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First Printing 2011

Overview

780

of the American Language Course

A Reference Guide for Instructors


Second Edition
Defense Language Institute
English Language Center
Lackland AFB, TX

First Printing 2011

First Printing 2011

PREFACE
The Overview of the American Language Course: A Reference Guide for Instructors is designed to
acquaint English as a Second or Foreign Language (ESL/EFL) instructors and program managers
with the organization, content, and components of the DLIELC General English American Language
Course (ALC) materials, with an emphasis on the second-edition texts which comprise Levels IIII.
A second edition of the Overview has been prepared in order to address the recent completion of
LevelIV.

Inquiries and Orders


Please address inquiries and requests for more information about DLIELC publications to
DLIELC/LESL
2235 Andrews Avenue
Lackland Air Force Base, Texas 78236-5259
E-mail: dlielc.leslwork@us.af.mil
2011 by Defense Language Institute English Language Center and its licensors. Notice of Rights:
All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any
means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the publisher.

Supersedes 780, Overview of the American Language Course: A Reference Guide for Instructors,
First Edition, October 2009
Second Edition, August 2011
First printing
i

First Printing 2011

First Printing 2011

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Introduction . .............................................................................. 1

1 The ALC at a Glance | 3


Materials..................................................................................... 4
Focus & design .......................................................................... 7
Levels & student placement...................................................... 10

2 ALC Student Text Organization | 11


Book table of contents.............................................................. 12
Lessons 14.............................................................................. 13
Lesson 5.................................................................................... 14
Appendices . ............................................................................. 15
Homework . .............................................................................. 18
Evaluation exercises . ............................................................... 19

3 Using the ALC Instructor Text | 21


Scope & sequence chart............................................................ 22
The introduction . ..................................................................... 23
ST vs. IT.................................................................................... 24
IT notes..................................................................................... 26

4 ALC Objectives | 31
The selection process................................................................ 32
Enabling & terminal objectives ............................................... 34
Systematic recycling................................................................. 39
Continual reinforcing................................................................ 41

5 ALC Vocabulary | 45
Overview & objectives . ........................................................... 46
Word list . ................................................................................. 47
Lesson themes........................................................................... 48
Lesson activators....................................................................... 49
Objective terms......................................................................... 50
Recognition & other types of terms.......................................... 51
The diamond symbol ............................................................... 52
Flash cards................................................................................ 53
Exercise types........................................................................... 54
OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

iii

First Printing 2011

TABLE OF CONTENTS
6 ALC Grammar | 59
Overview & objectives . ........................................................... 60
Structure list.............................................................................. 61
Activators.................................................................................. 62
Progression of exercises . ......................................................... 63
Progression of objectives.......................................................... 66

7 ALC Skills | 69
Overview & objectives . ........................................................... 70
Subsumed skills objectives....................................................... 72
Integrated skills activities ........................................................ 73
Speaking skills progression ..................................................... 74
Listening skills progression...................................................... 77
Reading skills progression........................................................ 80
Writing skills progression......................................................... 84

8 ALC Functions | 89
Overview & objectives . ........................................................... 90
Progression by level.................................................................. 91

Appendices | 95
Appendix A: Contents of the Indexes for the ALC (789).......... 97
Appendix B: ALC materials chart............................................ 99
Appendix C: Scope & sequence charts................................... 101
Appendix D: ALC terminal objectives................................... 127
Glossary.................................................................................. 129
Index........................................................................................ 135

iv

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

First Printing 2011

INTRODUCTION
A Note about the Levels of the American Language Course
Level I: Books 16
Level II: Books 712
Level III: Books 1318
Level IV: Books 1924
Level V: Books 2530

The 30 books in the General English American Language Course


(ALC) collection are often categorized and referred to by their level
in this book. There are five levels in the ALC. Each of the five levels
contain six books each. The books in each level share particular
features and objectives; therefore, referring to them collectively
allows for concise descriptions of the books in each level as well as
comparisons and contrasts of the books across levels.

About this Book


The Overview of the ALC is intended as a guide and reference to
the ALC, 2nd Edition, textbooks in the first four levels. Future
editions of this book will include features of the books in Level V
as development of the second-edition textbooks continues. While
the focus of the Overview is on the second edition, the practices,
guidance, and ideas which are outlined here can be applied to the
use of the remaining first-edition textbooks as well. Moreover, the
information pertaining to the design, focus, and general organization
of the ALC applies to both editions. The specific reference book to
the first edition is titled Familiarization with the ALC (780).

Using the Overview of the ALC


This book is primarily intended as an orientation guide to the ALC
for Defense Language Institute English Language Center (DLIELC)
instructors in pre-service training, international students in Instructor
Development courses at DLIELC, and non-native instructors of
English who use the ALC General English curriculum in their
own countries. Additionally, program managers, supervisors, and
experienced ALC instructors who use this book as a reference
guide can find the answers to questions about the course and use the
information to help mentor instructors new to the ALC.
The section subheadings printed at the top of each page help the
reader to locate specific information about the ALC quickly. The
information in the main gray box at the top of each page summarizes
important points about the topic and gives necessary definitions.
Sample pages from the ALC illustrate the information presented in
the main box. The smaller gray boxes and arrows provide further
details and guide the reader to notice certain aspects of the ALC texts.
Most of the ALC sample pages demonstrate the general layout and
features found in the books and are not intended to be read closely.
Similarly, the Overview itself is designed primarily as a reference
resource to accompany the textbooks, not necessarily as a text to
be read from cover to cover. However, for those new to the ALC,

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

First Printing 2011

INTRODUCTION
a thorough reading of this book will provide valuable insight and
background information as well as helpful tips on using the course to
its full potential.
The first section contains a general introduction to the ALC course
materials, a summary of the design and focus, brief ALC level
descriptions, and information about DLIELCs proficiency tests. The
second section describes and shows the organization of the student
text. The third section highlights the many helpful planning tools
which are incorporated into the instructor text. The fourth section
provides background information on how the objectives for the
course were determined and examples of how the careful planning
and sequencing of the objectives provide a cohesive, predictable
framework for the course. Sections 58 provide an overview of
lesson objectives in vocabulary, grammar, skills, and functions. These
sections also contain a sampling of presentations and activities from
corresponding sections of the ALC. The end of the book contains five
appendices; a glossary of terms commonly associated with the ALC,
ESL, and DLIELC; and an index.

