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The Eugene Area Chamber Of Commerce: Celebrating…Promoting…Informing Business

Publisher
David Hauser, CCE

THIS ISSUE
Cover story

Director Of
Communications
Katherine Movalson
Eugene Chamber
Executive Committee

Columns/Departments

10

We talked with three downtown
business leaders to find out what
they think would make Eugene’s
downtown even better.
Pictured from left: Rob E.
Bennett, a downtown property owner and an
owner of the Downtown Athletic Club; Jenette
Kane, Dean of Continuing Education and
LCC’s Downtown Campus; and Thomas
Pettus-Czar, owner of The Barn Light.

4

Chamber @ Work
What the Eugene Chamber is doing to
support and promote businesses in the
Eugene area.

Photo by David Loveall
Illustration by Asbury Design

Last Call
Dave Hauser reflects
on the long list
of projects that are completed or
underway in downtown Eugene.

Four Questions

7

$PAC-091_EugeneChamber_OpenBiz_7.375x4.8126_AugSept2015.indd 1

6/19/15 11:39 AM

Potential.
We see it in Eugene. And in the industries that do
business here—from forest products to not-for-profit
and manufacturing, to name just a few.

For more than a century we’ve helped organizations
reduce risk, gain efficiencies, and find room for growth.
How can we help you prosper?

975 Oak Street, Suite 500 | Eugene, OR 97401
(541) 686-1040 W W W. M O S S A D A M S . C O M

22
30

Business News
Promotions, new hires,
and new members

Learn more about
local businesses
Oregon
Contemporary
Theater and
Capelli-Miles.

Craig Wanichek
Chair
President & CEO,
Summit Bank
Nigel Francisco
Chair-elect
CFO, Ninkasi Brewing
Company LLC
Cathy Worthington
Treasurer
Licensed Tax
Consultant,
Worthington Business
Services
Sheryl Balthrop
Past Chair
Partner, Gaydos,
Churnside & Balthrop PC
Advertising
Eugene Area
Chamber of Commerce
541.484.1314
Design/Layout
Asbury Design
541.344.1633
www.asburydesign.net
Printing
Shelton Turnbull
541.687.1214
Eugene Area Chamber
of Commerce
1401 Willamette St.
Eugene, OR 97401

CHAMBER CONTACTS
David Hauser, CCE

Cedric Rudd

President
(541) 242-2350
daveh@eugenechamber.com

Director of Membership Development
(541) 242-2352
cedricr@eugenechamber.com

Beth Tassan

Jeannine Erving

Administrative Assistant
(541) 242-2356
betht@eugenechamber.com

Membership Services Manager
(541) 242-2355
jeanninee@eugenechamber.com

Barb Brunton

Katherine Movalson

Business Manager
(541) 242-2358
barbb@eugenechamber.com

Director of Communications
(541) 242-2360
katherinem@eugenechamber.com

Ashley Barrington
Administrative Support
(541) 242-2351
ashleyb@eugenechamber.com

Brittany Quick-Warner
Director of Business Advocacy
(541) 242-2354
brittanyw@eugenechamber.com

Megan Richter
Community Coordinator
for DEI & USBA
(541) 242-2357
meganr@eugenechamber.com

Mary O'Neil
Events Manager
(541) 242-2353
maryo@eugenechamber.com

Leigh Anne Hogue
Director of Economic Development
(541) 242-2359
leighanneh@eugenechamber.com

Correction
In the cover story of the October/November issue, David Bickell’s name was misspelled.

541.484.1314
Open for Business:
A publication of the
Eugene Area Chamber of
Commerce
(USPS-978-480).
Open for Business is
published bimonthly
by the Eugene Area
Chamber of Commerce
in February, April, June,
August, October and
December. Circulation:
3,800.
Open For Business
© 2015
The subscription price
is $25, included in
membership. Periodicals
Postage Paid at Eugene,
OR.
POSTMASTER: Send
address changes to
Eugene Area Chamber of
Commerce, P.O. Box 1107,
Eugene, OR 97440-1107

CHAMBER@WORK
Twenty eight selected for
Chambers’ leadership program

New 4J
Superintendent
addresses
Chambers

Mayor Kitty Piercy speaks to leadership participants.
The Eugene and Springfield Chambers recently kicked off the 30th Leadership
Eugene-Springfield program. Twenty eight participants were selected from 53
applicants for the eight-month program designed to create leaders who are informed
on local issues, equipped with leadership skills, and involved in the community. This
year’s participants join over 700 community members who have graduated from this
distinguished program. See a full list of participants at http://bit.ly/LES_participants.

Eugene School District 4J
Superintendent Dr. Gustavo
Balderas and Springfield
Public Schools Superintendent
Sue Rieke-Smith addressed a
joint meeting of the EugeneSpringfield Greeters in
October. They spoke about
the state of public education,
training our future workforce
and opportunities for business
and education / partnerships
in Lane County.

Business-to-Business Expo draws 1,400 attendees
The 2015 Business-to-Business
EXPO was a huge success. Thank
you to our presenting sponsor, SAIF
Corporation, and our 670 exhibitors
who created an outstanding experience
for our 1,400 attendees.
In particular, we’d like to
acknowledge: Best New Exhibitor: Lane
Local Foods; Best Swag: McKenzie
SewOn; Best Booth Theme: Phoenix
Inn; Best in Show: Provisions;
Friendliest Staff: Strapworks
Congratulations to Lawralie Bunker,
winner of our grand prize of two $500
travel vouchers from the Eugene Airport
and Alaska Airlines.

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The Provisions
staff shows off
their Best in
Show award at
the Chamber’s
2015 Businessto-Business
EXPO.

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Four questions
We asked local businesses to respond to questions that give insight into
their companies and the value of their Eugene Chamber membership.

FOR YOUR

PEACE

OF MIND

Associate Producer, Oregon Contemporary Theatre,
How did Oregon Contemporary Theatre get started and
how did you get involved?

Oregon Contemporary Theatre was established in 1992 as
Lord Leebrick Theatre Company, named for founders Randy
Lord and Chris Leebrick. When the company moved to its
home on Broadway in 2013, it was renamed to better reflect
our focus on producing contemporary works. I’ve had the
pleasure of working here since 2011, while I was completing
my graduate degree. Nobody seemed to mind when I graduated
and didn’t give up my desk.
What trends are shaping your industry?

Nick Frost
PARTNER

The theatre world is tackling issues around diversity,
equity, access, and inclusion. We’re in the business
of telling the stories of our communities, but how
can we do that if the stories we tell don’t reflect
the entire community? And whose voices are
heard in the creation process? The result is a
national push to open doors, reach out, create
opportunities, include marginalized groups—not
a small task, but necessary, fruitful, inspiring work.
It’s an intense, wonderful time to be in the theatre.
What might someone be surprised to know
about your company?

