You are on page 1of 2

MAGNITUDE AND

INTENSITY SCALES
GABRIEL B. GONZAGA
7-FERMI

TABLE OF CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION
INTENSITY SCALE
MODIFIED MERCALLI SCALE
MAGNITUDE SCALE
RICHTER SCALE
ACTIVITY
REFERENCES

INTENSITY SCALE
MODIFIED MERCALLI SCALE
The Mercalli earthquake intensity scale,
developed by Italian seismologist
Giuseppe Mercalli in 1902, is a measure of
an earthquake's destructiveness. The
scale was modified by American
seismologists in the 1930s (called the
modified Mercalli scale). Modern
technology has made the Mercalli scale
obsolete, though the method is often used
to fill in "seismic blanks" when there is an
insufficient number of seismographs.
Level Characteristic Effects in Populated
Areas
I Generally not felt; detectable by
seismographs
II Felt by few people; objects may swing if
suspended

Earthquake magnitude is a measure of


the energy released by an earthquake,
or its "size". Earthquake intensity
describes how much ground shaking
occurred, or how "strong" an earthquake
was, at a particular location.

VIII Difficult to steer cars; damage to good


unbraced masonry; chimneys,
monuments, towers, and elevated tanks
fall; tree branches break; steep slopes
crack
IX Extensive building damage; good
masonry damaged seriously; foundations
crack; serious damage to reservoirs;
underground pipes break
X Most masonry, frame structures, and
foundations destroyed; numerous large
landslides; water thrown on banks of rivers
and lakes; railroad tracks bend slightly
XI Few masonry buildings stand; railroad
tracks bend severely; many bridges
destroyed; underground pipelines
completely inoperative

III Felt by few people, mostly indoors;


vibrations like a passing truck

XII Nearly total destruction; large rock


masses displaced; objects thrown into the
air

IV Felt by many people indoors but few


outdoors; windows, dishes and doors rattle

MAGNITUDE SCALE

V Felt by nearly everyone; sleepers


awaken; small unstable objects may fall
and break; doors move
INTRODUCTION

plaster, loose bricks, tiles, and stones fall;


small landslides along slopes

RICHTER SCALE

VI Felt by everyone; some heavy furniture


moves; people walk unsteadily; windows
and dishes break; books fall from shelf;
bushes and trees visibly shake

The Richter scale, used to measure


earthquake intensity, was developed in
1935, by Charles Richter. It measures an
earthquake's magnitude (intensity) on a
scale of 1 to 8.8 which means that each
successive whole number represents a 10fold increase in power.

VII Difficult to stand; moderate to heavy


damage to poorly constructed buildings;

Richter magnitudes Description


Earthquake effects

H
P
J
L
R
S
L
R
C
ACTIVITY
WORD SEARCH
B
H
M
D
T
K

S
O
K
J
D
R

C
O
V
B
L
M

A
D
Q
Y
K
P

L
A
O
M
G
A

E
D
L
U
H
W

K
B
C
T
N
L

A
H
T
I
O
U

U
Q
P
G
U
Y

Q
C
I
H
O
M

H
S
L
Y
T
I

T
A
B
O
E
X

R
A
F
Z
L
N

A
Z
P
C
R
H

E
R
Q
V
L
L

P
G
Z
Q
E
A
A
R
T

A
G
N
I
T
U
D
E
W

R
Y
S
C
H
R
A
Y
Z

G
M
Q
G
C
F
V
L
E

O
C
E
X
I
E
I
K
C

EARTHQUAKE
INTENSITY
MAGNITUDE
MERCALLI
RICHTER
SCALE
SEISMOGRAPH
SEISMOLOGIST

M
N
F
U
R
W
M
Y
H

S
F
M
C
Q
U
T
U
T

I
F
H
C
C
Z
P
B
F

E
R
C
A
L
L
I
H
F

S
N
E
T
N
I
G
B
O

Y
D
W
K
K
V
G
J
K

H
E
M
Q
F
L
C
X
D

R
F
Z
U
O
R
V
I
K

L
O
A
J
H
T
A
P
M

REFERENCES
http://www.gns.cri.nz/Home/Learning/Scien
ce-Topics/Earthquakes/MonitoringEarthquakes/Other-earthquake-questions
http://ecan.govt.nz/advice/emergenciesandhazard/earthquakes/Pages/earthquakemagnitude-intensity.aspx