Availability of the ALC, 2nd Edition, Textbooks


As of this printing, ALC Books 124 (Levels IIV) are available
in the second edition. Development of the new books in Level V is
underway. Each first-edition text is replaced by the corresponding
second-edition text upon its publication.
Further information on current availability of ALC textbooks as
well as other DLIELC courses and publications is available at
http://www.dlielc.edu/.

Questions, Comments & Suggestions Welcome


The General English curriculum developers appreciate feedback
and will gladly answer any questions about the course. Contact the
department by sending an email to dlielc.leagc.workflow@us.af.mil.
If overseas, send correspondence through the website address above
or to the mailing address on the first page of this book.

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

First Printing 2011

1
The ALC at a Glance
Materials
Focus & design
Levels & student placement

First Printing 2011

1 THE ALC AT A GLANCE: Materials


ALC, 2nd Edition, Textbooks

INSTRUCTOR TEXT

A comprehensive, sequential presentation of


general and military English
STUDENT TEXT

Four lessons introducing new material, plus one


review lesson
Homework, evaluation exercises, appendices
Instructor text (IT) and student text (ST)

Second Edition

Instructional guidance, objectives, and answers


toexercises in IT

Book 17

Books 124 in print

Second Edition

ALC, 1st Edition, Textbooks

Defense Language Institute


English Language Center

Book 17

Books 2530 available


Each book will be replaced as the corresponding
second-edition text is published.

Defense Language Institute


English Language Center

LANGUAGE LABORATORY ACTIVITIES

Language Laboratory Activities


Support for the ALC textbooks
Available for Books 1-30 (Levels I-V)
Audio CDs revised August 2009
Approximately 5 hours of audio per book
on8CDs
Texts provide

Book 17
Defense Language Institute
English Language Center

Activities to reinforce lesson objectives


Answers to all exercises
Audio scripts for all activities
Recordings provide
Approximately 5 hours of listening practice
perbook; more than 1 hour per lesson
Authentic listening practice in Levels IV & V
Complete tracking of exercises for easy access

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

First Printing 2011

1 THE ALC AT A GLANCE: Materials


Book Quiz

Book Quiz Kit:


Student booklets
Answer sheets
Audio recording
Answer keys

Achievement test for assessing ALC objectives


at the end of each book (Levels IV)
50 multiple-choice listening and reading items
Completely updated book quiz forms for the
second-edition texts

SAK:
Instructor booklet
Student answer booklets
Diagnostic assessment forms
Audio recording

Skills Assessment Kit (SAK)


For assessment of skills mastery at the end of
eachlevel
Focuses primarily on productive skills not testable
onbookquizzes
Available January 2012 for Levels II, III, and IV
ofthesecond edition

Interactive Multimedia Instruction (IMI)


Reinforces lesson objectives and provides additional
practice of language skills through audio, video,
graphics, and animation
Corresponding IMI program available for
Books 129 (as of October 2011; Book 30
forthcoming)

Flash Cards
Illustrate concrete vocabulary and situations
from the lessons
Available for Books 112 (Levels III)
B2 2:24

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

First Printing 2011

1 The ALC at a Glance: Materials


Indexes for the ALC, 1st and 2nd Editions (789)
A helpful reference for planning lessons and locating
specific material in the ALC
Includes indexes to all ALC objectives in Books 130
Provides additional information, such as level
descriptions, a summary of book objectives, and a
military themes index
CD format for both ALC editions
More information about the Indexes in Appendix A of
this book

Grammar for the ALC (782)


Contains explanation and examples of grammar
in the ALC

Video Activities
Reinforce lesson objectives, model American speech
patterns, present language and culture in context
throughdramatized situations performed byactors
Activities for accompanying student and instructor
guidesprovided in PDF format on CD
Available for Books 13-24 (Levels III-IV)
Six DVDs per level

HOMEWORK AND EVALUATION EXERCISES

Homework & Evaluation Exercises Booklets


All homework and evaluation exercises from
corresponding textbook included
Student texts can remain blank for reuse by new students
Available for nonresident programs

Second Edition

Book 17
Defense Language Institute
English Language Center

Further Materials Information See Appendix B of this book for a chart


summarizing all ALC materials available for Books 130. The DLIELC
catalog provides more detailed information.

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

First Printing 2011

1 The Alc At A Glance: Focus & design


The General English materials in the American Language Course are
developed by English as a Second Language (ESL) professionals at
the Defense Language Institute English Language Center (DLIELC).
The ALC series consists of extensively researched and carefully
controlled presentations of American English. Objectives are derived
from analysis and skills requirements of military follow-on training
(FOT) and based on Interagency Language Roundtable (ILR)
Language Skill Level Descriptions.
The ALCs focus and design have several special features which make
the course both thorough and challenging for students. Additional
features for the instructor save valuable planning and preparation
time, making the course enjoyable to teach and adaptable to many
programs of study.

Audience: The Military Student


The ALC materials contain a comprehensive presentation of the
English language. They are designed for international military
students from a variety of vocational and professional backgrounds.
Throughout the course, beginning with Level I, military themes
and terminology are presented and practiced. All efforts are made
to provide military students with realistic, relevant language for
success in English-speaking environments. Students are given stepby-step instruction from basic survival English to English at the level
of fluency and communicative proficiency necessary to succeed in
technical or professional follow-on training at schools administered
by the US Department of Defense.

Objectives: A Sequential & Self-Contained Design


Objectives are statements of what the learner is expected to know and
be able to do upon completion of a book. In the ALC, all language
components are controlled by limiting lesson objectives in number,
frequency, and degree of difficulty. Once presented, the objectives are
then continually reinforced and systematically recycled throughout
the materials, providing students with repeated exposure to each of
the courses objectives. Across the levels, books, and lessons, one
block of instruction supports and builds on the previous block. This
sequential design of the materials is one of the distinguishing features
of the ALC series.
Furthermore, the ALC materials are self-contained. Lesson objectives
are reinforced by homework, review, and evaluation exercises in the
textbook. Additional materials, including interactive multimedia
instruction, language laboratory activities, and video activities,
support the lesson objectives but can also be used to present the
OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

First Printing 2011

1 The alc at a glance: Focus & design


objectives independently of the main text. Mastery of each books
objectives is assessed through specially designed book quizzes
and skills assessments. Moreover, ALC reference materials offer
valuable instructional information. These combined resources provide
instructors with ready access to all they need to plan and conduct their
lessons.

