Deadwood Free Press Vol.

3 Issue 2

April 1, 1879

Vol. 3 Issue 2

April 1, 1879

DeaDwooD in ashes

Mining Town Nearly Destroyed by Fire, Estimated Loss of $2,000,000 Few Buildings Left Standing Including Newspaper and Church, Confirming God Does Have Sense of Humor Residents Powerless to Stop Flames, Hundreds Homeless and Destitute
A fire broke out this morning in the Star Bakery, on Sherman Street, at 2:20 o’clock, and following that thoroughfare swept everything before it in Lee, Main, Gold, Wall, Patton, and William streets, and several residences in Continental-avenue. Fanned by a light breeze, and with nothing to contend with except a very inefficient Fire Department, everything was at the mercy of the flames. Less than a score of pronounced fireproof warehouses withstood the severe test. The buildings, being mostly of wood and poorly constructed, burned like so much tinder. The fire spread with such wonderful rapidity that any attempt to save anything would have been useless. All along its course terrific explosions of gunpowder, petroleum, liquor, etc... were of frequent occurrence. Buildings were blown into atoms, and among the first things de stroyed were the hook and ladder apparatus and hose carriage, leaving unscathed only a few feet of worthless hose with which to battle against the flumes. The new waterworks, which were tried yesterday for the first time, were put to their full capacity, but with little success in subduing the flames, on account of the scarcity of the water. The hillsides were almost a solid sheet of flame, and water from the boulder ditch could not be had; otherwise much property would probably have been saved, as the ditch ran almost directly over the worst spot. Indeed, our geography came to haunt us: Deadwood is situated in a gulch, with a few houses scattered on the sides of the hills. When once on fire, a draft would be created, and no ordinary agency could prevent the town’s total destruction. The wind blew a gale from the south. In a short time the general effort for the salvation of the town was given up and every one was making frantic efforts to save his own movable property. In a few momenta the flames had passed from Sherman Street northward to the principal hotel in the city, and the guests, about 75 in number, had barely time to escape before the hotel, a fine three-story frame building, was a mass of flames. In less than 30 minutes Main Street was reached, and a mad flight took place, with no organized fighting of the fire. Men, women, and children rushed up the street, some with goods, and others only struggling to get out of the way of the advancing flames. From this time on the fire had its own way. and swept a clean path, only stopping for want of material at the lower end of Main Street, leaving only a few fire-proof buildings. In the hardware store of Jensen, Bliss & Co. a lot of powder exploded with startling noise, hurling missiles in ail directions, fortunately without fatal effect. The wildest excitement prevailed on account of the fearful force of the flames, and people thought of little besides saving their own lives, hundreds escaping with only their clothing. Every team within miles of the city was called into service to help save what could be got out. There are probably about 2,000 people who are homeless, and many are destitute. About 125 buildings, besides 50 or 60 dwellings, were destroyed, and, while it is utterly impos sible to get any definite figures regarding the loss, well-informed business men place it at from $1,500,000 to $2,000,000. The fire is still burning, but all its material is exhausted, and there is no danger of its spreading, unless an unfavorable change in the wind should come. Several of the firms whoso fireproof buildings were saved, have posted notices that they will open up for business in them on Saturday. Lumber is being hauled rapidly, and building will begin as soon as the debris can be cleared away, and in a more substantial way than before. Most of the merchants who have lost their wooden stores will erect brick ones in their stead. Labor is in great demand. A meeting was held by prominent citizens this afternoon, prompted by numerous thieving operations since the fire broke out and the many cases of lot-jumping, at which Judge Eun presided. It was decided to call upon Geo. Sturgis, commanding at Fort Meade, for a company of troops to guard the property of the sufferers by the fire. The request was promptly complied with, and a company of cavalry was at once sent here, together with 10 wagons and 2 ambulances to transport the destitute citizens to Fort Mead, where they will be furnished with camps and rations, which kind offer
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Deadwood Free Press Vol. 3 Issue 2