That’s the whole reason Hershner Hunter’s newest partner, Nick Frost, is here. His
passion for estate planning, business succession and business deals is all about
eliminating uncertainty...and all the other things nagging at the back of your mind.
Nick’s experience working on major transactions for one of the largest law firms in
the country means he’s adept at forward thinking, strategic planning, and complex
puzzles——no matter what scale. It’s a different kind of smart, with one eye firmly
fixed on the future, while examining and acting today.
Nick, and our entire team of next generation legal talent, gives us a quiet mind and
confidence that we’ve planned for our long-term legacy. We can help you get there too.
541-686-8511 | hershnerhunter.com

OCT is Eugene’s only
professional theatre company,
but the majority of our actors
and designers are based in
the area. Our local talent
pool is extraordinary.
Oregon is garnering
serious attention for
its flourishing theatre
scene, and OCT
works to be just
as much a part of
that reputation as
any company in
Portland or Ashland
while supporting
local artists. We were
also the first Oregon-

based member of the National New Play Network, a group
dedicated to the development and longevity of new works and
playwrights.
What would you tell someone who is thinking about
opening a business in Eugene?

People do business with other people, not with other
businesses, especially in Eugene. Get active in the community,
both personally and within the context of your business. The
more people you know, the greater the scope of perspectives
you can draw upon, the more informed your business decisions.
Several of our most innovative, effective partnerships are with
those outside of the arts sector.
Businesses in Eugene are all looking for ways to handle
the challenges and opportunities associated with the growth
of our community. Being located in the heart of downtown,
OCT is experiencing this first-hand. We have to find
ways to reach and serve as many as we can while
remaining true to our mission. It’s vital to remain
open, nimble, and responsive to make the
most of new commercial and community
opportunities.
What element of the Chamber has been
most beneficial to your company? 

Being a member of the Chamber has been
a huge boon. Participating allows us to form
new partnerships and collaborations, leading
to a broader impact on our community both
economically and culturally.
I also have the good fortune this year
to be participating in the Leadership
Eugene-Springfield program.
We’ve only just begun, but the
entire class is deeply
invested in improving
the quality of life
in our area. It’s an
impressive group. I
can’t wait to dig into
the experience, gain
deeper understanding
of important workings
of our community, and
apply that knowledge to
help create a better
Eugene.

PHOTO BY DAVID LOVEALL

PLANNING

Tara Wibrew

Eugene Area
Chamber of
Commerce

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7

Four questions
Rod Miles
President, Cappelli Miles
How did you and your company land in Eugene?

I was born and raised in the newspaper business and later
earned my degree in Journalism/Advertising at the University of
Oregon. At school I met Professor Willis Winter and a fellow
student Bruce Cappelli. I was interested in the “numbers” side
of the advertising world and with encouragement from Dr.
Winter I jumped into the media planning/buying world. I loved
learning of the Neilsen ratings and what and how audiences
habits could be measured in the broadcast world. It was a nice
balance to the print world I was raised in. Bruce and I had
similar energies and he certainly encouraged the fun for the
business. Bruce and I re-connected after graduation and worked
with and purchased the company in 1982.
It’s interesting, we’ve been a part of Eugene’s past with
some pretty impressive retail clients, today work with two
dozen regional clients and we look forward to a great
future reaching across the Northwest. 25-30% of our
business comes from out of State.
What trends are shaping the advertising
industry?

If you are locating downtown . . . change is afoot and in a
positive direction. We recently moved our offices back downtown from the Country Club Road area and we really like the
new mix in the heart of our city. Our employees are enjoying it
with so many activities and options just a short walk away, the
business people are great and the future looks even better. With
the Whole Foods addition to our east and a new City Hall I’m
excited to see what energy that brings to downtown.

As a true community health plan—started by
local doctors—Trillium offers extremely popular
low-cost dental plans that cover everything,
including cleanings. Dial in the dollars and take
a big bite out of expenses. We’re 20-plus years
old and100,000 members strong. That adds up
to a healthy grin.

Why would you recommend the Chamber to a friend?

When I have questions I feel I can always get an answer from
the Chamber staff and Dave Hauser. Generally it’s my first phone
call. With the Chamber, I’m speaking the language of business
and how to improve it. I feel we are on the same page with issues
that effect business and I value the person-to-person relationships
the Chamber fosters between businesses in Eugene.  
Eugene Area
Chamber of
Commerce

“If you are locating
downtown . . .
change is afoot and in
a positive direction.
We recently moved
our offices back
downtown from the
Country Club Road
area, and we
really like the
new mix in
the heart of
our city.”

hink well. Be well.™

541-431-1950 800-910-3906
trilliumchp.com

PHOTO BY DAVID LOVEALL

The old adage “the only constant is change” is
certainly true for the advertising/brand business.
The way we help clients deliver their message is
constantly changing. Every business has a story
to tell and we consult clients on how to tell that
story, it’s language and how to best deliver it to the
target market. We’ve seen many changes in how that
message is delivered with a wide variety of
channels including newspaper, radio,
TV, cable, social and digital efforts.
We love to jump into the market
segments and create high visibility for our clients. Bruce and I
have an excellent team that
works together to do so.

What would you tell someone who is thinking about
opening a business in Eugene?

Make your employees
all Smiles ;-)

8 OP EN FO R BUSI N ESS | EUGEN E AREA CH AMB ER O F COM M ERC E

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9

By Jeneca Jones
Photos by DAVID LOVeALL

R

evitalization has breathed new life into Downtown Eugene in recent years, and business
owners and community leaders say they are
optimistic about the future.
We sat down and talked with Jenette
Kane, Dean of Continuing Education and
LCC’s Downtown Campus; Thomas PettusCzar, owner of The Barn Light and an active
advocate for downtown; and Rob E. Bennett,
a downtown property owner and an owner of
the Downtown Athletic Club, to find out what
they think would make downtown even better.
Full of informed ideas, the threesome agreed that downtown
could benefit from more convention space, an expanded farmers
market, continued redevelopment, and improvements to downtown signage—all of which could be made possible through urban
renewal.
Adopted in 1968 and amended over the years, Eugene’s Downtown Urban Renewal Plan has paved the way for improvements
that stimulate economic development through private investment
for the public benefit.
The Downtown District encompasses more than 17 city blocks,
or 70 acres, defined by jig jagging lines that stretch from 6th to
11th Avenues and Lincoln to Pearl Streets. The Downtown District is one of two Urban Renewal Districts in Eugene, the second
being the Riverfront District.
Urban renewal supports economic development and civic