Focus:The Major Language Components


Each lesson contains objectives in the primary language components
of vocabulary, grammar, functions, and the skills of listening,
speaking, reading, and writing. Vocabulary and grammar objectives
in the lessons and accompanying support materials are controlled
at the beginning levels. Skills objectives progressively increase in
difficulty across the levels with the aim of preparing students for
success at follow-on training. Function objectives, which are tied to
the vocabulary, grammar, and/or skills of the lesson, allow students to
practice the language in real-life situations.
The presentation of each language component is based on a specific
objective, which is followed by activities designed to fulfill the
objective. The activities progress from simple to complex, beginning
with mechanical, or controlled, exercises and progressing to fully
communicative, open-ended activities. The latter are designed to
expose students to naturally spoken and written language in everyday
contexts and give students many opportunities to practice and become
more proficient in English.

Content: Support for Busy Instructors


The features of the helpful notes in the instructor text (IT) and the
design of the second-edition textbooks in general provide a program
of support, ease, and minimum preparation for the instructor.
Objectives are clearly written in professional terms at the beginning
of each lesson and repeated at the beginning of the section in which
they occur.
Presentation suggestions and step-by-step procedural guidance save
instructors time in both preparation and explanation.
A reduced version of the student text page, with answers when
applicable, is provided on the corresponding page in the IT.
Vocabulary presentations are thematically organized to present new
terms in a variety of cultural, military, semi-technical, and generalinterest contexts.
Visual aidsincluding photographs, illustrations, charts, and
graphic organizersenhance and expand most activities.
8

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

First Printing 2011

1 The ALC at a Glance: Focus & design


Exercises require active, individual responses as well as student
interaction. Numerous student-centered activities allow for
personalized responses through pair and group work.
Appendices in the ST and IT provide useful reference information
about the lesson and English language as well as resources to
enhance lesson activities.
Support materials for every lesson ensure students have sufficient
practice to master the objectives and eliminate, or greatly reduce,
the need for the instructor to develop supplementary materials.

Language Training: Intensive vs. Nonintensive


The ALC is designed to be taught primarily in an intensive language
training program, but the course is adaptable for nonintensive
programs as well. The materials have a high degree of flexibility,
which makes them suitable for large or small classes and for programs
of varying lengths.

At DLIELC, one week typically


consists of 30 hours of instructional time, including two hours
of IMI activities and a 45-minute
book quiz. Additionally, students
spend about two hours per
day completing homework and
studying outside of class. In
certain books and situations,
instructors can opt to use two
full weeks to cover one book.

English language training at DLIELC is intensive. General English


instructors usually cover and test material from one ALC book
each week. However, each book contains more material than can be
covered in that span of time. For that reason, program managers are
encouraged to adapt the length of time spent on each ALC book to
best suit the needs and goals of their particular students.
The ALCs counterpart, the Nonintensive American Language Course
(NALC), Volumes 14, shares the same objectives, and its focus and
design run parallel to the ALC. It is intended, however, to fit into a
broad academic program of study in which students meet infrequently
to learn English. For that reason, two shorter lessons in the NALC are
equivalent to one complete ALC lesson. The NALCs current range of
instruction, which spans Books 116 of the ALC, will take students
to an ECL level of 57 and up. (Refer to the chart on the next page for
ECL ranges.)

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

First Printing 2011

1 THE ALC AT A GLANCE: Levels & student placement


ALC Levels IV (Six books per level)
ALC Books 130 introduce students to general English and military
terms and expose them to American language and culture while
providing ample opportunities to put English into practice in a
classroom setting. Books, and the lessons and activities within them,
progress from simple to complex language usage and topics. Themes
range from common survival topics to high-interest general and
military topics. Semi-technical vocabulary, such as words needed to
change a tire or describe an electrical circuit, appears with increasing
frequency as students progress through the levels. Book quizzes and
skills assessments are the means of determining student mastery of
objectives.

Student Placement Using the ECL or ALCPT


The English Comprehension Level (ECL) and the American
Language Course Placement Test (ALCPT) are DLIELC-produced
assessment tools which test English language proficiency. The tests
each have a listening section and a reading section with items in a
multiple-choice format. Either the ECL or the ALCPT can be used to
determine ALC book placement.
ALC Book
Range

ALC Level & Proficiency

ECL/ALCPT
Range

16

I Elementary

712

II High Elementary

2551

1318

III Intermediate

4963

1924

IV High Intermediate

6174

2530

V Advanced

7381

3134

VI Advanced Professional

029*

79+

Scores of 29 or below require instructor evaluation for placement.

10

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

First Printing 2011

2
ALC Student Text Organization
Book table of contents
Lessons 14
Lesson 5
Appendices
Homework
Evaluation exercises

11

First Printing 2011

2 ALC student text organization: Book table of contents


A Reference to the Major Sections of the Book
The books table of contents is located at the end of the preface,
just before Lesson 1. It provides a comprehensive overview of
each major section of the book, including the appendices.

ts

Conten
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LESSO

N 3:

LESSO

N 4:

LESSO

N 5:
ES:

DIC
APPEN

The Lesson Resources


appendix pages are listed
in their entirety for quick
reference.

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OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

xxi

Using the above table of contents as


a guide, the following sample pages
from Book 18 highlight each major
section of an ALC student textbook.

First Printing 2011

2 ALC student text organization: Lessons 14

The Four Main ALC Lessons


All objectives for the book are presented and practiced in Lessons 14.
Each lesson begins with a table of
contents, which lists each sections
language area, title, and page number.