April 1, 1879

DeaDwooD in ashes...
was made by Gen. Sturgis. All saloons are closed by order of the Sheriff, and the city presents an unusually quiet appearance. A Citizens’ Committee of Safety, numbering seven, was also appointed at today’s meeting, which will assist the Sheriff in preserving the peace. Evildoers, if caught, will be speedily dealt with. A proposition to organize a vigilance committee, 100 strong, proposed by Mr. Streeter, was voted down. The Post Office, which was destroyed, lost $3,000 in postage stamps and stamped envelopes, but no mail was destroyed, and coaches are running regularly with the daily mails. Many kind offers of assistance have been made by Eastern merchants, but will hardly be accepted, as merchants bear their losses with the best possible grace, and are not inclined to place themselves under any obligations, at the same time appreciating the willing offers made by Eastern houses in all branches of trade. Surviving houses have not taken advantage of the necessity of the hour by advancing prices on staple goods, and, as was generally expected, prices remain as usual. ((The preceding was from the Real Life New Y ork Times, with one exception, and the rest is from other press accounts)) We note with interest how other newspapers have reported our tragedy: Bismarck, Dakota, .—The burning of Almost every class of business is represented in Main and Sherman streets, and all have a great rush of custom. Prices have not advanced except in very few instances, where the demand for some articles was creator than the supply, and. in such cases, the advance has been slight. All of the daily papers are being issued on small sheets, struck off at Lend City and Central. They contain little else than news of the fire. Lumber is being hauled in by every available team in this vicinity, and it is bringing $4 per 1,000 feet. Mills are running night and day, but not enough can be brought in to supply the demand. Some persons had Deadwood this morning threw all Dakota into a tremor of excitement. The town was the richest and largest in the Territory. No details can be received during the day. The military telegraph line was occupied all day with commercial messages ordering stocks of goods and preparing for the emergency that was threatening the homeless people. The Deadwood operator took up his station on a bluff a mile and a half from the ruined town, and contented himself with the head of a barrel for a desk. Gen. Sturgis, commanding at Fort Meade, 20 miles ; away, early responded to the cry of the sufferers, and tendered them shelter at the barracks and rations. St. Paul, Minn.—There is much excitement in St. Paul over the burning of Deadwood, as large commercial, mining, and transportation interests there are controlled by capitalists in this city. Advices are still too incomplete to indicate the losses. Blakely & Carpenter, proprietors of a stage line from Bismarck, state that their principal office is not destroyed, and the loss probably is not great. The insurance will certainly be in small proportion to the loss. Deadwood has been regarded as a precarious point, and avoided by cautious companies. Further reports of Deadwood, right before press time, as the fire has died: shanties erected within five hours from the time of the outbreak of the fire. All day long, telegrams have been pouring in offering stocks of goods, money, clothing, food, etc... but as yet nothing but merchandise has been accepted. No relief committee has been organized yet, and probably none will be organized. The people who are bankrupt and homeless do not want to accept aid from the outside world. Merchants and others are very generous, being able and willing to stand their share of the burden. Competent judges place the loss at fully $3,000,000, although some time must elapse before exact figures can be

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Deadwood Free Press Vol. 3 Issue 2

