’s what we call diversity,”
he said.
HVRHS teacher Dave Moran
said a good production night will
result in 70 to 80 wreaths.
The workshop, as usual,
smelled strongly of pine, and
resounded with laughter and
good-natured kidding.

Shelby Jacquier, FFA president, advised a group of students and parents on how to proceed.

PHOTOS BY PATRICK L. SULLIVAN

Ryan Washburn stirred hot chocolate for the crowd.

PHOTO BY PATRICK L. SULLIVAN

The Cullerton sisters bundled pine clippings together for
making wreaths. From left: Eve, Mari and Kyra Cullerton.

On Monday morning, Garth Kobal hung works for the Dec. 12 sale of art at the Hunt Library.
The works will be covered until the sale; no peeking at this photo!

100 pieces in fifth 12x12 art sale
FALLS VILLAGE — Garth
Kobal was bringing artworks out
of the basement at the D.M. Hunt
Library Monday morning, Dec.
7, prior to hanging them on the
library’s Art Wall for the 12x12
Turns Five! art show on Saturday,
Dec. 12, 5 to 7 p.m.
Kobal said there are precisely
100 submissions for the show —
an increase of about 30 pieces

Wayne Jenkins, left, and Tracy Atwood, Class of 1962, were
reunited at the FFA production night on Wednesday, Dec. 2.

FALLS VILLAGE
CALENDAR
Monday, Dec. 14 — Board
of Finance at Town Hall, 6:30
p.m.; Board of Selectmen at
Town Hall, 7:30 p.m.

Send Family & Friends
announcements to
darrylg@lakevillejournal.com

Email reporter
Patrick Sullivan at
patricks@lakevillejournal.com

MURPHY CREST
TREE FARM

from previous years. Sixty artists
are represented.
The 12x12 shows were started
in 2011 by Sergei Fedorjaczenko
and the late Christopher Morley.
The pieces must be 12 inches
square in size.
Other than that, anything
goes.
In the basement, pieces were
stacked up on long tables. A

quick look revealed a wide
range of media — pen and ink,
photography, a vinyl record of
the music from the 1959 film
“Ben-Hur” serving as the base
of a multi-media piece.
Kobal said the pieces will
be hung by Wednesday of this
week and then covered prior to
Saturday’s show.
— Patrick L. Sullivan

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MONDAY, DECEMBER 14TH, 7:00 PM
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Artisans Group
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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16TH, 7:00 PM
Hollenbeck Room

FALLS VILLAGE — The David M. Hunt Library will host the
Artisans Group Holiday Market
on Saturday, Dec. 12, from 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Center on
Main.
This event is a collaboration
between the library and the
Artisans Group, an association
of artisan craft professionals residing in the Northwest Corner.
A portion of the proceeds will
benefit the library. Purchases
will be accompanied with a gift
certificate for a free dessert at the
Falls Village Inn.

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A10 THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL, Thursday, December 10, 2015

OBITUARIES
Arthur R. Taylor
SALISBURY — Arthur R.
Taylor, 80, former president of
CBS Inc. and 10th President of Muhlenberg
College died Dec. 3,
2015, with his loving
wife, Kathryn, and
his beloved daughter,
Annie, by his side at
Lehigh Valley Hospital-Cedar Crest in
Allentown, Pa.
A resident of Salisbury Township, Pa.,
and Salisbury, Conn., Taylor was
born July 6, 1935, in Elizabeth,
N.J. He was the son of the late
Marion (Scott) and Arthur Earl
Taylor.
A native of Rahway, N.J., he
graduated from Rahway High
School and went on to earn a
full scholarship and was a magna cum laude Phi Beta Kappa
graduate from Brown University, where he also received his
master’s degree and later served
as a trustee.
Taylor began his business
career with the First Boston
Corporation. He went on to
become vice president of finance,
executive vice president and a
director of International Paper
Company. Taylor was one of a
group of young fast-rising executives known as the Whiz Kids,
when at age 36 he was named
president and a director of CBS
Inc., where he was responsible
for the operations of the entire
company including the CBS
Television Network, CBS News
and the New York Yankees.
Taylor was founding chairman and president of cable television’s Entertainment Channel
(now the Arts and Entertainment
Network — A&E). He was also
the founding president of the
formidable New York City Partnership with Chairman David
Rockefeller.
In 1985, Fordham University named him dean of the Graduate School of Business Administration and dean of the faculty
of Business. In his seven years at
Fordham, he transformed the
young graduate school, which
subsequently awarded him an
honorary doctorate. Taylor then
served as president of Muhlenberg College for a decade
(1992–2002), during which time
Muhlenberg tripled its endowment, halved its debt and saw a
significant rise in admissions. Its
prominence as a fine liberal arts
college grew substantially.
Taylor served on the boards
of many corporations including
Toshiba, Eastern Airlines, Pitney
Bowes, the First Boston Corporation and The Travelers.
In addition, he held government advisory positions on
foreign policy under Presidents
Nixon and Carter.
He was a member of many
philanthropic boards including
New York Hospital, the Joffrey
Ballet, the Kiski School, the
American Assembly at Columbia
University (chairman), and he
was a member of the Council
on Foreign Relations.
He received numerous awards
and honorary doctorate degrees
from Bucknell, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and Simmons
College, to name a few. Throughout his career and after retiring
from Muhlenberg he continued
mentoring young people. His

students from Muhlenberg
regularly sought his advice as
did numerous people with whom he
worked and lived.
He and his wife,
Kathryn, lived in
Salisbury in the Old
Bushnell Tavern, an
historic home, which
he truly loved. He was
proud to live in Salisbury and served as a
commissioner of the
Historic District Commission.
He was a founding member of
the Berkshire Taconic Community Foundation and the Friends
of Washinee Park and was a
trustee of the Salisbury School.
He was incredibly proud of
his family. His three daughters
and their achievements were
everything to him. His four
grandchildren meant the world
to him and they felt the same
— not a day went by that he did
not speak to at least one of his
grandchildren.
In addition to his family, he
adopted hundreds of surrogate
sons, daughters, nieces and
nephews who depended on
his love and guidance. He was
known as “Uncle Arthur” to
many. He loved people and was
truly larger than life.
He is survived by the love
of his life, his wife Kathryn
(Pelgrift) Taylor, from whom
he never wanted to be apart;
his daughters, Martha (Taylor)
Josephson and her husband, Jon
Carter, Anne (Taylor) Madden
and her husband, Sean, and
Sarah (Taylor) Rountree and her
husband, John; his four beloved
grandchildren, David Arthur
Josephson, Zoe Taylor Josephson, John Taylor Madden and
Brody McFarland Rountree; his
sister, Marilyn (Taylor) Rocks;
his brothers- and sisters-in-law,
Robert Y. Pelgrift Jr. and his wife,
Susan, Elizabeth P. Boak and her
husband, Jeffrey, Anne P. Crawford and her husband, Gregory,
James D. Pelgrift and his wife,
Sara, Nancy P. Kocian and her
husband, Matt, and Christopher
Y. Pelgrift; 15 nieces and nephews
for whom he cared greatly; and
his dear friends the Scarpa family
in Salisbury.
The family asks that in lieu
of flowers, memorial contributions be made to Lehigh Valley
Health Network, which took
such great and caring care of
him for many years (Lehigh
Valley Health Network-Development Department, 2100 Mack
Blvd., 6th Floor, Allentown, PA
18105); The Kiski School, where
Arthur was a trustee and deeply
involved in mentoring the young
students (The Kiski School,
Advancement Office,1888 Brett
Lane, Saltsburg, PA 15681); or
the Friends of Washinee Park, a
project of deep interest to him
(Friends of Washinee Park, c/o
The Salisbury Association, PO
Box 553, Salisbury, CT 06068).
A memorial service will be
held at 2 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 18,
at the First Presbyterian Church
in Allentown.
Arrangements are under the
care of the J.S. Burkholder Funeral Home, www.jsburkholder.
com.
A second memorial service
in Salisbury will be held at a
later date.

Tom Crawford
MILLERTON — Tom Crawford of The Villages, Fla., and
formerly of Millerton, died Nov.
30, 2015.
Tom was the devoted, patient
and genuinely kind husband of
Susan Crawford.
He was the loving son of Lydia
Johnson of Millerton and the late
Francis Crawford and the younger brother to Linda Kaplan (of
Millerton, where she lives with
her husband, Sanford).
His easy-going, thoughtful
way won over Susan’s family
from day one. Uncle Tom was
adored and respected by numer-

ous nieces and nephews. In fact,
everyone loved Tom; he made
friends wherever he went, and
he will be greatly missed.
Tom bravely protected his
country, community and family.
He was an Army veteran who
served in Vietnam, and he was a
firefighter for the city of Poughkeepsie, N.Y.
A happy hour in his memory
was held Dec. 4 at Hacienda Hills
Country Club at The Villages.
A Celebration of Life will
be held on Dec. 13 at 1 p.m. at
American Legion Post No. 178
in Millerton.

Another obituary is on Page A11

www.facebook.com/thelakevillejournal

Polly Jo Masters
ANCRAMDALE — We
mourn the passing of Polly Jo
Masters of Ancramdale, who
died peacefully at home on
Dec. 4, 2015, surrounded by her
children, at the age of 91. The
family thanks the community
of caregivers and friends who
encircled her with love, companionship, laughter and music since
2008: Diane F., Keavy B., Joni F.,
Elizabeth M., Gaye P., Peggy O.,
Lolly S., Anne C., Julia H., Jackie
H., Mandy L., Mary S., Carol P.,
Brian C., Becky R., David H.,
Harold H., Terry B, and Gregg B.
Born in Beckley, W. Va., on
March 14, 1924, she was the
daughter of Effie Lajo Stalnaker
and Dr. John H. McCulloch.
After graduating from the
University of Kentucky, fate
ushered her through the doors
of Beckley’s WJLS radio station
in 1947 where, as Side-Saddle
Sue, she hosted a weekly radio
program. She played banjo and
ukulele, singing cowboy music,
reading local news and engaging
in easy humor.
A year or so later she departed
for New York City, where she pursued a career in musical theater.
She sang cabaret, stage-managed
many productions including
“Oh, Captain!,” and was a principal in the summer traveling
company of “Brigadoon.”
In 1951, she and a business
partner, the director George
Quick, renovated several old
stables and barns on the Vanderbilt Estate in Hyde Park,
N.Y., establishing the Hyde Park
Playhouse. While in Hyde Park
she also assisted the late Eleanor
Roosevelt with the New York
State Literacy Project. When
theatrical success required a
press agent, she and Quick hired
a young writer, Hilary Masters.
Polly and Hilary fell in love,
married and ran the Playhouse
for the next seven years.
In 1960 they sold the Playhouse and moved to their
new home on Woods Drive in
Ancramdale. From the mid1960s she was very active in her
community. She volunteered for
the American Cancer Society,

worked with the local PTA and
was a friendly and welcoming
face at the polls during election
time.
In 1968 she ran successfully
for president of the Pine Plains
Board of Education, becoming
the first woman in local history
to hold that honor. She held that
post until 1975 and was, among
many other things, instrumental
in the conception and building of
the Stissing Mountain Junior-Senior High School, also the first
of its kind in the region.
From 1979 until the mid1990s she contributed a regular
column for a local newspaper,
the Roe-Jan Independent, under
the heading, “One Side to Everything.” She wrote about politics,
local and national education,
television, rural homeownership, the origins of linguistic
memory and the diminutive interior dimensions of the original
Ancramdale Post Office.
She was predeceased by her
brother, John H. McCulloch
Jr.; her parents; and her former
husband, Hilary Masters, whom
she divorced in 1985.
She is survived by her sister-in-law, Carolyn McCulloch
of Beckley; her three children,
Joellen Masters of Lexington,
Mass., Catherine Masters of Deer
Isle, Maine, John D.C. Masters of
Paros, Greece; and a grandchild,
Kaolin R.E. Pitcher of Portland,
Maine.
She was a mother, a grandmother, a prescient community
leader, a lover of Broadway musicals and English mysteries, a
fount of knowledge and a source
of no-nonsense unending love
and support to all. She covered
the ground she walked on. The
family will announce a memorial
gathering at a later date.
In lieu of flowers, memorial
donations may be made to the
Polly Masters Educational Fund
for Young Women at Pine Plains
Stissing Mountain High School.
Arrangements are under the
direction of the Peck and Peck
Funeral Home in Copake, N.Y.
To send an online condolence, go
to www.peckandpeck.net.

Muriel Rothstein
AMENIA — Muriel Rothstein, 90, a former longtime resident of Amenia and
Sharon, and a recent
eight-year resident
of Delray Beach, Fla.,
died Dec. 4, 2015.
Muriel was born
Sept.24, 1925, in
Brooklyn, the daughter of the late Julia
(Haves) and Julius
Furst.
She grew up in
Brooklyn, graduating from Girls
Commercial High School there.
On Feb. 25, 1945, she married
Leon Rothstein of Amenia. They
lived in Amenia for more than
50 years. During that time they
raised their three children and
worked in the community. For
many years, Muriel held several
administrative assistant and
leadership positions (Webutuck
Central Schools, Dutchess Area
Rural Transportation and the
local Mended Hearts Chapter).
She was a member of several
organizations during her Amenia
years: Beth David Congregation,
Order of the Eastern Star, Amenia Free Library Board, Mended
Hearts and Sharon Bridge Club.
Muriel was an avid bridge
player, a prolific reader, an excellent cook and baker, a talented
piano player and seamstress.
She is survived by three children, Gail (Rothstein) Gamble
and her husband, Alan, of Amenia, Dr. Richard Rothstein and

his wife, Lia, of Hanover, N.H.,
and Jay Rothstein and his wife,
Patrice Cistulli, of
Sudbury, Mass.; her
grandchildren, Jennifer (Gamble) Guild
of Wellesley, Mass.,
Jeffrey Gamble of
Poughkeepsie, Ariel
(Rothstein) Clemmer
and her husband,
Darrell, of New York
City, Zachary Rothstein and his wife,
Alli Smith, of London, England,
Elena Rothstein and her fiancé,
Joshua Cook, of Douglas, Mass.,
and Miles Rothstein of Sudbury;
one great-grandchild, Aidan
Guild of Wellesley; and several
nieces and nephews.
In addition to her parents,
she was predeceased by her husband Leon in 1996; her brother,
Morton Furst; her sister, Shirley
(Furst) Sandweiss; and several
nieces and nephews.
Muriel was a devoted daughter, sister, mother, mother-inlaw, grandmother, great-grandmother, community member
and friend.
There will be no calling hours.
A graveside service was held Dec.
7 at the Schomre Israel Cemetery
in Poughkeepsie. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be
made to the Amenia Free Library,
P.O. Box 51, Amenia, NY 12501.
To send the family an online
condolence, go to www.hufcutfuneralhome.com.

IMS Holiday Marketplace Dec. 18
LAKEVILLE — Indian
Mountain School will host its
annual Holiday Marketplace on
Friday, Dec. 18, from 2 to 6 p.m.
in its new Student Center.
The event will feature a showcase of handmade goods, including home accessories, fine foods,
handcrafted jewelry, clothing
and seasonal decorations from
more than 20 vendors from
throughout the Tri-state area.
Also featured will be a Gingerbread House Workshop,
where families can purchase a
pre-assembled house for $25 and

decorate it with a large selection
of confections and candies.
Houses will be sold first-come,
first-served, and supplies are
limited. To reserve a Gingerbread House, call Tanya Waugh
at 860-435-2855. A percentage
of sales from the houses will be
donated to The Corner Food
Pantry, a volunteer organization
that provides regional residents
with ingredients for more than
10,000 meals a month.
For more information, call
Susan Zekas at 860-435-0871
ext. 141.

FAMILY & FRIENDS

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Alexandra Walsh and Conall Doorley

Walsh to wed Doorley in summer
LAKEVILLE — Michael and
Kate Walsh of Lakeville joyfully
announce the engagement of their
daughter, Alexandra Elisabeth
Walsh, to Conall Doorley of Dun
Laoghaire, Ireland.
Miss Walsh is a writer and
German-English translator. She
is a graduate of the University of
Edinburgh, Scotland.

Mr. Doorley is the founder and
owner of Zero Zero Wood Fired
Pizza and an engineering graduate
of University College Dublin. His
parents, Ed and Helen Doorley,
reside in Glenageary, Ireland.
Alexandra and Conall will
marry in the summer of 2016 near
the bride’s family’s ancestral home
in County Clare, Ireland.

Worship Services
Week of December 13, 2015

The Congregational Church
Of Salisbury, U.C.C
30 Main Street
Serving the Lord with Gladness
We bid you warm welcome to come
worship with us Sundays at 10 am.
All are welcome!
Child care, moving music,
and Christian fellowship in a
historic 19th C. Meeting House.
The Rev. Diane Monti-Catania
(860) 435-2442
www.salisburycongregational.org

St. John's Episcopal Church
12 Main Street, Salisbury, CT

“Praising God, Serving Neighbor”
Sunday Services
8:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist (Rite I) Said
10:00 a.m. Choral Eucharist, Rite 11
Coffee Hour and Fellowship follows
Breakfast Club
1st Sunday of the month Oct.-May
Litany for Healing
2nd Sundays of the month
www.stjohnssalisbury.org
860-435-9290
Please join us!

North Canaan
Congregational Church, UCC
Rev. Savage Frieze
172 Lower Rd/Route 44, East Canaan, CT
860-824-7232, Church Office
A congregation that puts faith into service,
in the community and in the world.
Worship Services Sundays at 10 am
Fishes & Loaves Every Wed. 9-11 am
at the Pilgrim House, 30 Granite Ave., Canaan
All are welcome. Please join us!
www.northcanaancongregationalchurch.org
nccongchurch@snet.net

North East Baptist Church

Historic Meeting House, Main & Maple
Millerton, NY
God's word Is Always Relevant!
A Warm Welcome Awaits You At
Sunday Services:
Family Bible School - 9:30 AM
Morning Worship - 11:00
Evening Service - 6:00 PM
Weekday Meetings:
Tues. Bible Studies, 1:30 PM,
and Weds. Prayer Meeting 7:00 PM at
at Parsonage 33 S. Maple Ave.
Fellowship Luncheon, first Sunday of
each month after AM services
Contact Pastor Henry A. Prause
Phone: 518/789-4840
Email: heprause@gmail.com

The Lakeville
United Methodist Church
319 Main St., Lakeville, CT 06039
860-435-9496
The Rev. MARGARET LAEMMEL
9:30 a.m. Worship Service
Sunday School 9:15 a.m.
"Open Hearts – Open Minds – Open Doors"
Lakevillemethodist@snet.net

The Sharon United
Methodist Church

112 Upper Main Steet,
North end of Sharon Green
Touching Lives - Lifting Spirits
The Rev. MARGARET LAEMMEL
10:45 a.m. Worship Service, Nursery Care
No Sunday School in Summer
860-364-5634
email: sharonumc5634@att.net

Falls Village
Congregational Church
16 Beebe Hill Road, Falls Village
10:00 a.m. Family Worship
11:00 a.m. Coffee Hour
A Friendly Church with
a warm welcome to all!!
860-824-0194

Canaan United
Methodist Church

2 Church St., Rte 44, Canaan, CT
860-824-5534
Pastor Peter Brown
10 a.m. Worship Service
"Open Hearts – Open Minds – Open Doors"
Canaanumc.wordpress.com
Church email: canaanctumc@gmail.com

Church of St. Mary

76 Sharon Rd., Lakeville, CT
860-435-2659
Weekend Liturgies
Sat. Vigil at 4:00 PM
Sun. at 8:00 & 10:15 AM
Weekday Liturgies Thurs. & Fri. at 9:00 AM
Wed. at 10:00 AM at Noble Horizons

Christ Church Episcopal in Sharon
9 South Main, Sharon CT 06069
860-364-5260
email: cces@att.net
www.christchurchsharon.org
Reverend Jon Widing
Sunday Holy Eucharist 8 & 10 AM
All welcome to join us

Greenwoods Community Church
355 Clayton Road, Ashley Falls, MA
413-229-8560
Sunday Service 10:30 AM
Kidz Konnection K-6th grade
(during Sun. Service)
Nursery Care All Services
Rev. Richard Woodward

St. Thomas Episcopal Church
Rev. Elizabeth Fisher, Vicar
Leedsville Road at
Hitchcock Corner & Amenia Union
Every Sunday Silent Prayer:
10-10:15 am
Worship: Sunday 10:30 am
Silent Meditiation Every Sunday
10-10:15 a.m.
Tel: 1-845-373-9161

Trinity Episcopal Church
484 Lime Rock Rd., Lime Rock
Sun. 8 & 10:30 a.m. Holy Eucharist
Nursery Care/Sunday School 10:20 a.m.
(860) 435-2627
"Offering companionship along the way"
email: trinity@trinitylimerock.org
website: www.trinitylimerock.org
Rev. Heidi Truax

All Saints of America

Orthodox Christian Church

313 Twin Lakes Rd., Salisbury, CT
860-824-1340
Rev. Fr. John J. Kreta
Vespers Sat. 5PM
Divine Liturgy Sun 9:30 AM
Go to our website, or call
www.allsaintsofamerica.us

Unitarian-Universalist
Fellowship of NW CT

Next meeting Dec. 13
Home of Jane and Peter Fitting
8 Salmon Kill Rd. Salisbury
10:30 a.m.
Noble Horizons
For information call 860-435-2319

The Chapel of All Saints, Cornwall
An intimate Episcopal service every Sunday
8:00am Holy Eucharist and sermon
The North Cornwall Meeting House
Town Street at Cogswell Road,
West Cornwall, CT

Congregation Beth David

A reform Jewish Synagogue
3344 East Main St., Amenia
Rabbi Jon Haddon
High Holiday Services and Services- Sat.
morning-twice monthy
Followed by lunch and adult education
ALL ARE WELCOME
For information call Rabbi Haddon 203 748 4589
or visit our website: www.congbethdavid.org

e it fie d
Presbyterian Church

656 Smithfield Valley Rd.
Amenia, NY
845-373-8320
Hours of Worship:
Every Sunday 10 a.m. - 11 a.m.

St. Bernard Church

52 New Street, Sharon, CT
Vigil Mass at 5:30pm
Sunday Mass at 10:30am
Weekday Mass - Wed, Thurs and Fri 9:00am
Eucharistic Adoration Fri after Mass
Confession call 860-364-5244

St. Bridget Church

7 River Road, Cornwall, CT
Vigil Mass at 4:00pm
Sunday Mass at 8:30am
Confession call 860-364-5244

THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL, Thursday, December 10, 2015

I had the privilege of knowing
Samuel R. Berger for 65 years.
Sandy, as everyone knew him,
died on Dec. 2, 2015, at age 70.
Our friendship began in Mrs.
Hultslander’s kindergarten class
at the Millerton School, and my
wife, Meg, and I last saw him on
Nov. 8.
Sandy had a keen interest
in people. As former President
Clinton humorously observed
at his Memorial Service at Temple Sinai in Washington, D.C.,
on Friday, Dec. 4, Sandy was a
great humanitarian, but unlike
many who profess to be such, he
actually liked real people. Add to
that his natural empathy and his
wonderful sense of humor, and
the result was a person with a
rare capacity for true friendship.
As has been mentioned in
some of the national coverage
of his death, Sandy was a passionate baseball fan and that
may have been the greatest test
of our friendship. He loved the
Brooklyn Dodgers and I was an
insufferable Yankee fan. During
our childhood in Millerton, the
Yankees and Dodgers were often in the World Series and the
Dodgers seldom won. Sandy, ever
patient and taking the long view,
knew his time would come. It did
in our freshman year in college.
The Dodgers had moved to Los
Angeles and were playing the
Yankees in the World Series. They
swept the Yankees four straight.
Mel Allen, the longtime Yankee
announcer, did the television
play-by-play for the final game.
He had laryngitis and by the end
of the game could hardly talk.
Two hours later a man knocked
on my dorm room door and
handed me a telegram. I opened
it and read: “Ed. Even Mel Allen
choked. Sympathy. See you soon.
Sandy.”
Sandy could have left Millerton and never looked back, but
he didn’t. He enjoyed visiting
the area to the extent his busy
schedule allowed. Whenever we
saw him, after inquiring about
us and our family, his next ques-

A11

OBITUARIES

SPORTS

In appreciation: Sandy Berger

Macneil earns
title from NIAAA

tions were about his friends in
Millerton and Amenia and what
was going on in those communities. When we saw him in early
November, he was delighted to
hear that our classmates George
Kaye and Victoria Perotti had just
been elected supervisor in their
communities and asked me to
send him their e-mail addresses. For many years, he kept his
subscription to The Millerton
News and especially enjoyed
Bernie Silvernail’s column on
local history.
During the memorial service,
former President Clinton, former Secretary of State Madeleine
Albright and Vice President Joseph Biden all spoke of Sandy’s
wisdom, wit, warmth and perseverance as did, most eloquently,
Sandy’s daughter Sarah and son
Alex. When speaking at a gathering of his family and a group
of close friends afterward, I told
them that many of those qualities
could be traced back to his time
in Millerton.
Sandy’s parents, Rose and Albert Berger, were business people
with a strong sense of civic and

social responsibility. They were
actively involved in the effort
to consolidate the Amenia and
Millerton school districts into
the Webutuck Central School
District, and Al was a member
of its first Board of Education.
They purchased the department store business from Lena
Bloch in 1952, located in what is
now Oblong Books and Music,
and it became Berger’s Department Store. Two years later, Al
Berger died from a heart attack.
Sandy was 8 and his sister, Laurie,
was 12. Sandy once told me how
difficult it was for his mother. Not
only had she unexpectedly lost
her husband, but her education
had prepared her to be a teacher,
not a business person. Sandy and
Laurie worked in the store, and
Rose successfully continued the
business until both children had
graduated from college.
We attended Webutuck when
it was under the aspirational
leadership of Superintendent
Mike Rindsberg, who was so
committed to seeing we got
into the right colleges that he
would drive us to visit them.