Left: Thomas Pettus-Czar, owner of The Barn Light and an
active advocate for downtown. Right: Jenette Kane, Dean
of Continuing Education and LCC’s Downtown Campus and
Rob E. Bennett, a downtown property owner and an owner
of the Downtown Athletic Club.
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COVER STORY
improvement by promoting redevelopment
within the districts. It provides financing
needed for infrastructure, land acquisition,
renovation and façade improvements, as well
as upgrades to open spaces, plazas and parking
garages.
Redevelopment, made possible through
public and private partnerships, has attracted
businesses to downtown like bees to blooms,
bringing a bustle and buzz to our city streets
that didn’t exist a decade ago.
“Urban renewal is a tool to bring more
positive activity to downtown,” Bennett says.
The Downtown Athletic Club serves a
significant anchor to downtown, employing
about 150 people and drawing club members
and visitors to downtown daily. It is also an
example of how urban renewal funds were
used to bring life back to a dilapidated building that’s now a community success story.
Back in the 1970s, the Eugene Urban
Renewal Agency acquired the former Ax Billy
Department Store building, built in 1909 and
scheduled for demolition. The agency sold the
property in 1985 and provided $150,000 in
gap financing for its renovation. The building
is now on the National Register of Historic
Places and is home to the Downtown Athletic
Club.
“The redevelopment that happened back
then and in recent years would not have been
possible without urban renewal,” Bennett says.
Bennett is a board member of Downtown
Eugene Inc. and chairs its marketing committee. He is also a member of the Eugene Area
Chamber of Commerce Local Government
Affairs Council, which reviews and advocates
on public policy issues that impact the local
economy.
Bennett says he’s in favor of extending
the Downtown Urban Renewal District, so
that even more can be done to improve the
atmosphere of downtown.
“Bringing more businesses and people to
downtown generates more positive energy and
creates a safer, more welcoming environment
for everyone,” he says.
Convention Center

Many of the city’s iconic civic spaces and
downtown businesses, such as the Hult Center for the Performing Arts, Hilton Eugene
Hotel and Eugene Community Conference
Center are examples of public and private
partnerships.
In 1978, voters supported an $18.5 mil-

lion general obligation bond to finance the
Hult Center construction, which was built
on Eugene Urban Renewal Agency property
that was donated to the project. In 1980, the
agency sold the adjacent property to Hilton
Eugene developers and issued more than $2
million in urban renewal bonds to finance the
parking structure upon which the conference
center was built. In 1981, more than $6.9 million certificates of participation were sold to
construct the conference center. This public
and private trifecta continues to bring daily
visitors to downtown.
Regarded as the only premier performing
arts center between Portland and San Francisco, the Hult Center hosts more than 700
events each year, while the 30,000-square-foot
Eugene Community Conference Center plays
host to numerous events.
Similar in size to the Eugene Community
Conference Center are Riverhouse Hotel &
Convention Center in Bend, Sunriver Resort,
and the new Salem Convention Center.
“If we want to stand out from the competition, we need more convention space,” says
Travel Lane County President and CEO Kari
Westlund.
Published feasibility studies say that based

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on our population, the economy, and surveys
of convention and trade show event organizers, associations, corporations and public
show event promoters, our community could
support an additional 65,000 square feet of
high-tech conference space, ideally with a
large co-located hotel, Westlund says.
“Eugene has lost events to other communities simply because they outgrew us,” she says.
What we have to offer often doesn’t meet
the criteria of large organizations that want
their event space and overnight accommodations co-located, she says.
Some examples include The Oregon Wine
Board Annual Symposium—a February event
that draws visitors at a time when travel and
tourism spending is typically low—and the
American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association, which held its annual conference and
retreat in Eugene from 2002-08, but is now
hosting it at larger venues elsewhere.
“Both organizations have told us that they
would love to come back to Eugene when we
have room for them,” she says.
In addition to serving as a civic space and
pillar of community pride, conference centers
typically draw thousands of visitors with
dollars to spend locally, benefiting hotels, res-

A 33,750-square-foot Whole Foods Market set to open in 2016 at the corner of East Broadway Avenue and High Street.

“For the size of our city, it’s pretty surprising
that we don’t have more to offer in terms of
conference space. A new conference center
would bring more people to downtown,
especially during slow times of the year.”
Kari Westlund
Travel Lane County President and CEO

taurants and retailers, in addition to bolstering
arts and cultural offerings and outdoor activity
in the region.
There are many configurations and possible
locations for a convention center in downtown
Eugene, Westlund says. “And it would be great
to have a new convention center up and running by 2021, when we host the World Track
and Field Championships.”
Pettus-Czar is active in the downtown Eugene business community, serving as marketing committee member of Downtown Eugene

Inc. and co-vice president of the Downtown
Eugene Economic Development Committee.
He also serves on the Sustainability Commission for the City of Eugene.
“For the size of our city, it’s pretty surprising that we don’t have more to offer in terms
of conference space. A new conference center
would bring more people to downtown, especially during slow times of the year.”
Westlund believes an opportunity exists on
several publically owned downtown parcels,
including the county-owned parking lot,

known as the “butterfly lot,” located on 8th
& Oak, home to the Lane County Farmers
Market, and just south of the Hilton Eugene
Hotel and Community Conference Center,
and west of the Lane County Circuit Courthouse.
Rather than competing, our current conference center and a new conference center
could, together, accommodate larger groups
and really complement each other, she says.
Co-locating a new convention center, a
new hotel and the Farmers Market would be
a huge draw and a great way to showcase our
region’s farm-to-table culinary scene, she says.
A convention center would potentially
increase property values for downtown businesses, which would, in turn, generate more
incremental tax financing for the Downtown
Urban Renewal District, paving the way for
more improvements and redevelopment,
Westlund says.
Farmers Market

One of the goals of the current Downtown Urban Renewal Plan is to improve the
function, condition and appearance of the