April 1, 1879

eDitorial
We Shall Rebuild
What? Y feel discouraged, pioneer? ou Remember you are of America. We laugh in the face of fire. Y think a lil smolderou ing timbers can set us back? No! We shall rebuild. Every major town has been cleared by fire, including my own home of San Francisco, and it only means we rebuild stronger. Y think a few smoldering ruins ou can set back Deadwood? No! When the railroad arrives in a year or two (well, maybe three) it shall find a town made of brick. This wood was only temporary, and we all knew it. Y think a fire is something in our hisou tory? HA! Remember our history .... Well there was Wild Bill getting shot in the back, Sheriff Dazar’s corpse getting dug up and hung from the balcony of the Bella, Marrant Vita and five orphans dying in a fire, Darren Darkstone holding the whole town hostage while he bet up Sheriff Dazar’s son and Jeni Trefusis holding a gun at several women like Mahalia Bertrand and FaithMay, Cameo killing half the town, sometimes more than once, Miss Addison Leigh being taken hostage, Miss Sal has to teach dozens of prospective whores how to perform oral sex, Santa Claus burning down the Phoenix, Rev. Henry Smith killed in cold blood, Phaeton Perra killing lots of miners, Mr. Densmith trying to take over the Bella Union, them Mormon women who set fire to the Gem all the time, John Tanner menacing all sorts of people and having a bloody hook suspended above the butcher’s for interrogating people, all sorts of snipers who either stayed in town one day or had to be hunted down, approximately 307 men who pretended to be priests but turned out to be rapists and killers, a certain editor’s wife cooking people into pies, Miss Sal telling one irritating person who kept trying to get laid and threatening to kill himself that he couldn’t get laid in a whorehouse, and her parrot kept repeating that every time the fellow came around, Mayor Clay cutting off a half dozen heads, Miss Jemima works 24 hours a day in the Gem for 18 months and becomes Snow Queen, Mrs. Dio Kuhr cutting off dozens of testicles, Miss Jeni sleeping with enough men to populate Chicago, Mr. Shakespeare threatening everyone all over, little girls kidnapping a boy’s bear, all sorts of mysterious royal visitors with one dire idea or other, Mr. String threatening to break the union, the union threatening to break Mr. String, considerable amounts of just awful dancing, a whiskey riot in which a fella was killed, Coodnank Thibedeau talking to unseen spirits, Miss Cookie talking to the dead, Silas Acker being .... Silas which was bad enough, the Phoenix Hotel being robbed, Miss Sal ruling over the Bella and shootin up the misbehaving, our Methodist minister shooting highwaymen down in the street, Jeni Trefusis gunned down in China Alley, Estwee made pie after pie after pie after pancake after pancake and made so many of us fat, a mystic calls forth Wild Bill at Rod Eun’s No. 10, Blackjack Landar and Miss Daisy gunned down in the Gem, Mister Bu’s pigs looking awful plump sometimes, bodies stacked three people deep in the icehouse, Ron Xi having to shoot down all sort of people to keep the law, Pancho robbing people right and left afore he was finally run out of town, two complete morons who talked potty talk over and over and over until they were run out of town over and over and over, playwright Wild Bill Finkelstein shot dead during a performance of his play at the Bella, Sheriff Glen is murdered, Billie Whitman dealt faro till her fingers bled or maybe it was just her customers’ needs, Miss Sal’s parrot disappearing, former Gov. Pennington perving over our women, Badger Bagley slapping all sorts of people, Doc Morri getting shot hourly there for awhile, a young man trying to shoot down the entire City Council only to be killed first by Mr. Densmith, Cheyenne Wilder’s body is set ablaze after his death, Mr. and Mrs. Westland leading a march on the Free Press and demanding Mr. Streeter be lynched for committing comments about Mrs. Westland’s breasts to print, the charity auction held by Miss Dufaux in which bachelors were sold off to charity for millions, Randal Carfield’s reign of bloody terror, Marshall Hawks discovering Miss Cyn and Mr. Cameo doing something on a bridge that involved more than driving a post, the enormous townwide personal problems of Doc Keli, Miss Munster, Miss Alex, Miss Capra, Miss Paxan, Miss Bedlam, the suicides of Starbuck Shippe, his being unusual only in that he did not come back, Cameo shoots the sheriff, the Pinkertons instill terror in union men and innocent people, several women arrive to meet husbands who end up dead and thus become eligible widows, shootists trying to kill JF and Lola Kanto a couple dozen times, Mr. Slade is murdered, Guru having children by the second, a librarian who changes his name by the hour and seems to always have blood under his fingernails, Alabama Jack keeps escaping from crimes, Joe Verwood repeatedly shoots up the town, the Dethly brothers shoot up the town, two English redcoats from the Revolutionary War show up to run for town council, Carrie Anne is nearly froze to death and loses toes, crazed killer Larsson finally gets his from Ron Xi, a miner turns away a young couple, they and their baby freeze in the snow and he is thus tried in miners court and hung, young Deac asks for work *a lot*, Deldrago Rieko kills two women while holding hostages during a bank robbery, bank teller Mr. Muggins is pistol-whipped causing mental deterioration in his razor sharp mind, Judge Mo is kidnapped, Dusty’s harp carpet, Jesus Christ, Doc Morpork never performs surgery sober, mortician Mackman Mauer enjoys dressing bodies a bit too much, Mayor Pel’s council meetings run wild and efforts to limit gun use become wildly controversial, his daughter Lucy shoots up several towns, Chinese women openly caged on the back streets, dead bodies follow Miss Taj around wherever she goes, the crazy Chinese Tong woman who insults all white people and beats people up while boxing, Sheriff Scara has to take down Scarface, Adiiniah Darkstone disappears, Roku offering to help recruit lawmen by screwing them if they stay in town long enough, the Furkels poisonous street carts, Sand Rau and others desperately try to save jail after Darenn Darkstone sets it afire, Seth disappears from the Gem .... To name a few problems. If we have survived all that, can’t we survive a small fire?