US Presidents

2
Weath
er

VOCABULARY:

Can you name these world leaders? . . . . . . . . . . . 3


Who can be president in the US?. . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

GRAMMAR:

Its unlikely that the boss will agree with us. . . . . . . 6

VOCABULARY:

The road to the White House . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

WRITING:

Sending messages by e-mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

GRAMMAR:

Choices with correlative conjunctions . . . . . . . . . 14

READING:

Reading graphs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

VOCABULARY:

The accidental US president . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

GRAMMAR:

I asked him if we had any homework. . . . . . . . . . 20

DIALOG:

Reporting information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

VOCABULARY:

Science: Examining the world around us . . . . . . . 24

WRITING:
VOCAB
ULARY
: READING:
GRAM
Extrem
MAR:
e wea

WRITIN

G:

LISTEN

ING:

VOCAB
ULARY
:
MAR:

GRAM

VOCAB
ULARY
:

SPEAK

ING:

GRAM

Employment

MAR:

LISTEN

Organizing a text using a visual map . . . . . . . . . 27


Reading faster for better comprehension . . . . . . . 30

ther .
. . . .
If I had
. . . .
. . . .
longer
arms, I
. . . .
. . . 33
could be
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. . . .
Today
. . . .
42
will be
.
.
.
.
partly
. . . .
sunny.
. . . 44
I wish
. . . .
Iw
. . . .
BOOK 18 LESSON
1 ere a sp
. . . .
orts ch
. . . 45
ampion
The ra
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in will
. . . .
change
. . . .
to snow
. 47
Its dan
in the
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afternoo
to walk
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. . 50
Are yo
night.
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. . . .
to gett
. . . .
ing up
. 55
Listen
at 0600
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? . . .
warnin
. . . .
g briefi
. . . 56
Giving
ngs . .
warnin
. . . .
gs . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . 58
Readin
. . . .
g a char
. . . .
t . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . 59
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . 60

GRAMMAR:

ING:
Conducting a successful job search . . . .D.IA.L. . . . 63
OGS
New employee training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . :. 64
READIN
G:
Arent we studying negative questions today? . . . . 66

VOCABULARY:

Company benefits and policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

GRAMMAR:

That cant be Chris. He broke his leg. . . . . . . . . . 72

READING:

Reading a diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74

VOCABULARY:

Keep it professional. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Whats your point of view? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
VOCABULARY:

DIALOGS:

LESSON
Im sorry, but I completely disagree with you.
. .2 . . 82

SPEAKING:

GRAMMAR:
It was a big storm, wasnt it? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83

What should Chris have done differently? . . . . . . . 95

GRAMMAR:

WRITING:
Changing adjectives to nouns with suffix -ness . . . . 84
Changing verbs to nouns with suffix -ment . . . . . . 85
VOCABULARY:

Organizing a text using a visual map . . . . . . . . . 98

WRITING:

Organizing a text using a visual map . . . . . . . . . 87

VOCABULARY:

Memories and
story telling

BOOK 18

BOOK 18 LESSON 3

There is more than enough


material in each lesson for
a typical six-hour class day.
Program managers can adapt
their course schedule to meet
the needs of their students
and instructional situation.

61

Childhood memories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
A crazy and tiring day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92

31

Helen Keller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Americans with Disabilities Act . . . . . . . . . . . .101

READING:

Scanning a chart for information. . . . . . . . . . . .105

GRAMMAR:

A man whom many people still honor today . . . . . .106

DIALOG:

Telling stories about the past. . . . . . . . . . . . . .109

GRAMMAR:

I expect you to explain this low score to me. . . . . . .110

VOCABULARY:

Working with definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112

READING:

Reading faster for better comprehension . . . . . . .115

WRITING:

Sending messages by e-mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116

BOOK 18 LESSON 4

A gray bar on the edge


of the page indicates the
beginning of each major
section of a book.

89

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

13

First Printing 2011

2 ALC student text organization: Lesson 5

Review of the Four Main Lessons


Lesson 5 contains approximately
2025 exercises which are designed
to be completed in class. They offer
an additional opportunity to practice
the objectives from Lessons 14.

ISE H

mble

Unscra

rds in
the wo

eses to

parenth

s.

ntence

write se

e.
languag
foreign
ires) a
/ requ
age.
u
gu
yo
n
/
la
study
foreign
sity (to
study a
univer
you to
t)?
1. That
requires
you wan
o
ersity
d
iv
/
n
u
That
to order
a (us /
ight.
zz
pi
of
every n
at kind
ework
2. Wh
of hom
o hours
tw
o)
d
to
pects /
(us / ex
b.
teacher
ecial jo
3. Our
a) a sp
t. Garci
ct / Cap
ill sele
w
/
o
(to d
)?
major
instruct
4. The
to do /
uits /
he recr
(t
t
n
l sergea
the dril
at did
5. Wh
nce.
a sente
to write
t order
correc
e
th
in
words
Put the
ISE I
and / .
EXERC
nner /
/ for di
ry.
/ steak
va
e
l
av
il
h
w
s
/ We /
Answer
going to
th / are
e/.
ken / bo
ry awak
1. chic
/ or / ve
er / I am
d / eith
re
ti
ry
.
ass / ve
t also /
r this cl
ash / bu
2. afte
ust / w
/ You m
ly
on
/ not
es / dry
e cloth
of thes
ly / .
3. all
im / Sal
nor / K
party /
out the
ab
/
er
eith
told / N
4. was
eat / .
This m
t also /
/ is / bu
ot only
n
/
y
dr
salty /
5. too

EXERC
r
Numbe

1 is an

Review

e.

exampl

117

BOOK 18 LESSON 5

sk &
ates. A

sm

ral clas

seve
Talk to

ISE W

EXERC

No and
le Yes or s.
box, circ
as
In each swers to the cl
a few an

used
re you

answer
smate

e clas
me of th

who

LESSON

e na

write th

to

t
g to ge
walkin ere?
h
everyw
NO
YES

s in
g movie
watchin glish?
En
NO
YES

righ
g from
readin left?
to
NO
YES

the
ing in
swimm n?
ocea
NO
YES

the
g late on
sleepin kends?
wee
NO
YES

veral
g out se
workin a week?
times
NO
YES

ee
your fr
ng all
spendi ith family?
time w
NO
YES

every
e-mails
writing day?
NO
YES

ther
g tea ra
drinkin coffee?
than
NO
YES

In these examples, students


review three different grammar
objectives from the book in a
variety of exercise formats.

for
d meat
eggs an kfast?
brea
NO
YES

14

dinner
zza for

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

LESSON

n
your ow
Write
:
question

pi

YES

ner is
Lt Wer g movies in
watchin
vorite
used to In fact, his fa
h.
Englis movie is .

