NanoMarkets

thin film | organic | printable | electronics  www.na nomarkets.net

Trends in Electronics Drive Growth in EMC Industry
This  article  is  based  in  part  on  research  from  Electromagnetic  Compatibility  (EMC)  Materials  and  Components Markets and Opportunities 

Electromagneti c interference (EMI) and the na rrower category of ra dio frequency interference  (RFI) ha ve been a  persistent  problem in  the electroni cs indus try since  the ea rliest da ys .    The  tradi tional   exa mple  is   the  “s now”  seen  on  analog  television  displa ys ;  audible  s ta ti c  on  telephones  and  radios  is   another.    Such  interference  can  also  ha rm  the  opera tion  of  computers,  cell  phones ,  networks  a nd  other  electroni cs .    And  as  this  list  indi ca tes  EMI/RFI  challenges  (and  hence  opportuni ties)  exis t  whether  any  kind  of  wi reless  communica tion  is  invol ved or not.   And  both  the  challenges   and  opportunities   ha ve  grown  as  the  kind  of  s ys tems  tha t  a re  impacted  by  EMI/RFI  ha ve  prolifera ted.  Fortunatel y  for  devi ce  manufa cturers —and  for  the  suppliers  of electroma gneti c  compa tibility  (EMC)  products —EMI  can  be shielded  to  prevent  this  performance  degra dation.    Shielding  is  often  as  simple  as  surrounding  sensi ti ve  components —or  troublesome  emi tters —wi thi n  a  conducti ve  box  or  other  enclosure.    The  types  of encl osures  used incl ude small  boxes  to cover pa rts  of ci rcui t boa rds , conducti ve dips  for indi vidual  components , ja cketing or condui ts  for wi res  and cabling, and the cases or outer  “skins ” of devi ces or a ppliances .    Markets for EMC Materials and Products  EMC  ma rkets a re  created by  two separa te  but  rela ted  goals:    keeping external interference  out and keepi ng i nternal  signals , whi ch could ca use interference in other devi ces, i n.  Certain  “hi gh‐risk”  appli cations  a re  pa rti cula rl y  sensi ti ve  wi th  rega rd  to  EMC.    These  include  hi gh‐ value  manufa cturi ng  fa cili ties,  such  as   wafer  fa bs,  where  a   high  density  of  equipment  is  extremel y sensiti ve to many fa ctors , life‐sus taining or otherwise vulnerable opera tions such as  ai rcraft  flight  controls and hospi tal equipment, and  high‐securi ty opera tions  where pri va cy is  cri ti cal and  “electroni c ea vesdroppi ng” must be  minimi zed, such as banking appli ca tions and  mili ta ry facili ties.    But by fa r mos t EMC products  and materials a re used in more mundane appli cati ons .  Vi rtuall y  all electroni c devi ces  a re subject  to  EMC  regulations  and hence  mus t demonstra te—and  be  built for—a  mini mal  level  of electroma gneti c leaka ge as  well as  a  tolerance for EMI tha t ma y  come  from other s ources .    This  includes  ordina ry i tems  not generall y  considered  to emi t  or  absorb  EMI,  such  as  household  appliances.  And  as  appliances   become  “s ma rter”  in 

Page | 1 

NanoMarkets, LC | PO Box 3840 | Glen Allen, VA 23058 | TEL: 804-360-2967 | FAX: 804-270-7017