Citizens gather to discuss future of town after fire Continued from page 2 obtained. Tho bank vaults were opened today, and the contents were found intact. The chronometers on the timelocks were still running. Both banks will open Monday. All that was saved of the county records, etc... was one set of books from the Treasurer’s office, The assessment rolls were all destroyed, and at a meeting of the County Commissioners this afternoon a new assessment Was ordered as soon as possible. Strong guards are on duty at the bank vaults, the outer doors of which were left unlocked, and no one is allowed to pass without being recognized,

Editor and Publisher Neil Streeter Reporter Addison Leigh Contributing Writer D. A. Kuhr Typesetter S. Morigi

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Deadwood Free Press Vol. 3 Issue 2

April 1, 1879

Dethly Dies for DastarDly Doings
Sheriff’s Killer Hangs High after Trial with Low Points
After a fair and impartial of trial among people clearly impatient for his death, the vile killer Clint Dethly was hung in penalty for crimes both known and surely many unknown. The beast, known for a variety of crimes including the murder of Sheriff Glen Devon and the despoiling of young comely virgins, died unrepentant. The villain before trial was cool as the proverbial cucumber, trying to banter with his jailors. “Uh, if only one of these uhh deputies let me out for some fresh air before the trial...” he stated, quite unsuccessfully. The one thing the fellow did get right before trial was representation, attorney Rampart Vasser. Mr Vasser said he was retained by Mr. Daniel Densmith who said he deplored the sheriff’s death but felt any accused man was entitled to representation. The crowd was well aware the man would hang after a fair trial, and there was a lot of excitement. The poor man was unlucky, as somehow between his holding cell at the jail and the courthouse, he lost two teeth and bled profusely from the mouth. As he was seated in the courthouse, the defendant’s attorney handed him a letter that the attorney claimed was set to Dethly by one “Sister Mary Elizabeth Jesus Murphy.” The attorney claimed the letter wished him well for his bad situation and thanked him for care of oprhans he had once provided “and the other nuns send their love as well and thank you for all the money you’ve sent them.” That said, even people with good eyesight said they never did actually see a letter. Another attorney, Judge Tristanne Gallagher, was pressed into service as prosecutor. It quickly became clear the evidence against Dethly, other than that we all know he did it, was threefold: he had threatened the sheriff, he had been wounded the day of the sheriff’s killing, and he possessed a ring that had belonged to the deceased. Gem owner Clay Kungler testified that he had purchased a ring from Dethly that, when cleaned, had the inner engraving “G.D.” Both the sheriff’s daughter, Joellen Buck Carter-Devon and the sheriff’s former wife testified that the ring beloged to the sheriff. Mr. Vasser attempted to suggest that rings look similar, and other people could have the initials G.D, but the ladies held firm that they recognized this ring. ”Sir, this ring never left my father’s person and he always wore it on his finger,” priest? “Ohh wonderful miss Granny....” the defendant said. “Did you not tell me that since you failed to become a priest, you have felt ashamed to tell the story which is why you did not reveal this and have led a life of ill repute and dissolution, and that you had to take the ring from this Fred, and if released you would make good on your promise and take the vow of Christian faith? And you say all this as you whisper Scripture to yourself in your cell and pray daily that you may be restored to the ring gave you by Granny Dethly?” “Bless her soul!’ the defendant shouted. Neither the judge nor Gallagher would have anything to do with the unsubstantiated story. “Do you have any family available that can testify that this ring was previously in the possession of your deceased grandmother?” Gallagher aked. “Your law keeps killin’ my family,” Dethly replied. It got grimmer under questioning from the judge, as it became clear that even with death a feew threads of rope away, the man could not lie further. “O course I hated the sheriff, he casted a blind eye to his deputies! … I hate you too, judge, but I ain’t killed you yet.” Judge Eun then got the defendant to claim another man had run out on him after the killing. Vasser attempted to end the questioning, saying, “Wait, Mr. Dethly, he’s got you confused … Y our honor, this man needs a rest.” “I think he’ll be getting plenty of rest.. to be sure,” Eun replied. At that point, the defendant became difficult to control, and he was swiftly moved to a scaffold by the jail. He was then hung, his last words unrepentant. “I hope you all fuckin’ die for letting muh brother die, he was a good man!” Dethly stated. As his body was swinging slowly, parents brought children by to show them what happens to a life poorly lived. “This is an excellent example of how we conduct justice and protect our citizens,” Judge Eun stated.