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COVER STORY

COVER STORY

downtown plan area through an improved site
for the Lane County Farmers Market, which
recently celebrated 100 years.
Approximately $500,000 in urban renewal
funds have been set aside for improvements
to the Park Blocks along 8th Avenue to make
the location more attractive and functional for
the Farmers Market, but it will take more than
that to create a year-round space for the market, says Mike Sullivan, Lane County Farmers
Market board member.
For years, the Lane County Farmers
Market has wanted to expand its footprint
to include more seasonal space and a covered
year-round space for local farms and food
producers to market their products.
“With an expanded footprint, the market
has the potential to nearly double its space
and provide greatly  improved circulation for
shoppers,” Sullivan says.
The
market’s
current,
congested
25,000-square-foot space is located on 8th
Street, on a U-shaped sidewalk that hugs the
south side of the county’s parking lot.
Because there’s synergy between the Farmers Market and Saturday Market, Farmers

benefit from more frontage than others. We
also lack electricity, which limits our ability to
bring in certain vendors who have electrical
requirements. Currently, and in the past, vendors have made deals with local businesses on
West Park Street to tap into their electrical,
for which they negotiate a cost.”
Current membership hovers around 90
with approximately 60 members cramming
into the market’s current space each Saturday,
April through mid-November. The market
also operates on a smaller scale on Tuesdays
on property sub-leased by Saturday Market,
and on Thursdays, to an even lesser degree,
during fair weather months.
“The market’s annual gross sales are approximately $1.5 million,” says Lynne Fessenden, Executive Director of Willamette Farm
& Food Coalition. “It could easily be $2.5
million if they were able to expand.”
Business owners say they support the idea
of an expanded Farmers Market, knowing it
will bring more people to downtown.
“Establishing a year-round Farmers Market would be a huge draw for downtown. It’s
such a community institution,” says Pettus-

The 120-room Home2 Suites by Hilton is currently under construction at 11th and
Olive Downtown and set for completion next summer.

Market members want to remain where they
are, says Market Manager Carrie Swarts, but
there are challenges associated with the space.

“There are some inequities,” says Swarts.
“Some vendors benefit from extra storage
space while some have none, and others

“With an expanded footprint, the (Saturday)
Market has the potential to nearly double
its space and provide greatly improved
circulation for shoppers.”
– Mike Sullivan
Lane County Farmers Market board member

Czar, whose popular coffee-shop-by-day-andbar-by-night business sits at the crossroads of
Willamette Street and Broadway.
He would also like to see aesthetic improvements made to the Park Blocks where
Saturday Market is held. “It’s a tired space. I
think we need to consider changes to the old
structures and how it might function better in
conjunction with Saturday Market and a yearround Farmers Market.”
Recent Redevelopment

In addition to public improvements, urban

A clear choice
for straighter teeth

renewal funds help businesses get off the
ground. Such was the case for Pettus-Czar
and his business partner three years ago, when
they presented a business plan to the city and
became recipients of a $55,000 loan through
the Downtown Revitalization Loan Program.
The loan helped them establish the first
ground-floor business at the recently renovated Broadway Commerce Center, which
was also made possible through urban renewal
funds.
The new Broadway Commerce Center, a
once vacant and blighted structure, was made

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a new 66-lot housing
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1 4 OP E N FO R BUSI N ESS | EUGEN E AREA CH AMB ER O F COM M ERC E

The Lee family at Addyson Creek. Pictured from left,
Steve and Sally Lee, Summit Bank’s Jenny Bennett, and
Chelsey and Ryan Lee with Addyson.

96 east Broadway in eugene
541-684-7500
summitBankonline.com

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COVER STORY

Eugene’s new City Hall on 8th Avenue is set to open in late 2016. It will include a public lobby, meetings space and a civic plaza.
1 6 OP E N FO R BUSI N ESS | EUGEN E AREA CH AMB ER O F COM M ERC E

possible through a combination of local and
federal funds. Beam Development renovated
the building using a $7.89 million loan from
the city’s Urban Renewal Agency, funds from
the federal HUD Section 108 loan program, a
$2 million loan from the Brownfield Economic
Development Initiative, and a $350,000 loan
from the city’s Downtown Revitalization Loan
Program.
Since opening in 2011, with five stories of
creative office space and ground-floor retail and
restaurant space, Broadway Commerce Center is
home to a mix of high-tech software companies,
a creative design agency, a comedy radio station,
architecture and law firms, a martial arts studio,
an organization that supports start-ups and
entrepreneurs, and several restaurants, including
The Barn Light, Sizzle Pie and Killer Burger.
Other recent examples include The Woolworth building, adjacent to the Broadway
Commerce Center, which opened the same year;
the five-story $11 million investment features
ground-floor retail and office space, as well as
underground parking. Then in 2014, came the
First on Broadway Building, located on the
northwest corner of Broadway and Willamette
Street, featuring 19 apartments, and groundfloor commercial space that was quickly filled by
Starbucks.
Built with the help of urban renewal funds,
the new $55 million Lane Community College Downtown Campus includes a LEED
Platinum education building and LEED Gold
student housing that benefited from urban
renewal. The city’s Urban Renewal Agency provided an $8 million grant for construction. The
city also donated land, valued at $1.6 million,
and transferred a Recovery Zone Bond to LCC
to help the college access a $7,839,000 bond for
the housing portion of the project.
In addition to offering continuing education, enrichment courses, and a successful aging
program for care providers, LCC is working
with the tech sector to build a workforce that
can sustain Eugene’s continued tech growth,
says Kane.
Kane is a board member of Downtown Eugene Inc., and Downtown Eugene Merchants,
organizations that are focused on the long-term
economic health of downtown.
While the new LCC location is thriving,
LCC’s previous downtown location sits vacant.
“It could either be fixed up or torn down to
make way for something new,” she says.
Originally a Montgomery Ward department store, the three-story building at 11th
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COVER STORY

COVER STORY

& Willamette was constructed in the 1920s.
Appraised at $1.1 million, the 57,000-squarefoot, L-shaped building would require updates to the fire suppression system and one
of two elevators, in addition to a new roof.
“Anything would be an improvement,”
says Pettus-Czar. “It’s one of the only vacant
properties of its size in downtown that could
accommodate something of a great scale.”
He says one of the challenges downtown
businesses continue to face is parking signage,
which could be improved if the city advances
its recent wayfinding work.
Wayfinding

A recent effort to make finding your way
around downtown Eugene began a year and a
half ago. Because Eugene lacks a coordinated
pedestrian wayfinding program, those who
visit—visitors and residents, alike—don’t
always know where to park or even what to do
once they arrive.
“This effort was spearheaded by ABAE
(Arts & Business Alliance of Eugene), which
was interested in highlighting our many
cultural assets. For the City of Eugene, it fits
our need and desire to enhance downtown

