www.smartgridanal ysis.

com

Shift to Decentralized Power Presents Microgrid Opportunities
This article is based in part on research from Transmissio n and Distribution Equipment Opportunit ie s for t he Smart Grid

  A  mi crogrid,  as   defi ned  by  the  Consortium  for  Electri c  Reliability  Technology  Solutions   (CERTS),  is   an  “a ggrega te  of  loads   and  micro  resources   opera ted  as   a   single  s ys tem  providing  hea t  and  power  a nd  presented  as  a   single  controlled  unit  to  the  overall  grid.”    This   ra ther  formal  defini tion  hides   the  fa ct  tha t  mi crogrids   will   be  a   crucial  component in  the  trend  towa rd  distributed electri city  generati on  tha t is  so central  to the Sma rt Grid concept.    The  tradi tional  grid  is  based  on  centralized  genera tion  wi th  genera ting  units   from  10  MW  to  GW‐s cale  capa ci ty  i n  one  loca tion  (or  a   few  loca tions )  and  dis tribution  through  high‐vol tage  (greater  than  69  kV)  dis tribution  s ys tems .    By  contrast,  distri buted  generati on  consists   of  smaller  genera ting  resources  (less  than  10  MW down  to  <  10 kW)  using  medium‐vol tage  (between  1K  a nd  69K)  and  l ow  vol ta ge  (<  1K  vol t)  dis tribution s ys tems .    Not  all  distributed  genera ting  resources   a re  mi crogri ds.    Ma ny  a re  genera tion  resources  onl y  and  never  act  as  l oads  on  the  grid.    But  all  mi crogrids   are  distri buted  resources ;  they  a re  a tta ched  to  the  medium/low  vol tage  dis tribution  network  and  a ct  both  as  genera ting  resources and loads . 
Microgrid Drivers: Technology Much Needed Functionality and Enabling

The  mi crogrid  concept  i tsel f  is  not  especiall y  new.  However,  Na noMa rkets/Sma rt  Grid  Anal ysis  believes  that  mi crogri ds  present  an  important new business potential  due to the confluence of thei r ability to  suppl y some of  the mos t pri zed advanta ges associated  wi th Sma rt  Grids  and  the  appea rance  of  certain  enabling  technologies   tha t  make  mi crogrids possible. These a re identi fied below.    

Smart Grid Analysis | PO Box 3840 | Glen Allen, VA 23058 | TEL: 804-360-2967 | FAX: 804-270-7017

www.smartgridanal ysis.com

As  pa rt of a  la rger gri d, the mi crogrid can “island” i tself when the  grid  becomes  unstable,  draw  current  from  the  grid  when  grid  power is  less expensi ve and provide  power  to  the  grid  when it’s  economical  to sell its  power to the grid.  While  the  cos ts   per  kilowa tt‐hour  for  centralized  genera tion  is  increasing  (because of feeds tock  volatility a nd  regulatory issues),  the  cos t  per  kilowa tt‐hour  of  dis tributed  generati on  utilizing  mi crogrids  has been falling (because of lower cos t wind and sola r,  lower  cos t  s tora ge,  and  low  cos t  sensor  networks  to  enable  mi crogrids).  This  falling  cos t has   rea ched  the  point  tha t i t is  now  an a ttra cti ve option for many si tua tions , especiall y in applica tions  where genera tion source and load a re in  close  proxi mi ty and  the  hea t from genera tion can also be used for s pace hea ting.  In s uch  cases,  overall   feeds tock  effi ciencies   (hea t  plus   electri city)  of  grea ter than 60 percent ha ve been realized i n tes t settings , whi ch  is  far more effi cient than the a pproxima tel y 30 percent efficiency  of  centralized  genera tion  wi th  up  to  10  percent  loss  of  the  genera ted electri city i n the distribution network.   