Kungler testified that Dethly was freshly injured on the day the sheriff tried to fight off his attacker or attackers, commenting as he looked at the defendant, “The very same right leg that is still bandaged ... by the looks of it I’d say the same bandage even.”
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stated the young miss. She also testified “on the day of the conversation that man stated he wanted vengeance for the death of his brother … he was blaming the death of his brother on my father.” The late man’s wife testified the very particular ring was “Dear to him, given to him by Carol Devon his late mother. It would take death to part him from the ring from his mother - she died in November and he broke hard ground with his Pa to bury her in Fargo.” Mr Dethly, in a desperate and what turned out to be pathetic effort to save his life, took the stand in his own defense. He claimed to have cheated, and then quickly corrected himself, to say he had won fairly the ring in a poker game. Dethly could only identify the man as one “Fred.” “I got word my brother Jesse was murdered at the jail house, and ain’t no one fuckin investigated it. The law just wants me dead like my brother. It’s a big cover up. And I hope you all rot in hell!” he added What drew us hence to walk these rugged hills? What force doth pull men out across the plains? with no apparent purDoes gold protect us from the bitter chills? pose except to anger Will fortune ward us from our hunger pains? the crowd. It was not a good strategy. Such questions have I asked myself at length A new twist was And pondered thusly well into the night added when the defense The quiet hours give one time to think lawyer, Mr. Vasser, And seek the answers hidden in the light claimed that Dethly had told him a different But therein doth the truth begin to out story before trial: “Mr The answer lies within the question asked Dethly, I am moved to Removed from the city’s noisome shout reveal what you told me The mind finds peace to focus on the task in confidence in the cell. I am sorry. But I must So drawn are we to find, beyond our fear, tell people the story of The peace to question what has drawn us here that ring. Did you not tell me that the initials Titus Shackleton on the ring stand for “Granny Devon?” The woman who raised you as a small boy? And that this man Fred had previously won it from you? “Uuhh yes,” Dethly responded. “Did you not tell me that Granny Devon A Mr. Grover Daniels says he has lost a gold ring and wishes it back. For a reward of gave you that ring and made you promise $50, enquire at the offices of the Deadwood Free Press. The ring is gold and engraved upon her death that you would become a inside with his initials, G. D.