BOOK 18

rt

n repo
ed. The
answer

123

BOOK 18

.
s below

estion

the qu

NO

used to
is not dinner.
Lt Kal
r
pizza fo
eating efers lamb.
He pr
133

First Printing 2011

2 ALC student text organization: Appendices


The Language Reference &
Resource Section

APPENDIX A

Word List

D
academic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
damage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
academy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
danger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
acquire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
deaf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
advise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
definite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
agree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
design (n) (v) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
agreement
...................3
detail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
all of a sudden . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
disability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
along (adv)
..................4
disabled . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
along (prep) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
disagree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
anthropology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
disagreement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
appoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
drizzle (n) (v) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
E
appointee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
economics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
....................1
APPENDIX B Structureappointment
List
either ... or . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
as . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
B
elect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
PART OF
STRUCTURE
WORD OR
LESSON
barricade (n) (v) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
eligible . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
SPEECH
SENTENCE PATTERN
be accustomed to . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
employ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
be used to . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
employee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Affix
Suffix:
I hademployer
a
3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
. . . . . . . . . After
. . . . . the
. . . .game,
.3
benefit (n)
. . . . . . . . . . . . weakness
. . . . . . . . . in
. 3my legs.employment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Adjective benefit
to noun(v)with
biology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
engineer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
-ness
blame . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
blind (adj) (v). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
establish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Affix
Suffix:
I had a disagreement
3
both ... and . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
evacuate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Verb to noun
with
-ment
with
my
wife.
bring/brought/brought back
.....4
evacuation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
C
excellent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
campaign
. . . . . . . . . . . Thats
. . . . . . the
. . . .woman
1
F
Clause
Restrictive
adjective. clauses
4
APPENDIX C The English Alphabet
candidate.
. . . . . . . . . . (whom)
. . . . . . . I. .was
. 1 speaking
fact . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
with who(m),
that, or. .which
cant be . . . . . . . . . . . . . . to
. . yesterday.
........3
favorable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
carry . . . .CURSIVE
......................4
fire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
TYPESCRIPT
HAND PRINTED
chemistry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
flash (n) (v) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
CAPITAL
SMALL
SMALL
CAPITALpresent
ClauseCAPITAL
If-clauses chief
to express
(adj)
(n) . . . SMALL
. . . . . . . If
. . I. had
. . . . .more
. . 3 time, Id
flood (n) 2
(v) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
unreal
conditions
chiefly . A
. . . . . . . . . a. . . . . study
. . . . . .more.
....3
fog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
A
a
A
a
childhood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
foggy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
b
B
b
coast.
. . B.following
. . . . . . . . b. . . . . Its
. . . .important
. . . . . . 2 that we
force (n) 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,4
Clause B
That-noun
clause
communicate . . . . . . . . . . work
. . . . . together.
.....4
force (v) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
the
C
c anticipatory itC. =
C
c
c
....................3
forecast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
It + BE + concern
adjective .+. .(that)
concerned
forecast/forecast/forecast . . . . . . . . . . 2
D
d clause
D
d
D . . . . . . . d. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
noun
condition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
G
E
e
E
e
E
consideration.
. . . . e. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
get/got/gotten off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Conjunction
Correlative
conjunctions:
is both tall and get/got/gotten
1
control
(n) (v). . . . . . . . . . Jim
...........3
rid of
F
f
F
f
F. . . . . . . . f. . . . . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 43
get the point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
both convince.
and
strong.
APPENDIX D American English Sounds
have
. . . . . . . g. . . . . Neither
. . . . . . . the
. . . 4teacher nor
graduate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
G
gnot onlycould
G
g
Galso
but
couldnt
be . . . . . . . . . . . the
. . . .students
. . . . . . 3 were on
either
or
H
h
h is spelled several
H
h
English is not spelled phonetically. TheHsame sound
different
ways.
..........1
neither current
nor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . time.

The appendices, which follow


Lesson 5, are an invaluable resource for students and instructors alike. The example appendix section on this and the next
two pages is from Level III.

For this reason it is helpful to assign separate symbols to each sound. The following
I
i
I
i
I
i
is the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) system. Twenty-four (24) consonant
Negative
Negative
information
J
j
symbols, eleven (11) vowel symbols, and
representing
diph
thongs
J five (5) symbols
j
J
j
questions
to18seek
information
BOOK
APPENDIX
A
are used to represent the significant sounds of AmericanQuestion
English.
K
k
K
k
K
k
These charts are only aids and not to be memorized. However, the students must
Negative
Negative
inl
L must be
l able to yes/no questions
L
l
L
be aware of the different sounds represented
in these
charts.
They
Question
expectation of agreement
recognize and repeat them accurately. M
M
m
m

VOWELS

Reported
CONSONANTS

Symbol Examples

o
Symbol
Examples O

/i/
he, meet, teach, chief
List of Contractions

Speech

/p/
p

past, stop, Pput, paperp

(are not)

/ei/

/b/
in, is, sit, big
Q
q
well
(we
will / we shall ) /t/
day, make,
train, vein,
steak

bed, baby, barber, lab

arent
cant

(cannot)

//

(we are)
met, let,were
said, bread

date, student, do, hard

APPENDIX E

/i/

n
o

S recorder,
s book
car, chemical,

take, sent, ten, gentle

/d/

n
N
Reported
information
questions
o
O

couldnt (could not)

//

cash, half,
laugh, hand
weve
(we have) S

s
/k/

didnt

(did not)

//

father, far,
heart, pot,
not is) T
whats
(what

//
t

gas, eggs, dog,


T cigar t

BOOK 18 APPENDIX B

doesnt

(does not)

/m/

arm, my, number,


from
U
u

dont

(do not)

hasnt

(has not)

//

sing, long, wrong, rank

/u/

all, saw, bought, caught


wheres (where is) U
go, know, coat, tow, pole
V has)
whos
(who is / who
book, took, good, should
wont
soup
(will not) W
food, blue,
blew, do,

//

(would not)X
cup, son,wouldnt
sun, enough

/r/
x

X for, writex
read, course,

farmer, affiYrm, phone,ylaugh

//
/o/
//

havent

(have not)

hed

(he would / he had)/i/

hell

(he will)

hes

(he is / he has)

hows

(how is)

Id

(I would / I had)