“As a community, we’re going to have to change
our attitude about parking in garages and being
OK with having to walk a block or two.”
– Rob Bennett
Downtown property owner and an owner of the Downtown Athletic Club

and other areas of our city and make it feel
welcoming for visitors,” says Renee Grube,
executive director of the City of Eugene Library, Recreation and Cultural Services, and
president of ABAE.
The City of Eugene, in partnership with
Travel Lane County and ABAE, commissioned wayfinding specialists MERJE of West
Chester, Pennsylvania, along with Julie Jensen
of Graphic Space in Eugene, for the development of a Downtown Pedestrian Wayfinding
Master Plan that was completed in July.
Wayfinding systems typically include a
variety of tools that allow cities to communicate with visitors and residents at different
touch-points along their journey. These tools
include pre-visit technology, in-place technology, environmental cues, support materials

and signage.
Considered Phase 1, the Master Plan
was built on information gained through
meetings with city staff, approving agencies,
stakeholder interviews and public input presentations, Grube says. The city-funded plan
cost $29,000.
It outlines the criteria, priorities and strategies of the wayfinding system. Phase 2 will
include the actual design and planning of the
system. Phase 3 will involve implementation
of the program over multiple phases of fabrication and installation of various wayfinding
tools, she says.
“The next step will be to identify funding
opportunities, so that we can move forward
with Phases 2 and 3,” she says.
The Master Plan focuses on Eugene’s

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1 8 OP E N FO R BUSI N ESS | EUGEN E AREA CH AMB ER O F COM M ERC E
86518_MWMC_ERpldg_7_735x4_8125c.indd 1

downtown core with potential for future
expansion to a larger geographic area. The
general project area is bounded by the Willamette River to the north, 13th Avenue to the
south, Washington/Jefferson to the west, and
Hilyard Street to the east.
With the goal of making downtown
more accessible and easier to navigate, the
Master Plan calls for: reducing sign clutter
and establishing a consistent visual theme
that will aid visitors; enhancing multi-modal
transportation efforts, including auto, bicycle
and pedestrian paths; and supporting a “parkonce” philosophy.
While multiple public parking opportunities exist downtown, finding them and convincing people to walk a few blocks to their
destination is another thing, says Pettus-Czar.
“What’s available is not advertised well,” he
says. “And there’s a lot of confusion and lack
of consistency over metered and non-metered
parking.”
Portland, he says, does a good job advertising their public parking garages. Those who
live there or visit know that if they drive, they
will be parking in a garage and walking or biking to their final destination.
It will take a change in mindset for Eugeneans to understand and accept that they can’t
always park right in front of the place where
they want to eat or shop when they come
downtown.
Bennett agrees. “As a community, we’re
going to have to change our attitude about
parking in garages and being OK with having
to walk a block or two.”
Wayfinding strategists recommended the
creation of a “Park Eugene” logo that could be
used across a variety of communication tools,
as well as directional signage and parking
signs to help drivers find their way. An electronic guidance system with real-time parking
vacancy information, accessible via a mobile
app, was also suggested.
Overall cost, including signs and infrastructure can be expensive, Grube says.
Parking was just one of the many pieces
to the wayfinding plan. The integration of art,
playfulness, interactivity and/or other unique
qualities will also help set downtown Eugene
apart from other communities and contribute
to Eugene’s sense of place, say strategists.
Establishing an effective wayfinding system can help establish trust and confidence in
people who visit, and it reinforces a sense of
place and local identity that encourages explo-

ration and discovery. It also makes it easier for
people to find their way to downtown business, whether their destination is downtown
or whether they’re headed to a football game,
says Kim Mast, wayfinding project manager
with the City of Eugene.
The hope is that the overall system will
be well received, artistic, useful and seamless
for the public. “We want it to be uniquely
Eugene,” Mast says.

Downtown business owners recognize
that there are still challenges to overcome
downtown, but believe it’s moving in the right
direction and are excited about what could be
on the horizon.
“So much negative stigma still exists with
downtown, but the landscape has completely
changed from what it was, yet there’s still so
much we can do,” says Pettus-Czar.
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Chamber of
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19

PORTLAND EUGENE SALEM
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800.315.4172

COVER STORY

Downtown is poised for possibilities
In addition to a new convention center,
year-round farmers market and improved
wayfinding, Thomas Pettus-Czar, Rob Bennett Jr. and Jenette Kane say they would like
to see the future include the following.
Arts Incubator

Create a downtown space for artist residencies, arts education, community-based arts
projects, as well as exhibitions, performances
and talks.
In other communities, arts incubators have

proven to stimulate economic growth, says
Pettus-Czar.

if we’re going to be a technology hub,’” Bennett says.

High-Speed Fiber Build-Out

Innovation Lab

Expand high-speed fiber Internet to
downtown buildings. The Broadway Commerce building and The Woolworth building
on Willamette Street were the first downtown
buildings to connect in June 2015. Reliable,
high-speed fiber Internet allows local businesses to compete in the global marketplace.
“We need to get serious about adding fiber

Provide a creative place for students and
tech innovators to collaborate on special
projects. “A specialized workforce is needed
to support our tech companies,” Kane says.
“Creating a high-tech space for students and
entrepreneurs to collaborate would promote
learning, provide employment opportunities
and further our tech sector.”

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Park Blocks Facelift

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that can take you
where you want to go

Make upgrades to Park Blocks where
Saturday Market is held, so that it’s more welcoming, usable and conducive to its use. “It’s a
very tired space—a lot of aesthetic improvements could be made,” says Pettus-Czar.
Public Art

Bring more public art to downtown. Ideas
have included bringing back and creating
more of the giant Ducks that were made by
local artists as a fundraiser several years ago.
“There are a lot of logistics involved in making that happen, but it would be a great way
to create a more family-friendly atmosphere
downtown,” Kane says.
Retail Mix

Generate a mix of local, regional and
national businesses downtown. Local business owners say the right mix of reputable,
well-known retailers and restaurants side by
side with local businesses is best way to bring
people downtown. “Memorable communities
have great downtowns,” says Bennett. “Having basic services and specialty retail within
walking distance makes living and working
downtown easier and more enjoyable, and it
creates a lot of positive energy.”

Jim Mountain

Sharon Rudnick

Susan Marmaduke

Bill Gary

Firm Ranked Tier 1 in Eugene
Commercial Litigation
Employment Law for Management

Workforce Housing

Establish downtown workforce housing
to promote a live-here, work-here, play-here
environment for families, young professionals
and retirees. “When you have people living
downtown, it becomes more of a neighborhood—public safety improves and people
really start to care about it. And that’s what
more and more people want these days, convenience, walkability and more of an urbansustainable life,” says Pettus-Czar.
Eugene Area
Chamber of
Commerce

2 0 OP E N FO R BUSI N ESS | EUGEN E AREA CH AMB ER O F COM M ERC E

Firm Ranked Tier 1 in Portland

Appellate Law
Administrative/Regulatory Law
Commercial Litigation
Professional Malpractice Law for Defendants
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21

BUSINESSNEWS

BUSINESSNEWS

Promotions/
New Hires

Shelton Turnbull expanded their team and
welcomed Jeff Estuesta, President; Sarah
Evans, Marketing Manager; Steve Light,
Senior Sales Account Manager; and Heather
Standifer, Administrative Specialist. The
company also launched a new website to
support their growing business.