Sandy’s interest in history and
government was nurtured by
exceptional teachers, my mother,
Leola Downey, and her close
friend, Violet Simmons, whose
admonition to her students was:
“The difficult we do right away,
the impossible takes a little longer.” His confidence to express
himself publicly was helped
enormously by his participation
in our school plays under the
direction of our gifted English
teacher, Jack Bower.
Sandy and I came of age in a
world that valued public service
as a way to help people improve
the quality of their lives. Given
Sandy’s rare combination of intellect, personality and sense of
social responsibility, a career in
public service was a natural fit.
That his work would take
him to a point where he would
become one of the key architects

of our nation’s foreign policy,
and by extension the world’s, is
remarkable but even more remarkable is that it never changed
him. I believe it was his capacity
to keep the important things in
life in perspective that drew an
estimated 1,000 people to Temple
Sinai to remember Sandy and
celebrate his life.
As usual, Sandy said it best
when in an Aug. 25, 1999, interview in The New York Times he
told R.W. Apple: “Where I grew
up is very important to what I am.
My perspectives are still more
Millerton 1960 than Washington
2000. The small-town sense of
community and social responsibility — that’s the lasting imprint
of Millerton on me.”
— Edward Downey is a Millerton native and founding partner
of the law firm of Downey, Haab
& Murphy, PLLC, in Millerton.

More obituaries are on Page A10
Send obituaries
to cynthiah@lakevillejournal.com

FALLS VILLAGE — Housatonic Valley Regional High
School Athletic Director Anne
Macneil has earned the title of
certified athletic administrator
from the National Interscholastic Athletic Administrators
Association.
According to the announcement, she has “demonstrated the
highest level of knowledge and
expertise in the field of interscholastic athletic administration.”
In addition to a “rigorous
comprehensive written examination,” Macneil also had to submit
to a thorough examination by the
organization of her experience
and professional contributions.
“Anne is one of an elite group
of interscholastic athletic administrators nationwide to attain this
level of professionalism.”
Macneil is also the middle
school sports director for the
Region One School District.
— Cynthia Hochswender

Turn to Page A16
for more sports

A Good Mechanic Is Not Hard to Find!

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11/13/15 11:04 AM

A12 THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL, Thursday, December 10, 2015

P.O. Box 1688, Lakeville, CT 06039
860-435-9873 FAX 860-435-0146
EDITORIAL PAGE A12

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2015

EDITORIAL

It affects us all

W

hat is it that radicalizes people who have lived
their lives as law-abiding citizens with connections
to their communities, as well as to non-radical
family and friends? It’s a question that has too many answers,
which experts on terrorism say are unique for each individual. Yet in some ways, they must all share some level of
disgruntlement with their lives and the society in which they
live. They must have some things in common, which those
around them could observe and define.
In a New York Times interview Saturday, Dec. 5, Secretary
of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson said he believes there
must now be an entirely new approach to the global terrorist
threat. There will have to be more reliance on people watching one another carefully and then reporting suspicions, he
said. When President Barack Obama spoke to the nation
Sunday night, Dec. 6, he agreed with Johnson, and described
the U.S. government’s approach to combating this growing
threat. There are programs already in place to give citizens
the opportunity to report anything they see as suspicious,
but those without training in such matters and without a
natural bent toward an understanding of secrecy might be
hard-pressed to catch the signals of violent plans hatching
around them.
California, where the San Bernardino shooting occurred
last week, has gun laws that are among the tightest in the
nation, and the structure for support of those struggling
with mental illness is better than in many other states. Yet the
two shooters there were able to obtain weapons capable of
killing and injuring many people in a short period of time,
and they also built homemade bombs in an attempt to cause
even more damage during their attack, now being universally
defined as terrorism. The married perpetrators presented a
seemingly credible facade to the world, one which did not
crack under the observation of their family, neighbors and
coworkers (whom the man saw regularly, and who were the
target of his and his wife’s attack).
How can Americans, or anyone across the globe who
might be victimized by such profound hatred, see through
such a determined plot? Noticing the gathering of high-powered weapons could give a clue, even without spouting of
radical rhetoric accompanying it. It’s not easy to take the
step, though, of going to the authorities to accuse a neighbor, family member, friend or acquaintance of suspected
terrorism. Yet this is just the kind of thinking that law-abiding people will need to accept and embrace in order to stop
shootings like the one in California.
The president’s stated desire for universal background
checks throughout the nation for those buying guns should
also become a reality. As long as people with bad intentions
can circumvent the more stringent laws in one state by
purchasing their firearms in a more lenient one, it will be
more difficult for law enforcement, or observant citizens, to
foresee violent events. As those who fear that their Second
Amendment rights will be violated stock up with firearms
(as they did in record numbers on Black Friday), those
close to them may find they cannot easily tell the difference
between someone who uses their guns for target practice and
someone who has secret plans to kill.
Why do people turn radical? Perhaps it’s better just to accept that some people do, without fully understanding why.
Americans and moderate people all over the world are going
to have to accept a long-term reality of vigilance, as has been
the case since 9/11, but now on a very personal level, in order
to spot possible terror suspects. The challenge will be to continue living open lives in a free society, which is after all what
those who turn to terrorist acts want to end.

Opinion

If they’d stay tax-exempt, why sell the hospitals?
THE MILLERTON NEWS The Winsted Journal

C

ommunity support for
the acquisition of Waterbury Hospital and
Eastern Connecticut Health
Network’s Manchester Memorial
and Rockville General hospitals, all nonprofit hospitals, by
Prospect Medical Holdings, a
for-profit company, has been
based largely on the expectation
that the new owner would start
paying millions of dollars in
municipal property taxes each
year. Because of their nonprofit
structure the hospitals now are
tax-exempt.
But as the Journal Inquirer’s
Don Michak reported the other
day, Prospect’s applications with
state government show that it
wants the property tax exemption of the hospitals to continue
indefinitely while it tries to repair
their finances.
It’s not clear how continuing
the tax exemption after the
change in ownership could be
arranged. Presumably either the
municipalities involved would
have to grant the exemption
by ordinance — in the case of
ECHN, joint action by town
government in Manchester and
Vernon — or the exemption
would have to be imposed by new
state law. How long would the exemption last and what would be
the criteria for ending it? There’s
no telling at the moment.
In any case Prospect’s requirement for indefinite property
tax exemption has exploded the
rationale for the hospitals’ communities to support their sale.
That rationale was weak to begin
with. For the money that would
flow to municipal governments
from the hospitals in property
tax revenue would come only
from higher bills to hospital
patients and their insurers, and
these higher bills would constitute a hidden tax on the public.
(No wonder so many municipal
officials and local legislators like
the idea.)
The hospitals say they are
losing money, so all along the
big issue with their sale has been
exactly how a new owner would

P.O. Box AD, Millerton,
NY
12546
THE C
HRIS
518-789-4401 FAX 518-789-9247

POWELL
COLUMN

make them profitable, and particularly what a new owner could
do to make them profitable that
the hospitals couldn’t do on their
own. Prospect and the hospitals
themselves have been vague
about this, thereby indicating,
as might be expected, that the
only economies likely to save
substantial money and produce
profit for the new owner would
require reducing staff, staff compensation, and medical services,
reductions that could not be
acknowledged in advance of any
hospital sale without generating
prohibitive opposition.
So the decisive issue with

the hospital sales may be only
whether these economies are to
be exacted by outside ownership
answerable to an out-of-state
leveraged-buyout company like
Prospect or to ownership by a
community foundation answerable to the people being served.
Of course if the current
boards of the hospitals had the
necessary courage, they might
have made the unpleasant decisions already. Instead, offering
the hospitals for sale, their boards
have given up, unwilling even
to cut executive salaries that, at
Waterbury and ECHN, range
from $700,000 to more than a
million dollars.
But if there’s not enough
community engagement and
backbone to do what needs to
be done to preserve the hospitals, the financial predators will
be only too glad to take over. In
many respects that’s what’s happening throughout the country.

P.O. Box 835, Winsted, CT 06098
860-738-4418 FAX 860-738-3709

TURNING BACK
THE PAGES

LIME ROCK — Miss Harriette Fenton has been suffering
with an ulcerated tooth.

fair such a happy one.

SALISBURY — Mrs. Rufus
Baldwin has purchased the old
Congregational Parsonage. It
will be moved to a lot owned by
Mrs. Baldwin.
If you are interested in and
wish to aid the Community
Christmas tree please drop
something into the contribution boxes, which may be found
in some of the business places
throughout the town.
A new series of Lincoln pennies have just been issued, the
first to bear a mintage mark, that
of “D” showing that they were
coined at Denver.
SHARON — The Sharon high
school now have their new piano.
50 years ago — December
1965
KENT — The annual St. Andrews Bazaar once again scored
a financial success with profits
exceeding $1,400. Mrs. Marcia de
Paralta, chairman of the bazaar,
has expressed her appreciation
to all who contributed time and
energy and talent to make the

NORMA GALAISE

Dr. Laurence C. Smith, son of
Mrs. Loretta Smith of Canaan,
has been elected to the Texas
State Board of Psychologist
Examiners.
25 years ago — December
1990
By the end of March 1991
the Board of Directors of the
Connecticut Hazardous Waste
Management Service will announce the location of three
possible sites within the state
for the disposal of low-level
radioactive waste. One of
these may well be in western
Connecticut.
The Canaan firemen surprised former Assistant Chief
Joseph Franks on his 99th
birthday Nov. 11 when they
blocked off Barlow Street and
brought all their trucks to his
front door. Members presented
Mr. Franks with a large birthday
cake, flowers, and a CFC cap.
Mr. Franks also received cards,
balloons and best wishes from
friends and family.
These nuggets are reprinted as
they originally appeared.

Chris Powell is managing
editor of the Journal Inquirer in
Manchester.

It’s time to scold childish adults

P

arent remember children
saying they didn’t want,
perhaps, to eat broccoli
with a petulant, “I hate broccoli.” Or peas, or liver, or fish,
or whatever. And as parents we
scolded our kids for saying they
already hated something they
had not tried or, if they had
tasted it, there was no way they
could hate it — perhaps they
could say they did not prefer
it, or perhaps even they could
say they did not like the taste of
broccoli. But hate the plant itself? How irrational to say you
hate something when in reality
all you can say is that you do
not like it very much.
According to the American
Psychological Association, hate
is a dangerous state of mind.
“Hate is among the most powerful of human emotions…”
Hate can lead to blind opposition, mistrust of even the simplest actions (including gener-

A VIEW FROM
THE EDGE
PETER RIVA
ous ones) and often “promotes
a terrifying psychological need
of the hater to disregard the
personhood of others.”
Disregarding the personhood of others can easily lead
to violence and death. The tools
are there, we all know that, we
all see that (sadly) every day.
Something has happened
in America to well-meaning
adults. They have forgotten to
behave as adults. Instead of —
quite appropriately — saying
they do not prefer the opinions
of others, or that they do not like
or want to associate with other people or their beliefs, they

PHOTO BY PATRICK L. SULLIVAN

100 years ago — December
1915
SALISBURY — Dr. John
Calvin Goddard and family are
moving into the Rose cottage
where they will remain until
the new parsonage is completed.

The University of Connecticut, which last year paid presidential candidate Hillary Clinton
more than $250,000 for a banal
chat and this year is paying its
president, Susan Herbst, a salary
of more than $750,000, plans to
raise tuition in stages over four
years — by $3,300 for in-state
students and $4,400 for out-ofstate students.
The university’s chief financial officer, Scott Jordan, says the
main cause of the tuition increase
is the increase in compensation
of the university’s employees,
which, like personnel compensation in government throughout
the state, keeps rising even as
the wages and benefits of most
taxpayers are not rising.
They call this public service,
wherein the public serves the
government.

Ho ho ho in Salisbury

LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Black Friday
Folks snatching clothes out of each others’ grip
Gimme that shirt, I’m here first, you ain’t my bro
That’s White Everyday, open carry, I shoot from the hip
All-Mart, Cussed-Co and Big Box tell and show
Let’s trample each other for that flat screen
Got it all over DeNiro streets mean
They selling rods these stores, fishing, buckshot
Arrest that 9 year old, that 9 mill Glock
It’s just a toy but he’s a boy with pot
And that South Asian urch who made a clock
Handcuff him, little Wog, how dare he think
He must to the loo and scrub out that sink
I never met a Syrian I liked
I never met a Syrian, they smell?
Their beards, what do they hide? Are they so psyched
They’d blow us down to the ninth circle of hell
Or are they just immigrants, the Statue of Lib
They take her words so literal, perhaps a little fib
Is what she tells, “your tired, your poor, your huddled masses”
ReThuglican governors and their border passes
“Yearning to breathe free, the wretched refuse
Of your teeming shore.” Or deserts, parched; let’s lose
All those who’d turn their backs on those so lost
“Send these the homeless, tempest-tossed
To me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door.”
Now let them in, or what’s this nation for?
Lonnie Carter
Falls Village

‘I once bought my kids a set of batteries for Christmas
with a note on it saying, toys not included.’
— Bernard Manning

have, like spoiled children, chosen to hate instead. You hear it
all the time, they “hate” this and
“hate” that. Their speech is peppered with hate and words that
demonstrate their physiological
— pathological? — hatred for
things they do not agree with.
For example, the Internet and
public demonstrations are filled
with people saying they hate
the president, or that they hate
their congressmen and women, or the police, or that they
hate Muslims, Christians, Jews.
And politicians and would-be
elected officials spout the rhetoric of hate to cuddle up to baby-minded people, condoning
and magnifying the most base
and most childlike behavior
with hate speech.
And yet, when you speak
with someone who had, for
example, said they “hate illegal immigrants,” and you ask
this question, “Do you really
hate them as individual people
or do you disagree with their
illegality and dislike what they
have done?” Dislike or disagree
with — that is normal human
thought, normal consideration.
People are allowed opinions,
even prejudices. Civilized conversation can follow providing
that leap off the spoiled child’s
cliff of “hate” does not become
the manifestation of what is, after all, only opinion.
Remember, if you hear
someone say they hate this or
that … doesn’t that remind you
of the child who hasn’t tasted
broccoli and yet is dead certain
they hate it? Spoiled brats all.
Peter Riva, a former resident
of Amenia Union, now lives in
New Mexico.

The letters deadline for the Dec. 17 issue is 10 a.m. on
Monday, Dec. 14. The deadline for the Dec. 24 issue is
early, 10 a.m. on Friday, Dec. 18. There will be no paper
issued Dec. 31. The Lakeville Journal will take a one-week
break. The next issue will be Jan. 7, 2016, for which the
letters deadline will be 10 a.m. on Monday, Jan. 4.

THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL

(USPS 303280)
An Independent Connecticut Newspaper
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33 Bissell Street, P.O. Box 1688, Lakeville, CT 06039-9989
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www.tricornernews.com • editor@lakevillejournal.com
Volume 119, Number 18

Thursday, December 10, 2015

Mission Statement

The Lakeville Journal Company, LLC, Publishers of
The Lakeville Journal, The Millerton News, and The Winsted Journal
Our goal is to report the news of our communities accurately and fairly,
fostering democracy and an atmosphere of open communication.
Cynthia Hochswender
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Janet Manko
Publisher and
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Libby Hall-Abeel
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In Memoriam
A. Whitney Ellsworth
1936-2011
Managing Partner
Robert H. Estabrook
1918-2011
Editor and
Publisher Emeritus

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Viewpoint

THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL, Thursday, December 10, 2015

A13

Due process rights may be
weakened in U.S. courts of law

A

lthough much progress
has been made in affirming basic human rights
and freedoms in the United
States, there are too many recent
cases of U.S. courts backsliding
on procedural rights of due
process, sometimes undermining longstanding constitutional
interpretation, legal precedent,
legislative intent and common
sense. Here are some examples
expressed, for simplicity, in the
form of a few rhetorical questions:
When police make a warrantless, “no-knock” invasion of a
suspect’s home, shouldn’t evidence thus obtained be excluded
from the courtroom during trial,
under the exclusionary rule?
That long-standing rule has
proved in the past to be the best
guarantor of law enforcement’s
compliance with the U.S. Constitution’s ban on “unreasonable
search and seizure.” Why do we
see more and more cases where
this basic rule is overlooked by
courts of law?
When seeking evidence of
suspected criminal or terrorist
activity, shouldn’t law enforcement nevertheless respect the
basic constitutional “right of the
People” to be “secure in their
persons, houses, papers and
effects,” and shouldn’t “Warrants be issued upon probable
cause”? When concerned citizens
report wholesale government
violation of their privacy and
rights, why are they often treated
as unpatriotic “whistle-blowers,”
when it is they who are actually
defending the U.S. Constitution?
When the prosecution in a
criminal trial has information
that might exculpate (that is,
prove the innocence of) the accused, shouldn’t the prosecution
be required to share that information with the defense? That
was a long-standing principle
of due process. Why is it that,
in case after case of what turns
out to be unquestionably false
conviction and incarceration,
the key information that later
justifies reversal of conviction
appears to have been known to
the prosecution all along and
withheld from the defense, while
the judges have turned a blind
eye to what is going on in their
own courts?
When a plaintiff seeks access
to the courts of law in order to
claim compensation for injury
due to a dangerous or faulty
product (such as a defective auto
part or a carcinogenic herbicide),
shouldn’t it be enough for the
claimant to submit “a clear statement of right to relief,” as civil tort
law specifically calls for, without
having also to provide proof of
all the facts normally obtained
during the “discovery phase” and
finally decided by trial jury? Why
are some courts setting up such
biased barriers to court access,
thereby protecting corporate
defendants at the expense of
injured citizen plaintiffs?
When on camera and in the
public eye, for all the world
to see, a policeman shoots or
strangles an unarmed suspect,
or an errant child, shouldn’t it
automatically be the case that
the officer concerned be subject
to independent, impartial investigation and that the ultimate
factual determination be made,
not by law enforcement, but by a
jury of independent citizens? In
all too many obvious cases today,
law enforcement fails to indict,
thus shielding its own from
independent investigation or
prosecution.  Are they saying,
in effect, that the objective truth
doesn’t count, or that, “Black lives
don’t matter”? Why do our courts
of law tolerate this?
When a suspected criminal
or even a suspected terrorist is
imprisoned  or “detained,” and
no evidence can be obtained or
offered to justify initial arrest
let alone incarceration (as was
the case of over 90 percent of
Guantanamo detainees), or
when subsequent information,
such as DNA evidence, is found
to prove the prisoner’s innocence
(as in dozens of actual cases in the
U.S. today), shouldn’t that person be immediately freed from
incarceration and receive full
and fair compensation for false
imprisonment, mistreatment
and denial of due process by the
state? Shouldn’t our legislatures
enact this into law, and the courts

Insight

Anthony Piel
enforce it?
When a death row convict
reasonably objects to the use
of a faulty lethal injection drug
cocktail (e.g., in Oklahoma),
shouldn’t it be for the state and
not for the convict himself to
come up with the alternative
chemical to kill him? How can
he do so from behind bars? Aren’t there so many mistakes and
defects in the actual practice
of killing prisoners, especially
innocent ones, that the time has
come for legislatures and the
courts to abolish capital punishment entirely as a violation of the
U.S. Constitution’s proscription
of “cruel and inhuman punishment”?
When considering the rights
of “Persons” and “People” in
plain English under the U.S.
Constitution, doesn’t it seem
inescapable that, as Justice John
Paul Stevens wrote in Citizens
United,   “Corporations have
no conscience, no beliefs, no
feelings, no thoughts, no desires;
they are not themselves members
of “We the People,” by whom
and for whom our Constitution
was established.” What does this
imply for the new-found impunity of corporations to evade
campaign finance laws, or to
deny their employees the right
to family planning insurance
and health services on supposed
religious grounds?
When hundreds, and even
thousands, of women working
for a major corporation (such as
WalMart) complain of unequal
pay for equal work, or unequal
opportunity for promotion,
shouldn’t these women as a
group have status to bring a class
action lawsuit, or must each
complainant bring a suit by herself? How can she demonstrate a
pattern of discrimination affecting the entire group when she
can only represent herself? Why,
in the eyes of the courts, does
the corporation deserve more
procedural protection than the
employees?

In every one of the above
examples, courts have recently
decided key procedural issues
against the interests and rights
of ordinary citizens. What’s the
answer? Once again, the solution
begins in the electoral voting
booth. We have to elect executive leaders and legislators who
will not only stand up for civil
due-process rights law, but equally important will appoint court
judges who will base their rulings
on objective constitutional and
legal principles, and not on the
basis of their own undemocratic
ideology or self-interest. The
informed, intelligent, and concerned voter is the answer. As
they say, if you don’t vote, you
don’t count.
Sharon resident Anthony Piel
is a former director and legal
counsel of the World Health Organization.

Cartoon by Bill Lee of Sharon and New York City

Young men need something to turn to

I

write this column as I turn
32 and another mass murder
pierces the conscience of our
country. This column isn’t about
policy; it’s about people. And a
certain kind of person: those
in the gray area between boys
and young men. It’s not about
psychology, but experience, my
experience. While it may not
be universal I hope it provides
some insight.
I started upon this reflection
wondering how certain killers
end up so nihilistically violent.
Then I remembered my flailing
adolescent efforts to defend my
pride. Over time I found my
identity and dignity, and recognized those same qualities in
others, but for a while I struggled
to prevent my anger from becoming violent.
The writers Chip and Dan
Heath — borrowing from the
social psychologist Jonathan
Haidt — use a metaphor of a rider
on an elephant to describe the relationship between our rational
thinking and emotions. The rider’s logic can turn the elephant’s
emotions, but only slowly over
time. The rider doesn’t force the
elephant to do anything because

he can’t. The elephant takes the
rider many places he doesn’t want
to go because he can.
“Perched atop the Elephant,
the Rider holds the reins and
seems to be the leader. But the
Rider’s control is precarious because the Rider is so small relative
to the Elephant. Anytime the
six-ton Elephant and the Rider
disagree about which direction
to go, the Rider is going to lose.
He’s completely overmatched,”
the Heath brothers wrote in their
book Switch.
This metaphor describes mature adults. While my self-image
is one of a logical, thoughtful
person, at some level even I
know I am more controlled by
emotions than I’d like to believe.
This metaphor must be adapted to describe adolescence, at
least my own. The elephant was
particularly temperamental and
the rider particularly helpless.
To say I easily lost control of
my emotions while a teenager
is an understatement. Yet, even
then I saw myself as rational.
Hardly.
I can remember an early phase
when insults to my pride led me

The Foundry

Zachary Janowski
to aggressively seek what I then
considered justice. Vengeance is
probably a better word. I plowed
through people on the soccer
field or pulled hair in a fit of
senseless rage. Thankfully, I did
no permanent harm. With time
— and not very much of it — I
felt remorse. I even found my
own actions incomprehensible.
I eventually learned to control
these outbursts, but that wasn’t
the end of my anger or warped
sense of justice. Deprived of an
immediate outlet, I stewed in
anger. “I’ll show them,” I thought.
The question was how.
Looking back I feel discomfort more than anything else. I
see myself trying to fit in, wearing uncomfortable clothes and
experiencing feelings that are
even more uncomfortable.
As I pondered how to get even
when a peer stung my pride,
two things in particular led me

to forego violence. First, I had
someone left to disappoint. Of
course, I really had many people left to disappoint, but in my
consciousness usually one or two
stood out. Second, I could imagine another way to “show them,”
by becoming more successful.
Sometimes, even when I
didn’t care much about how my
actions would reflect on me, I
cared enough about how they
would reflect on others that I resisted the urge to lash out. When I
wanted the instant satisfaction of
revenge, I realized that by waiting
I could prove how wrong the
other person really was.
Perhaps, if my experience is at
least somewhat representative, it
points us toward the antibodies
that prevent nihilistic violence.
Adolescent males need meaningful connections and a way out
and into the future. Today, as an
adult, I would call these things
community and opportunity.
Together, they create hope.
Zachary Janowski writes for
the Hartford-based Yankee Institute, Connecticut’s free-market
think tank. His opinions are his
own.

Another mass murder, trot out the thoughts and prayers

W

ith word of another
mass killing, this one,
the worst since Newtown, the campaign consultants
issued their tweeting orders:
“Send out the usual ‘thoughts
and prayers’ tweet.”
And within minutes, they did:
“Praying for those impacted
by shooting…” Mike Huckabee,
3:34 p.m.
“Praying for the victims, their
families…” Jeb Bush, 3:39 p.m.
“My thoughts and prayers are
with the shooting victims and
their families…” Ben Carson,
3:45 p.m.
“My thoughts and prayers
are with the victims, families
and brave first responders…”
Rand Paul.
“My thoughts and prayers
go out to those impacted by
the shooting, especially the first
responders…” John Kasich,
3:58 p.m.
“Thoughts and prayers are
with San Bernardino…” Lyndsey
Graham, 4 p.m.
“Our prayers are with the
victims, their families and the
first responders…” Ted Cruz,
4:07 p.m.
“Praying for those victimized

by the shootings…” Chris Christie, 4:25 p.m.
All of these carefully crafted comments came within 51
minutes or so, along with two
that had the benefit of sounding
original. They came, not surprisingly, from Donald Trump,
who, regardless of what else
may be said of him, does tend
to be original. He may have even
written them:
“California shooting looks
very bad. Good luck to law
enforcement and God bless.”
Donald Trump, 3:38 p.m.
Later, he was a bit more
secular:
“Police and law enforcement
seem to have killed one of the
shooters and are in a shootout
with the others. Go police.”
Trump, 6:53 p.m.
The Democrats were heard
from as well, but seemingly without a thought or a prayer or, like
their Republican cohorts, much
substance:
“Enough is enough. It’s time
to stand up to the NRA and enact meaningful gun safety laws.”
Martin O’Malley, 2:36 p.m.
“I refuse to accept this as
normal. We must take action to

Prickly frost

If You Ask Me
Dick Ahles

stop gun violence now.” Hillary
Clinton, 3:26 p.m.
“Mass shootings are becoming an almost everyday
occurrence in this country. This
sickening and senseless gun violence must stop.” Bernie Sanders,
4:08 p.m.
Compliments to Martin
O’Malley, the candidate with the
poorest chance of becoming his
party’s nominee, for being the
only candidate to mention the
unindicted coconspirator, the
National Rifle Association.
Finally, nearly four hours
later, at 7:47 p.m., the last sound
bite was issued by a candidate.
Rick Santorum, the winner of
the 2012 Iowa Caucus, must
have done a lot of praying and
thinking before tweeting, “Our
thoughts and prayers are with
the victims, their loved ones and
all those impacted.”
After all these Republican
comments failed to mention

PHOTO BY JOEL ERNST

guns and the Democrats didn’t
say their prayers, each side accused the other of politicizing
the tragedy and, of course, each
side did exactly that.
Then things got a bit more
testy and a little closer to home
when The New York Daily News
framed the cliché-laden Republican comments around a front
page headline, “God Isn’t Fixing
This” and Connecticut Sen. Chris
Murphy told his colleagues,
“Your thoughts should be about
steps to take to stop this. Your
prayers should be for forgiveness
if you do nothing again.”
Within hours, Senate Republicans stopped doing nothing.
They killed a bill that would
prohibit those on the anti-terrorist No Fly List from buying
guns. Since the list of 10,000
was created, 1,321 people on it
have bought guns, even though
as candidate and Sen. Marco
Rubio pointed out, just one evil
person out of 10,000 Syrian immigrants could commit an act
of terror. Senator Rubio voted
against the bill.