NanoMarkets

thin film | organic | printable | electronics  www.na nomarkets.net

conjunction wi th  the  Sma rt‐Gri d  rollouts ,  they  will  also become both  more sensi ti ve  to and  more likel y to produce EMI.  The ma terials, products , and s tra tegies  used  for  EMC a re  fairl y simila r  to  those  used  for  ESD  protection to an extent.  Both invol ve providing a  measure of conducti vi ty to the outer surfa ce  Page | 2  of sensiti ve devi ces or equipment, but  they  requi re di fferent levels of  conducti vi ty.    For  ESD  protection,  cha rges   are  ca rried  to  ground  and/or  resisti vel y  dissipated,  and  ca n  a ccommoda te—or even require—low levels of surfa ce conducti vi ty.  On the other hand, EMI  shielding  requi res   high  mobility  of  the  electrons   in  the  ma terial,  meaning  much  higher  conducti vi ty.  This  has impli ca tions  for  the  ma terials used.    For  coa tings or  filled plasti cs , generally a  much  la rger  quanti ty  of  conducti ve  material   must  be  used  for  EMC,  raising  cos ts.    And  some  ma rginall y  conducti ve  ma terials used as  fillers  for  ESD  ma terials ma y be  too  resisti ve even in  bulk to be used for EMC ma terials.  But the higher conducti vi ty requi rements also open some  new  opportuni ties.    Some  filler  ma terials  can  now  be  used  more  comfortabl y  within  thei r  percolation  thresholds ,  for ins tance, and metal  foils and sheets  become  reasona ble  material  options .  Opportunities for EMC Products Are Growing Rapidly  Na noMa rkets  believes  tha t  there a re several   trends  occurri ng  tha t a re leading  to i mportant  new  opportunities   emerging  in  the  EMC  indus try.    These  ha ve  to  do  wi th  the  quantity,  complexi ty, and use of electroni c devi ces  and the components and ma terials wi thin them:

The explosion in  the number  of wi reless phones in  recent  yea rs  has produced billions  of new ubiqui tous devi ces  tha t need to be protected; well over one billion cell  phones  a re sold every yea r. And i t is not jus t because the phones themsel ves  emi t and recei ve  RF signals for communi ca tion; the large number of components  wi thin the phones also  emit EMI and can be sensiti ve to i t.  The  shrinking  size  of  electroni c  devi ces  a nd  the  components   wi thin  them  is  making  EMC more problema tic.  The s maller size of the components  and their closer proxi mity  to one another makes them more sensi ti ve to the EMI from thei r nei ghbors  wi thin the  same devi ce.  And the smaller size of the overall  devi ce reduces  the spa ce a vailable for  EMI shielding s olutions .   Simple  off‐the‐shelf shielding  boxes   tha t worked well  in  the  pas t  often  cannot  do  the  job  toda y  because  they  si mpl y  will  not  fi t.    And  wi th  the  complexi ty  of  the  components  a rranged on  the boa rds,  custom shielding solutions — wi th added cos t—a re frequentl y requi red. 

NanoMarkets, LC | PO Box 3840 | Glen Allen, VA 23058 | TEL: 804-360-2967 | FAX: 804-270-7017

NanoMarkets

thin film | organic | printable | electronics  www.na nomarkets.net

Hi gher  radio  frequencies  a re also  becomi ng  more  common  for  communi ca tions  and  this  produces  problems  on  two levels.   For one,  the potential  vi cti ms of  these higher  frequencies  need to be protected by shielding tha t is  capable of dampening such high  frequencies.   Also,  the equipment  tha t sends and  recei ves  these  frequencies  mus t be  Page | 3  able to block the lower frequencies  while recei ving the i ntended ba nd. 

However, the opportuni ties tha t these trends present for the EMC industry a re cons trained by  wha t is  possible based on cost and regula tory requi rements : 

As  ma ny electroni c devi ces  use less metal in thei r encl osures  in order to reduce cos ts ,  the  requi rements   for  EMC  increase  since  a   potential   Fa rada y  ca ge  (a   conducti ve  enclosure completel y s urrounding the shielded object) is  los t.  The metal  for the ca ge  ma y  be  replaced by a nother  conducti ve  material  or  the  devi ce  ma y  rel y more  hea vil y  on the shielding of the components  inside i t, wi thout an external  Fa rada y cage.  EMI  is  hi ghl y  regula ted  by  government  a gencies  throughout  the  world.    Thus  aside  from  the  a ctual   performance  of  the  devi ces  and  thei r  impa ct  on—and  from—other  devi ces , addi tional  EMC  requi rements  ma y be present because of  the  regulations .  In  fa ct, EMC regula tion has been the dri vi ng force of an enti re indus try segment—tes ting  and  certifi ca tion  of products  for electroma gneti c  compa tibili ty.    While  the  goals  a re  similar  in  the  va rious  geographies  a round  the  globe,  there  a re  differences   tha t  can  impact the EMC approa ches  used in manufa cturi ng for di fferent ta rget geographies. 