• 2 

The  appea rance  of  low‐cost  computing,  sensors   and  wireless  communi ca tions   networks   over  the  last  ten  to  fifteen  yea rs   is  the  key  enabler  tha t makes  mi crogrids  such an a ttra cti ve  means  to increase  grid  capa ci ty  and  functionali ty.    This   new  technology  we  believe  is   putting  mi crogrids   on  a   pa th  to  become  “plug‐and‐pla y”  elements   of  the  grid  wi thin  the  next  few  yea rs .    Control   of  local  mi crogrids  wi th  low‐cos t  wi reless sensors  and communi ca tions  as well as the incorpora tion of local  s tora ge  provi des  the  means  for  hi gh  reliability/hi gh  quality  power  solutions   tha t  surpass  the  reliability  of  the  best  centralized  genera tion  and can approa ch those of UPS sol utions .    This high reliability is due to both the compa ct si ze and the local  na ture of  mi crogrid  dis tribution  networks,  close  proxi mity  between  source  and  load and  the inclusion of electri cal s tora ge  to serve both as a  source  to  level  loads  a nd peak sha ve, but also as  a  means  to s mooth any transient  ins tability in  the  microgrid.   These new lower  cos t electroni cs  also allow  “intelligent islanding” of  the mi crogrid  to disengage when power quali ty 

Smart Grid Analysis | PO Box 3840 | Glen Allen, VA 23058 | TEL: 804-360-2967 | FAX: 804-270-7017

www.smartgridanal ysis.com

is low  or  pri ces a re  high, and  to  reengage when  the  “ma crogrid” pri ce is  low.  As   a   resul t  of  all   this ,  NanoMa rkets/Sma rt  Grid  Analysis   believes   tha t  mi crogrids present  major opportuni ties  throughout  the  world, but  these  opportuni ties also seem to va ry by geography.    3 
Microgrids, Power Quality and Opportunities in the Developed World

In  the  es tablished  continental  grids  of  North  Ameri ca   and  Europe,  the  cos ts   of  centralized  genera tion  a re  increasing,  mi crogri d  cos ts  a re  decreasing a nd the demand for power quality applica tions  tha t a re better  served by mi crogrids  is  rising.  The potential of mi crogri ds  in these areas  is  to i ncrease the use of distributed resources , whi ch will  boost capa ci ty,  reliability, and securi ty, as well  as incorpora te  renewable  resources  such  as  wind and sola r into the overall  grid.  This  opportuni ty is  al ready being  pursued in some countries such as Denma rk.   Microgrids  improve  power  quality:    The  main  nea r‐term  dri ver  for  mi crogrids   in  regions   with  esta blished  grids   is   to  signifi cantl y  i mprove  power  quality.    The  increased  reliance  on  electri ci ty  for  key  mission‐ cri ti cal appli ca tions is  now a t a point  where  the power quality needs for  such a pplica tions  exceed  the a bility  of  centralized genera tion  to  deli ver  the  requi red  power  quality.    Power  quality  has  been  s ta tic  for  several  decades  and is predi cted by some  to even  begin deteriora ting slightl y as  demand  continues   to  increase,  while  suppl y  and  distribution  remain  s tagnant.    The  tradi tional  centralized  genera tion/dis tribution s tra tegy ma xes  out in  reliability a t between 3‐ and 4‐nines  reliability or s omewhere on a vera ge  of about  1–9 hrs  of dis ruption per  yea r.   While  this has been a cceptable  for most applica tions  in  the  past,  the increasing  reliance  on  “alwa ys  on”  mission‐cri ti cal  electri cal  gea r  and  the  damage  to  gea r  due  to  power  surges/spikes   associated  wi th  outages   make  this   level   of  reliability  unacceptable for many appli ca tions going into the future.     

Smart Grid Analysis | PO Box 3840 | Glen Allen, VA 23058 | TEL: 804-360-2967 | FAX: 804-270-7017