Ill

(I will / I shall)

Im
Ive

/i/
//

/n/

no, line, find, noon

youd
(you wouldY/ you had)/f/
I, nice, tie,
buy, by,write
y
noise, boy,
point, oil
youll
(you will) Z
out, now,youre
town, mouth
(you are)

Wtory, always,
w let
well, labora

w
/l/

/v/

very, give, live, seven

//

thank, Thursday, bath, north

//

the, this, these, weather

/s/

see, this, lesson, tapes

/z/

zero, rose, blows, dozen

//

ship, nation, should, push

(I am)

//

pleasure, measure, usual

(I have)

/h/

have, he, how, hot

isnt

(is not)

/t/

chair, teacher, picture, march

its

(it is / it has)

/d/

judge, bridge, page, July

lets

(let us)

/w/

we, walk, wish, away

/j/

yes, you, yesterday, young

//
//

ago, alphabet, listen, student


youve
(you have)
her, bird, doctor, earn

mustnt (must not)


shed

(she would / she had)

shell

(she will / she shall)

shes

(she is / she has)BOOK 18 APPENDIX D

BOOK 18 APPENDIX C

(that is)

theyd

(they would / they had)

theyll

(they will / they shall)

theyre

(they are)

theyve

(they have)

wed

(we would / we had)

BOOK 18 APPENDIX E

v
w

Didnt your father


retire last year?

Jim asked me if we had


any homework.

A-1

B-1

x
Appendices
AE
y
z

A: Lists vocabulary in the book


with the corresponding lesson
C-1

D-1

B: Lists grammar in the book, including examples, part of speech, and


the corresponding lesson
C: Shows three variations of the written English alphabet
D: Provides the International
Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) with
examples

shouldnt (should not)


thats

V
W

Why arent you coming


to the party tonight?

E: Lists English contractions and


their full versions
E-1

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

15

First Printing 2011

2 ALC student text organization: Appendices


Appendices FI and K

APPENDIX F

Spelling Rules for Regular Past Tense Verbs

VERB ENDING

F: Provides spelling rules for


regular past tense verbs

2 vowels + 1 consonant

G: Lists irregular verb patterns


sorted alphabetically

vowel + y

-ED ENDING
CC

2 consonants

VVC
VY

APPENDIX G

vowel + consonant
in
Present
a 2-syllable wordarise
with
stress on first syllable

Past

VC arose

add
-ed

BASE FORM

PAST TENSE

talk

talked

want

wanted

repeat

repeated

clean

cleaned

play

played

Principal Parts of Some Irregular Verbs


Past Participle

open
Present

arisen

opened
Past

fall
fell
answer
answered
feed
fed
be
was
been
feel
felt
bear
bore
borne
fight
fought
circle
circled
Drop thebeaten
-e
beat
beat
find
found
consonant + e become CE became and add
become
flee
fled
-ed
shave
shaved
begin
began
begun
fly
flew
H Patterns offorget
Irregular Verbs
bend
bentAPPENDIXbent
forgot
bet
bet
bet
forgive
forgave
vowel + consonant in a
VC bid
stop
stopped
bid
bid
freeze
froze
INFINITIVE
1-syllable word
bind
bound Double the
bound
consonant
principal
parts theget
same
bite
bit 1. Three
bitten
gothit
occur
occurred
quit
and add
vowel + consonant
in
bleed
bled
give
gave
split
-ed bled
VC
a 2-syllable word with
blew
blown
grind
ground
stress on second blow
syllable
bet
prefer
preferred
break
broke
broken
grow
grew
let
set
bring
brought
brought
build
built
built
hang
hung
put
study
studied
burst
burst Change yburst
have
hadcut
to i
shut
CY bought and add
consonant + y buy
dry
dried
bought
hear
heard
-ed
hide
hidtried
bid
try
cast
cast
cast
hit
hit
hurt
catch
caught
caught
hold
held
burst
APPEN choose
chose
chosen
hurt
hurt
DIX I
cost
Punctcame
come
uation
Punctu come
and Cap
shed
aticost
italizat
cost
cost
on
keep
kept
ion
spread
A. PE
creep
crept
crept
know
knew
RIOD (.)
cast
cut
cut
cut
1. Use
lay
laid
a period
2. Last two principal parts the same
The pe dealat the enddealt
dealt
lead
led
of a stat
n
emenconsonant
Go to th and paper ar
tdug
or com change only
dig
dugthe a. Final
BOOK 18 APPENDIX
leave
lefthave F-1
eFch
alkboa e on
mand.
table.
make
rd and
2. Use
write yo
do
did
done
lend
lent
a period
ur nam
after an
NOTE
e.
drawn
let
let build
: Abbdraw
brevia
reviated abdrew
ti
on
Feb. (F
or andrunk
milita
drank
lie
laybend
initial.
eb drink
ry rank
APPENDIX K
US Military Ranks, Grades, and Insignia
Dr. Sm ruary)
s do no
ith (Doc
t requir
drive
drove
driven
light
lit spend
e a peri
r Smith
Mr. Bro
send
US MILITARY OFFICER RANK INSIGNIA J. Jones (John to
od. lose
)
w
n
lost
Jones)
B.
Ms. Littl
eeaten
a.m.
AIR FORCE
ARMY
MARINES
NAVY QUESTION MA eat
ate b.MVowel
rs
change
only
meet
. White
RK (?)
p.m.
read
Use a
Maj Jo
question
bleed
hnson
mark af
statem
O-10
ent.
ter a qu
feed
GENERAL
GENERAL
GENERAL
estion.
How m
Somet
lead
ADMIRAL
any ch BOOK 18 APPENDIX G
imes th
ildren ar
Hes he
e
qu
e in yo
estion
re toda
ur
m
y?
fa
ay
mily?
C. EX
be writt light
CLAM
en
slide
lik
ATION
ea
O-9
MARK
sit
LIEUTENANT
LIEUTENANT
LIEUTENANT
(!)
Use an
GENERAL
GENERAL
GENERAL
VICE ADMIRAL
shoot
exclam
ation m
ment,
hold
surprise
ark afte
r
, or em
win
exclam
otion. A words, senten
ation m
shine
ny excl
ark.
O-8
What a
amatio ces, or expres
game!
n, even
sions th
REAR ADMIRAL
MAJOR GENERAL
MAJOR GENERAL
MAJOR GENERAL
Lo
if
at
not a se
show ex
(UPPER HALF) ok out!
nt
ci
ence, w
teDo it!
ill end
with an
Wow! O
h!
D. QU
O-7
O
BOOK
18
APPENDIX
H
TA
TION M
BRIGADIER
BRIGADIER
BRIGADIER
REAR ADMIRAL
ARKS
GENERAL
GENERAL
GENERAL
( )
(LOWER
1. UHALF)
se quot
ation m
the lin
e and ar arks to show
the wor
e
us
ed
Jo
O-6
hn said
in pair
ds of a
s.
speake
Where , The comm
r. They
COLONEL
COLONEL
COLONEL
CAPTAIN
issary
are the
re alway
closes
childre
s placed
2. If th
at 2100
n? she
above
e words
ho
as
ur
ked.
s today.
of the
both pa
sp
eaker ar
rts.
e
di
O-5 LIEUTENANT
vided in
Do yo
LIEUTENANT
LIEUTENANT
u, she
to two
asked,
parts,
COMMANDER
COLONEL
COLONEL
COLONEL
3.(SILVER
use qu
go to th
UseOAK
(SILVER OAK LEAF)
(SILVER OAK LEAF)
(SILVER OAK LEAF)
otation
quLEAF)
e library
otat
marks
after cl
zines, sh ion marks ar
around
ass?
ound th
ort poem
e titles
s, shor
Last ni
of
t
st
gh
ch
ories, an
apters
O-4
Learn t, I read the ch
,
ar
d
so
ti
cles, pa
ngs.
ing Eng
rts of bo
MAJOR
MAJOR
MAJOR
LIEUTENANT COMMANDER
lish in apter Gramm
the new
oks an
ar Is E
(GOLD OAK LEAF)
(GOLD OAK LEAF)
(GOLD OAK LEAF)
(GOLD OAK LEAF)
d magaasy in
spaper
.
our book
. Then,
I read th
BOOK 18
e ar ticle
APPEND
O-3