Photos appear left to right from top. Names
in bold indicate Eugene Area Chamber of
Commerce members. If you are interested in
joining the Chamber, please contact Cedric
Rudd. cedricr@eugenechamber.com

Systems West
Engineers named
Steven Savich as
Associate. He is a
10-year veteran of the
firm and specializes
in the design of plumbing systems for
laboratory, medical and commercial
facilities, with a LEED accreditation.
Amber Keen, Kristin Short and Michelle
Corona were promoted to Assistant Vice
Presidents at Pacific Continental Bank.
Amber works at the bank’s Olive Street
office. Kristin works at the Gateway office
in Springfield. Michelle works at the bank’s
West 7th Avenue office.

Jones & Roth CPAs and Business
Advisors announced Adrienne Beck
joined the firm as a Senior Accountant.
She holds a BS in Accounting with a
minor in Business Law from Pennsylvania
State University and comes to the firm
with assurance expertise. Theron Sikora
joined the firm as a Senior Accountant.
He holds a BA in English and a BA in
Business from Western Oregon University.
His expertise includes tax preparation,
business consulting, tax planning, and
bookkeeping for small clients.
Lindsay Maghan, FNP joined the
medical staff of Serenity Lane, a
nonprofit treatment center for alcohol
and other drug dependencies, with an
inpatient specialty hospital and residential
facility in Eugene.

Monica Parvin joined KPD Insurance as
Accounting Manager. Monica obtained her
bachelor’s degree in accounting from the
University of Oregon and has had a career
in accounting and management. Chish
Courtney also joined KPD as Human
Resources Manager. She brings over 17
years of experience in human resources
and three HR designations.
King Estate Winery
hired longtime public
relations leader Jenny
Ulum as its Managing
director of Strategic
Communications.
In this new role she will oversee all
marketing, public relations and public
affairs work for the winery’s brands,
including King Estate, North by Northwest
and Acrobat.

Grace Brown joined
RE/MAX Integrity in
Eugene. She also serves as
the 2015 Springfield Board
of Realtors President-Elect.
Richard L. Larson joined
the law firm of Hutchinson
Cox as Of Counsel. He
focuses on estate planning,
probate, business and real
property issues.
Isler CPA hired Joseph
Lewis as a Tax Partner.
Joseph has a broad
background as an Attorney
and CPA.

Sharon Thomson joined PacificSource
Health Plans as Executive Vice President of
Community Strategy and Marketing. She will
oversee government and community relations
and provider network management.

“It can be hard to squeeze
fItness Into my schedule but It’s
manageable when everythIng I
need Is In one place.”

As a CEO, wife and mother, it’s easy to see how fitness
could take a backseat to Sabrina’s demanding schedule if
she let it. With new equipment, inclusive classes, laundry
service, unlimited towels, and childcare all in one place,
Sabrina is able to make the most of the little time she has.

Sabrina Parsons, CEO, Palo Alto Software
DAC Member Since 2013

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2 2 OP E N FO R BUSI N ESS | EUGEN E AREA CH AMB ER O F COM M ERC E

S. “Brad” Smith, joined PeaceHealth Medical
Group as an Audiologist with the ear, nose and
throat team at the University District clinic.
He earned a doctorate in audiology at Salus
University and a master’s in audiology at the
University of Tennessee. He has more than 12
years clinical audiology experience. Thomas
Forestieri, a Physician Assistant, joined the
diabetes, endocrine and metabolism team at
the clinic. He completed the MEDEX Northwest
physician assistant program at the University
of Washington School of Medicine, where he
earned a bachelor’s degree in clinical health
services.

Our new HVAC system
saves energy and keeps
our members and
employees comfortable.
— LEED Building Team,
Northwest Community
Credit Union

Tony Kopki was promoted to Vice President
of Commercial Programs at PacificSource
Health Plans. He will provide strategic product
and market leadership.

Save energy and operating costs with support from
Eugene Water & Electric Board. Learn more about
EWEB’s business programs including facility loans,
special rates for expanding facilities and rebates at
eweb.org/growthretention.

D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 5 /J A N U A R Y 2 0 1 6

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23

Tap into Summit Bank’s
SBA DIVISION.

BUSINESSNEWS

BUSINESSNEWS

Michael Landsberg is the new Chef at
Oregon Electric Station. He is a graduate of
The Culinary Institute of America and comes
from King Estate.

Ashley Espinoza rejoined Josh Gourley’s
State Farm Insurance office. Ashley is a
bilingual Office Associate.

Christie Wells is now the Business
Development Manager for The Arc of Lane
County, under Angela Phinney.
Lindsay Welborn joined Hayden Homes.
Deus Machine, LLC hired Marti Gaiter as
Director of Marketing and Sales.

Jeff Althouse

Ashley Horner

Founder Oakshire Brewing

SBA Program Administrator

Contact Ashley today!

ashley.horner@summitbanksba.com
541.684.7500
MEMBER FDIC
SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION DIVISION

Premier Security
promoted Zach Baker
to Operations Manager,
a new position created
in response to business
growth. Zach recently
returned from a one year tour in Afghanistan.
Kori Murphy joined Potter
Manufacturing as an
Account Executive in their
Commercial Division. She
brings with her more than
18 years of experience in
commercial printing.

Nicholas R. Balthrop joined Gaydos,
Churnside & Bathrop, PC as an
Associate Attorney.
Kirk Martin’s State
Farm Agency added
Jingjing Qiu as a
Marketing Intern.
Jingjing is from China
and a marketing
major at the University of Oregon due to
graduate this spring.
Kristi LeBlanc joined Therapeutic
Associates Physical Therapy at
Crescent Village as a Physical Therapist
Assistant and Licensed Massage
Therapist. LeBlanc has a background in
myofascial release and sports massage.
Jenny Vielleux joined Therapeutic
Associates West Eugene Physical
Therapy Clinic as a Physical Therapist
Assistant. She earned a PTA degree at
Flathead Community College in Montana.

The #1 Whipple Real Estate Team
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is ready to work for you!