www.smartgridanal ysis.com

By  moving  to a  mi crogrid  deployment s tra tegy  wi th local  genera ting and  dis tribution  resources   tha t  can  island  themsel ves   seamlessly  from  the  grea ter  grid,  the  reliability  can  be  increased  from  3‐  to  4‐nines  (1–9  hrs /outa ge per  yea r)  to  6‐  to  7‐nines  (3  to  30 seconds/yea r).    Wi th  the  addi tion of electri cal  s torage,  which is  an essential  component of  mos t  mi crogrids ,  the  reliability  for  the  mos t  cri ti cal  appli cations  can  be  increased further, to up to 9‐nines (30 ms/yea r).  4  Microgrid deployment in  the U.S. and Europe:   In the U.S., several  large  pilot  demons tra tion  projects   a re  al ready  underwa y.    The  following  projects  all  ha ve  a cti ve  mi crogrid  demons tra tion  progra ms  in  pla ce:   Chevron  Energy,  Consolidated  Edison  (New  York),  ATK  Spa ce  Sys tems ,  Illinois   Ins ti tute  of  Technology,  the  Ci ty  of  Fort  Collins,  Col orado,  San  Diego  Gas  and  Power,  and  the  Uni versi ty  of  Las  Vegas‐Nevada .    These  demons tra tion  projects  contain  the  elements   of  local   genera tion,  intelligent  self‐islanding,  and  local  s tora ge  and  demand  response  capabilities .    Dependi ng  on  the  exa ct  goals,  they  also  incorpora te  hi gh  levels of wind and solar and/or combined hea t and power.    Europe  is  also  a cti ve  in  mi crogrid  development.  Serious   work  on  mi crogrids   in  Europe  s ta rted  ea rlier  than  in  the  U.S.  for  two  major  reasons :  • Fi rs t,  Europe  experienced  poli ti cal  pressure  to  explore  power  solutions   wi th  a   lower  ca rbon  footprint  ea rlier  than  North  Ameri ca; thus , mi crogrids  with thei r ability to integra te high levels  of renewa bles a nd integra te cogenera tion were explored for tha t  reason.    Second, the EU i mplemented legisla tion in the ea rl y 2000s , whi ch  enabled  distributed  genera tors .    This   legislation  reduced  the  ba rrier  to  entry  for  distri buted  resources ,  allowing  distributed  genera tion  to  move  into  ma rkets   tha t  were  previ ousl y  underserved by conventional central  genera tion. 

Currentl y,  eleven  European  countries  a re  opera ting  mi crogri d  projects .   But  Denma rk is  the leader in distri buted genera tion.   The bes t  known of  the  true  mi crogri d  demons tra tions   in  Denma rk  is   the  Bornholm  Island  mi crogrid.    It  serves   28,000  cus tomers ,  provides   over  55  MW  of  peak 

Smart Grid Analysis | PO Box 3840 | Glen Allen, VA 23058 | TEL: 804-360-2967 | FAX: 804-270-7017

www.smartgridanal ysis.com

power,  a nd  incorpora tes   30  MW  of  wind  power.  The  mi crogrid  is  connected  to a   high  power  node in  Sweden  and is  a ble  to s uccessfull y  island off from the overall grid when power quality is  low. 
Island Microgrids

A  smaller  but  high‐growth  appli ca tion  of  microgrids  is   in  true  “island”  grids ,  whi ch either  do not  connect  or a re designed  for sus tained  periods  of  independent  servi ce.    Thus ,  the  U.S.  milita ry  a nd  ma ny  remote  industrial  and residential a reas a re rela ti vel y small ma rkets , but mi crogrid  growth in these a reas is projected to be brisk over the next ei ght yea rs .    Nea r term appli ca tions for “island mi crogrids ” include:  • Ca mpus   applica tions   (hospi tals,  educa tional ,  governmental),  whi ch  can  use  both  the  electri ci ty  and  hea t  of  CHP‐based  mi crogrids  Premium power appli ca tions  such as  high‐quality indus trial  power  pa rks, da ta  centers  and certain ga ted communi ty appli ca tions  

A key for all  of these applica tions  is  the ability to island themsel ves  from  the  grid  wi thi n  one‐qua rter  cycle  to  maintain  loa d  integri ty  wi thin  the  mi crogrid and provide quality una ttainable in tradi tional  gri ds.    The  final  a rea  is  in  remote  loca tions   (indus trial,  remote  town,  and  mili ta ry),  where  the  falling  cost  of  mi crogrids  and storage  ca paci ty, a nd  the  emerging  ability  to  sea mlessl y  integra te  wind  and  sola r  into  s uch  grids  makes   mi crogri ds  viable  in  a   wa y  that  was  not  possible  even  10  yea rs  ago.   
Microgrid Opportunities in the Developing World

In less‐developed grid regi ons , politi cal  ins tability and i nadequa te ca pital  mechanisms  ha ve prevented advanced centralized grids  from developing.   The  demand  for  mi crogrid  is   increasing  in  such  a reas,  ena bling  electrifi ca tion where i t was not previousl y possible.    Mi crogrids  i n emerging regions  seem to be the mos t economi cal method  a vailable for implementing rural electri fi cation. 
 

Smart Grid Analysis | PO Box 3840 | Glen Allen, VA 23058 | TEL: 804-360-2967 | FAX: 804-270-7017