H: Shows irregular verb patterns sorted by pattern type


I: Highlights rules of English
punctuation and capitalization with examples
K: Illustrates US military
ranks for each service
(Levels IIIIV only*)

CAPTAIN

CAPTAIN

IX I

(SILVER BARS)

(SILVER BARS)

(SILVER BARS)

CAPTAIN

LIEUTENANT

1ST LIEUTENANT

1ST LIEUTENANT

1ST LIEUTENANT

LIEUTENANT JUNIOR GRADE

2ND LIEUTENANT

2ND LIEUTENANT

2ND LIEUTENANT

(SILVER BARS)

O-2
(SILVER BAR)

(SILVER BAR)

(SILVER BAR)

(SILVER BAR)

O-1
(GOLD BAR)

BOOK 18 APPENDIX K

16

(GOLD BAR)

(GOLD BAR)

ENSIGN

(GOLD BAR)

K-1

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

Past Participle

fallen
fed
felt
fought
found
fled
flown
forgotten
forgiven
frozen
PAST

PAST
PARTICIPLE

hit (got)
gotten
quit
given
split
ground
bet
grown
let
set

hit
quit
split

hung
put
had
cut
shut
heard
hidden
bid
hit
hurt
held
burst
hurt
cost

put
cut
shut

shed
kept
spread
known
cast

shed
spread

bid
hurt
burst
cost

cast

laid
led
lefthad
made
lent
letbuilt
lain
bent
lit spent
(lighted)
sent
lost
met
read
bled
fed
led
lit
slid
sat
shot
held
won
shone

bet
let
set

G-1

had
made
built
bent
spent
sent
met
read
bled
fed
led
lit
slid
sat
shot
held
won
shone

H-1

*Appendix contents vary by level


and slightly by book. Level I books
contain an additional appendix,
which lists the flash cards available
for the lessons.
I-1

First Printing 2011

2 ALC student text organization: Appendices


Appendix J (Lesson Resources)

APPENDIX J

This section contains the books


supplementary materials, which
instructors are encouraged to prepare before class. Many of these
resources are designed to be made
into transparencies or copied and
then cut out. Preparation tips are
offered in the IT notes.

Lesson Resources

18L1 #1

Writing skill (Message role-plays) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .J-3

18L1 #2

Reading skill (Timed reading) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .J-5

18L2 #1

Weather report cards (Exercise F) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .J-7

18L4 #1

Reading skill (Timed reading) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .J-9

18L4 #2

Writing skill (Message role-plays) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .J-11

18L5 #1

Reading skill (Timed reading) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .J-13

A partial gray bar


on the edge of the
first page of Appendix J
makes it easy to locate.

Materials are labeled


with lesson information
and location for easy
reference and filing.

Readin
g skill

B18

L1 # 2

Lesson
1
Page
Timed Re 30
ading

Writing
skill

18L

4 #2

Lesson
4
Message Page 116
role-pla
ys

Mr. Wol
fson
Tell your
the trav secretary to se
Secretar
nd an eel office
1A
y
mail to
to notif
will be
y th
trav
Mr. Wol
business eling to Germ em that you
fs
e-mail. on will tell yo
an
ne
u to send
Ask ques
ticket an xt week. You y for
l
d
informat
tio
an
possible hotel reservat l need a plane
ion to pu ns to find out
ions as
.
w
t in the
soon as
e-mail. hat

Mecha
nic
Tell the
se
Parker to rvice manager
Service
2A
to
Manag
be read let him know th e-mail Mr.
er
y by tom
The mec
at his ca
or
repair w
r
hanic w
ill cost row afternoon. will e-mail
$99 and
to a cust ill tell you to se
pick up
The
om
nd an
M
hi
find out
er. Ask
anytime s vehicle at th r. Parker can
w
e servic
the e-m hat informatio questions to
after 3 o
e desk
ail.
n is need
clock.
ed in
2B
Paint st
ore owne
r
Tell one
your wor
e-mail to
kers to
Paint st
3A
se
ore wor
to tell hi a customer nam nd an
ker
Your bo
m
ed Mr. R
ss
ready. H that his specia
eid
e-mail to will tell you to
e
l
today or can pick it up order is
se
at the st
find out a customer. Ask nd an
tomorro
ore
will be
w
w, and th
$789.
include hat informatio questions to
e total co
n you ne
in the est
mail.
ed to
3B
Maj Nie
lson
The base
from 08 will give flu sh
SSgt
BOOK 18
00
ot
4A them. It -1500 to anyo s tomorrow
APPEND
IX J
ne who
is
Maj Nie
w
personne required that
all milita ants e-mail. lson will tell yo
l receiv
u to send
Ask ques
e the sh
ry
highly re
ot
in
commen
tions to
an
,
formatio
because
fin
ded for and its
n
d
you need
ou
th
e-mail.
th
to includ t what
bad this e flu season is eir families
e in the
year.
expected
to be
4B
BOOK 18