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PBP Insurance hired Anna Johnson as
a Commercial Lines & Bonds Producer.
She has more than 10 years of experience
as a customer service representative in
commercial insurance. Michele MelloGonzales was hired as a Personal Lines
& Individual Health Benefits Producer.
Her career is supported with 17 years of
experience. Kimberlee DeVault joined as
a COO Executive Assistant. She has over 18
years of accounting and customer service
experience and recently acquired her
property and casualty insurance license.
Gladys Boutwell was hired as an Individual
Health Benefits Producer. She is bilingual and
biliterate in English and Spanish.

Funk/Levis & Associates has two new
team members. Cally Deal was hired as
an Account Manager. She has an MBA
from the University of Oregon and a BA in
Sports Management from the University
of Michigan. Kayla Gordon was hired
as an Account Assistant. She is a recent
graduate of the University of Oregon and
works with social media platforms and
techniques.

Announcements
& Kudos
Seneca Jones Timber Company
received two awards from the Oregon
Department of Forestry, one for its
effort to protect wetlands during timber
harvests, and another for cooperating
with the Oregon Department of Forestry’s
Incident Management Team during the
Cable Crossing Fire.

Travel Lane County received a Best Idea
Program award from the Destination
Marketing Association of the West.
Their entry was “MIKE the Bike,” a visitor
center bike designed to bring its brand
to an audience that doesn’t frequent
traditional visitor centers.

Eugene Airport Director Tim Doll, AAE
was named Airport Director of the Year
by the Oregon Airport Management
Association. The award recognizes and
honors his accomplishments in the
airport and aviation industry. Doll has
been director at the Eugene Airport
since April 2007. Cathryn Stephens,
A.A.E., Assistant Airport Manager of
the Eugene Airport was elected Second
Vice-President of the Northwest Chapter
of the American Association of Airport
Executives for 2015-2016.
Jennifer Evans of Trio Property
Management Inc. was awarded the RMP®
(Residential Management Professional)
designation from the National Association
of Residential Property Managers
(NARPM®). Trio Property Management
Inc. specializes in middle to higher-end
single family homes up to four-plexes.

RAIN
grows
BUSINESS
We are proud
to partner with
the Eugene
Area Chamber
of Commerce
on the Regional

Oregon Imaging Center added 3D
mammography to their practice in Lane
County. The new technology vastly
improves the detection of breast cancer
and greatly reduces the number of false
alarms.

Accelerator

The Science Factory Children’s
Museum opened Sportsology, a traveling
exhibition focused on the science of
sports, health and nutrition. It will be on
display until January 10. The Science
Factory will also have 4 weeks of laser
light shows in the planetarium beginning
December 12.

to cultivate new

Northwest Community Credit Union
announced LEED® Gold certification of its
new support center building by the U.S.
Green Building Council. The building was
designed by Eugene-based architects
Rowell-Brokaw.

and Innovation
Network (RAIN)
businesses in
Eugene.

research.uoregon.edu/rain

Number of Homes Sold by Top 25 Realtors/Realtor Teams in Eugene/Springfield 1998-2014
*Based on RMLS combined in-company Home sales 1998-2014.

2 4 OP E N FO R BUSI N ESS | EUGEN E AREA CH AMB ER O F COM M ERC E

D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 5 /J A N U A R Y 2 0 1 6

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25

BUSINESSNEWS

BUSINESSNEWS

GloryBee Foods Inc. was awarded 960
points out of a possible 1000 in an audit
by the American Institute of Baking.
The score is the highest earned in the
company’s 40-year history.

The Princeton Review named the
University of Oregon’s Lundquist
School of Business the number one
“Green MBA” program in the nation for
2016.

Katharine Gallagher was named
President of the 2015-16 board of
directors for Parenting Now. She is
joined by President Elect, Laura Illig,
Corinthian Consulting; Secretary, Carrie
Hellwig Christopher, Hershner Hunter;
Treasurer, R L Widmer, Moss Adams, and
Past President, Rachelle Bunnao Villano,
DDS. Celeste Edman, Lunar Logic, also
joined the board.

Kathy Smith, Principal of KJ Smith
Associates, was recognized for excellence
in facilitation practices for her work with
the Lane Blood Center on the strategic
affiliation decision-making process.
Kathy’s work led the organization to
affiliate with Bloodworks Northwest, a
regional nonprofit blood network.

Datalogic was selected by the
Association for Automatic
Identification and Mobility as winner
of the international 2015 Automatic
Identification and Data Capture case
study competition. The company
produces bar code readers, data collection
mobile computers and vision systems.

Heather Brinton, Director of
University of Oregon School of Law’s
Environmental and Natural Resources
Law Center, received the 2015 Oregon
Bar Association President’s Sustainability
Award for leading seven theme-based
interdisciplinary research projects that
center on concepts of sustainability,
research, and analysis.

The Duck Store and University of
Oregon Brand Management are
accepting applications to the Oregon
Incubator Program. The program is
designed to provide new entrepreneurs
and businesses with the resources to
bring an idea for a licensed product to
reality. 

King Estate Winery won their 2nd
consecutive KEGGY award from Free
Flow Wines, recognizing exceptional and
sustainable wine on tap programs. More
than four million wine bottles were saved
from landfills last year by using kegs and
King Estate is responsible for more than 12
percent of that savings.

BRING Recycling placed 11th of the
small nonprofits ranked on the 100 Best
Nonprofits to Work For in Oregon 2015.
BRING earned the top score for nonprofits
of all sizes in the Eugene-Springfield area.
BRING also announced Laughing Crow
Salon, PIVOT Architecture, KRVM and
Equinox Real Estate Agency earned
RE:think Business certifications in
September and October.

New Members

Paul Nielson of Isler CPA earned the
Certified Fraud Examiner designation
from the Association of Certified Fraud
Examiners. This designation requires
passing four exams and meeting
character, experience, and education
criteria.

When you join the Eugene Area Chamber of
Commerce, you become part of a vibrant
and prosperous community of creative
entrepreneurs, forward-thinking innovators
and visionary business leaders.  We’re
pleased to welcome these new members
who have chosen to take advantage of the
Chamber’s tools, resources and expansive
network to grow their businesses:
Belle Sorelle
www.thebellesorelle.com

Benjamin Dieter Photography

Saving Lives and
Helping Put Families
Back Together!
Serenity Lane has been treating individuals
suffering from the disease of addiction since
1973, creating tens of thousands of success
stories. We have now outgrown the facility
that has served us for more than 40 years.
Our new Coburg campus will double our
capacity, allowing us to save more lives.
Give us a call to learn about the plans for
the future of Serenity Lane.