As the investigation continued, Rush Limbaugh and the
other rightwing radio raconteurs concentrated on President
Obama’s unwillingness to smear
an entire religion by calling
the terrorists who are Muslims
Islamic terrorists or extremists.
Of course, he didn’t call the
Evangelist who did the Planned
Parenthood killing a Christian
terrorist either.
The radio bloviators were,
however, silent when New York
Cardinal Timothy Dolan told
CNN on St. Patrick’s Day that
labeling an entire faith Islamic
terrorists would be akin to calling
the violent and often murderous
Irish Republican Army Catholic
terrorists.
“The IRA claimed to be Catholic,” said the cardinal. “They
were baptized, they had Catholic
identification, but what they
were doing was a perversion of
everything the church stood for.”
Simsbury resident Dick Ahles
is a retired journalist. Email him
at dahles@hotmail.com.

A14 THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL, Thursday, December 10, 2015

NATURE
Continued from Page A1
Professor and anthropologist-in-residence at New York
City’s Department of Sanitation Robin Nagle looks at how
that metropolis generates some
11,000 tons of throwaways a day.
In “Picking Up: On the Streets
and Behind the Trucks with the
Sanitation Workers of New York
City” (Farrar, Straus & Giroux),
Nagle is not satisfied to offer perfunctory history and dry facts.
She goes into the streets, first to
follow and observe sanitation
workers — the nearly invisible
workforce that residents seldom
acknowledge — then, after taking the exam and waiting her turn
on the hopefuls list, becomes a
sanitation worker herself.
Nagle gives us the lingo (“fruit
wagon” is another name for a collection truck) and describes the
workings of management and
labor and the atrocious habits
of some homeowners.
Graphic artist John “Derf ”
Backderf approached the topic in
reverse order. He worked as a garbageman in 1979 and 1980 then
as an artist drew stories which he
turned into “Trashed: An Ode to

the Crap Job of All Crap Jobs”
(Abrams Comic Arts).
Main character “J.B.,” in need
of employment, responds to a
village help-wanted ad and is
immediately hired — for the
sanitation crew. In entertaining
visuals, Backderf visits many
of the same topics as Nagle, interspersing stories of trashmen
encountering unimaginably
noxious and belligerant bags of
trash or getting their revenge
on aggressive homeowners with
graphic full-page drawings of
the size of a pile of 1,460 bags
of trash, the amount (weighing
more than 7,387 pounds) an
average family of four discards
each year.
Nagle’s book has its light
moments but one has to plow
through the obligatory meat of
the subject.
Backderf ’s book has lots of
light moments but makes ecological aspects of closed landfills and
their toxic gases entertaining, if
nevertheless appalling.
Take your pick, you’ll come
away from either book more
concerned about our solid waste
issues.
The writer is an associate editor
of this newspaper.

TROOP B
Continued from Page A1
Johnson.
“It was the idea of Penny Terry,
another retired dispatcher,” Baldwin said. “She and her husband
bought the trees. Volunteers
from the troop landscaped the
two front corners of the building
and planted them.”
There was also a ceremony at
the new dispatch center, which
was dedicated in memory of
Johnson.
While Baldwin’s request to
the state to pay for renovation
of the “State Police, B” neon pole
sign was denied, he believes it
triggered an assessment of the
grounds. A sign that marks the
property with the State Police
patch got a facelift, with a new
decal applied last week.
The refurbished neon sign is
expected to be completed and
reinstalled this month.
“I am very grateful to Phil

[Ghi] and Gary [Rovelto] at Ghi
Sign for volunteering to redo the
sign,” Baldwin said. “They are
very professional and it’s going
to look terrific.”
That effort is being done on
an absolutely volunteer basis,
despite word going around that
Ghi Sign was charging for the
work. They are collecting donations toward about $4,000 in
costs, with any extra funding to
be used toward work on the neon
“State Police” sign over the front
door, which is only half lit; and
for the Toys for Tots program.
The finishing touch, for
Baldwin, would be the removal
of “Trooper Smurf.” The bright,
blue call box was installed when
the barracks was locked at night.
“We want it out, but the department says it’s keeping it up.
We put a sign on it telling people
to come inside and talk to a live
person. That’s what we’re about.”

BERGER
Continued from Page A1
still has a population of under
1,000 people (as it did when he
was growing up here). Millerton
was the place he returned to, a
place that he made certain his
three children knew about.
The last time I saw him was
in 2000, when he and his older
sister, Laurie Gross, came back
for a multi-generational reunion
for the Webutuck Central School
District. He and Laurie were
enjoying the summer sun on
the front porch of the former
Simmon’s Way inn on Main
Street. He had a Secret Service
detail there keeping an eye on
everyone who walked up the
steps to see him.
There are still plenty of people
around the area who remember
him. One of his closest friends,
from the time they were in
kindergarten, was Ed Downey.
Ed shared some memories with
me of Sandy, in his office late
on Thursday, Dec. 3. He and his
wife, Meg, were flying to Washington the next morning for the
memorial service.
I also talked at length to my
cousin Laurie (Sandy’s sister);
she and her husband, Phil, were
in their car driving from their
New Jersey home to Washington,
also for the service and to be with
Sandy’s widow, Susan, and the
three Berger children.
Berger’s Department Store
Sandy and Laurie’s childhood
here in Millerton has a kind of
mythic quality. Of course my
family always talked about the
tragic early death of their father,
Al Berger. But after I moved
here to the Tri-state region 20
years ago, I used to hear about
Al’s death from people in town,
especially Lew Saperstein, who
was a few years younger than
my cousins but knows their
history well.
In part, this could be because
the Saperstein family and the
Berger family had parallel businesses. They both ran apparel
shops in the center of town. If
you read the national newspapers, they all say that the Bergers
owned an Army Navy Surplus
store here in town. That’s a
correct but incomplete version
of the family’s businesses. Ed

PEARL HARBOR
Continued from Page A1
neighbor Carol Trotta and her
grandson, Erick — who gave
Tadiello a loving hug in front of
the monument where he would
later lay a wreath.
At 5, Erick is too young to
comprehend what happened
on that day, a turning point in
history; but Tadiello will never
forget every detail.
While there were prayers,
poems and thanks for all who

served, Tadiello’s mind goes
back those 74 years. Every time
he tells the story, it brings him
to tears. It begins with the young
sailor enjoying the tropical
sunshine on a Sunday morning
— and ends with him removing
the body of a Japanese pilot from
the crane on his nearly sunken
ship tender.
This year’s service was expanded with a three-gun salute.
Marine veteran Brian Richard-

son of the Marine Corps League
bugled a poignant taps to end the
ceremony.
But it was Tadiello’s humble
words, spoken softly to a crowd
that moved in close to hear, that
everyone took with them.
“I am very pleased to be here.
It was just a matter of having to
do what we were supposed to do.
I greet all of you people here this
afternoon, and thank you very
much for your attention.”

PHOTO BY REBECCA DROBIS

Former President Bill Clinton was among the guests at Sandy
Berger’s 70th birthday party in October.
shared with me an old newspaper clipping that described Al’s
arrival here in town, in 1929,
when he was in his 20s (Rose
followed later).
In case you’re wondering,
Rose was a member of the Lehrman family, and so am I. That’s
how Sandy and I are cousins.
Al moved here from Brooklyn
and opened Berger’s Army and
Navy Store, which he ran until,
interestingly, he was drafted into
the U.S. Army. That store was
on South Center Street, Ed said.
It burned down in a fire several
years ago; the playground for the
Northeast Community Center is
on the spot where the store used
to stand.
Laurie remembers her father
as an entrepreneurial type, who
started several businesses here
and then sold them. According
to a 1952 newspaper article
that Ed shared with me, when
Al returned from his military
service he bought the Parsons
Glen-Lake Laundry in Millerton;
he later opened and operated
New England Cleaners, which is
still open, on Route 44 (he sold
the business in 1951). He also
at one point owned a business
that made aviator suits during
the Korean War.
In 1952 he purchased what
was known kind of grandly as a
department store in the center of
town, in the building that is now
home to Oblong Books and Mu-

sic. According to the newspaper
article, the store had been around
for 68 years and had been owned
by two men named Goodman
and Strauss and then by Irving
Bloch. Bloch’s Department Store
became Berger’s Department
Store.
Laurie remembers that this
was the first business in which
her father actively involved her
mother.
“She had been a schoolteacher
and didn’t feel she was suited to
business, but it turned out she
had great business acumen,” Laurie recalled. “My father trained
her, and Sandy and I worked
there too. He swept the floors
and stocked the shelves. I helped
with sales.”
Laurie wonders now if her
father had a premonition that he
was in failing health. Perhaps, she
thinks, he knew that he needed
to prepare his young family to
survive without him. Two years
after opening the store, he died
suddenly of a heart attack at age
44. Laurie was 12, Sandy was 8.
“At first our mother wasn’t
sure what she should do with the
store,” she said. “But she decided
eventually to give it a try. She
though it would give her some
financial security, so she could
pay for us both to go to college.”
The Central School District
Education was important to
the family. Laurie recalled that
Rose Berger was part of the group

that helped regionalize the small,
town schools into what is now
the Webutuck Central School
District.
According to the local news
article about his death, Al Berger had been a member of “the
new Central School Board of
Education.”
“Millerton schools were
closed for a half day March 16
in memory of Mr. Berger,” the
article said. “Many Millerton
business places were also closed
during the funeral services on
March 16.”
The article described Al
Berger as “one of Millerton’s
most civic-minded residents.”
Certainly this legacy was passed
along to his son, Ed Downey said.
Next week: Berger’s legacy of
public service.

MILLBROOK
Continued from Page A1
by Richard Colesanti, 47, overturned in the road, spilling its
contents of gravel. The truck was
registered to Bulldog Concrete
of Poughquag. Colesanti was
unharmed.
Route 44 was closed for more
than 11 hours.
Allen came to the Millbrook
School in 2009 and was highly regarded by coworkers, parents and
students of the private boarding
college preparatory institution.
The school’s Facebook page was
filled with heartfelt condolences
and praise for Allen by students
and alumni.
The school posted on Facebook,“This is an incalculable loss
for all who knew and loved Ed,
starting with his family. It is an
equal tragedy for the Millbrook
School community. Our focus
now is to care for the Allen family
and each other at school.”
Allen’s wife, Emily, was not
in the car. She is expecting their
third child in the spring.

Brain Teasers

CLUES ACROSS
1. Characters in one inch of
tape
4. In a hold
9. Jewish mystic
14. A way to souse
15. A small sharp knife
16. Frogs, toads, tree toads
17. Brew
18. Rowdy carouser
20. Poetries
22. __ salts, remedy
23. Expect eagerly
24. Obstructing the view of
something
28. Denotes three
29. Expression of uncertainty
30. Greek portico
31. Bureau
33. Electric battery
37. Vapor density
38. Radioactivity unit
39. Strive to equal or match
41. Cologne
42. Carrier’s invention
43. Highest in degree or
quality
44. Female horses
46. Serbian
49. Publicity
50. Actress Lupino
51. Supporting structures
55. Jobs
58. Indian founder of
Sikhism
59. Capital of Zimbabwe
60. Woman of charm and
good looks
64. Order
65. Draft animal in desert
regions
66. Unaccented syllable verse
67. Fail to keep pace
68. Sheath or shirtwaist
69. Moss stalks
70. __ Lilly, drug company
CLUES DOWN
1. Exclamation of praise
2. 200 island Pacific nation
(alt. sp.)
3. Repeated
4. Hungers
5. School of Business, UCB
6. Bobby __, NHL champ
7. Lease
8. More parched
9. Medieval merchant guild
10. Negative ions
11. Top
12. One of the Gershwins
13. Dekalitre

19. Imitate
21. Gentlemen
24. Dawn
25. A citizen of Chile
26. Bright stars
27. Codfish genus
31. Extremely unrefined
32. Diacritical mark
34. Correspondences
35. Indicates position
36. Small cup
40. 12th Greek letter
41. Capable of being eliminated
45. 12th Jewish month
47. Rechristen
48. In a way, imputes
52. Hydroxyls + 2C
53. Follows sigma
54. Vegetable shrubs
56. South African village

57. Monetary unit of D.R. Congo
59. First Chinese dynasty
60. Divides evenly into (Math)
61. Household god (Roman)
62. Pakistani rupee
63. American time

December 3 Solution

Sudoku

December 3 Solution

retirement rehabilitation healthcare
www.noblehorizons.org 860-435-9851
17 Cobble Road, Salisbury, CT 06068

Health

THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL, Thursday, December 10, 2015

A15

A team of experts to help with healing wounds
By Cynthia Hochswender

There have been significant
changes at Sharon Hospital in
the past year or two but one
department that has remained
stable and productive is the
wound care center.
Inaugurated in October 2011,
the center has treated about
890 patients with wounds that
weren’t healing. Program Director (and registered nurse) Renee
Maus said that about 96 percent
of the wounds treated at the center are healed with interventions
that range from simple consultations to specialized synthetic
skin substitutes or the use of the
center’s two hyperbaric oxygen
chambers.
Those are the most extreme
cases, explained the center’s medical director, Dr. Douglas Finch.
“The hyperbaric chamber is
the most advanced treatment
we have,” he said, adding that it
is in use every day of the week.
It’s used primarily with patients
“who haven’t healed after 30 days
or more of standard wound care.”
Not all wounds respond to the
hyperbaric treatment, cautioned
Dr. John Zboinski (known at the
wound care center as Dr. Z). A
podiatric specialist, his particular
area of expertise is helping patients who suffer from diabetes.
“Many diabetics are prone
to foot wounds, because they
have vascular problems and
neuropathy,” Dr. Zboinski said.
Neuropathy, he explained, is “a
loss of sensation due to diabetes.”
The end result of these
wounds for many diabetics is
amputation.
“Our goal is limb salvage,”
Zboinski said.
The hyperbaric chamber can
help.

“With hyperbaric oxygen
therapy, the patient is in a pressurized chamber breathing in
air with a high concentration of
oxygen,” Maus said.
“The pressure in the chamber
forces the oxygen into the tissues
at a higher concentration,” Finch
added.
Many other protocols are tried
before the hyperbaric chamber is
called into use, the medical team
explained. Sometimes all it takes
is a simple consultation with a
patient about his or her lifestyle.
“We do a full assessment on
each patient,” Maus said. “We
look at circulation, sensation,
nutrition and vascular status.”
“We make sure they’re seeing
their primary care doctor and
trying to control their diabetes,”
Zboinski said. “We check their
diet and make sure they’re eating
the right foods. We check their
prosthetics, if they have them,
to be sure they fit correctly. We
check their shoes, too, to make
sure they fit well. If there is a
wound, it’s important to have
shoes that fit properly so the
pressure on the wound can be
offloaded.”
“If they have an infection, I
get involved, to make sure they
are getting the right treatment,”
said Finch, who is an infectious
disease specialist.
“It’s an interdisciplinary approach,” said Maus. “It includes
podiatry, surgery, infectious
disease and nutrition.”
If it sounds like there is a heavy
emphasis on aiding patients
who are diabetic, that’s because
there is.
“There’s a lot of diabetes in
the general population, and so
there is also a lot of it here in
the Tri-state region,” Finch said.
“I was one of the people who

PHOTO BY JIM HUTCHISON

The main wound care team at Sharon Hospital includes infectious disease specialist Douglas Finch, MD, at left in photo,
program director and RN Renee Maus and podiatrist John Zboinski, DPM.
really pushed for us to have a
wound care center here, because
there is so much diabetes, and
because I was seeing so many patients with wounds that weren’t
healing,” Maus said.
“There was no expert structured approach to follow-up after
someone was discharged from
the hospital,” Finch added.
“And then they’d end up back
at the hospital with another
infection, and sometimes there
would end up being an amputa-

tion,” Maus said.
The elderly are another highrisk group for wounds.
“There are a lot of people
with venous stasis ulcers,” Maus
said. “Those are caused by poor
circulation and it’s a problem
many of our older patients have.”
Of the patients they see,
Maus estimated that 40 percent
are diabetics (from teens to the
elderly) and about 60 percent

When signing up on Connecticut’s Health Exchange,
bring the following:
• Birthdates for all family
members who need coverage.
• Social Security numbers for
all family members who need
coverage (or document numbers
for legal immigrants)
• Citizenship or immigration
status and certificate of naturalization, if applicable
• A federal income tax return
from the most recent year
• Employer and income information for every member of your
household who needs coverage

Pain relief with dry needling
NORTH CANAAN — Geer Outpatient Physical Therapy
is sponsoring program on pain relief with dry needling. The
program will take place in the Hollenbeck Room at Geer Village
on Thursday, Dec. 17, at 3:30 p.m.
Trigger point dry needling treats many common conditions
such as headache, neck and low back pain, plantar fasciitis, tennis
elbow, rotator cuff pain, hip/knee arthritis, bursitis and more.
After treatments, many patients experience dramatic pain relief
and improved function. Learn about this treatment and results.
This is a free program, open to the public, presented by Dr.
Michael Mangini. RSVP at 860-824-3820 or steddick@geercares.
org by Dec. 15.

Send health news to
cynthiah@lakevillejournal.com

(W-2s, pay stubs)
• Health care coverage information (policy numbers for
any current health plans, as well
as information about employer-sponsored coverage you or
someone in your household is
eligible for).
• Anyone who has previously
signed up online through Access
Health CT should bring their
username and password.
PharmaCares is a 501(c)(3)
entity and an independent licensee of Health Educated, funded
in part from the Foundation for
Community Health.

Meditation at
Noble Horizons
SALISBURY — Noble Horizons is hosting a guided and
silent meditation class in the
Learning Center with Tracie
Shannon on Thursdays from 5:30
to 6:30 p.m. through Dec. 17.
Meditation is an ancient form
of healing that allows the body
and mind to find a peaceful
place of rest by reducing stress
and anxiety.
New class members are welcome throughout the series. No
experience is necessary and there
is no fee, although donations
are accepted. Register at www.
noblehorizons.org or 860-4359851, ext. 190.

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“Sometimes it turns out to be
a rash,” Finch said. “We’ve also
identified some skin cancers.”
“People can call us and we
can screen them on the phone,”
Maus said. “If we’re not the right
place, we can refer them to the
right provider.”
To contact the wound center,
call 860-364-4515 or go to the
Sharon Hospital website at www.
sharonhospital.com.

SVNA Home Assistance

Help with signing up for health care on Dec. 11 and 12
The deadline for signing
up for affordable health care is
approaching. PharmaCares has
scheduled several events to help
area residents with re-enrolling
or initial enrollment in health
insurance. Plans have changed
for 2016 and anyone with questions or in need of insurance is
encouraged to come for a free
consultation.
Friday, Dec. 11, from 4 to 7
p.m., at North Canaan Town Hall
Saturday, Dec. 12, from 10
a.m. to 1 p.m. at Kent Town Hall
Call 860-672-0043 x114 for
an appointment or just walk in.

have venous stasis ulcers.
Some patients come to the
center because they are referred
by their primary care doctors
(some patients are also referred
from the wound centers in Torrington and Danbury, because
Sharon’s outcomes are so good,
the team said).
Many patients come in on
their own, to ask about a wound
or a skin condition.

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A16 THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL, Thursday, December 10, 2015

Sports

Getting in the spirit with field hockey
FALLS VILLAGE — The
Housatonic Valley Regional High
School field hockey team doesn’t
generally end the season with a
high tally of wins. But year after
year the team is exemplary for
the high spirits and camaraderie
of the players.
This year, for the annual
athletic awards event, four
players earned Berkshire League
recognition. They are Megan
Ackerman, 1st team; Hannah
McGuire 2nd team; Maddie
Sheldon, honorable mention;
Morgyn Gasperini, honorable
mention.
Coach Lisa McAuliffe prepared and read the following list
at the awards night on Dec. 3.
— Cynthia Hochswender
Top 10 Things
The Field Hockey Team
Would Like You to Know
10. Any player with long hair
has worn it in a braided ponytail
at least once. For some reason we
think this is fashionable.
9. Getting a new stick is the
most exciting thing that can
happen for you and all of your
teammates.
8. There is always one player
who can drive the ball so hard

PHOTO SUBMITTED

The ladies of the Housatonic Valley Regional High School field hockey team may not win a
lot of games but they really love their team.
that everyone on the field is
secretly afraid to defend it. And
you’re psyched when she is on
your team.
7. Our bruises are prized
possessions, and we take any
opportunity to show them off.
6. The words “get on the line,

we’re doing sprints” “or buddy
run” give us nightmares.
5. We know no one else understands the field hockey rules;
heck, half the time we don’t
understand the rules.
4. We wear kilts not skirts.
3. Playing a sport that requires

you to be in a squatted position
90 percent of the time has one
major benefit: buns of steel.
2. Field hockey is not like
soccer with a stick or ice hockey
without ice.
1. Yes we know that there are
a lot of whistles.

Teamwork, selflessness will be key for Housy hockey
By Will Burchfield

FALLS VILLAGE — The
Housatonic Valley Regional
High School (HVRHS) boys ice
hockey team suffered substantial
attrition due to graduation last
spring, but coach Dean Diamond
believes his returning core can
lead the Mountaineers to another
strong season.
The caveat, though, is this:
The players must embrace a
team-first approach.
“They need to buy into the
concept that the win is more
important than any individual
thing you do,” Coach Diamond
said. “It’s not about personal
stats, it’s about team stats.”
That message rings true for
any team, but especially so for
the Mountaineers, who must
fill the holes left by last year’s
seniors through a group effort.
In all, Housy lost six players to
graduation in 2015, including
starting goalie Eric Chin and
leading scorer James Huftin.
Those aren’t easy pieces to
replace, but the departure of
one group of players opens
the door for another. And so
opportunities abound for the
Mountaineers, who will see new
faces emerge in key roles from
the drop of the puck.
On offense, Housy will be
led by senior co-captain Jason
Diamond, whose 36 points last
season ranked second on the
team. (Hockey is typically a game

controlled by bigger players; at
5-foot-6, the talented Diamond
is the exception to the rule.) He
will be aided up front by junior
Finn Bambery and senior Chris
Richards, the latter of whom
seems primed for a big season.
“He could have a breakout
year,” Diamond said of Richards,
who will likely center the team’s
first line between Diamond and
Bambery. “He definitely could
be an impact player.”
In goal, the team’s makeup
isn’t quite as clear. But whoever emerges as the starting
net-minder will be supported
by a stout defensive corps led by
senior co-captain Seth Sherwood
and senior Garett MacLaren, who
will serve as an alternate captain.
After that, the Mountaineers
are noticeably young on the blue
line, but what the defense lacks
in experience they make up for
in talent.
“They’re young, but they’re
certainly capable,” Diamond said
with conviction.
Housy opens the season
with a three-game homestand
beginning Monday, Dec. 21
against Byram Hills. After that,
the Mountaineers face off with
Suffield, the defending Division
II champions. For the Housy
team, which plays in Division
III, Diamond believes it will be
the toughest game of the year.
“Get it out of the way early,”
he said with a laugh.
And, ideally, learn from it. It

will certainly be a challenge for
the Mountaineers, but one that
is likely to pay dividends as the
season progresses.
Other notable matchups
include a pair of games each
against Woodstock Academy
(Jan. 18, Feb. 19), and Tri-Town
(Jan. 9, Feb 5), who knocked the
Mountaineers out of the state
tournament the past two years.
“It’d be nice to get some revenge on them,” said Diamond.
All of the team’s home games
will be played at The Hotchkiss
School.

After a 13-5-2 finish last season, coach Diamond feels 12 wins
is a realistic target for this year’s
team. After that, he said, their
goal is to advance past the first
round of the state tournament.
To do that, the Mountaineers
will have to fuse their many different pieces into a cohesive unit.
“It all starts with selflessness,”
said Diamond. “Whether in
practice or in games, you need
to work hard to do whatever you
can do make the team better.”
“It should be fun. The kids
are ready to go.”