EMC Materials and  Products:  The Shift to Polymers and Nanomaterials  Beca use of  thei r high  conducti vi ty, metals ha ve his tori call y domina ted  the EMC  indus try and  they  continue  to  domina te  i t.    These  include  metal  shields  for  ci rcui t  boa rds   and  wi res ,  enclosures for electroni c devi ces , and ca binets all  the wa y up to whole rooms  and even enti re  buildings .    However, as  we  ha ve al ready  noted,  there is a   defini te  trend in  reducing  metals  usage  in  manufa cturing in  order  to  reduce  cos t and  wei ght.    This  is  especially  true  for  the  la rges t devi ce pa rts , such as the case or devi ce enclosure.   As a  resul t, ma terials fi rms  ha ve long been on the lookout for new ma terials tha t can genera te  profi ts   for  them i n  the  EMC  sector.    Ma terials  that  ha ve been  tes ted or  used in  this  sector  include conducti ve pol ymers , TCOs , and ca rbon ma terials: 

Ca rbon  nanotubes   can be  used  for  EMC  applica tions  in s mall  quanti ties and a re not  inherentl y  expensive;  thei r  current  high  cost  is   due  to  their  newness .    Ca rbon  nanotubes  (some of them a nywa y) a re more conducti ve than any metal  and a re easil y  ma de  into  di ffusely  dispersed  suspensions.    Ca rbon  nanotube  coa tings  or  filled 

NanoMarkets, LC | PO Box 3840 | Glen Allen, VA 23058 | TEL: 804-360-2967 | FAX: 804-270-7017

NanoMarkets

thin film | organic | printable | electronics  www.na nomarkets.net

pol ymers   ca n offer  an interpenetra ting  conducti ve  network  tha t produces  a   Fa rada y  cage  wi th  minimal   qua ntities   of  ma terial.    And  as   graphene  develops   and  can  be  produced more easil y, it  too will  find i ts ini tial appli ca tions , and perha ps appli ca tions  using graphene as an EMC ma terial will be among those. 

Conducti ve pol ymers  like PEDOT: PSS ha ve proved sui table for some EMC appli ca tions .   However, they ha ve not come down in pri ce as  rapidl y as hoped.  Still, they a re flexible  and  often  transpa rent, especiall y i n  thin  la yers , and  offer  the  likelihood of l ow  cos t  wi thin  the  next  several   yea rs.    All   of  these  fea tures   a re  a ttra cti ve  i n  certain  EMC  appli ca tions  Other  nanoma terials used  for  EMC  coa tings  include  metals,  mos tl y sil ver.    The small  size  of  nanopa rti cles  offers  the  potential  to  use  such  small  amounts   of  metals  tha t  even an expensive  metal like sil ver is  not  cos t prohibi ti ve.   (This potential has not  yet  been  realized  because  of  the  s till  high  cos t  of  nanoma terial  manufa cturing.)   Na nosil ver has  recei ved most of the a ttention for conducti ve applica tions  because i t is  so  much  more  conducti ve  than  any  of  the  other  nanometals  under  a ctual  use  condi tions —largel y  because  sil ver’s   oxi de,  unlike  those  of  other  metals,  is  conducti ve—but  EMC  does   not  require  as   hi gh  a   level   of  conducti vi ty  as  do  other  nanometal a pplica tions like electrodes , so other metals ma y also come into pla y.   

Page | 4 

These newer  ma terials a re a mong  the most  exci ting  devel opments  in a   field  tha t  has  been  otherwise fai rl y ma ture for many yea rs . 
 

NanoMarkets, LC | PO Box 3840 | Glen Allen, VA 23058 | TEL: 804-360-2967 | FAX: 804-270-7017