SERENITY LANE

alcohol & drug treatment
Call us to schedule a tour
of our new campus!
Mike Dyer, President &
CEO of Serenity Lane

2 6 OP E N FO R BUSI N ESS | EUGEN E AREA CH AMB ER O F COM M ERC E

541-284-8609
serenitylane.org

D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 5 /J A N U A R Y 2 0 1 6

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27

BUSINESSNEWS
Bryan LaBar

Kaiser Permamente

Cascade Precision Painting

www.healthy.kaiserpermanente.org

Lane County Dental Society

www.cascadepaints.com

Cravings Fine Foods / The Country Inn
Event Center
www.cravingsfinefoods.com
www.eugenecountryinn.com

Deus Machine LLC

www.lanedentalsociety.org

LPL Financial
www.bielefeldtfinancial.com

Mindfulness at Work
www.elsvanderhorst.com

www.deusmachine.com

My Party Bus LLC

Dr. Alison Cadaret, DDS
www.riverbend-dental.com

Elwood Staffing

www.my-partybus.net

OMT Mortgage

State Farm Insurance-Mike SchroppFoya
www.mikemysfagent.com

Tailwind - EUG LLC (Eugene Airport F &
B Concessionaire)
The Springs at Greer Gardens
www.thespringsliving.com

The Starlight Lounge
http://on.fb.me/1GTEaa9

Tradesmen International
www.tradesmeninternational.com
Eugene Area
Chamber of
Commerce

www.omtmortgage.com

www.elwoodstaffing.com

Oregon Retina, LLP

Emanuel Construction LLC

www.oregonretina.org

Gorilla Soft LLC

RenewToSell

www.gorillasoftnw.com

www.renew2sell.com/approach.html

Halo Aviation, LLC

River Run Place

haloaviation.net

www.enlivant.com

InJoy Wellness

State Farm Insurance-Jason Stefely

www.injoywellnessmassage.com

www.jasoninsures.com

“We are excited that we have
a team of experts to help market
our business online!”
With The Register-Guard, we can target
our customers wherever they are. Between
the daily newspaper, special sections,
registerguard.com, extended digital buys,
and the new website they created for us, we
invest more of our advertising budget than
ever with The Register-Guard.
We are excited that we have a group of
experts to help market our business online!
The R-G team is tech and business savvy,
sales oriented, and understands the
digital space we do business in today.
They manage our online campaign on
hundreds of top websites for our home
and garden shows.

We have great plans
for your business.

They are monitoring and adjusting
the campaign in real time, and their
campaign reporting helps us monitor
our investment.

As a true community health plan—
started by local doctors—Trillium offers
a popular range of comprehensive, lowcost health plans. Dial in the dollars, and
choose a plan that’s right for you. We’re
20-plus years old and 100,000 members
strong. It’s a smart local call.

The Register-Guard provides us with
the expertise to stay competitive in a
digital world.
Karen Ramus
Show Director
Berg Productions, Inc.
Eugene Home Show

hink well. Be well.™

541-431-1950

800-910-3906

trilliumchp.com

Terry Coplin, CEO &
David Cole, CFO
Trillium Community
Health Plan

2 8 OP E N FO R BUSI N ESS | EUGEN E AREA CH AMB ER O F COM M ERC E

TRG

We’ll help your business succeed online.
Contact your Register-Guard account executive or
D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 5 /J A N U A R Y 2 0 1 6 | O P E N F O R B U S I N E S S
Director of Digital Solutions Tyler Mack at 541-338-2291 or tyler.mack@registerguard.com

29

New nonstop
EUG to San Jose

LAST CALL BY DAVE HAUSER

Connecting the Silicon Shire to the Silicon Valley

The Chamber enthusiastically supports the proposed 2 East Broadway (2EB) mixed-use project.

Remarkable progress, yet
much more work to be done
The Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce believes that a healthy downtown is important to business. It is an
important symbol of our community’s economic health, quality of life, and self-esteem. In addition, today, more
than ever before, attracting and retaining talent to fuel new economic opportunities is vital. Cities with fun,
active, vibrant downtowns clearly have a leg-up in attracting and keeping the creative class, the talent that will
drive the next economy.
Downtown Eugene has made remarkable strides recently.
With outstanding support from the City of Eugene, developers,
DEI, the Eugene Chamber and many others there has been over
$300 million invested in our downtown over the past five years.
It is astounding to reflect on the long list of projects completed
or are underway. These new investments have brought residents,
students, businesses, people and positive energy to downtown.
While we are proud of what has been accomplished, we know
the journey to a great downtown is far from complete. That is
why our Chamber enthusiastically supports the proposed 2 East
Broadway (2EB) mixed-use project. The proposed six-story,
multi-use building would include market-rate apartments and
open, accessible ground floor rental space. The project proposes
to purchase the Broadway Plaza/Kesey Square from the City
of Eugene.
• 2EB would build on the momentum currently underway in
downtown. More housing and additional retail space are key to
continued downtown progress.
• The corner of Broadway and Willamette represents the
center of downtown Eugene and it currently only has three
corners that are active year-round. 2EB will allow for greater,

3 0 OP E N FO R BUSI N ESS | EUGEN E AREA CH AMB ER O F COM M ERC E

more inclusive activity at the main downtown intersection and
in the process, helping to support the many new restaurants and
retail businesses around it.
• While 2EB would displace underutilized public plaza in
the core, downtown will see a net increase and improvement in
public space with projects such as the new City Hall complete
with a public plaza roughly twice the size of Kesey Square, a
long overdue renovation of the Park Blocks, better use of the
Hult Center Plaza and ultimately a new riverfront park as a
component of the EWEB redevelopment.
• The 2EB development team is made of local business
people who are enduring champions of downtown Eugene.
Progress is rarely achieved without change. We believe that
the 2EB projects represents the kind of positive change that
can result in another important step in the journey toward a
downtown that is a fun, active, vibrant asset to attract and keep
talent that drives economic prosperity.
Eugene Area
Chamber of
Commerce

Dave Hauser is the President and CEO of the Eugene Area
Chamber of Commerce – a position he has held since September of
1991.

D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 5 /J A N U A R Y 2 0 1 6

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OPEN FOR BUSINESS

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PO Box 1107
Eugene, OR 97440-1107

SCOTT WRIGHT, PARTNER

Professional
Holding our commitment to client service in the highest regard
Scott Wright and the team at Kernutt Stokes take a unique approach to client
service – understanding that our job as accountants is to help our clients achieve
the next level of financial success.
Contact Kernutt Stokes to see what possibilities we can find for your business.

Certified Public Accountants & Consultants
1600 Executive Parkway, Suite 110, Eugene, Oregon 97401 | 541.687.1170 | kernuttstokes.com