2015 HVRHS fall athletic awards
FA L L S V I L L AG E —
Housatonic Valley Regional
High School Athletic Director
Anne Macneil shared the list
of the 2015 athletic awards for
the fall season.
Boys Soccer
Most Valuable: Jason Diamond
Most Improved: Scott Dignacco
Sportsmanship: Blake
Buckley
Tyburkski (outstanding
freshman): Matthew Lopes
Girls Soccer
Most Valuable: Maddie
Horosky and Lauren Segalla
Most Improved: Chloe
Dakers
Sportsmanship: Angela Tabor, Grace Lancto and Abigail
LaFontan
Tyburski: Josie Horosky
Girls Cross Country
Most Valuable: Mari Cullerton
Most Improved: Alison
Holmes
Sportsmanship: Chelsea
Kearns
Tyburski: Sammantha
Starr
Boys Cross Country
Most Valuable: Jordan
Santiago
Most Improved: Hunter
Riley
Sportsmanship: Malcolm
Scott
Tyburski: Aidan Dillon
Volleyball
Most Valuable: Haley
Gulotta
Most Improved: Mara
Dorsey
Sportsmanship: Ashley
Coon
Tyburski: Anna Coon

Football
Spartan Award: Billy Hur-

ley
Hitman Award: Ted Perotti
Tyburski: Eli Brinson
Field Hockey
Most Valuable: Megan
Ackerman
Most Improved: Grace
Cohn
Sportsmanship: Jada Wilson
No Tyburski winner
Berkshire League All Stars
Lauren Segalla (Girls Soccer 1st Team), Maddie Horosky (Girls Soccer 1st Team),
Amanda Jacquier (Girls Soccer
1st Team), Chloe Dakers (Girls
Soccer 2nd Team), Jose Horosky (Girls Soccer 2nd Team),
Emily Geyselaers (Girls Soccer
2nd Team), Lauren Gilderdale (Girls Soccer Honorable
Mention), Megan Ackerman
(Field Hockey 1st Team Goalie), Hannah McGuire (Field
Hockey 2nd Team), Morgyn
Gasperini (Field Hockey
Honorable Mention), Maddie
Sheldon (Field Hockey Honorable Mention), Matthew
Lopes (Boys Soccer 2nd Team),
Jason Diamond (Boys Soccer
Honorable Mention), Mari
Cullerton (Cross Country 1st
Team), Eve Cullerton (Cross
Country 1st Team), Katherine Starr (Cross Country 2nd
Team
Connecticut Girls Soccer
All State
Lauren Segalla, Maddie
Horosky, Amanda Jacquier
This year the field hockey
team also won the Ted Alex
Sportsmanship Award for
their season. The team was
chosen by other teams in the
league.

LEGAL NOTICES

LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
ESTATE OF CÉCILE B.
SALISBURY — The Salisbury Winter Sports Association (SWSA) WHITTEMORE, Late of Saliswill host two major events in February as it celebrates its 90th birthday. bury (15-00488)
The Hon. Diane S. Blick,
The annual Jumpfest Winter Festival will be held Feb. 12 to 14. In
addition to the competition between the top ski jumpers in the East, Judge of the Court of Probate,
there will also be the popular Human Dogsled Race, Chili Cook-off District of Litchfield Hills Probate District, by decree dated
and ski jumping under the lights, all at Satre Hill.
In town, there will be ice carving demonstrations, a wine tasting, November 25, 2015, ordered that
a bourbon tasting, restaurant specials, art shows, children’s activities, all claims must be presented to
the fiduciary at the address below.
retail sales and more.
From Feb. 23 to 27, SWSA will host the Junior Nationals. This Failure to promptly present any
event comes to Salisbury every five years and features the high- such claim may result in the loss
est-ranked jumpers in the country who are 20 years old and under. of rights to recover on such claim.
The fiduciary is:
Many of these competitors will go on to represent the United States
Anne B. Mason,
in the 2018 Olympics.
c/o William J. Manasse, Esq.,
Event dates, times and locations will be posted online at www.
Manasse, Slaiby & Leard,
Jumpfest.org.
LLP,
50 North Main Street,
P.O. Box 460,
Send sports news and photos
Kent, CT 06757
to cynthiah@lakevillejournal.com
Heath B. Prentis,
Assistant Clerk
12-10-15

Jumpfest 2016 will be Feb. 12-14

LEGAL NOTICE
PUBLIC HEARING
Thursday, December 17,
2015
To Whom it May Concern:
Notice is hereby given that on
Thursday, December 17, 2015
at 7:00 p.m., in the Canaan Falls
Village Town Hall, the Canaan /
Falls Village Planning & Zoning
Commission will hold a Public
Hearing on the following application;
Consideration of Renewal
of existing Special Use Permit
at Century Aggregates, 75 Sand
Road, Canaan, Connecticut.
At this hearing, interested persons may be heard and written
communication received.
Frederick Laser
P&Z Chairman
12-03-15
12-10-15

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Lakeville
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Millerton
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Millerton
NewsNews
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Journal
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HELP WANTED
HAPPENINGS

FARM MAINTENANCE POSIThe
Gift Horse
Of Kent
(21 Railroad
TION:
available
in Amenia.
SumSt.
Kent,
CT 06757)
a
mer,
temporary
job.is40hosting
hours per
free
horse
drawn please
drivingcall
lesson
week.
For details
Tom
and
demonstration
at 845
518-1546. on Sunday,
December 27th 2015 at 1pm.
“Basics COURSE
of Driving”LABORERS:
or “Driving
GOLF
101”
will begin
1p.m.
needed
for uppromptly
comingatseason.
and
runs860
for 364-0146.
approximately 90
Call Bill,
minutes. For details and location,
interested parties
should register
MACINTOSH
SUPPORT:
at The Gift Horse
Of KentDo
oryour
call
friends
call
you
fi
rst when they
860 927-4677.
have a problem or question
about their Mac, iPod, iPhone,
iPad or AppleTV? Can you
HELPtechno-speak
WANTEDinto
translate
plain English? Are you ready
DRIVERS:
to $350
per day
and
to spendUp
your
workday
enrichbenefits.
Class Alives
CDL, 3while
years miniing people’s
using
mum
experience.
Parttechnology
time, with
the coolest
Apple
full
time
opportunity.
Weekdays
on
earth?
Drop
us
an
and weekends. Local andemail
long jobs@visionarycomputer.net
distance.
Safe record. Team work.
Judge Manning Horse Transport,
PAINTERS
AND
PAINTERS
Amenia, NY. 845
373-8700.
HELPERS: Pay according to
experience.
Own
transportation
FOOD
SERVICES:
Kent
School’sDina plus.
Monday
Friday.
Call 518
ing
Services
seek- two
motivated
789-4185.
and responsible individuals to
support its operation. A Weekend
PASTORALE
BISTRO Academic
IN LAKEDishwasher, part-time
VILLE,
CT: isand
currently
seeking
Year
position,
a full time
KitchanHelper
experienced
Line
Cook to add
en
who will
be responsible
for
the stir
fry stations.
to our
kitchen
team. Successful
Must have
candidates
willhavedemonstrated
culinary background,
ambitious
aoutlook
reliable work
andhistory.
greatExperience
attitude.
preferred
but appearance
will train. To apply,
Clean & neat
a plus.
please
Services at 860
Pleasecall
callFood
860 435-1011.
927-6128.
POOL/RECREATION DIRECTOR:
The North Canaan Recreation
Commission is looking for Responsible, reliable lifeguards to
work at town pool for the 2011

HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED

RETAIL SALES POSITION EARLY
LEARNING
CENTER
PART TIME:
available
at our
-newly
TEACHER’S
AIDE:
Kent
expanded
tile The
and stone
School
ELC inseeks
kind,
and
showroom
Sheffiaeld.
Looking
responsible
Teacher’s
to
for a motivated
and Aide
friendly
help
implementing
its childperson
to join our team.
Good
centered
curriculum.
ideal
communication
skillsThe
- ability
candidate
will be
flexto multi-task
andupbeat,
basic comible
andknowledge
passionatea about
puter
must. carSating
for and
educating
urdays
required.
Willyoung
train
children,
ensure
the daily
carecall
of
the right
person.
Please
children
following
all licensing
413 297-6940
or e-mail:
lisaguidelines,
be able to commurocksolid@roadrunner.com,
nicate
effectively
Rock Solid
Marblewith
andparents,
Granite
and be willing to work with
existing
staff
achieve
pro-is
THE
TOWN
OFto
PINE
PLAINS:
gram
goals.applications
The Center follows
accepting
for the
an
Academic
Schedule.
A CDA
position
of truck
driver/laborer.
or
12 credits must
in earlyhave
childhood
Applicants
a CDL
are
preferred,
Class
B licenseafternoon
valid for thehours
State
aofmust.
candidates
New Interested
York. Job will
include
should
submit
a resume
to
seasonal
mowing,
operation
Director,
Rachel
at
of equipment
andO’Hazo
machinery
ohazor@kent-school.edu.
as well as a variety of manual
tasks in connection with the
SAFETY/DRIVER:
Kent
construction, repair
andSchool
mainseeks
a part
time owned
safety/driver
tenance
of Town
roads,
to
supportand
its other
operation.
This
highways
properties.
isApplicants
a part time,
Academic
Year
must
pass physical
position,
p.m. to Applications
9 p.m. Must
and drug4 testing.
hold
a Publicfrom
Service
License
are available
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and
a clean drivingduring
record.regular
InterSuperintendent
ested
submit
hourscandidates
of businessshould
at 20 Highway
resume
toPlains,
benjamini@kentBlvd., Pine
NY 12567. Apschool.edu.
plications are to be returned to
the Highway Superintendent or
mailed to the Highway Superintendent at PO Box 955, Pine
Plains, NY 12567 by the close
of the business day on June 10,

INSTRUCTIONS,
HELP
WANTED
CLASSES

SERVICES OFFERED
HELP WANTED

GUITAR LESSONS: An innovative
LEARN
NEWSPAPER
programTHE
personally
designed
BUSINESS
WITHyouA listen
PAIDto.
around the music
INTERNSHIP:
colLearn technique,Qualified
theory, chords
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students
interested
in
and scales
from an
experienced
learning
the insExplore
and outs
college instructor.
songof
how and
a newspaper
writing
recording. works
Electric
and acoustic
guitars
welcome.
now
have the
opportunity
Callapply
Jeff atfor
845a 877-3311.
to
paid summer
internship at The Millerton
PRIVATE
LESSONS
INisWATERNews. The
internship
to last
by an
experienced
aCOLOR:
total of eight
weeks.
The New
painter.
$50/2
hours. My
place
York
Press
Association
(NYPA)
or yours. And/or
learn$2,500
to sell
Foundation
is offering
you paintings
on E-bay.
860
internship
stipends
to 25 ran596-4251.
domly
selected newspapers.
Applicants
in a
SAT
TUTOR: interested
Critical reading,
career
in community
journalgrammar,
essay, SAT II Literature,
ism
mustRegents,
apply directly
toappliThe
NY State
college
Millerton
News.
Applicants
cation essays.
Experienced
edumust
attend
collegereferences.
during
cator with
excellent
the
2016-17
academic
year.or
Tri-state
location.
Your home
Application
forms are availmine. 845 729-3193.
able online at: www.nynewspapers.com. Mail completed
forms to The Millerton
News,
SERVICES
OFFERED
PO Box AD, Millerton, NY
12546
by Monday,
Feb. 15,
ALL
SMALL
HOME IMPROVE2016.For
more information
MENTS: Handyman
Services •
contact
Rich• Carpentry
Hotaling
at
Home Repairs
• PaintNYPA
at 518-464-6483,
ing • Decks
• Tile • Wood email
Floors •
Licensed and Insured • 35 Years
editor@millertonnews.com
or
Experience
• Good Prices • I will
call
518-789-4401.
show up and do the job! Call
George 860 435-6461.

SOCIAL
ADMINISDAVIDSERVICES
JAMES VALYOU
TRATOR:
Town -ofPAINTER
Cornwall
- CARPENTER
seeking
part time social
services
- HANDYMAN:
Renovation
administrator.
Experience
for homes and
barns. Fullrequired.
Call 860
672-4959.
remodeling
service;
kitchens,
baths, additions, roofing,
THE
HOTCHKISS
painting,
structuralSCHOOL,
repairs.
LAKEVILLE,
CT: Campus Safety
Historic preservation
and
and
PerLong
Diem:
careSecurity
of olderOfficer,
homes.
Assist
School
community
list ofthe
local
clientele,
manyin
maintaining
safe364-9880
and secure
references. a860
environment
for students, staff,
davidvalyou@yahoo.com.
faculty, and residential families.
DRIVE
YOUR
CAR:
Anywhere.
Maintain
a high
degree
of visibilNY/CT
airports,
NY business/
ity
on School
property,
serve as a
shoppingtotrips,
local
trips,
deterrent
crime and
enhance
trains.
Reasonable
rates,security
courier
the
feeling
of personal
service.
860 364-5950.
for
students,
staff, faculty, and
residential families. Assist law
HOUSE
CLEANING
- OUR
enforcement,
EMS
andVERY
Fire
BEST: Experienced. Thorough,
Department
personnel
with
& honest. Satisfaction guarantheir
response
School.
teed. Call
Dilma to
860the
459-4383.
Flexibility with scheduling is
necessary,
as Per Diem
Officers
HOUSE
CLEANING:
Dependwork
schedules
over
able, varying
honest and
thorough.
three
shifts.
To No
view
deFlexible
hours.
jobmore
too big
tails
about
open positions
or too
small.our
Experienced
with
references.
Call 860
and
to submit
your459-1878
resume
leaveapplication,
message. visit: www.
and
hotchkiss.org/abouthotchkiss/
LAWNS
ETC.: Extremely
reasonemployment/
.To submit
your
able rates.
All phases
lawn
resume
directly,
pleaseof
mail
to:
care,
you
pick
the
day
and
The Hotchkiss School, Human
time.
No
job
too
small.
Call
860
Resources, 11 Interlaken Road,
318-5280.
Lakeville, CT 06039.

C A R E TA K E R AVA I L A B L E :
Young,energetic and very experienced person looking for
a caretaker position full time
or a part time in exchange for

MANZ CONSTRUCTION: Excavation, foundations, heavy
brush removal for property/
fence lines & slopes with boom
mounted brush mower. 203

SERVICES OFFERED
HELP WANTED

TAG SALE CLEAN-UP • SAVE
THE
OF PINE
IS
THISTOWN
AD: Have
truck -PLAINS
will come
SEEKING
APPLICATIONS
FOR
and
help haul
it away! 860 824THE POSITION
OF: Part-time
7181,
leave message.
Highway Secretary. Applicant
must be motivated,
computer
WINDOWS
- WINDOWS
- WINliterateCleaning
and a self
starter. and
ApDOWS!
residential
plications and
a copy
of and
full
commercial
windows,
inside
out!
860 913-4471.
job Call
descriptions
are available at the Pine Plains Town
YARD
students
Hall, WORK:
MondayCollege
through
Friday,
available
lawn3mowbetweenfor
8 raking,
a.m. and
p.m.
ing,
cleanup.
Also,
on ourAmenia,
websiteMillerton,
at www.
Millbrook,
Lakeville, Sharon 845
pineplains-ny.gov.Completed
373-8832.
applications may be dropped
off at the Town Hall, faxed
to 518
398-0092 or mailed
HOUSEHOLD
to Town of Pine Plains, Attn:
GOODS
Highway
Superintendent,
P.O. Box 955, Pine Plains, NY,
FOR
THEApplications
KITCHEN: are
Stainless
12567.
being
Steel
Traulsen
Refrigerator
• GE
accepted
through
12/23/2015.
Profi
le Electricare
Glass
Top Range
Applications
available
from
•the
Granite
Counters
& Sinks •
Highway
Superintendent
White
Refrigerator.
duringKenmore
regular hours
of busiGood
best offer.
860
ness Condition,
at 20 Highway
Blvd.,
364-5929.
Pine Plains, NY 12567. Please
submit letters of interest,
resumes and applications to
theAPARTMENTS
Highway Superintendent
directly or mail to the Highway
AMENIA:
Two bedroom,
Superintendent
at POdeck,
Box
yard.
Near
Metro955, Heat
Pineincluded.
Plains, NY
12567
by
North.
Walk
to
village.
$875.
close of business on 12/22/15.
845-373-9570.
The Town of Pine Plains is an
E.O.E
COLEBROOK APARTMENT
IN COUNTRY FARM HOUSE:
2 room furnished apartment
with full bathroom, wood
stove (firewood provided),

APARTMENTS
HELP WANTED

DOVER PLAINS: 2 bedroom
UNDERMOUNTAIN
CHILD
apartment. $850/month
inCARE CENTER
BERKSHIRE
cludes
heat, hotATwater,
trash
SCHOOL:
is looking for a Credit
tempoand
lawn maintenance.
rary, full-time
teacher845
from877March
check
required.
15, 2016 through May 15, 2016.
9343.
Hours would be Monday-Friday,
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Applicants with
EAST
First floor, three
someCANAAN:
Early Childhood
teachrooms,
$625. Second
oor, four
ing experience
are flpreferred.
rooms,
$750. and
Heat
and check
hot
A CORI check
SAFIS
are both
required.
Interested
water
included.
Shared
yard,
applicants
please email
send
off
-street parking.
Noorpets.
resume and only.
letterReferences,
of interest
Non-smokers
to Director,
Wysocki,
security,
lease.Tammy
860 824-5751.
umcc@berkshireschool.org, or
245 North Undermountain
LAKEVILLE:
Charming Road,
one
Sheffield, MA 01257.
bedroom, 2 bath apartment.
Convenient
location,
walk
WAIT
STAFF/BUSSERS
NEEDED:
to
town. $700
per month,
No experience
necessary.
Please
includes
heat. Brothers
Pets OK. Tenant
stop by Four
Pizza in
pays
own Valley
electric.toReferences.
Pleasant
fill out an
First,
last, security. For appointapplication.
ment, please call 860 435-3023,
or 413 229-5951.

APARTMENTS
LOST & FOUND

LIME ROCK: Large, 3 bedroom,
WEDDING
BAND:
2PLAIN
bathGOLD
apartment
equipped
Small
size, 5? Turned
in at Courwith
washer/dryer,
dishwasher.
$1,200/month
utilities. Now
tesy Booth atplus
LaBonne’s.
860
available,
860 435-8149.
435-2559.
MILLBROOK VILLAGE: Beautiful,
SERVICES
affordable,
well kept studio, one
and two bedroom apartments. All
OFFERED
major appliances. Includes washer and dryer. Close to all amenities. $630/$990/$1,215/$1,175.
A1ITEMS
Call
845HOUSEHOLD
677-8180.
REMOVED AND TRUCKED
AWAY: fromSpacious
basements,
atMILLERTON:
1 bedtics, garages
& barns.
room
apartment.
WalkInsured.
to town.
Call 860 364-4653.
$800/month
includes heat &
hot water, and garbage, utilities
extra. Credit check required. 845
877-9343.
PINE PLAINS: 1 bedroom. Hardwood floors. Heat included.
References. $650. Call 518 3987683.

LESSONS AND
PINE PLAINS: Nice, large effiapartment
on 2nd
floor.
ciency
LAKEVILLE:
125 Millerton Road,
INSTRUCTION
AMERICAN
TREE AND
LANDCentral location. $600/month
corner Belgo Road. Park like
SCAPE:
Tree
Removal

Logutilities. 914 474-5176.
setting.LESSONS:
3 large An
rooms,plus
GUITAR
innovative includes
ging
• Land clearing
• Cabling
845
462-7381
leave message.
aprogram
kitchenpersonally
and bath.designed
$1,300
• Pruning • Stump Grinding
around
the
music
you
listen
to.
includes heating, snow plow• Excavating
• Trucking.
Fully
CORNWALL
- 1/2 DUPLEX:
Learn
technique,
theory, chords WEST
ing,
and
garden maintenance.
Insured. References
Available.
Available
now.
2
bedrooms.
and scales
from an
experienced
Wired
for cable
and
internet,
Veteran Discounts. Call Jason
college instructor.
Explore
song- References and security deposit
separate
garage,
washer/
203 994-$800
8707.per month plus
required.
writing
and
recording.
Electric
dryer on premises. No smoking
and acoustic guitars welcome. utilities. 860 672-6048.
building.
1 year minimum. 860
Call 845 877-6309.
435-2818 or 212 666-4513.
LAKEVILLE/LIME ROCK: 1 &
2 bedroom apartments. $700
and up per month + utilities.

CONDOS FOR SALE

FOR SALE BY OWNER -LION’S
HEAD CONDOMINIUM: 2 bed-

THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL, Thursday, December 10, 2015

A17

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CONDOS FOR SALE
SERVICES
SALISBURY SALE: Quiet and
OFFERED
private
in a woodsy setting.

HOUSES FOR RENT
PETS AND
LAKEVILLE/LIME ROCK: 2 bedLIVESTOCK
room
house, large living room

2 bedrooms, one car garage.
with fireplace, study, 1 bath and
AND
PET$900/
FEEDmonth
FOR
$225,000 by owner. Call 860 LIVESTOCK
a gardener’s
shed.
DAVID
JAMES
VALYOU
SALE:
Holiday 860
gifts435-7000
for familyor
309-9166.
plus utilities.
- RENOVATION AND CONpets!
Green Mountain Organic,
e-maildmason@kuhnsbrothers.
STRUCTION: Renovation
Poulin
com. Grain, Taste Of The Wild,
and restorationFOR
of homes
and
Blue Buffalo, Wellness and much
HOUSES
RENT
outbuildings. Painting and
more.
Salt blocks, lime,
bird 3seed,
LAKEVILLE/LIME
ROCK:
bedhandyman3services.
860 435you1.5need
forgarage,
your
room house,
baths,
AMENIA:
bedroom,
2 bath everything
9799, davidvalyou@yahoo.
Stock
and
Pets.
Delivery
service
large living room, kitchen, dinhome, deck/yard, washer/dryer.
com.
available!
The
Giftroom,
Horsebeautiful
of Kent,
ing room,
social
$1200 includes heat, lawn a full
service
tackand
shoplots
andoffeed
wooden
fl
oors
intemaintenance & garbage.
HOUSEKEEPING:
CleaningNo store,
21 Railroad
St., Kent, plus
CT
rior details.
$1500/month
pets.
Security
&
references
845
homes and offices. Good ex06757
Call860
860435-7000
927-4677,
utilities
orwww.
e-mail
224-8454
or
845
373-9387.
perience and references. Call
thegifthorseofkent.com.
dmason@kuhnsbrothers.com.
Claudia and Alfredo. 860 453COPAKE
LAKE:
1 bedroom loft,
4496 or 860
480-8518.
- COTTAGE FOR
close to lake, nice views. Rent MILLERTON
FREE
RENT: Small
one bedroom
negotiable. 845 242-3996.
cottage, 1.5 miles from Village,
HOUSEHOLD
FIREWOOD:
Huge
Sugar
Maple
suitable for single.
Nice
yard,
COPAKE,
NY: 2 bedroom, living limb
in pasture.
Must remove
GOODS
quiet
neighborhood,
room, kitchen, landing, washer all material from property.cable
available, $650/month 860
plus
and dryer
hookup. UPRIGHT
2 floors. $750 364-5019.
KIRBY
DELUXE
utilities, security, references.
+
utilities.
Security
deposit,
VACUUM: Used 10 times. ALL
518 789-3201.
reference and/or
creditPower
scores
attachments,
including
required.floor
No pets.
Available.
Suction,
washing
and
APARTMENTS
MILLERTON
VILLAGE - WALK TO
6/1/11. carpet
Apartment
is in a 2 family
waxing,
and upholstery
EVERYTHING! Great weekend
dwelling
in
a
Farm
setting.
518
cleaners (most unopened in PUBLISHER’S
NOTICE:
Equalfor
Houssmall cottage,
ideal
one
851-9854.packaging)$1,200
original
ing
Opportunity.
All 1real
estate
person
or couple!
bedroom,
new. Yours for $600. 860 435advertised
inroom,
this newspaper
is
den, living
eat in kitchen,
2289.
subject
to porch
the Federal
Housing
screen
and Fair
garage.
FurAct
of 1966orrevised
March 12,$1200
1989
nished
unfurnished.
which
illegal
to advertise
plus makes
utilitiesitper
month.
Security
FOR SALE
and
references.
845 677-3735.
any
preference,
limitation,
or discrimination based on race, color
ELECTRIC SNOW BLOWER: 18”
SHARON:
beautiful
locareligion,
sex,Quiet,
handicap
or familial
Toro Power Curve, like new, cost
tion.orOne
largeorigin
bedroom,
spastatus
national
or inten$275, just $75.jimsheff@gmail.
cious
kitchen,
washer/dryer,
tion
to make
any such
preference,
LAKEVILLE:
Three bedroom,
com.
living/dining
with fireplace,
limitation
or discrimination.
All
1.5 baths, village home with
screen porch.
Ideal
for couples/
residential
property
advertised
in
updated kitchen and baths.
single.
smoking. $1,000
per
the
StateNon
of Connecticut
General
HOLIDAY
On a side
street with patio and
month46a-64c
plus utilities.
Includes
Statutes
which prohibit
large COLUMN
rear yard. $1,800/month
snow
removal
lawn. Call
the
making,
printingand
or publishing
unfurnished. Best and Cavallaro
364-0319.
or860
causing
to be made, printed or
Real Estate, TREES
860 436-2888.
CHRISTMAS
- FRESH:
published any notice, statement or
Cut and carry. All sizes. Open
advertisement with respect to the
Saturday and2.5
Sunday
1:30 p.m.
LAKEVILLE:
bedrooms,
living
sale or rental of a dwelling that in- room,
5 p.m. 21
Cardinal
Lane,
Salisdining room, 1.5 bath.
dicates any preference, limitation or
bury.
Call if directions
needed
Remodeled
kitchen with
new
discriminationbasedonrace,creed,
860
824-5608.
appliances.
Laundry room with
color, national origin, ancestry, sex,
washer/dryer. Walking distance
marital status, age, lawful source of
CHRISTMAS TREES: Cut your
to lake.
month
plus
own
or $1,200
chooseper
from
trees
income, familial status, physical or
utilities,
references
and
security.
on display, wreaths, garland,
mental disability or an intention to
860
480-2349.
kissing balls, and more. www.
make any such preference, limitaseekonktreefarm.com. Great
LAKEVILLE:
3 bedroom
house, 1 tion or discrimination.
Barrington. 413
528-0050.
bath, private yard, washer/dryer
hook-up. $950/month plus utilities. References. No pets. 860
435-2533.