Stillness

MISSING RING, REWARD

Deadwood Free Press Vol. 3 Issue 2

April 1, 1879

Continued from previous issues

The Perilous Journeys of Mary Sue Sweetlyness
A Husband Gained, A Brother Gained, Death Everywhere
By Miss Adele Leeland
Mary Sue Sweetliness stared vacantly as she passed through the trackless sea of waving grass that reached out gently, swiping her legs and arms with arid fingertips. If the prairie held any eyes that followed her slow and swaying gate, it kept this secret. Along the trail, her once smooth foot cast mindlessly along a faint indentation in the grass that might have been the receding tracks of a preceding wagon or completely imaginary in her scattered recognition. For Mary Sue trod her path seemingly without benefit of rational thought. Her clothing tattered nearly to indecency, her hair scattered on the wind like the dirty cast away feathers of a plucked swan. She walked along the whisp of a trail shod only with what God provides all humanity upon the dark side of our tread. To those hidden eyes of the prairie, or any other sentient man or beast that happened upon her, her round indigo eyes revealed nothing but the listless focus of one doomed by cruel recompense to live out their days in a tortuous mindless bliss where no joy or sorrow lit a fire in the brain. A light once taken in, by all appearances reflected out again without response or comprehension. But as nature may shelter a tiny string of green at the center of each frozen tendril, and as winter may keep free one icy current under the frozen table of its lakes and streams, a slow trace of images, beautiful and horrific, passed through her mind undetected to any outside gaze. Images more than thoughts paraded in her bruised mind: The faraway church yard where lay the last remains or her dear dead beloved passed through her mind’s eye. The smoke filled town of thieves and vermin who harried her and her sisters away from retrieving much needed medicine and the corruption of her youngest sister to their ranks. The vapid mewling prostitute who begged to be beaten, and the man that lured away her older sister to his arms. The sight of Jesus and his wagon rolling away in the waves. The filthy men who recued her from death in the captive creek bottom and the last memories, almost too much to bear. Personal tragedy slaked its thirst at her well. It stalked poor Mary Sue, opening her wounds and cutting her a new with every breath. Already doomed to a life of staid remembering at the loss of her first love. Not three days ago the universe seemed ready to right itself, and reward one such as she – the possessor of incomparable mind, body, and soul with all she was do. Finding herself hopelessly embedded in creek mud, but rescued for ill purpose by a clutch of sneering rampant louts not five days before, God himself performed a miracle. Taking up one of the surly barrel shaped man who menaced her with shame beyond considering. He turned the massive man to look upon the virtuous angel touched continence and truly see her. He stretched the man’s mind and heart into a good man and converted him to worthiness at the very sight of her. In turn the man beat his brothers away, sent for a preacher, took Mary into his arms and made her his bride and his for all time and eternity. In this, Mary Sue saw the hand of God and embraced his gift. Given her depth of understanding, led by spiritual awareness and superior morality few woman ever experienced she bound together fully with him in blissful a state completion of herself, obedient to God and to the virtuously tall and well formed man who was now her husband. Were not true love and the fulfillment of her existence enough. Fortune smiled with the dawn. As they walked next morning, an accidental trip on God’s Dewey ground landed her in a bed of daisies. The overturned stone stunned them with the revelation of golden promise. But alas, God’s demons are nothing if not jealous of those that wander the earth in superior look and bearing. Mary knelt on the ground to thank God for his bounty. Her husband, rewarded in ways he never dreamed declared their property the “the Sweetliness Gold mine” and prostrated himself on the ground beside her. At the height of their bliss, a shadow crossed over the sun. The husband’s brother possessed by a devil unseen appeared over the hill. In but a moment all life was changed. The brother’s face contorted in anger upon sight of the gleaming bride and the shaft. Without forethought, he drew his knife above his brother and buried it so deep, fratricide was accomplished before the victim had time to scarcely turn his head before light faced from his eyes. The next moment, regret. In anguish the wayward brother fell upon his knees. “What have I done” screamed he, his face a massive contortion of pain and desperation. “I repent of my evil deed, dear Lord forgive me” Mary stood watching the man sob in grief and desperation and shock. Surely she thought to herself, “though his deed be evil, it is the work of the devil and a reminder that all may fall into such grief as the evil one seeks to take our human hands and guide them to the path of evil,” even though it had never happened to her personally. So overcome with compassion, Mary fell to her knees with the man, taking his head to her bosom, rocking him too and fro over the fallen body of his lost brother. Soon there were others who joined the tableau as cries of wonderment and concern fell through the trees as a crowed of rake- and shovel-bearing townsfolk sped to defend the innocent from danger. Mary looked upon the good people and down upon the distraught brother with no words of recrimination passing her rosy lips for no anger did she bear. Only the light of divine acceptance and peace traveled from her eyes. Suddenly God’s light let her know the course. Among the crowd stood a small round man in vestments. She bid the preacher step forward and bind them at once. All was competed and in a manner of moments, the erring brother, now her husband redeemed in her eyes and those about them. Smiling he stepped back to look at her, hardly sensible of his good fortune and, eager to examine his acquisition in a golden ray of light. It is a truth of living that even the most saintly among us have days when that God we adorn with worship, who we dedicate our lives, minds and hearts, acts in ways the most learned cannot comprehend. For as the brother, now husband, stepped back, a small but decisive crack of a small but important branch resounded in the clearing. His wife reached out, but too late. His body froze hanging in the air as if angles allowed him bid adieu: Hanging on the pendulum of eternity. For one moment, their eyes met and breathed one last breath with each other. In the next, all was lost. His body plunged madly into the mine shaft, their suspense relieved brutally as his mass slammed against rocks deep inside the crevice and dashed out his brains. Stunned inconsolable by the loss of her husband, whom she loved as deeply as any love every experienced by any man or woman upon the earth, and fresh out of siblings for a replacement, Mary left the town. Walking past the crowed of stunned onlookers who raised rude crosses in protection as she passed. Mary Sue took mindlessly to that same road where we and her fate now find her.

To be continued...
(( and you’ll have to be there for the restart of Deadwood to see it when this serial somehow, magically, reappears ))

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