HOUSES FOR RENT
APARTMENTS
SALISBURY: 3 bedrooms, 2.5

baths, NY:
deck
patio,floor
private
AMENIA,
Second
apart-2
acres.2$2,000
month
pluspark
utiliment.
bedrooms,
1 bath,
ties.setting.
860 824-5601.
like
Heat, hot water
and trash pickup included.
Coin operated
washer dryer on
SEASONAL
premises. References required.
$925 perRENTALS
month. 1st, last and 1
month’s rent deposit. Call 413
CHRISTMAS IN ENGLAND?
896-2390
Christmas in London? Swap
my London
flat for $1,000
your place
AMENIA:
2 bedroom.
per
in Sharon.email
stephanie.
month.
All utilities included.
No
holm@fox.com
.
pets.
Call 845 518-6267.
CANAAN: Sunny apartment,
updated kitchen/bath, wood
floors, quiet two family. No
dogs/smokers. $750 plus utilities. Security, lease, references
required. 860 989-8673.
LIME ROCK: 2 bedroom apartFURNISHED
LAKEFRONT
ments
for rent.
Includes SUMheat,
MER RENTAL:
Charming
garbage
pickup &
off street3
bedroom,
2.5 smokers
bath furnished
parking.
Nononly!
country
on 1 acre
Please
callchic
JW cottage
at 203-725-1706
150
ft. direct lakefront,
orwith
email
popwoerm@aol.com.
gazebo, private dock. Summer
2011ROCK:
- $25,000;
winter 2011-12
LIME
Studio/effi
ciency,
$2,500/month
plus utilities.
16’
x 32’, partly furnished
with
Best & Cavallaro
Real Estate
complete
kitchen facilities
and
860 435-2888.
storage
areas, cabinets. Above
a garage with private entrance
SHARON,
SILVER
LAKE
COTand
deck. Clean
and
tidy with
TAGE:
1 bedroom,
queen
three
skylights
and a sliding
size door
bed, onto
new the
appliances.
On
glass
deck. Heat,
private
dead end
road. 3drivemina/c,
electricity,
tv cable,
uteplowing
walk to private
Nonway
and wifidock.
included.
motorized
Available
July
Nonsmoker,lake.
no pets,
no launand
$2,500
per
month.
dry
onAugust.
premise,
$850/
monthly
No smoking.
pets. 1 months
with
deposit. No
Available
Jan 1
security,
cleaning
fee and refer2016
in Lime
Rock.info@greenences. afford71020@mypacks.
worksatwhitehollow.com
net.
MILLERTON: Available January
2. Two bedroom cottage in the
Village of Millerton. Walk to all.
Back yard with deck $800 +
utilities. 518 789-3462.
MILLERTON: Large 1 bedroom
apartment, convenient to everything. $650/month. Heat
included. No smoking, no pets.
845 518-5413.

SEASONAL
RENTALS
APARTMENTS

REAL ESTATE FOR
SALE
OFFICE
SPACE

SPACE FOR RENT
HOUSES
FOR RENT
MILLERTON STORE FOR RENT:

acres. 3 acre stocked pond.
Next to McDonalds,
Square LAKEVILLE:
CORNWALL:
New
2 bedroom,
1.5 NORFOLK,
SHARON: 4A bedroom
SHARON:
Above
Doctor’s
Office,
CT: 2-3 750
bedroom
World of Cape,
Your
Valley andOffi
Catskill
views.
feet, recent
renovation,
good
bath quiet
duplexindividuals.
home on 25 bedacres. sunny
deck,
pool,
barn
on
.97
acre.
need
SHARON:
ce nearrange
hospital,
and private house
Own. Immaculate, carpeted
Engineered
driveway.
B.O.H.A.
parking.
Available
Large 1living
with
ceil- close
$265,000
Bosworth
Real
Estate
room,
bath.room
Center
of 16’
town.
1,200
sq. ft. for
sale or lease.
to town.
3 acresMarch
of land,1, second
story
space for
office
or
2011. Telephone
5182 789- Electricity
- Several Former
sites total
ing, kitchen/dining
with washer/dryer,
860 364-1700.
$950
per month, plusroom
utilities.
Available
immediately.
attached
car
retail
with 1/2 bath and large
3636. $1,250/monthly. 860
all new appliances,
offisecurity.
ce/study garage.
privacy Nordicare
- 5 minutes
Millerton
1st/last
month’s rent
tenant
Physical
storage area. 1,120 sq. ft. Ideal
area,860
laundry
with washer/dryer. 307-5431.
center. Owner
- 518-329-2244.
Call
364-5814.
Therapy.
860
567-2435.
central
location near
Salisbury,
MOBILE
HOMES
Pictures at www.cornwalct.org.
Price $995,000. Ready to go.
Millerton and Sharon. Ample
REAL-COZY
ESTATE
FOR
Annual lease
plus SHARON
SHARON:
One$1,800/month
bedroom, heat
FOR
SALE
SALT BOX:
parking,
central
a/c,
$1,100
utilities and
security
860
672- 3 bedroom,SALE
SHARON: Close to SPACE
town, apincluded,
second
floor, no
smok2 bath house on
COMMERCIAL
per month + utilities. Best &
6309
or 212 534-0727.
proved, 2 acres. $95,000. Boing
$875/month.
Bosworth Real
DOVER:
3
bedrooms,
2
baths.
quiet road. 1 mile from Sharon.
860-435-2888.
COPAKE LAKE $1,400/month
- FOR SALE OR Cavallaro
sworth RealCommercial
Estate 860retail
364Estate 860 364-1700.
$1,200/month includes trash & MILLERTON:
Washer/dryer.
RENT:
2 cottages
1/2 and
acre.
1700.in center of town, excelsnow removal and law mainteplus
utilities,
first,onlast
space
SPACE
FOR
RENT
75 yardsNo
to dogs.
the lake!
SHARON:
Three
bedroom,
1 1/2
nance. 845 877-9343.
security.
CallAsking
860
lent location, plenty of parking.
.com
$179,000 or best offer. 845
bath Duplex in 2 family house.
364-5814.
Formerly Pringle & Zimring. 845
.com
.com
MILLERTON:
Several
offices.
242-3996.
Newly renovated. Pantry with
IS YOUR NEW
518-5413.
Great downtown
location!
washer/dryer
hookup.
Oil, SHARON: 4 bedroom, 1.5 bath,
IS YOUR NEW
REGIONAL
NEWS SITE
IS
YOUR
NEW
Plenty heat.
of off street
parking.
518 washer/dryer,
FALLS VILLAGE:
Estate$1,500
on 55 REGIONAL NEWS SITE
steam
Screened
porch.
garage.
REGIONAL NEWSfromSITE
789-3623.
acres,
callplus
for details.
Off
street parking. References,
per
month
utilities.$875,000.
No pets,
The Lakeville JournalARNEY
EAL STATE
from LYSE
from The Millerton News
Bosworth
Real
Estate
860
364credit check and security deno smoking. 860 435-9481.
The Lakeville Journal
The
Lakeville
Journal
The
Winsted
Journal
1700.
posit required. No pets. $1,190/
A Tradition of Trust
The Millerton News
The Millerton News
The Winsted JournalWe’ve made it easier to find all theonews,
LAKEVILLE
• MAIN STREET:
3
month
plus utilities.
Call John
SHARON: Brand New Log Home,
The Winsted Journal
Connecticut
New York o Massachusetts
exceptional
LAKEVILLE:
Belgo3 Bedrooms
Road with We’ve made it easier to findartsallcoverage,
860
354-0449.offices available.
Delightful
Setting,
the news,photos, classified ads and more!
We’ve
made
it
easier
to
find
all
the
news,
Extremely well maintained
Great Southern
Views, Real
open arts coverage, photos, classified ads and more!
$2800/month.
Bosworth
arts coverage, photos, classified ads and more!
building. Small , medium and
field, 860
private.
$459,000. BoEstate
364-1700.
E
CONDOMINIUM
IC
large
spaces. 860 435-2635.
sworth Real Estate 860 364PR
W
1700.
E
FOR RENT

TriCornerNews
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SEASONAL

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The Millerton News
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MillertonJournal
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Winsted
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$ 9 85 , 000

860-435-2200 www.HarneyRE.com
To Place
an
or Vo
To PlaceAdanCall
Ad 860-435-9873
Call 860-435-9873

TriCorner
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Bosworth

Real Estate

So That We May Be Free This Memorial Day !

Jen Bosworth

NEWS REPORTER

E

R

R

NEW PRICE - SALISBURY! 3 bedNews Site
room, 1 bath ranch on dead-end
Real Estate
street; freshly painted, nicely
Stay informed of all
maintained; full basement, front
deck. NEW PRICE: $178,000. Best
the local
news
andLives
We Honor All Those Who Have
Given
Their
& Cavallaro: 860 435-2888.

litchfieldhillsSIR.com

L

H

N

MILLERTON, NY CONDOMINRENTALS
IUM: 2 Bedroom Condo with
loft
area for rent
in Millerton.
PUBLISHER’S
NOTICE:
Equal Housing
Opportunity.
All real estate
SHARON
WINTER RENTAL:
Brick
advertised
in this 1,
newspaper
is subject
to theDining
Federal
Fair Housing
Act
Available
January
2016. Close
house.
room,
living room
1966yard
revised
March
1989 which
makes
it illegal insert,
to advertise
any
toof
town,
area,
deck12,
& more.
with
fireplace
kitchen
preference,
limitation,
discrimination
on race, 4color
religion,
$1,150
per month
plusor
utilities.
withbased
appliances,
bedrooms,
sex,518
handicap
or familial status or national
originutility
or intention
to make
Call
789-3636.
2 baths,
room
with
any such preference, limitation or discrimination. All residential property
washer/dryer
and garage.
advertised in the State of Connecticutnew
General
Statutes 46a-64c
which
$1,200
with to
security
prohibitthemaking,printingorpublishing
orcausing
bemade,deposit.
printed
HOUSE
SALE
through
Apriltowith
or publishedFOR
any notice,
statement or December
advertisement
with respect
the
optional
renewal.
860
364-5019
sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation or
for details.
discrimination based on race, creed, color,
national origin, ancestry, sex,
marital status, age, lawful source of income, familial status, physical or
mental disability or an intention to make any such preference, limitation
or discrimination.

information that is
taking
place Regional
around
The Best
860-364-1700
you.
Whether
you are
News Site
www.theboz.com
looking for the high
school
sports scores,
Stay informed
of all an
obituary
or
wedding
the local news and
LAKEVILLE/LIME ROCK: 2 bedLYSE
ARNEY announcement
EAL STATE
room house, 2 baths, large
Kent Brokerage 860.927.1141
information
thatofisa
kitchen,
outdoorreporter
deck, family
Full-time
wanted for The
Lakeville
friend,
or
the
police
Trust
taking
place around
Kitchen &Bath Sales/Designer A– Tradition of
Lakeville Brokerage 860.435.2400
CONDOS
FOR SALE
room, dining/living room, wood
o
o
blotter

it’s
all
there!
Journal.
Includes
benefits.
Lakeville CT Connecticut New Yorkyou.Massachusetts
Whether you
are
stove. $1,200 per month +
Each Office Is Independently Owned and Operated.
SALISBURY SALE: Quiet and
Immediate
opening
for
an
experienced
kitchen
and
bath
utilities.Please
860 435-7000
or
e-mail
send resumé and writing samples
looking
for
the
high
in a woodsy setting.
designer, to provide customer support in room design
and oP en H private
P ubliC
ouses
dmason@kuhnsbrothers.com.
2 bedrooms,
one
carangarage.
We’ve
made
it even
purchase of products/accessories. 1-3 yrs K&B
scores,
to Cynthia Hochswender at cynthiah@
ev experience
ery satu rd ay an d su nschool
d ay$225,000
, 12:sports
002:by00
owner. Call 860
and proficiency with 20/20 software design system required.
obituary
or
wedding
easier
to
W
est
Main
street,
north
Can
aan
,
CT
lakevillejournal.com
309-9166.
Alternating 5 & 6 day work week, including every Saturday.
obiNSoN eeCh
eaL STaTe
Competitive base weekly wage plus monthly commission.
announcement
of a
Stay Informed.
The
Best
Regional
YourCountry
Independent, Properties
Distinctive
friend,
or
the
police
HOUSES
FOR RENT
Contractor Sales Rep – Millerton NY
Locally Owned,
Outstanding
service and sales support to walk in and phone
blotterNews
— Visit
it’s all
there!
Site
AT
NUMBER
OF YEARLY
FROM
$2000/MO.
AND
UP,
AVAILABLE.
HE MILLERTON
NEWS RENTALS
Community
AMENIA:
3 bedroom, 2 bath
in contractor customers in purchase of lumber and building
tricornernews.com
deck/yard, washer/dryer.
materials for jobs and projects. Knowledge of building
The Winsted Journal
Newspapers &
tohome,
purchase
a print
or
materials and processes required, millwork skills desired. Five
$1200
includes
heat, lawn
Stay
informed
of
We’ve
made
it all
even
Regional
News
Website
www.TriCornerNews.com
day work week including every other Saturday.
online
subscription.
maintenance
& garbage. No
thepets.
local
newsto
and
Security
& us
references 845
Oreasier
contact
Competitive wages and benefits include: medical, dental,
information
is
224-8454 orthat
845 373-9387.
Stay
Informed.
vision, employee life and dependent life insurances; paid
by phone,
taking
place
around
vacation, PTO, holiday time; LTD; STD; purchase discount;
COPAKE
LAKE: 1 bedroom loft,
800-339-9873
401k with match and more. EOE/Drug Free Workplace.
you.
Whether
are Rent
close
toVisit
lake, you
nice views.
blACK beRRy RiveR
CoMMons
orfor
by the
email,
negotiable.
845
242-3996.
tricornernews.com
looking
high
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Con
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s
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villag
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Stop by any location or mail to: Ed Herrington, Inc.
VILLAGE LIVING:
MULTI-FUNCTIONAL
MINI-ESTATE:
WaHillsdale
l k to tow NY
n a n 12529.
d a short d riv e to G school
rea
tpurchase
Bacirculation@
rrin
g NY:
ton a,scores,
l isb uryor
toCOPAKE,
Attn:
Human Resources, P.O. Box 709,
sports
an, living
2Saprint
bedroom,
4-5 bedrooms, high ceilings, comfortable spaces, lovely
6+ acres, horse stables, horse
pasture,
large capacity garages
Fax: 518-325-5666,
email: mary.prazma@herringtons.com
and Norfolk. Single-level living with
beautiful
open
floorwasher
lakevillejournal.com
room,
kitchen,
landing,
online
subscription.
obituary
or wedding

R

LAND FOR SALE
OFFICE SPACE
ANCRAMDALE,
N.Y. 28 estate

H

R

Lakeville
Journal
- The
Millerton
New
TheThe
Lakeville
Journal
The
Millerton
News
Real -Estate

E

TriCorner
News.com

e

HOUSES FOR RENT

HOUSES FOR RENT

LAKEVILLE/LIME ROCK: 2 bedroom house, large living room
with fireplace, study, 1 bath and
a gardener’s shed. $900/ month
plus utilities. 860 435-7000 or
e-maildmason@kuhnsbrothers.
com.

SALISBURY: 3 bedrooms, 2.5
baths, deck patio, private 2
acres. $2,000 month plus utilities. 860 824-5601.

LAKEVILLE/LIME ROCK: 3 bedroom house, 1.5 baths, garage,
large living room, kitchen, dining room, social room, beautiful
wooden floors and lots of interior details. $1500/month plus
utilities 860 435-7000 or e-mail
dmason@kuhnsbrothers.com.

SEASONAL
RENTALS
CHRISTMAS IN ENGLAND?
Christmas in London? Swap
my London flat for your place
in Sharon.email stephanie.
holm@fox.com .

1830 LAKEVILLE ANTIQUE

MILLERTON
- COTTAGE
An immaculate
1830FOR
Village home with 1,462 sq. ft.,
RENT:
Small one
bedroom
2 bedrooms,
den,
1 bath, fireplace, screened porch, 1
cottage, 1.5 miles
from Village, LAKE HOUSE
THE
car garage
justULTIMATE
a short
suitable
for single.
Nice
yard,walk to the Town Grove and

3135
sq.ft.
• 0.68
acres
• 4 BRs
• 3.5 BAs • perenlake.neighborhood,
On .46 acres
with
mature
landscaping,
quiet
cable
SALISBURY.
Cus Factory
t om
de plus
s iBrook
gne d A di inr onda the rear.
c k i ns pi r e d hom
e
yard, and walk-to-school convenience. Also the lake
for vehicles or other needs, work shop, home office, plus a
available,
$650/month
pl a n s. C en tra l Air, f ul l Ba semen ts, a ttaand
c hed
2
c
a
r
G
a
ra
g
e,
2
nial
beds
and
dryer hookup. 2 floors. $750
and restaurants. OFFERED AT: $398,000.
wonderful 3+ bedroom residence including an apartment
with
150’
of
direct
lake
frontage.
Open
floor
plan,
vaulted
utilities,
security,
references.
Or
contact
us
FURNISHED
LAKEFRONT
SUMannouncement
of
a
and
3
BR
units,
2
full
BAs,
terrific
Kitchens.
+ utilities. Security deposit,
$299,000
annex, and 2 car garage. Two additional homes also available.
We’re looking for an experienced R.N.
518
789-3201.
MER RENTAL:
Charming
ceilings,
floor to ceiling stone fireplace,
chef’s kitchen,
classic3
and/or
credit scores
phone,
Three d esig n sty les: $ 269 , 9 00- $ 29friend,
9 , 9 reference
00 by
All within 5 minutes of Sharon. ASKING $985,000
or the
police
who’s ready for a challenge.
bedroom,
2.5
bath
furnished
bow
windows
with
built-in
seating
overlooking
a
stunning
required.
No pets.
Available.
W
eb#
eH
2162,
2163
,
2164
Juliet
Moore/Dave
Taylor
MILLERTON
VILLAGE
- WALKof
TOthe lake.
800-339-9873
country chic cottage on 1 acre
blotter
it’s all there!
Selling properties in CT, Mass, and New York, since 1955
THE
M—
ILLERTON
Nis EWS
stone terrace
with views
6/1/11.
Apartment
in a 2 family
EVERYTHING!
Great weekend
with 150 ft. CT
direct
lakefront,
5EH3173
Academy
Street,
Salisbury,
06068
or
by
email,
dwelling
in
a
Farm
setting.
518
Web#
Carol
Staats
$2,575,000
318 Main Street • Lakeville, Connecticut • 860-435-9891
860-435-2200 www.HarneyRE.com
The Winsted Journal
small cottage,
ideal
for one
private dock.
Summer
phone:
860-435-2888
•gazebo,
fax: 860-435-6119
851-9854.
you are an exceptional www.robinleechrealestate.com
R.N. with long-term care
person or couple! 1 bedroom,
circulation@
2011 - $25,000; winter 2011-12
We’ve
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www.
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den, living room, eat in kitchen,
$2,500/month plus utilities.
experience and outstanding clinical skills, we’d like to talk
lakevillejournal.com
screen porch and garage. FurBest & Cavallaro Real Estate
easier to
to you about an opportunity as Charge Nurse at Noble
nished or unfurnished. $1200
860 435-2888.
Stay Informed.
Horizons, a 5-Star continuum of care retirement village
plus utilities per month. Security
and references. 845 677-3735.
SHARON, SILVER LAKE COTin Salisbury, CT, known for excellence in nursing care and
Visit
TAGE: 1 bedroom, queen
Like to be up on the latest news? Want to work
rehabilitation.
THE MILLERTON NEWS
SHARON: Quiet, beautiful locasize bed, new appliances. On
tricornernews.com
tion. One large bedroom, spain the charming, picturesque Harlem Valley?
private dead end road. 3 minThe Winsted JournalDistinctive
You’ll be part of our quality assurance team and play a
Country
Properties
cious kitchen,
washer/dryer,
toLAKEVILLE:
purchase aThree
printbedroom,
or
ute walk to private dock. NonThe Millerton News is looking for a full-time
key role in project management and enjoy the following
www.
.com
living/dining with fireplace,
motorized lake. Available July
online
subscription.
1.5
baths,
village
home
with
screen porch.
Ideal forPRICES
couples/
and
August. $2,500
per month.
benefits:
ENJ
OYkitchen
L OW
HEATING
FUEL
THIS
SEASON
news reporter to work 40 hours a week coverupdated
and
baths.
single. Non smoking. $1,000 per
Or contact us
No smoking. No pets. 1 months
• competitive compensation commensurate
On
a
side
street
with
patio
and
ing Amenia, Pine Plains and Webutuck.
month plus utilities. Includes
security, cleaning fee and referphone,
with experience
largeby
rear
yard. $1,800/month
snow removal and lawn. Call
ences. afford71020@mypacks.
Position
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all
aspects
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local
news

unfurnished.
Best
and
Cavallaro
860 364-0319.
800-339-9873
net.
• supportive management
Real
Estate,
860
436-2888.
community news, business news, government,

R.N. Charge Nurse

www.bestandcavallaro.com

News Reporter Wanted

If

TriCornerNews

Full Time

Robinson L eech Real Estate

TriCornerNews

• one-on-one orientation
• excellent insurance package with no-lapse coverage
• 8-hour shift
• per diem and full-time opportunities
• shift differentials
• an attractive, positive, respectful work atmosphere

17 Cobble Road | Salisbury, CT 06068
www.noblehorizons.org
Equal Opportunity Employer

www.bainrealestate.com
Sharon 860-364-4646
West Cornwall 860-672-2626
Kent 860-927-4646

LAKEVILLE:
2.5 bedrooms, living
circulation@
room, dining room, 1.5 bath.
lakevillejournal.com
Remodeled kitchen with new
appliances. Laundry room with
WONDERFUL
SECURE
CAR STORAGE: YEAR ROUND RENTAL:
washer/dryer. Walking
distance
to lake.
$1,200 per
month
plus Four month Out in the country side; a casual home, 3-4
Heated
interior,
mouse
proof.
your Classified Ads to:
utilities, references and security.
bedrooms, unfurnished,
Non-smokers, pet
T
HE
ILLERTON
NEWS
minimum.
Call Robin.
classified@lakevillejournal.com
860M480-2349.

Send Résumé and Writing Samples
attn. Whitney Joseph

restricted, quiet with views. Call Robin for
details.
LAKEVILLE: 3 bedroom house, 1
www.bath,
TriCornerNews
.com
private yard,
washer/dryer
Selling
properties in CT, Mass, and New York , since 1955
hook-up. $950/month plus utili318 Main Street • Lakeville, Connecticut • 860-435-9891
ties. References. No pets. 860
www.robinleechrealestate.com
435-2533.

The Winsted Journal

litchfieldhillsSIR.com

www.TriCornerNews.com

Priscilla Pavel $795,000
860-672-2626 Ideal location

on lakefront at the
quiet end of North Spectacle Lake.
Move-in ready home with 36’ porch
overlooking the lake, and 36’ deck on
the lower level. Attached 2-car garage,
fiberglass insulation and concrete tile
roof. Hardwood floors throughout. 4
bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, set on 4.16
acres.

CORNWALL
bath duple
Large living
ing, kitchen
all new app
area, laundr
Pictures at
Annual leas
utilities an
6309 or 212

SPACE

MILLERTON
Great dow
Plenty of off
789-3623.

LAKEVILL
exceptiona
Extremely
building. S
large space

PUBLISHER
advertised
of 1966 rev
preference
sex, handic
any such pr
advertised
prohibitthe
or publishe
sale or rent
discriminat
marital stat
mental disa
or discrimin

E-Mail

E-mail: editor@millertonnews.com
The Millerton News
P.O. Box AD, Millerton, NY 12546

North Spectacle Lakefront

SEA
RE

or by email,

education and the arts. Writing skills a must.

Call or e-mail Valerie Lattrell, R.N., Director of Nursing
at 860-435-9851 or vlattrell@noblehorizons.org

M
whe

Privacy &

Chris Garrity
860-364-4646

LAKEVILLE/LIME ROCK: 2 bedroom house, 2 baths, large
kitchen, outdoor deck, family
room, dining/living room, wood
stove. Forever
$1,200 per month +
Comfort
utilities. 860 435-7000 or e-mail
dmason@kuhnsbrothers.com.

Kent Brokerage 860.927.1141
Lakeville Brokerage 860.435.2400
Cozy
Lake
Each
Office Is Cabin
IndependentlyOn
OwnedSilver
and Operated.

LOOK FOR
TRI-CORNER
RobiNSoN LeeCh ReaL eSTaTe
REAL ESTATE
Distinctive Country Properties
A NUMBER OF YEARLY RENTALS FROM $2000/MO. AND UP, AVAILABLE.
NEXT WEEK

$405,000

Ethan Watt

We Hon
So Th

Jen B

ELY

Co

$179,900

Private country home immersed in
gem! This country cabin is hidden
860-364-4646 A
nature. Original 1940’s outdoorsman’s
at the outskirts of Silver Lake Shores
lodge complete with large native stone
Development. The cabin comes with
fireplace. Old floors, wood beams and
extra land which creates a beautiful
VILLAGE
LIVING:
MULTI-FUNCTIONAL
MINI-ESTATE:
a large porch. Surrounded on all sides
backyard and
privacy. Wrap-around
4-5
bedrooms,
high
ceilings,
comfortable
spaces,
lovely
6+
acres,
horse
stables,For
horsethose
pasture, large
capacity
garages
by State Forest and the Audubon Nature
porch.
looking
for
their very
yard, and walk-to-school convenience. Also the lake
for vehicles or other needs, work shop, home office, plus a
Preserve. 2 and
bedrooms,
2
bathrooms
set
own
log residence
cabin in
the country
this one’s
restaurants. OFFERED AT: $398,000.
wonderful 3+
bedroom
including
an apartment
annex, and for
2 caryou!
garage.2Two
additional homes
also available.set on
on 9 acres.
bedrooms,
2 bathroom,
All within 5.47
minutes
of
Sharon.
ASKING
$985,000
acre. Very special!

Selling properties in CT, Mass, and New York, since 1955
318 Main Street • Lakeville, Connecticut • 860-435-9891
www.robinleechrealestate.com

Ac
Wa l k t
and N
pl a n s.
and 3 B
Three
W eb#

86

A18 THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL, Thursday, December 10, 2015
A18 THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL, Thursday, August 19, 2010

ToToHave
30,000 Potential
PotentialCustomers
CustomersCall
Call860-435-9873
860-435-9873
HaveYour
YourService
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Listedand
andReach
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Specialist Directory

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Friday at 4 p.m. for
to draw your customer’s
the following Thursday’s
eyes directly to your
publication date.
service with full color.

The Lakeville
Journal- - The
The Millerton
News
- The- Winsted
Journal Journal
- www.tricornernews.com
The Lakeville
Journal
Millerton
News
The Winsted
- www.tcextra.com

AntiqueGutters
Restoration
5 1 8 -7 8 9 -3 5 8 2
518-789-3582

w w w . R osin iAn tique s. n et
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SEA GULL ROOFING & SIDING, INC.
All Types of Gutters
Vinyl Siding • Vinyl Replacement Windows
Standing Seam Metal Roofing

(518) 789-3342
FAX (518) 789-6256

Millerton, NY 12546
Est. 1961

R E ST O R E R S & C O N SE R V AT O R S
O F F I N E AN T I Q U E S

Appliances

Winter Months Are Perfect For:
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I

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.

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TiresLawn
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Treatments
For Weeds
Open Walls
Monday
- FridayWalls
8 to 5;
Saturday
8 to 1
Stone
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• Fencing
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(518)
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John
Heck
Cindy Heck

Tree / Shrub Planting • Decorative Water Features

up.country.svcs@snet.net
Commercial & Residential
Credit Cards Accepted
(800) 791-2916
(860) 364-0261
Home Improvement Contractor: #514326 • Ct Pesticide License: #b-1175
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4228 Route 22 Wassaic, New York 12592
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(860) 364-5906
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Edging & Mulching * Lawn Installation/Repair
Brush Clearing/Removal * Tree Takedowns
Driveway Repair * Spring & Fall Clean-Up
Snow Plowing & Sanding

Carpentry

Serving Residential & Commercial Properties

Todd C. Anderson, Owner

CANNON
CARPENTRY,
LLC
Free Estimates
* Fully
Insured
24 Reed Street, PO Box 1113
Canaan, Ct. 06018

email: cannoncarpentry11@gmail.com

Lightning Rods
860-309-8846

CT HIC# 0641295

• EXCAVATORS • BACKHOES
•BULLDOZER • CHIPPER
• DUMP TRUCKS
All
through
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All through
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community.
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Professional design, engineering
& installation.
Since 1953.
Visionary Computer

ASSOCIATED

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Millerton, New York

845-373-8309

Overhead Doors

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Boiler & Furnaces . Air Conditioning Units . Hot Water Heaters
LICENSED
/ INSURED
Oil & Propane Tanks
. Septic Tanks
& Systems . Radiant Heat
Water Treatment Systems . Water pumps
& Water
lines Accepted
. Log Sets
Commercial/Residential
Credit
Cards
Curtain Drains Kitchen/Baths . Pool Heaters

Storage1

$ MOVE-IN SPECIAL

Family owned and operated for
over 80 364-0261
years.
(800) 791-2916
(860)

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800.553.2234 | 518.789.4600

TUXIS SELF STORAGE
at Millbrook Commons, Millbrook, NY

Painting
Pool & Spa

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Hussey Painting
Decorating & Wallpapering

ALL
CLIMATE
CONTROLLED

845-677-2700

Weekly Maintenance
Interior &
Exterior
Custom Inground
Liner
Replacement
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Y o ur h o m e o r m ine

MADSEN OVERHEAD DOORS
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P h o ne: 860 -364-5338
Cell: 845-70 5-3762

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Crystal Clear

Tile
Installation
Tree
Service

State Licensed Home Improvement Contractors
Insured & EPA Certified PUBLICATION: Millerton News
POSITION/SIZE:
2.75 inches x 2 inches
Now accepting most major credit
cards
Family Owned and operated SincePUB.
1978DATE(S): 2013

POOL & SPA

860 - 364 - 0108

Emmet Hussey
www.husseypainting.com
OPENINGS & CLOSINGS • PARTS, CHEMICALS • REPAIRS
860.435.8149
emmethussey@gmail.com

Established in 1978 for the
preservation of landscape trees.

ROOT TREE SERVICE
Serving The Area Since 1983
Michael Root CT Arborist # 61802

L a k ev il l e, C T .

8 6 0 -4 3 5 -8 8 7 7

Tri-State News
Window Treatments

STONE &TILE SERVICES

HONING

CLEANING

Tree Care
• Tick Spraying
MARBLE
GRANITE

SLATE TERRAZZO

SEALING

LIMESTONE
SOAPSTONE

TILE REPAIR & INSTALLATION

Painting & Home

SEA GULL
ROOFING
Repair,
LLC& SIDING, INC.
All Types of Gutters
Vinyl860-201-7788
Siding • Vinyl Replacement Windows
www.pqpainting4u.com
Standing Seam Metal Roofing

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ROUT COLORING
ROOT
R
STREE
M SERVICE
T R
EGROUTING

EALING

EXICAN

ILE

EFINISHING

Serving
AreaCSince
1983
TILE &The
GROUT
LEANING
ZIGGY OSKWAREK
EMAIL: ZIG@ACNINC.NET
Michael Root CT Arborist
# 61802
TEL: 860-913-4473
TEL/FAX: 860-824-5192

L a VISIT
k ev ilUSl e,ATC WWW
T . .STONEPOLISHINGCT
8 6 0 - 4 3 5 .COM
-8 8 7 7

Millerton, NY 12546
Est. 1961

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10% off for new customers

Septic Service

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JOHN’S
Tree Service

LAND CLEARING • LOGGING • TREE REMOVAL • VIEW CUTTING • FIREWOOD

C hristopher T oomey
L ic en sed Arb orist

24 HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE

SEWER & DRAIN LINE CLEANING
EAST CANAAN, CT 06024

8 6 0 -8 2 4 -4 9 5 6
T el ephon e & F a x

Carol

860.435.9655 tel
860.384.0492 cell

Interior / Exterior 8608245181
Floor Restoration
Sheetrock / Taping
ag.carol@sbcglobal.net

2 5 Y ea rs E x p.
6 Ba rra c k s R oa d

SANITARILY CLEANED

Pet Sitting

Pruning-Bracing-Clearing
Ornamental & Hedge Trimming
Removals-Vistas
Tree Fertilization 8 6 0 - 8 2 4 - 4 9 5
hristopher T oomey

Certified Sewer Service By
In Your Home

F ree E stima tes
C a n a a n , C T 0 6 0 1 8
C T Arb orist L ic . # S- 4 2 0 7

Electric rotary drain cleaning for roots and clogged drains.
Steaming frozen sewer lines.

kennels make TORRANT
Loving Pet Care
me
nervous
Colebrook
(860) 379-2695

C

6
T el ephon e & F a x

L ic en sed Arb orist

Hard working and loving pet sitter
with lots of experience

Old/new resurfaced to perfection.
FRANK MONDA

WEB
When you need SITE
to know what’s

happening in your area, we’re there.

people,
schools, sports and
“Dressings for Your Windows”
Closet/Storage
organizations
inSystems
your area!
James R. Wexler

Independent
Community Newspapers
jamesrwexlerdesign.com

THE MILLERTON NEWS
Theyour
Winsted
Journal
news

your community

Upholstery
your
life!
Not sure who to turn to
Northwinds
Upholstery
& Design
when you
need a service?
Every week we bring you

Exquisite
Custom
Upholstery
this directory
of Specialists
in print and online at
LAURA WRIGHT
www.tricornernews.com.
860-435-0121 • LAKEVILLE, CT
FromFAX
Automobiles
860-435-0125 to
Windows, the Specialist you
need is at your fingertips.

We’llVeterinary
keep you connected.
And, when you find the
Specialist you’re looking for,
let them know you found them
in your independent, locally
owned, community newspapers.

THE MILLERTON NEWS
The Winsted Journal

TriCornerNews.com

Barb Vasaturo 508-274-2515

The Best Regional News Site

W i n d o W Wa r e s

Slipcovers, Window Treatments, Custom Pillows.
RESIDENTIAL

860-824-8149

WILLIAM PEROTTI & SONS, INC.
Glen

and information about towns,

McChesney Design
860-388-2349
design@mcfun.net

Jason Bresson

Pro Quality

(518) 789-3342
FAX (518) 789-6256

AGENCY:

860-733-2020

HIC# 0629057

Your best source of weekly news

ADVERTISER: Tuxis Self Storage

NATURAL STONE POLISHING & RESTORATION

Roofing

THE FLOOR SPECIALIST

(413) 229-8432

Repairs on all

SERVICES PROVIDED
TV, Stereos,
Pest Management
Vintage
166 Route 44, Millerton, NY
Emerald Ash Borer & Asian LongElectronics
518-789-3881
Horned Beetle Preventative Control
DIRECTTV®
Hours: Mon-Fri 8 to 5pm, Sat 8 to 3
Pruning
Sales and
Email: davestv.optonline.net
Cabling
Installation
Fertilizing
Stump Grinding
Removals
Lightning Protection
80’ Aerial Lift
Consultation
Free Estimates

By Appointment

applewoodtree@yahoo.com
License # 62658
B2580

www.tcextra.com
Your regional
TriCornerNews
.com

“When You Want The Best”

76 Jackson
Road Sharon, CT 06069
•Outside
HD Antenna
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COMPASS
Your Guide to Tri-State Events

Dec. 10 - Dec. 16, 2015

Art, Movies,
Theater, Food,
Music, Dance,
Recreation

PEOPLE RUN, walk their dogs and drive on Route 41 in
the center of Lakeville where a piece of public art, Danielle
Mailer’s image of a crow and a dancer, decorate, for the time
being, one of the bay doors at the old firehouse, 4
THEATER
‘A Christmas Carol,’
the familiar tale of
greed, redemption, 5

ART
Mirrors in the Sky: A
stunning view of Earth
and man’s mark on it, 9

MOVIES
‘Peggy Guggenheim: Art
Addict,’ a collector with
an unerring eye, 11

PHOTO BY MARSDEN EPWORTH

STUDIO SHOW
A day in Peter
Woytuk’s
workplace, 6

CELEBRATE
CANAAN,
NEW YORK
Holiday Events, 11

CALENDAR Auditions, Crafts, Dancing, Theater, Food, 16
SUPPLEMENT TO THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL, THE MILLERTON NEWS AND THE WINSTED JOURNAL

2

COMPASS, Thursday, December 10, 2015

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COMPASS, Thursday, December 10, 2015

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3

4

COMPASS, Thursday, December 10, 2015

ART: MARSDEN EPWORTH

In the Midst of Life
We Are in Art

I
PHOTO BY MARSDEN EPWORTH

Danielle Mailer with her mural of a horse on the wall of a brick building on Maiden Street in
Torrington.

t just seemed to appear one
day, a very large mural of a
crow and a swanning figure
of a woman on one of the red
painted bay doors in Lakeville’s old firehouse. Where did
that come from? Why is it
there? And, most urgently, who
made it?
It is clearly and distinctly
the work of Danielle Mailer,
with its fanciful scrolls and minuscule details, and the feeling
of figures caught in a spirited
and benign wind.
Mailer painted the mural two years ago and it has
hung for a time on a wall in
the Roger Smith Hotel in New
York City. It was quite a hit, she
says, with people taking selfies
of it, sending her the images
now and then.
But cities are dynamic places and beautiful things make
room for other beautiful things
and, recently, the hotel needed
to take down that wall. So
Mailer, with her husband Peter
McEachern, piled into their
1998 black rusty Mazda pickup
truck and drove to New York
to bring the image, broken
down to its seven pieces, back
to home territory. Wondering what she would do with it,
Mailer called Susan and Tino
Galluzzo, owners of The White
Gallery in Lakeville.
If you want something
done, these are the people to
call, Mailer told me. And that’s
how the mural landed, at least
for now, on the old firehouse
door in the middle of Lakeville.
This is public art: images,
figures, shapes on city streets,
like Mailer’s Mountain Lion
above the Scoville Library
steps in Salisbury and the
horse on Maiden Street in Tor-

rington. It is a beautiful horse,
pinned to a brick wall with
great curls of a mane, limbs
decorated with petals and
winged creatures — grasshoppers, butterflies, dragonflies,
hovering, magical.
“It’s transformative,” Mailer
says of art in public places —
on steps, on walls, on buildings. “I am putting out small
messages of optimism. I try to
shift the cosmos a bit.”
And she does. It’s a thrill to
see something beautiful and
inventive in a place where
everyone walks and drives
and lives their ordinary lives.
It stops us in our tracks. It
inspires a moment of surprise
and joy.
Now, Mailer is at work on a
new and gargantuan project.
With the aid of people like
Amy Wynn of the Northwest
Connecticut Arts Council, numerous Torrington officials including the mayor and the city
planner, State Representative
Roberta Willis, many financial
contributors, enthusiastic supporters and, of course, a cadre
of devoted painters, young
and not so young, Mailer is
making a spectacular mural to
run 200 feet along the exterior
back wall of Staples overlooking Franklin Street, right in the
middle of downtown Torrington. For the moment, its
brilliant pink and yellow and
marine blue sections of dibond
trout are spread like puzzle
pieces on the floor in donated
space opposite the Warner
Theatre on Main Street. But
she figures it will be up and
swimming above the Naugatuck River bed by the fall of
2016.
To be continued …

COMPASS, Thursday, December 10, 2015

THEATER: MARSDEN EPWORTH
‘A Christmas Carol’

A Familiar and Beautiful
Holiday Tale of Redemption

H

ere’s a take on Charles
Dickens’s “A Christmas
Carol” that an actor
like John Cleese could own
comfortably. Even admirably.
Half Moon Theater, performing
this holiday standard at the
Culinary Institute of America’s
theater in the Marriott Pavilion, gives this tale, in a tightened adaptation by Patrick
Barlow, a kind of zany snap.
And Darrell James, whose
Ebenezer Scrooge projects a
lean and angry look, tosses in
an occasional and unexpected
shot of antic glee.
The story is unaltered, of
course: a look at the indifference, even the hostility
that 19th-century haves had
toward the have-nots around
them. When women seeking charity for the poor visit
Scrooge, they are rebuffed. “I
hate Christmas,” Scrooge says,
many times. He just loathes
it, except for the profits he
makes when people borrow to
finance the season. And then
he jacks up the rate of interest
and diminishes the time for
repayment.
He is a bitter fellow, but
then Belle (Maria Silverman),
his fiancée, had left him years
earlier, probably because he
was more interested in finance
than love. Scrooge is all alone
in the world with his trunkful
of gold coins.
The first act, though beautiful to look at, has a kind
of one-note quality: all of it
rather forced. But that’s the
nature of any such tale bent on
revelation and reform. Dickens
was appalled by the poverty

he suffered in his youth and
the poverty of others in 19thcentury London. So instead of
writing pamphlets, he wrote
“A Christmas Carol,” listing the
plight of the impoverished, the
disdain of the privileged and
the consequences of letting
these inequities continue. It is,
after all, a man’s soul at stake,
he is telling us.
So Scrooge rejects invitations to holiday feasts and
rails at his clerk Bob Cratchit
(Wayne Pyle), grudgingly paying him for the day he spends
with his family on Christmas
instead of at work.
The story is a familiar one,
with Scrooge receiving ghostly
visits from his old partner,
Marley, warning him to reform.
Although Michael Schiralli’s
direction is obvious, at times,

and things drag a bit, the acting
of Half Moon players is lovely,
with Shona Tucker, Ryan Walter, Pyle and Silverman playing everyone but Scrooge, are
delightful. Oliver Renfroe Katz,
stumbling in on his stump of
a crutch makes an appealing
Tiny Tim, and the costumes, set
and lighting are gorgeous. Most
particularly fine is Alex Levy’s
playing the violin. It was expert
and affecting.
“A Christmas Carol” by
Charles Dickens, in an adaptation by Patrick Barlow, runs at
the Culinary Institute of America’s Marriott Pavilion in Hyde
Park, NY, through Dec. 19. It is
a beautiful theater in one of the
CIA’s many beautiful buildings.
For tickets, call 1-800-838-3006
or go to halfmoontheatre.org.

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PHOTO CONTRIBUTED

Darrell James as the greedy and heartless
Ebenezer Scrooge in “A Christmas Carol”

5

6

COMPASS, Thursday, December 10, 2015

ART: LEON GRAHAM

A Day in the Studio of Peter
Woytuk with Friends

P

eter Woytuk's studio in
Kent, CT, may remind
you of an auto repair
garage. Every surface and shelf
is chock-a-block with bronze
or iron fruits, birds, tiny animals. Three laptops lie open
on a dusty table. The space,
just behind the Kent firehouse,
is huge, with a warehouse
door on one side that opens
to a grass and dirt field — big
enough for bronze bulls to
come and go, but not enormous elephants.
Woytuk, of course, is the
most famous sculptor from
the Northwest Corner. In fact,
many consider him the finest
sculptor of animals in the
world. His robust bulls have
for years welcomed students
and parents to The Hotchkiss
School campus, while his lifesize elephants have enlivened
Columbus Circle in New York
City. Woytuk makes smaller

pieces, too. In his last show in
Kent, a group of small, heavy,
resting bulls created from
brown and green translucent
glass were showstoppers.
Casting large pieces requires expert foundries with
unusual capabilities. Woytuk
years ago found companies in
China and East Asia that could
meet his requirements, so he
moved to Thailand, where he
and his wife built a large compound north of Bangkok. He
spends about 10 months a year
there, receiving commissions
— he has a lengthy backlog —
and designing pieces on his
computers.
Now Woytuk is opening his
Kent studio to the public for
the first time. Working with
Judith Singelis of Argazzi Art
in Lakeville, CT, who now
represents him along with his
major gallery in Santa Fe, NM,
Woytuk has spruced up his

We’ve introduced

Accepting custom framing orders
for the holidays through December 15th!

space, though not too much,
and painted a wooden partition wall white to show work
from six other artists. Two are
friends of his, four are Argazzi
artists.
Woytuk intends to show a
variety of new work, some created within the last week. (Be
sure to look for the delightful
salt and pepper shakers made
from small birds.) He will
explain how he works if asked,
but he is self-effacing. Dressed
in work clothes and a close-fitting knit cap last week, he was
open to questions, anxious to
show photos of his compound
in Thailand and his three
beautiful daughters. His wife,
equally beautiful, has flown in
from Bangkok for the event.
Woytuk has asked his
friend, Ken Daniels, to show
some drawings. He has invited
Phil Grausman, too, the maker
of large and small sculpture
portraits in white, stripped of
detail to reveal the structure of
faces.
Singelis will have the lovely
pictures of abandoned structures by Victor Mirabelli, the
vertical, abstract nature paintings of Michael Kessler, the
ceramic and bronze vessels of
Ann Mallory and the drawings
and paintings of Liz Dexheimer, whose pictures of nature
straddle abstract art and
impressionism. (I hope one of
her gorgeous, watery paintings
of koi will be there.)
Peter Woytuk's studio will
be open Saturday, Dec. 12,
from 3:30 until at least 7 p.m.
There will be music, food and
wine. The studio is located at
28 Maple St., behind the Kent
firehouse, just east of Rte. 7.

PHOTOS BY MARSDEN EPWORTH

Peter Woytuk talks about his work in his Kent studio.

Set on a workbench among the tools,
a figure of a seagull gets its finishing work.

Photographed on a workbench in Peter Woytuk’s
studio in Kent is a figure of a crow on an apple,
a favorite image of the artist’s.

COMPASS, Thursday, December 10, 2015

7

THEATER

‘Lost in Yonkers’
Auditions Scheduled

T

he Warner Theatre is
running auditions for
Neil Simon’s “Lost in
Yonkers,” to be presented by
the Warner Stage Company
for a run beginning March 5.
All roles are open to audition. The cast includes two
men, three women and two
boys (age range 13-16) for
this production. Auditioners
are asked to prepare a short
monologue (one to two
minutes in length) of their
choosing that fits with the
style of the production. Auditioners will also be asked
to do cold readings from the
script.
Rehearsals will be held
Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday evenings beginning Jan.
10. There will be one midweek rehearsal on March 10.
The Warner Stage Company is a regional community theater company and
does not offer compensation
or housing for performers.
Callbacks will be Jan. 6 at
8:30 p.m.
Schedule an appointment
using the online web form
at www.warnertheatre.org/
auditions or by sending an
email to auditions@warnertheatre.org to schedule an
appointment. An audition
confirmation e-mail will
be sent with full details on
what will be expected at
your audition. Audition appointments made through
the online form are preferred, but if you do not have
access to the web or e-mail
call the Warner Theatre Audition Line at 860-489-7180
ext.151. Please be specific
when seeking an appoint-

ment time.
The roles available are:
Jay, 15 years old. The death
of his mother forces him
to be more mature than
he is ready to be. The play
tells his coming-of-age
story; Arty: Jay's younger
brother, he is 13 years old.
More of an observer than
the rest of his family; Eddie:
Jay's middle-aged father;
Bella: Jay's 35-year-old aunt;
Grandma Kunitz: Eddie and
Bella's mother, a big woman,
buxom, with a strong and
erect body, 70 odd years of
age; Louie: Jay's flamboyant,
jovial uncle, in his late 30s;
and Aunt Gert: Jay's aunt,
and Grandma's daughter.
Performance dates are
weekends March 5 though
15.

PHOTO BY MARSDEN EPWORTH

Early fog in Lime Rock and a morning chill
gave us a beautiful view of winter last Sunday.

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8

COMPASS, Thursday, December 10, 2015

To advertise your upcoming event under the Arts &
Entertainment banner of Compass contact us today!
860-435-9873 or advertising@lakevillejournal.com

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December 12 - January 12, 2016
Opening Reception Saturday, Decemeber 12 from 4 to 7PM
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Gallery Hours: Wednesday - Saturday 1 to 5 PM

THEATER
‘Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland’
Nicole Kalitsas as Alice, left, and Missy Hanlon as
the Queen of Hearts in The Sherman Playhouse
production of “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland,” running
weekends through Dec. 27. For tickets and information,
call 860-364-3622 or go to www.shermanplayers.org.

ARGAZZI ART
PRESENTS

OPEN STUDIO EXHIBITION
Featuring works by

PETER WOYTUK
and other artists
Saturday, December 12
From 3:30 until .....

PETER WOYTUK STUDIO
28 MAPLE STREET IN DOWNTOWN KENT
(BEHIND THE FIREHOUSE)

PHOTO BY TRISH HALDIN PHOTOGRAPHY

COMPASS, Thursday, December 10, 2015

9

ART: MARSDEN EPWORTH

A Stunning View of Earth
And What Commerce Has Done

N

auru is an island made
up of palm trees and
bird droppings. Bird
droppings, as it happens, turn
into phosphate, and mining
this phosphate has made the
population of the 8.5-squaremile island nation in the South
Pacific among the richest in the
world. Of course mining this
rock of phosphate has leveled
the island, the environment
is in tatters, the revenue has
stalled and the population
is looking to Australia as sea
levels rise. This disaster made
Nauru a perfect subject for artist Jeremy Starn’s Mirrors in the
Sky, a beautiful and provocative
exhibit at Noelke Gallery on
Water Street in Torrington, CT.
The United States Geological
Survey, for which Starn’s father
works, makes these satellite
images of heat and light and
color available, without cost,
to anyone who can download
them on a computer. So Starn,
24, a fellow deeply interested in
how globalization has affected
life on Earth, has collected

thousands of them and, over
the last three years, he has been
layering them in Photoshop
into sometimes gorgeous and
always startling and abstract
images.
Among them, the layered
images of Nauru is the most
straightforward: a minuscule
rock in a vast expanse of blue
South Pacific water viewed
through tufts of cloud. Then
you learn, because Starn will
tell you, that nothing grows
there anymore, save a ring of
palm trees at water’s edge,
and that almost all the food
is imported and processed,
contributing to the population’s
startling obesity. Oh, and one
more disaster. Because foreign
corporations can no longer dig
phosphates out of Nauru, the
unemployment rate is amongst
the highest in the world.
“You are looking at humanity’s imprint, here,” Starn says of
this image. “You are looking at
its mark on the planet.”
The marks are disturbing,
such as his view of Al-Jouf

Province in the Kingdom of
Saudi Arabia. This is about the
most important agricultural
area in the country, producing olives, dates, wheat and
other fruits and vegetables.
This sprawl of green and umber
hills is defaced by hundreds of
crowded-together brown spots,
pivotal irrigation wells sucking
up the underlying aquifer that
may run dry if the demands of
industrial agriculture are not
reduced.
And then there is the Kokaral Dam in Kazakhstan, built
to keep the Aral Sea from disappearing from the planet. Starn
says this lake — figured, at one
time, the fourth largest in the
world — was siphoned off to
fuel irrigation projects in the
1950s. The dam, built in 2005,
protected a small northern portion of the lake. Still, Uzbekistan is draining a river feeding
what remains of the Aral Sea to

PHOTO BY MARSDEN EPWORTH

Artist Jeremy Starn examines humanity’s imprint on Earth.
aid its global cotton industry.
Starn’s image, collected from
satellite views and refined in
Photoshop, is a stunning look
at arid and desolated patches
of earth pressed against a small,
blue sea.
In all, Starn is exhibiting
images collected from satellite
views of varied spots including
the Korean Demilitarized Zone,

The Las Vegas Valley in Nevada,
New Orleans, LA, the Crimea
and one of Brazilian deforestarion.
All of them beautiful. And
sobering.
Mirrors in the Sky runs at
Noelke Gallery, 15 Water St., in
Torrington through Jan. 3. For
information, call 860-648-0276.

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gifts
the nursery

Layered satellite images of agriculture in Al-Jouf Province,
Saudi Arabia.

32 Main Street, Millerton, NY
t: 518-592-1800
info@charlottetaylor.net

Drones • Helicopters • Airplanes • Trucks •Cars • Boats
PUZZLES • MODELS • ROCKETS & MORE
Black Friday Specials Everyday until Christmas

DISCOUNT COUPON
GOOD UNTIL JAN 31, 2016

$100 TO $150
$151 TO $250
$251 TO $400
$401 TO $500




$10 SAVINGS
$15 SAVINGS
$25 SAVINGS
$35 SAVINGS

NOT TO BE COMBINED WITH ANY OTHER SPECIAL OFFER

200 New Hartford Rd., Winsted, CT | 860-738-7534 | www.rcham.com
Mon Wed Thur Fri: 11-7 | Sat: 11-6 | Sun 11-4 | Closed Tues
www.facebook.com/rchobbiesmore/

10

COMPASS, Thursday, December 10, 2015

Open Every Day

Until December 30th, 2015
10 a.m. -5 p.m.
• Locally Hand Crafted Wreaths,
Garlands, Arrangements & Gifts
Fresh, Dried, or Faux
• DIY Workshops & Ingredients
• Paperwhites, Amaryllis & More
• Home & Event Decorating
Wedding Services Year-round
Right Back Where We Used To Be!
7 Academy Street, Salisbury, CT

(860) 671-7760
(860) 309-7132
www.sweethavenfarmct.com
SHOP:
CELL:

A local, organic and
sustainable health food
and specialty store

• Lunch

Wed - Sun 10a.m. - 6p.m.
51 Mechanic Street Amenia, NY 12501

• Cold Pressed Juices

845-789-1475

www.monteshealthnuthut.com

PHOTO BY MARSDEN EPWORTH

ART

• Coffee and Tea
• Wheat Grass Shots
• Local meat, produce,
cheese and more

Artists’ Discussion Dec. 11

Photographer Avery Danziger and painter Victor Leger, both
exhibiting at Five Points Gallery, will take part in an artists’
discussion there, 33 Main St., in Torrington Friday, Dec. 11 at 6
p.m. For information, call 860-618-7222.

‘TIS THE SEASON
TO SAVE!
www.Torringtontoyota.com

TORRINGTON TOYOTA
3 Year Leases With TRULY ZERO DOWN!
THE BASICS

MAINTENANCE

Sales Tax & Doc Fees Included
Registration & Title Included
Bank Fee Included
Security Deposit Waived
First Payment Included

First Tank of Gas
Oil Changes with Filter,
Oil and Labor for as Long as You Keep the Vehicle
ToyotaCare, 2 Years of No Cost Maintenance*
5K, 10K, 15K, 20K and 25K Service.

Questions? We’re here to help!

860-482-9496

* All lease payments include the Doc fee ($399), Toyota Financial Services acquisition fee ($650), sales
tax, first payment and registration. Security deposit is waived. Leases include $750 Camry and $1120
Avalon subvention cash through TFS. 36 month lease thru TFS with approved credit. ToyotaCare
thru TMS. Free oil changes for life as long as you own the vehicle thru Torrington Toyota. Oil changes
non-transferable to next owner. Free oil changes must be performed at Torrington Toyota. No prior
purchase. Models shown may differ from actual. Not responsible for misprints or errors. See sales
associate for additional details. Expires 12/31/2015. Offer limited to available in-stock models only.

BRAND NEW 2015

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3 year lease.

3 year lease.

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Sign & Go!*

Sign & Go!*

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No catch. TRULY ZERO DOWN!

COMPASS, Thursday, December 10, 2015

MOVIES: PATRICK L.SULLIVAN
‘Peggy Guggenheim: Art Addict”

An Unerring Eye for Art
And a Complex Life

T

his documentary film,
“Peggy Guggenheim:
Art Addict,” by Lisa Immordino Vreeland, examines
the life of art patron, gallery
owner and all-American screwball Peggy Guggenheim.
The film follows her life
chronologically, from Guggenheim’s upbringing (her father
went down on the Titanic)
to her adolescent (and subsequent) rebelliousness and
unassailable ability as a spotter
of artistic talent.
The film makes good use of
audio tapes of interviews toward the end of Guggenheim’s
life by her biographer, Jacqueline Weld.
The tapes, made in 1979,
two years before Guggenheim’s
death, have the woman speaking
bluntly about her life — lovers
(many of them famous), the tragedies associated with her family,
seven abortions, the soaring
price of art and why she helped
Jackson Pollock buy a house.

Her recollections are all
delivered in the speaking style
known as “Long Island Lockjaw,” in which the speaker tries
to move the lips, tongue and
jaw as little as possible. 
Weld, who appears on camera, reveals that the speaking
style was learned at a Manhattan girls’ school that the young
Peggy and all the other daughters of wealthy Jewish families
attended.
A good cache of audio tapes
doesn’t help with the visual side
of a documentary, so Vreeland
combines period photographs,
clips of avant-garde filmmaking (including Maya Deren
and Man Ray), and on-camera
interviews with assorted art
experts.
And she provides the audience with what amounts to a
crash course in 20th-century
art, via stills of the artworks
and the name of the artist ( for
rubes like me, who can tell a
Dali from a Picasso as long as

the light is good).
Guggenheim herself comes
across as an interesting and
very flawed character: narcissistic, pretentious, an indifferent mother.
But she had an uncanny
knack for finding the right art
and exhibiting it at the right
time — and the wherewithal to
make things happen.
So “Art Addict” is a worthwhile film even for someone
who isn’t especially interested
in art. It’s a look back at a time
when it was possible to cause
a scandal by carrying on with
a married man or showing a
painter like Pollock.
Since we have no taboos left,
except perhaps cannibalism,
Guggenheim’s extravagances
and excesses seem positively
quaint. Charming, even.
“Peggy Guggenheim, Art
Addict” is playing at The Moviehouse in Millerton, NY. This film
is not rated.

At The Movies
How about dinner before a
movie? Check out the restaurants
advertising in Compass this week.

Now Showing
12/11, 12, 13,
15, 16, 17

“BROOKLYN” PG-13 7PM
“ TRUMBO” R 7PM
OPEN FOR GIFT CARD SALES
DAILY 12PM-8PM

CLOSED MONDAYS

354 Main St., Winsted
354 Main St. Winsted Ct 06098
1-860-379-5108 • www.gilsoncafecinema.com
Doors open at 6 p.m. • 21 Years & Older

Shop Canaan
For the
Holidays
DAYS (860) 824-5802
NIGHT (413) 229-3308

ARNOLD’S GARAGE

24 HOUR TOWING/YOUR ONE-STOP GARAGE
ASE CERTIFIED QUALITY SERVICE & REPAIRS
HEAVY DUTY TRUCK REPAIR
Your Local Certified Emission Testing Station
ARNOLD AGAR JR.
Master Automotive &
Heavy Duty Truck Technician

2 NORTH ELM STREET
N. CANAAN, CT 06018

11

12

COMPASS, Thursday, December 10, 2015

GIUMARRO REAL ESTATE

25 Main Street, P.O Box 1025, Canaan, Ct. 06018
Robert L. Giumarro - Realtor

Farms & Country Homes
Residential-Commercial-Acreage
Licensed in CT, MA, NY

Shop Canaan
For the Holidays
Canaan
Auto Supply

Open 7 Days a week

#1

In Auto Supplies

We sell VP race fuel and propane refills

Office: (860)824-5885 — Fax: (860) 824-1020
giumarrorealestate.com | giumarro.real.estate@snet.net

Mon-Fri 7-5:30 | Saturday 7-3 | Sunday 8-12
1 860 824 4944
1 800 682 4222

860-824-7276

337 Ashley Falls Rd (Route 7) - Canaan, Ct 06018
sales - service - parts
Sales: Rich Crane - richie@cranesope.com
Service: Todd MacNeil - todd@cranesope.com

Outdoor Power Equipment
Salisbury Winter Sports Association 2009 27

WWW.CRANESOPE.COM

462 Ashley Falls Road
Canaan CT 06018

Rick Puff & Jonathan Routhier

Happy Holidays
from your friends at
Helping all people
live healthy lives

nors went to
(J.P. is also
h his “Flying
Conn., a conlace with “Balhe sculpture

404 Ashley Falls Road (Route 7) Canaan, CT

(860) 824-5467

www.deckerandbeebe.com

Featuring:

Sub-Zero • Wolf • Viking • Miele • Bosch
Vent-a-Hood • Fisher & Paykel • GE
Hotpoint • Miele Vacuums

MAHAIWE JEWELERS
Jewelr yver
il
Gold/S New
Lots of

Coloni
al
Candle
s

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booky
t
e
k
c
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Po ossbo
Cr ags
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eciation of SWSA

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C a n a a n , C T
(8 6 0 ) 4 5 3 -4 1 4 8

N o r fo lk , C T
(8 6 0 ) 5 4 2 -5 5 1 8

• Printing • Copies • Signs

A Christmas Charity CannonBall at the Couch Pipa VFW to
benefit the Fishes & Loaves Food
Pantry and VA hospitals.
The evening will feature prize
drawings, hors d’oeuvres and
dancing to the music of a variety
of local band and performers, including Two Guys, Mojo Nectar,
K. Macchi Band, Is, Molliekate
Dionne and Blue Eyed Fuel.
Tickets are available at the
door for $15 per person, or $10
with a donation of a non-perishable food or hygiene item.

Give the gift
of … News!
Save 25% off a print
subscription and your
recipient will receive access
to the best regional news site.
Call Subscription Manager
Helen Testa, Monday
through Wednesday
at 860-435-9873
or email circulation@
lakevillejournal.com.

• Banners • Lawn Signs

Scar ves
Fashionab
le

• Blueprint Copies
• Business Cards • Menus
• Letterhead & Envelopes
• Booklets • Notecards

Holiday Hours | Monday-Sat 9-5 • Sun 11-4

gift toCanaan,
ourCTcommunity

Merry Christmas!

CHARITY CANNONBALL
Saturday, Dec. 12,
6 to 11 p.m.

860-824-7516

• Forms • Poster Prints
• Graphic Design
• and so much more!

860-824-7565
Fax: 860-824-5082
325 Ashley Falls Road
Canaan, CT 06018
canaan@print-master.net

Visit us on the Web:
www.print-master.net
www.facebook.com/printmasterct

THE MILLERTON NEWS
The Winsted Journal
www.TriCornerNews.com
Your Independent,
Locally Owned,
Community Newspapers
& Regional News Website

COMPASS, Thursday, December 10, 2015

13

SEGALLA

SAND & GRAVEL, INC
Tech Air of Canaan, LLC
MAKE A RUSTIC TOY
AT FYI WORKSHOP
Saturday, Dec. 12
10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Learn to make an old-fashioned toy at a free FYI Workshop
of the Housatonic Youth Service
Bureau. This workshop will be
held Saturday, Dec. 12, 10 a.m. to
1 p.m., at the Canaan firehouse.
Children ages 8 and up, accompanied by an adult, are invited to work together to craft their
own rustic toy in time for the
holiday season. This program is
hosted in conjunction with Lost
Art Workshops.

Welding
Equipment
& Research
Supplies
* Industrial, Medical
& Equipment
Research
Gases
*Industrial,
Medical &
Gases
*Welding
& Supplies
Store Hours: Monday-Friday 7:30-5:30pm, Saturday 8-12:30pm
*Helium For Your Parties
*Oxy-Fuel Torch Equipment
424 Ashley Falls Road, Canaan, CT 06018
(860) 824-7392
*Cylinder Rentals
*Plasma Cutting Systems
**Propane Cylinders Filled While You Wait!**
Store Hours: Monday – Friday 7:30 – 5:30pm
Saturday 8 – 12:30pm
424 Ashley Falls Road, Canaan, CT 06018
(860) 824-7392

Design • Sales • Installation • Remodeling
210 East Canaan Rd, East Canaan, CT 06024
www.rosehillkb.com
Office: (860) 824-8051
Products & Services to Fit Your Needs & Budget

Nov. 21st – Dec. 24, 2015
8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
HANDMADE GIFTS
All Natural Cheeses
Hand Knits
Pickles - Relishes - Jams
Honey - Chutneys
Handmade Butter
Maple Products
Much More

Do your holiday shopping
at Rustling Wind.
OPEN 7 DAYS

860-824-4444

www.SegallaSandAndGravel.com
112 ALLYNDALE ROAD • NORTH CANAAN, CT 06018

Commercial & Residential Deliveries

11 Railroad Street, Canaan, CT
860-671-0214

860.824.7123
Fx 860.824.9887
phil@ghisign.com

DIGITAL PRINTING /// BANNERS /// CUSTOM SIGNS /// VEHICLE LETTERING

Stadium Size Savings
Throughout The
Holiday Season

HOLIDAY
OPEN HOUSE

SPECIALTY FOODS
CUSTOM GIFT BASKETS

Monday-Friday • Saturdays (Seasonal)

The Shoppe

Phil Ghi
Owner
Ghi Sign Service
532 Ashley Falls Rd.
Canaan, CT 06018

148 Canaan
Mountain Road
Falls Village, CT
(860) 824-7084
www.rustlingwind.com

• Sand & Gravel
• Crushed Stone
• Washed Septic Sand
• Washed Stone
• Topsoil & Fill
• Concrete & Mason Sands

Great
Gifts For Guys That Work!
*Carbon Dioxide for
Tap Systems
*Sales, Service & Rentals

Holiday Open House
Thursday, December 10
4-7 p.m.
With over 60 vendors, you are sure to
find something for everyone on your list!
Antiques —Arts—Crafts—Gifts—Refreshments—Door Prize

WILLIAM PEROTTI & SONS, INC.

PLUMBING - HEATING - AIR CONDITIONING
Charles Perotti

Francis Perotti Sr. Francis Perotti Jr.

www.wmperotti.com
info@wmperotti.com
P.O. Box 248
11 Furnace Hill Road
East Canaan, CT 06024
PH 860-824-5181 ** Fax 860-824-5183

297 Ashley Falls
Road, Canaan, CT

860-824-4300

Happy Holidays!
THE MILLERTON NEWS
The Winsted Journal
www.TriCornerNews.com

Your Independent,
Locally Owned,
Community Newspapers
& Regional News Website

ITALIAN CUISINE

Chicken, veal, seafood & pasta dishes, pizza
Wine & Beer
14 Railroad Street Canaan, CT 06018
(860) 824-4060• Catering Available

14

COMPASS, Thursday, December 10, 2015

Celebrate New York at the Holidays
AMENIA, NY
Sat., December 12, 3 p.m.

Breakfast & Lunch

Yummy fresh food, sweets & delicious Intelligentsia coffee
served by a warm, friendly staff
Hours: Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fri., Sat. 7AM - 3PM • Sun. 8AM - 3:00PM
CLOSED TUESDAYS & WEDNESDAYS
3312 Rt 343, Amenia, NY 845-789-1444
Follow us on Facebook for Daily Specials

“Mention this ad for
a 10% discount”
Happy Holidays!
Mon- Fri
Sat
Sun

7:30 - 6:00
7:30 - 3:00
9:00 - 1:00

518-789-3696
800-543-0757
12 Main St. Millerton NY

The Holiday Light Parade will take
place starting from the Copake firehouse at 5:30 p.m. (line up at 5 p.m.)
and ending at the Copake Park Building. Santa Claus and his elves will be
giving out gifts to the children. There
will also be a bonfire with hot chocolate
and cookies.
Anyone interested in participating in
the Holiday Light Parade should go to
www.townofcopake.org for a form.

MILLBROOK, NY
Sun., Dec. 13, at 3 p.m.

Millbrook Chanukah Menorah Light-

BACK TO NATURE!

Decorate your Home For The Holidays
With Wreaths & Poinsettias From

Country Gardeners Florist
Countrygardenersflorist.com
Railroad Plaza, Millerton, NY 12546
(518) 789-6440 • jscasso@taconic.net
Open Sundays
In December!

30 YEARS!! 30 YEARS!! 30 YEARS!! 30 YEARS!!

Brick Block Auto Parts

COPAKE, NY
Sat., December 12, 5:30 p.m.

ing will be held on Sunday, December
13 at on the lawn of the Thorne Building.
The festivities will begin with refreshments at Grace Church Parish House
followed by the lighting across the street
from the church. All are welcome.
This event is sponsored by the Millbrook Chanukah Committee.

IN PROGRESS
All season

Adopt-A-Family to benefit children
and adults in need in the Millerton,
Amenia and Pine Plains area - send donations to P.O. Box 880, Millerton, New
York 12546. For more info call Stacey
Moore at 518-789-4508.
Corner Food Pantry, Lakeville, CT.
Volunteer organization that provides
regional residents with ingredients for
more than 10,000 meals a month.
Sunday in the Country Food Drive
– send checks to WHDD, 67 Main St.
Sharon, CT 06069– to provide over 500
Christmas dinners.

30 YEARS!! 30 YEARS!! 30 YEARS!! 30 YEARS!! 30 YEARS!! 30 YEARS!!
30 YEARS!! 30 YEARS!! 30 YEARS!! 30 YEARS!!

...as dreams of
sugarplums danced
in their heads...

Holiday of Lights, beginning with a
musical review performed by students
in Amenia’s Free Dance and Performing
Arts program at 3 p.m. in the Amenia
Town Hall Auditorium.
Participants in the Holiday of Lights
Parade should line up at 4 p.m., at the
firehouse with the parade stepping off
at 5 p.m. sharp.
At 4:30 p.m., at Fountain Square, there
will be caroling, hot chocolate and tree
trimming activities with the Flock of
Feathers 4-H Club providing wildlife
friendly decorations to trim a dozen
trees grown by Webutuck students and
donated by Indian Rock Schoolhouse.
All are welcome to join in and help light
the trees and square in time for the parade. Santa will be in the last firetruck.
The parade will proceed along East
and West Main Streets, then turn down

Broadway, then continue up Route 22
North to Town Hall. Santa will provide
children with gifts and photos, courtesy
of the Amenia Free Library. Raffle prizes, Citizen of the Year presentations,
historical exhibits, crafts and refreshments will add to the festivities.

Locally Owned • Locally Ope�ated • Locally Loved

Happy Holidays!
5094 Route 22, Amenia, NY
Freshtown Shopping Center
845-373-8000 | drugworld.com

30 YEARS!! 30 YEARS!! 30 YEARS!! 30 YEARS!! 30 YEARS!! 30 YEARS!!

See our daily specials on the CKC Facebook page
facebook.com/countykettlecafe

Fine Wines & Spirits • Custom Engraving
Gift Cards & Custom Gift Baskets

Merry Christmas & Happy Holidays!
Letecia Bates, proprietor
Tel: 845.373.8232 — Fax: 845.789.1234
5058 Route 22, Amenia, NY 12501
Open 7 Days: Mon-Sat, 10am-7pm, Sun 12-5pm

Always something new!
Barbara Crocco
Copper Star Alpaca
Millerton, NY 12546 | www.copperstaralpacafarm.com | 914-924-9197
~Experience the Exquisite Luxury of Alpaca~

20 Main Street, Millerton, NY
518-592-1414
‘....the farm store off the farm’
Winter hours: Thursday 11 - 6;
Friday, Saturday, Monday 11 - 5;
Sunday Noon to 5

Happy Holidays!

2938 West Church Street, Pine Plains, NY 12567
(518)771-3222
www.countrykettle.org

518-789-3881

Hours: Mon-Fri 8 to 5pm, Sat 8 to 3
Email: davestv.optonline.net

Rt. 44 East • Railroad Plaza
Millerton, NY 12546

Telephone: 518-789-9236 • 518-789-9237
Toll Free: 1-888-311-9236
Hours: Mon. - Thurs.: 10:30 a.m. - 10:30 p.m.
Fri. & Sat.: 10:30 a.m. - 11:00 p.m.
CHINESE
JAPANESE
Sun.:AND
12:00 noon
- 10:30 p.m.CUISINE

EAT IN • TAKE OUT • LUNCH DELIVERY
Rt. 44 East • Railroad Plaza • Millerton, NY 12546

Dave’s TV
166 Route 44, Millerton, NY

EAT IN • TAKE OUT • LUNCH DELIVERY

Happy Holidays!

open 7 days
7am - 2pm
7am-8pm tues, fri, sun
sunday buffet 5pm-8pm

• TV Sales
• Service Installation
• Outside HD Antenna
Installation

CHINESE AND JAPANESE CUISINE
H A Z R-0 0 7252

Come join us for breakfast, lunch or dinner

Repairs on all
TV, Stereos,
Vintage
Electronics
DIRECTTV®
Sales and
Installation

Since 1996, Golden Wok
has served
the finest Chinese food
Happy
Holidays!
to the tri-state area. Two years ago, the restaurant expanded
to include a full dining room, and added sushi to the menu.
GORDON R. KEELER APPLIANCES, Inc.
Come enjoy the lovely dining room, sit at the welcoming
PROFILE, SUB ZERO, MONOGRAM, WOLF
sushi bar. Full service bar.
APPLIANCE SALES AND SERVICE
For over 30 years

Telephone: 518-789-9236 • 518-789-9237
Toll Free: 1-888-311-9236
Hours: Mon. - Thurs.: 10:30 a.m. - 10:30 p.m.
Fri. & Sat.: 10:30 a.m. - 11:00 p.m.
keelerappliance@yahoo.com
12:00 noon
p.m. NY 12546
PO Box AKSun.:
• 3 Century
Blvd.- •10:30
Millerton,

518-789-4961

COMPASS, Thursday, December 10, 2015

15

Celebrate New York at the Holidays
SUPPORT THE ARTS
IN YOUR COMMUNITY.
Support coverage of the arts
in your local media.
THE MILLERTON NEWS
The Winsted Journal

Millerton
Service Center

“ Not Your Average Service Center”

Maintenance - Repairs • Quality Used Cars

Gift Certificates for Service
We Sell & Install Remote Car Starters
(makes a great Christmas gift!)
ADAM M. LYMAN & MICHAEL D. LYMAN
MASTER TECHNICIANS

52 S. Center St., Millerton, NY
518-789-3462

www.TriCornerNews.com

A SPECIALTY TACK SHOP

Happy Holidays!
Tack • Consignments • Gifts
3314 ROUTE 343
AMENIA, NY 12501

(845) 789-1177
CLOSED TUESDAYS

Lia’s Mountain View Restaurant
Casual Family Dining since 1983
Italian American Cuisine
7685 Route 82
P.O. Box 446
Pine Plains, NY 12567
518-398-7311
visit us on Facebook
liasmountainview@yahoo.com
www.liasmountainview.net

MOORE
OORE & MORE
M
& MORE
RINTING
P
PHappy
RINTING
Holidays!
Stacey L. Moore
Stacey
L. Moore
17 Dutchess Avenue
♦ P. O. Box 880
Millerton,
New
17 Dutchess Avenue York
♦ P. O.12546
Box 880
Tel: Millerton,
518.789.4508
♦ Fax:
518-789-4509
New
York
12546
mooreandmore@taconic.net
Email:
Tel:
518.789.4508
♦ Fax: 518-789-4509
Email: mooreandmore@taconic.net

NORTH EAST MUFFLER INC.
Custom Bending Up to 3 Inches
Tires • Brakes • Mufflers • New York State Inspections
Open Monday
- Friday
8 to 5; UFFLER
Saturday 8 toNC
1
ORTH
AST
Happy
Holidays!
Route 22,AST
Millerton,
NY
ORTH
UFFLER
Custom
Bending
Up to
3 Inches NC
(518) 789-3669
John Heck Bending
Cindy
Heck
Up York
to 3State
Inches
Tires • Custom
Brakes • Mufflers • New
Inspections
Monday
- Friday
8 to York
5; Saturday
8 to 1
TiresOpen
• Brakes
• Mufflers
• New
State Inspections
Route
22, Millerton,
NY
Open Monday
- Friday
8 to 5; Saturday
8 to 1
22, Millerton,
(518)
789-3669 NYCindy Heck
John HeckRoute
(518) 789-3669 Cindy Heck
John Heck

N
N

E
E

M
M

I .
I .

Millerton Auto & Truck Supply
6024 Route 22, Millerton, NY 12546
Phone: (518) 789-4474
Fax: (518) 789-9012
(800)525-5936

Mon-Fri 7:30 - 6:00
Sat 7:30 -3:00
Overnight Delivery

SAPERSTEIN’S
Clothing & Footwear For The Entire Family
Quality At The Best Prices
Acorn • Buster Brown •Carhartt • Dockers • Levi • Lee • Outback
New Balance • Merrell • Kamik • Carolina • Trimfit • One Step Up
Hitec Gloria Vanderbilt • Champion • Keds Movie Star • Reebok • Hanes •
Playtex Wigwam •Hue • Mucks • Cold Pruf • Winter Run Lamo Slippers
Fruit of the Loom • Elita • Many Other Fine Brands
Mon-Sat 9:00 – 6:00 Sun 11:00 – 4:00
LAY-A-WAYS & GIFT CERTIFICATES
Get The Quality And Value You Deserve

DEBIT
CARDS

41 Main Street, Millerton, NY
518-789-3365

TERNI'S

“For The Best
In Outdoor Wear”

Pendleton • Woolrich
Blankets • Sweaters • Knives
Case Cutlery • Outdoor Gear
Pipes • Jackets
Main St., Millerton, NY
518-789-3474

Previously Loved Items
by Karen Allan

PASS IT ON 2
RESALE SHOP

Happy Holidays!

Happy Holidays!

845-514-4950
7730 So. Main St.
Pine Plains, N.Y. 12567
(Rte 82 Across from the firehouse)
OPEN Thurs 10-3p,
Fri, Sat, Mon 10a-5p

McLEAN FORD
ROUTE 44 MILLERTON
(TAKE 44 EAST IN MILLERTON)
(518) 789-4477

SEASONS GREETINGS!

Happy Holidays
from all of us !
Millbrook, NY • 845.677.0505
Rhinebeck, NY • 845.876.6676
paularedmond.com

William J. Cole Agency, Inc.
GENERAL INSURANCE

Home • Auto • Farm • Renters • Commercial
VICKI BENJAMIN, AGENT/MANAGER
1 JOHN STREET
MILLERTON, NY 12546

518-789-4657
FAX 518-789-3576

16

COMPASS, Thursday, December 10, 2015

TRI-CORNER CALENDAR
THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL • THE MILLERTON NEWS • THE WINSTED JOURNAL

Auditions
The Ghent Playhouse, 6 Town
Hall Place, Ghent, NY, 518 3926264, www.ghentplayhouse.
org Accepting proposals from
directors interested in submitting
productions for its 2016-2017
season. For full details email
Ghent Playhouse Artistic
Director, Cathy Lee-Visscher,
ghentplayhouse@fairpoint.net.
Deadline for submission is Dec
15.
Otis Library and Museum, 48
North Main Road, Otis, MA, 413269-0109 Looking for local artists
to display their work. Please call
Vicki at 413-269-4008.
West Hartford Art League
37 Buena Vista Road, West
Hartford, CT, 860-231-8019,
westhartfordart.org Call for
artists for juried exhibits,

January: Instagram exhibit;
February: Elected Artists and The
Art of the Flower. For more info
go to westhartfordart.org/callfor-artists.

Books
The Cornwall Library, 30 Pine
Street, Cornwall, CT, 860-6726874, www.CornwallLibrary.
org A talk and reading by Janice

Nimura, author of “Daughters
of the Samurai: A Journey from
East to West and Back,” Jan 9, 5
pm.

Hudson Opera House, 327 Warren
Street, Hudson, NY, 518-822-1438
www.hudsonoperahouse.org
Reading Series at the Hudson
Opera House: Robert Kelly and
Charlotte Mandell, Dec 13, 5 pm,
book signing and reception to
follow.

Kent Memorial Library, Kent
Town Hall, 41 Kent Green
Blvd., CT, 860-927-3761 www.
kentmemoriallibrary.org 2015
Fall Book Discussion Group,
“The Invention of Wings,” by Sue
Monk Kidd, Dec 17. Sign up at
the library, moderated by Betty
Krasne.

Street, Litchfield, CT, 860-4225142, www.owlibrary.org Book
discussion series led by Mark
Scarbrough featuring author
Willa Cather, Jan 10, Feb 7, 1-2
pm.

North Cornwall Meeting House,
Cogswell Road, Cornwall, CT
Annual Boxing Day Reading
with Tom Walker reading
Marcel Pagnol’s “Memories of
Childhood,”Dec 26, 4 pm.

Bardavon, 35 Market Street,
Poughkeepsie, NY, 845-473-2072,
www.bardavon.org Bolshoi
Ballet, “The Nutcracker,” Dec 10,
noon, Dec 11, 9:45 am and noon.

The White Hart, 15
Undermountain Road, Salisbury,
CT, 860-435-0030, www.
whitehartinn.com The White
Hart speaker series: Carolyne
Roehm, “At Home in the Garden,”
Dec 12, 4 pm.
Oliver Wolcott Library, 160 South

Dance

The Bushnell, 166 Capitol Avenue,
Hartford, CT, 860-987-5900,
bushnell.org The Nutmeg Ballet
Conservatory presents “The
Nutcracker,” Dec12-13, 12:30 pm
and 4 pm.
Mahaiwe Theatre, 14 Castle St,
Great Barrington, MA, 413-5280100, www.mahaiwe.org Bolshoi

Ballet, “The Nutcracker,” Dec 20,
1 pm; “Taming of the Shrew,” Jan
31, 1 pm.
The Moviehouse, 48 Main St,
Millerton, NY, 518-789-3408,
www.themoviehouse.net Bolshoi
Ballet, “The Nutcracker,” Dec
20, 12:55 pm. For tickets, go to
theater or website.
Warner Theatre, 68 Main Street,
Torrington, CT, 860-489-7180,
www.warnertheatre.org The
Nutmeg Ballet Conservatory
presents “The Nutcracker,” Dec
19, 2 pm, 7 pm, Dec 20, 2 pm.
Wadsworth Atheneum Museum
of Art, 600 Main Street, Hartford,
CT, 860-278-2670, thewadsorth.
org “The Nutcracker Suite &
Spicy” by CONNetic Dance, Dec
11, 12, 8 pm, Dec 13 at 2 pm. For
tickets go to www.conneticdance.
com.

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COMPASS, Thursday, December 10, 2015

Galleries
Argazzi Art, 22 Millerton Road,
Lakeville, CT, 860-435-8222, www.
argazziart.com Holiday Tree,
featuring works on paper by Rudy
Vavra, through Jan 3.
Berkshire Museum, 39 South
St, Pittsfield, MA, 413-443-7171,
www.berkshiremuseum.org
American West, a dual exhibition
with National Geographic
Greatest Photographs of the
American West, through Jan 3.
Lauren Clark Fine Art,
25 Railroad Street, Great
Barrington, MA, 413-528-0432,
www.LaurenClarkFineArt.com 17
Painters and a Sculptor, annual
invitational featuring new work
by sculptor Joe Wheaton and
the work of 17 artists from the
Berkshires and beyond, through
Jan 10.
Cornwall Library, 30 Pine Street,
Cornwall, CT, 860-672-6874, www.
cornwalllibrary.org Sightings,
collages by John Perry, through
Dec 31.
The Equis Art Gallery, 15 West
Market Street, Red Hook, NY, 845758-9432, equisart.com Paintings
by Joanna Keller Quentin.
Five Points Gallery, 68 Main
Street, Torrington, CT, 860-6187222, fivepointsgallery.org Victor
Leger, Avery Danziger, through
Dec 26, artist conversation, Dec
11, 6 pm.
The Gallery at Naples Studio, 3
Landmark Lane, Kent Green,
Kent, CT, 860-592-0700, www.
naplesrestoration.com/gallery

Pentimento by Kathy Wismar,
Dec 12-Jan 12, opening
reception, Dec 12, 6-9 pm.

The Gallery @ Sharon Historical
Society & Museum, 18 Main
Street, Sharon, CT, 860-364-5688,
sharonhist.org What’s the Big
Idea?, a juried exhibition and sale
of artworks, through Dec 18.
The Gallery on North, Hotel
on North, 297 North Street,
Pittsfield, MA, 413-358-4741,
hotelnorth.com Fine art
photography by Eric Korenman,
curated by Sohn Fine Art.
The Good Gallery, 13 Railroad
Street, Kent, CT , 860-927-5065,

www.thegoodgallerykent.com
Art Collective Extravaganza 2015,
a group show, through Jan 3.
Good Purpose Gallery, 40 Main
St, Suite 1, Lee, MA, 413-394-5023,
www.goodpurpose.org Holiday
Glow, with artwork by Terry Wise
and Susan Himmel and others,
through Jan 12.
Green River Gallery, 1578 Boston
Corners Rd, Millerton, NY, 518789-3311 Works by Eric Sloane,
and American art of the 19th and
20th centuries.
Gregory James Gallery, 93 Park
Lane Road, New Milford, CT, 860354-3436, gregoryjamesgallery.
com Walking the Sea by Anton
Ginzburg, through Dec 15; 2015
Holiday Group Art Show, through
January.
The Harts Gallery, 20 Bank
Street, New Milford, CT, 917913-4641, thehartsgallery.com
Transgeneration, featuring
the photographs of Peruvian
Christian Fuchs and the vintage
collages of Italian Francesca
Belgiojoso, through Jan 7.
The Silo, Hunt Hill Farm Trust, 44
Upland Road, New Milford, CT,
860-355-0300 hunthillfarmtrust.
org Wonderment exhibit curated
by Jessica Jane Russell, featuring
seven women artists whose work
is focused in the craft medium,
through Jan 3.
Kent Memorial Library, Kent
Town Hall, 41 Kent Green
Boulevard, CT, 860-927-3761
www.kentmemoriallibrary.
org Kinetic Fields, paintings by
Heather Scofield, through Dec 28.
The M Studio Gallery, 48 Main
Street, Millerton, NY 12546, 518789-3408, www.themoviehouse.
net Vanishing America, oil and
watercolor paintings by Jeffrey L.
Neumann, through Jan 9.
MASS MoCA, 1040 MASS MoCA
WAY, North Adams, MA, 413-6622111, massmoca.org Francesco
Clemente: Encampment, through
Jan 3.
Millbrook School, Hamilton
Math and Science Center Gallery,
Millbrook School, 131 Millbrook
School Road, Millbrook, NY,
millbrook.org Metal on Metal, A
Toolmaker’s Tool, photographs by
Helen Hamada, through Jan 29.

Morrison Gallery, 25 North Main
Street, Kent, CT, morrisongallery.
com Wolf Kahn, pastels, Dec 12Jan 31, opening reception, Dec 12,
5-7 pm.

West Hartford Art League
37 Buena Vista Road, West
Hartford, CT, 860-231-8019,
westhartfordart.org Members
Juried Exhibit, through Dec 20.

Noelke Gallery, 15 Water Street,
Torrington, CT, 860-618-0276,
noelkegallery.com Jeremy J.
Starn, satellite images, Mirrors In
The Sky, through Jan 21.

The White Gallery, 344 Main St,
Lakeville, CT, 860-435-1029, www.
thewhitegalleryart.com Clay,
celebrating the versatility of clay
and the artists that shape it into
its many forms, through Dec 13.

Norman Rockwell Museum, 9
Glendale Road, Stockbridge,
MA, 413-298-4100, www.nrm.
org Norman Rockwell in detail,
Dec 11, 2:30 pm; Coming of
Age: Rockwell’s children grow
up, Dec 13; Norman Rockwell’s
Spirit of the Holidays, through
Jan 8; Masters of the Golden Age:
Harvey Dunn and his students,
through Mar 13; Love a Vet:
Honoring Our Veterans, through
Jan 5.
Ober Gallery, 10 North Main
Street, Kent, CT, 860-927-5030,
www.obergallery.com Robert
Andrew Kelly and Geoffrey
Parker, paintings, prints and
sculpture, through May 1.
Pinacoteca, 896 Bantam Road
(Route 202), Bantam, (Litchfield),
CT, 860-480-0100, www.
pinacoteca.us Wallace Harding,
through Dec 23, Sat and Sun,
1:30-5:30 pm, or by appointment.
Sohn Fine Art Gallery, 69 Church
Street, Lenox, MA, 413-551-7353,
www.sohnfineart.com Muse,
through January.
Souterrain Gallery of The Wish
House, 413 Sharon Goshen Tnpk.,
West Cornwall CT, 860-672-2969,
www.wishhouse.com Magaly
Ohika, Art Evolves, through Jan 3,
artist reception, Nov 28, 3-6 pm.
Tremaine Gallery at The
Hotchkiss School, 11 Interlaken
Road, Lakeville, CT, 860-4354423, hotchkiss.org/arts Field
Kallop: The Melody of Structures,
through Dec 13.
Wadsworth Atheneum Museum,
600 Main Street, Hartford, CT,
860- 278-2670, wadsworth.
org Exhibition to pair the work
of Andy Warhol and Robert
Mapplethorpe, Warhol &
Mapplethorpe: Guise & Dolls,
examines issues of gender and
identity through iconic artists’
work, through Jan 24.

Window into the World of
Art Gallery, 716 Main Street,
Winsted, CT, 203-243-3069,
windowworldart.com All in
the family exhibit, paintings,
drawings, watercolors, pastels
and photographs, through Dec
11.
Williams College Museum of Art,
15 Lawrence Hall Drive, Ste 2,
Williamstown, MA, 413-597-2429
wcma.williams.edu Imagining
the Trojan War, through Dec 13.

Holiday
Events
Bardavon, 35 Market Street,
Poughkeepsie, NY, 845-473-2072,
www.bardavon.org New Paltz
Ballet Theatre’s “The Nutcracker,”
Dec 12, 2 pm and 7:30 pm, Dec 13,
3 pm.
The Cornwall Library, 30 Pine
Street, Cornwall, CT, 860-6726874, www.CornwallLibrary.
org Senior Tea with caroling and
assorted edible goodies, Dec 12,
2 pm.
Falls Village Center on Main,
Main Street, Falls Village, CT The
Artisans Group holiday market,
Dec 12, 10 am-4 pm. For more
info. go to www.artisansale.org.
Grace Episcopal Church, 3328
Franklin Ave, Millbrook, NY, 845677-3064, www.gracemillbrook
Festivities with refreshments
at Grace Church Parish House,
Dec 13, 3 pm, followed by the
Millbrook Chanukah Menorah
lighting on the lawn of the
Thorne Building. All are welcome.
The Harts Gallery, 20 Bank Street,
New Milford, CT, 917-913-4641,
thehartsgallery.com Benefit
featuring Chef Joel Viehland,
former Executive Chef at
Community Table in Washington,

17

CT, Dec 12, 5-8pm. To buy tickets
go to thehartsgallery.com/
benefitarts.
The Silo, Hunt Hill Farm Trust, 44
Upland Road, New Milford, CT,
860-355-0300 hunthillfarmtrust.
org Gingerbread House classes,
through Dec 13; free holiday
choir concerts, Dec 12, 19. Go to
website for times.
Kent Gingerbread Festival, Main
Street, Kent, CT, 860-592-006,
http://kentct.com/events Dozens
of gingerbread creations will be
revealed in participating shops,
through December.
Kent Historical Society, Kent
Town Hall, 41 Kent Green
Boulevard, Kent, CT, 860-9274587, www.kenthistoricalsociety.
org Festive Holiday Party, wine,
cheese & savories, Dec 12, 5-7
pm; Annual Holiday Boutique,
through Dec 31. Go to website for
times.
Salisbury Congregational
Church, 30 Main Street,
Salisbury, CT, 860-435-2442,
salisburycongretational.org A

Christmas Concert with Vocal
and Bell choirs with guest
soloists, Dec 13, 3 pm.

Salisbury School, 251 Canaan
Road, Salisbury, CT, 860-4355700, www.salisburyschool.org
A Service of Nine Lessons and
Carols, Dec 13, 4:30 pm.
Southern Berkshire Chamber
of Commerce, Great
Barrington, MA, 413-528-4284,
Southernberkshirechamber.com
Holiday Stroll, Shop, Sip & Stroll
in downtown Great Barrington,
Dec 12. For more info. go to
website.
St. Thomas Church, 71 North
Street, Goshen, CT, www.
goshenfarmersmarket.com
Goshen Farmers holiday market,
through Dec 20, Sundays 1-4 pm.
Wadsworth Atheneum Museum
of Art, 600 Main Street, Hartford,
CT, 860-278-2670, thewadsorth.
org 42nd Annual Festival of
Trees & Traditions, through
Dec 13; Santa & Mrs. Claus, Dec
12, 2-5 pm, Dec 13, 10:30 am1:30 pm. For full schedule go to
thewadsworth.org/festivaloftrees.
Washington Art Association
& Gallery, 4 Bryan Memorial

18

COMPASS, Thursday, December 10, 2015

Plaza, Washington Depot,
CT, 860-868-2878, www.
washingtonartassociation.com
Holiday Home Gift Fair, through
Dec 24.
Washington Depot, 11 Titus
Road, Washington, CT, 860-8680518 Native American artist
show and holiday market, Dec
11, 5-8:30 pm, Dec 12-14, 10
am-4 pm.
Western Connecticut State
University, 181 White Street,
Danbury, CT, 203-837-8732, www.
wcsu.edu “Amahl and the Night
Visitors,” Dec 11, 7 pm, Dec 12, 1
pm. For tickets go to wcsu.edu/
tickets.
WCSU Department of Theatre
Arts, 43 Lake Avenue, Danbury,
CT, 203-837-8732, www.wcsu.edu
“The Snow Queen,” Dec 12, 3 pm,
7 pm, Dec 13, 3 pm. For tickets
go to www.eventbrite.com/e/thesnow-queen-tickets-17831695080
Oliver Wolcott Library, 160 South
Street, Litchfield, CT, 860-4225142, www.owlibrary.org Old
Fashioned Yuletide Caroling
Party, Dec 13, 5-7 pm.

Movies
The Cornwall Library, 30 Pine
Street, Cornwall, CT, 860-6726874, www.CornwallLibrary.org
Winter Film Series, “It Should
Happen to You,” Jan 30, 7:30 pm.
Crandell Theatre, 48 Main Street,
Chatham, NY, 518-392-3331, www.
crandelltheatre.org Masterpiece
Theatre’s “Downton Abbey,” the 1st
hour of Season 6, Dec 12, 2 pm.
Digiplex Torrington, 89 Farley
Place, Torrington, CT, 860-4894111, www.cinerom.com
Gilson Cafe Cinema, 354 Main St,
Winsted, CT, 860-379-5108, www.
gilsoncafecinema.com
Kent Memorial Library, Kent
Town Hall, 41 Kent Green
Blvd., CT, 860-927-376, www.
kentmemoriallibrary.org
“Minions,” Dec 28, 1 pm, popcorn
will be served, please register.
Mahaiwe Theatre, 14 Castle St,
Great Barrington, MA, 413-5280100, www.mahaiwe.org “It’s a
Wonderful Life,” Dec 20, 7 pm;
“Home Alone,” Dec 26, 4 pm.

The Moviehouse, 48 Main St,
Millerton, NY, 518-789-3408,
www.themoviehouse.net “It’s a
Wonderful Life,” Dec 13, 11 am,
free. Go to website for times and
tickets

Music
Bard College, 60 Manor Ave,
Annandale-On-Hudson, NY, 845
758-7900, www. fishercenter.
bard.edu Dawn Upshaw and the
Bard Conservatory Graduate
Vocal Arts Program, pianists of
the Conservatory Post Graduate
Piano Fellowship Program,
actress Mary Stuart Masterson,
and The Chancellor-Livingston
5th Grade Chorus present “A
Winter Songfest, “Dec 13, 3 p.m;
Bard College Symphonic Chorus,
Chamber Singers and Red
Hook School Concert Choir Fall
Concert, conducted by James
Bagwell, Dec 15, 8 pm. Go to
website for times and tickets.
Bardavon, 35 Market Street,
Poughkeepsie, NY, 845-473-2072,
www.bardavon.org Met Opera
Live in HD: Bizet’s “Les Pêcheurs
de Perles,” Jan 16, 1 pm; Puccini’s
“Turandot,” Jan 30, 1 pm.
Club Helsinki Hudson, 405
Columbia St., Hudson, NY,
518-8284800, helsinkihudson.
com Holidelic, Dec 11, 12, 9 pm;
Hedda Lettuce, Dec 13, 8 pm;
Club d’Elf with John Medeski,
Dec 20, 8 pm; Jon Cleary and
the Monster Gentlemen, Dec
31, 9 pm; Bully, Jan 8, 9 pm; The
Living Roots Trio, Jan 9, 8 pm;
Darlingside, Jan 14, 8 pm.
The Harts Gallery, 20 Bank
Street, New Milford, CT, 917-9134641, thehartsgallery.com Sound
Healing Concert: John Marshall
with artist Crystal Cymbalogy,
combining crystal and Tibetan
singing bowls, drums and
keyboards with voice and poetry,
Dec 13, 4 pm.
Infinity Music Hall & Bistro,
32 Front Street, Hartford, CT,
866-666-6306, www.infinityhall.
com Jason Gray Christmas
Stories with Carrollton and
Jonny Diaz, Dec 10, 8 pm;
Rusted Root, Dec 11, 8 pm;
Larry Carlto, Dec 12, 8 pm;
Sounds of Frank—Centennial
Celebration-The Music of Frank
Sinatra, Dec 13, 7:30 pm; Eileen

Ivers-Joyful Christmas, Dec 17, 8
pm; Kashmir—The Ultimate Led
Zeppelin Tribute Band, Dec 18,
8 pm.
Infinity Music Hall & Bistro,
8232 Route 44, Norfolk, CT,
866-666-6306, www.infinityhall.
com Pat McGee Band reunion
show to benefit Adopt-A-Family
with Jeff Przech, Dec 10, 8
pm; Phil Vassar, Dec 11, 8 pm;
Rusted Root, Dec 12, 8 pm; The
Whiffenpoofs with The Quirks,
Dec 13, 1 pm; The Black Lillies,
Dec 13, 7:30 pm; Security Project
presents the Music of Peter
Gabriel, Dec 17, 8 pm; Ladies
of Laughter, Jane Condon and
Robin Fox, Dec 18, 8 pm.
Kairos: A Consort of Singers,
Holy Cross Monastery, West
Park, NY, 845-256-9114, www.
kairosconsort.org Annual
Service of Lessons & Carols, Dec
20, 3 pm. A holiday reception
will follow the service.
Kellogg Music Center, Bard
College of Simon’s Rock, Great
Barrington MA, 860-435-2627,
worldclassmusic.org Crescendo Trumpets and Angels: A Baroque
Christmas Story, H. Schütz’
Weihnachtshistorie and Motets
by M. Praetorius for Choir and
Brass, Jan 2.
Mahaiwe Theatre, 14 Castle
Street, Great Barrington, MA,
413-528-0100, www.mahaiwe.
org Dually Noted, music for
four hands, Dec 12, 6 pm; Met
Opera Live in HD: Mozart’s
“The Magic Flute,” Dec 13, 1 pm;
John Pizzarelli’s Frank Sinatra
Centennial Celebration
Saturday, Dec 19, 8 pm. Go to
theater or website for tickets.
UPAC, 601 Broadway, Kingston,
NY, 845-339-6088, www.
bardavon.org Handel’s
“Messiah,” Dec 19, 2 pm.

Potpourri
Noble Horizons, 17 Cobble
Rd, Salisbury, CT, 860-4359851, www.noblehorizons.
org Annual Red Cross holiday
blood drive, Dec 16, 1-6 pm. Call
1-800-RED-CROSS or visit www.
redcrossblood.org to schedule a
donation appointment.

Talks
The Cornwall Library, 30 Pine
Street, Cornwall, CT, 860-6726874, www.CornwallLibrary.org
Antique Oriental Rugs – Is it Art
Just Because It’s Old? A Talk by
Kristen Bedell, Jan 23, 5 pm.
The Salisbury Forum, Hotchkiss
School, Walker Auditorium,
11 Interlaken Road, Lakeville,
CT, salisburyforum.org
Why Architecture Matters
with Pulitzer Prize-winning
architecture critic Paul
Goldberger, Dec 11, 7:30 pm.

Theater
The Center for Performing Arts
at Rhinebeck, 661 Route 308,
Rhinebeck, NY, 845- 876-3080,
www.centerforperformingarts.
org “Miracle on 34th Street,”
through Dec 20.
Fisher Center, Bard College,
60 Manor Ave, Annandale-OnHudson, NY, 845 758-790, www.
fishercenter.bard.edu “The
Object Lesson,” Dec 17-19. Go to
website for tickets and times.
The Ghent Playhouse, 6 Town
Hall Place, Ghent, NY, 518-3926264, www.ghentplayhouse.org
“Snow White: House of Dwarfs,”
Dec 11-13, “The Weir,” Jan 22-24,
29-31, Feb 5-7.

Warner Theatre, 68 Main
Street, Torrington, CT, 860489-7180, www.warnertheatre.
org Lucinda and Michael, 2016
“No Boundaries” tour with a CD
release perform- ance and live
DVD taping, Jan 9, 8 pm.

Half Moon Theatre, Culinary
Institute of America, Marriott
Pavilion, 1946 Campus Drive,
Hyde Park, NY, 845-235-9885,
halfmoontheatre.org “A
Christmas Carol,” through Dec
19. For tickets and times go to
website.

Waterbury Symphony Orchestra,
NVCC Fine Arts Center, 110 Bank
St, Waterbury, CT, 203-5744283 waterburysymphony.org A
Connecticut Christmas, Dec 13,
3 pm.

The Institute for American
Indian Studies, 38 Curtis Road,
Washington, CT, 860-868-0518,
www.iaismuseum.org Listen
to traditional Native American
stories as told by Janis Us,

Mohawk/Shinnecock descent, A
Time For Stories, Dec 12, 12:30
pm. Please call for reservations.
Mahaiwe Theatre, 14 Castle St,
Great Barrington, MA, 413528-0100, www.mahaiwe.org
London’s National Theatre in
HD, “Jane Eyre,” Dec 27, 3 pm;
“Les Liaisons Dangereuses,” Jan
28, 7 pm; “As You Like It, Feb 28,
3 pm.
The Moviehouse, 48 Main
St, Millerton, NY, 518-7893408, www.themoviehouse.
net London’s National Theatre
in HD, “Jane Eyre,” Dec 13, 1
pm; NTLive: “Hamlet,” starring
Benedict Cumberbatch, Dec 12,
3 pm, Dec 16, 7 pm; “Les Liasons
Dangereuses,” Jan 28, 7 pm, Feb
7, 1 pm; “As You Like It,” Feb 25, 7
pm, Feb 28, 1 pm.
The Sherman Playhouse, 5 Route
39 North (next to the firehouse),
Sherman, CT, 860-354-3622,
shermanplayers.org “Alice’s
Adventures in Wonderland,”
through Dec 27. Go to website
for times and tickets.
TheaterWorks, 233 Pearl
Street, Hartford, CT, 860-5277838, theater- workshartford.
org “Christmas on the Rocks,”
through Dec 23; staged
reading “The Eight: Reindeer
Monologues,” Dec 23, 8 pm; Tom
Lenk in “Buyer & Cellar,” Jan 7Feb 14. For tickets and times go
to the website.
TheatreWorks, 5 Brookside
Avenue, New Milford , CT, 860350-6863, theatreworks.us “Bell,
Book & Candle,” through Jan 9,
gala fundraising performance,
Dec 31, 8 pm. For tickets and
times go to website.
Warner Theatre, 68 Main Street,
Torrington, CT, 860-489-7180,
www.warnertheatre.org “Sister’s
Christmas Catechism, The
Mystery of the Magi’s Gold,” Dec
10-13; Moses Pendelton and
the dancer-illusionists troupe,
MOMIX, present “Opus Cactus,”
Jan 9-10. Go to website for
tickets and times.

For free access to
our full calendar,
go to our website at
www.tricornernews.com

COMPASS, Thursday, December 10, 2015

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Making Works of Art,

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COMPASS, Thursday, December 10, 2015

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