APPEND

IX J

J-11

1B

BOOK 18 APPENDIX J

US Mil
itary A
Th
cadem
militar e United Sta
ies
y
te
leader academies fo s governmen
s in th
r the ar
t establ
e
sc
m
ished sp
people
the oppo iences and in ed forces to
train it ecial
and gu
le
s future
arante rtunity to rece adership. It
es them
of
active
iv
duty.
a comm e a high qual fers young
ission
Th
when th ity education
ey go on
States. ere are five
service
T
academ
is also he oldest one
ies
ca
is
establis lled West Poi the US Milit in the Unit
ed
nt. The
hed in
ary Aca
18
The Coa
US
de
st Guar 45 and is loca Naval Acade my, which
Connec
ted in
d Acade
my was
ti
A
Academ cut, was esta my, located in nnapolis, Mar
bl
y
yland.
Colorad was establis ished in 1876 New London
,
h
,
o. The
Merch ed in 1954 n and the Air F
Kings
ant Mar
ear Col
Point,
orce
or
N
in
in the
ado Spr
Naval ew York. Its gr e Academy
is locate ings,
Reserve
aduates
d in
.
Get
receive
is not an ting an appo
commis
in
sions
ea
tm
sy thin
small n
g. Gov ent to one of
u
these ac
must be mber of candi ernment offi
ademie
ci
da
h
al
ig
te
s
s
h
s
se
ly m
each ye
lect on
loyalty
ar. All
ly a
and hon otivated stu
candida
de
this, th
or as w
tes
e candi
ell as le nts and have
da
Every
adersh
a record
tes mu
ye
ip
necessa ar many stude st have a good . In addition of
to
ry
fewer ge qualification nts apply but academic reco
only a
rd
s to be
t appoin
few hav .
come ca
tments
e the
ndidate
.
s, and
even

J-1

Word C
ou

nt: 204

The Lesson Resources appendix includes a variety of materials, such as the following:
J-5

role-play cards
listening scripts
timed reading texts
transparency masters
activity cards

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

17

First Printing 2011

2 ALC student text organization: Homework


Reinforcement of Lessons 14

HOMEWORK FOR BOOK 18 LESSON 1


EXERCISE A

Each lesson has a corresponding


homework section located after the
appendices. Lesson objectives are
reinforced in the homework exercises, which students can complete
independently after class.

Complete the letter with the words in the box.

Dear Wesley,
I am happy to tell you that you have been selected as a

1 5

candidate for an 1

Academy

qualifies
academic
leadership

to the US Air Force


. We have looked not only at your

record but also at your fine record of

as president of your high school class.

We receive many applications, and you are one of the few

appointment

who 5

to be an Air Force cadet.


In this package you will find further information

about what you must do to complete the necessary steps to


become an 6

EXERCISE A

recommendation, medical reports, and all other papers will

reach

HOMEWORK FOR BOOK 18 LESSON 2

be kept. Your advisor is 8

named

hurricane
flash

barricading

tornados

I offer you my congratulations and ask that you


our 10

established

flood

11

Sincerely,

is moving across
the Atlantic
Ocean
EXERCISE
A Use
the words from the box to complete the dialogs.

Maj Gen Alan Able, Commandant

towards our city.


concerns
Because of the storm, city officials are ordering an 3
people from their homes to safer areas. Its 4
rains from the storm will 5

head

supervises
that heavy

of

agreement

get rid of
benefits

convince

you 1the
truth
BOOKto18tell
LESSON
HOMEWORK

our town, and the water could

6
. company health
cover cars and houses. High winds could also cause1.several
Jan: Im worried about my

has passed. Police will start 8


2.
Paul: Did you
all city roads tomorrow morning, so if you plan to evacuate, now is the time. We
Pat:
now return you to our regular programming.
Match the synonyms.

3.

2.

a. bad, severegood idea.


b. partly frozen rain
Jeff: Whos the
c.4. danger

3. sleet
4. take precautions
5. unfavorable
6. hazard

BOOK 18 LESSON 2 HOMEWORK

Paul only cares


for himself. He doesnt have any
today.

, I disagree with you.


3. You have a very good argument;
of this company?
a. however
b. therefore
Roger:
this department.
d. light
rain Im not sure, but Greg Jenson
c. rather than
e. be careful
.
4. Dont forget to put the meat in the refrigerator. Itll
f. EXERCISE
power
B Select the best answer.
a. carry
b. share
1. Do you understand this homework?
c. spoil
a. No, I still dont getHW-11
the point.
b. Yes, Im going to get rid of it.
5. Would you like to come
with us to the movies?
c. Yes, its unfavorable.
a. along
b. during
2. How many employees does your company have?
c. such as
a. We make 2 different products.
b. The workers start at 0900.
6. The police officer used
to stop the man from hurting anyone.
c. We have 25 people who work for us.
a. force
b. memory
c. childhood
HW-19

BOOK 18 LESSON 3 HOMEWORK

At DLIELC, students are encouraged to spend at least two hours


per day doing homework and
studying outside of class.

7.

I was driving down the street when,

, a man ran in front of my car.

a. all of a sudden
b. therefore
c. frequently

BOOK 18 LESSON 4 HOMEWORK

18

for others.

a. memory
them that it was a
b. disability
c. consideration

Josh: Great! Then you were able to

2. force

some money each month for my vacation.

b. set aside
c. look after

, I forgot.

Alana: Our companies finally signed the

1. drizzle

Select the. best answer.

1. Im going to
that garbage?
a. blame

until the 7

HW-1

HOMEWORK
FOR BOOK 18 LESSON 4
.

A
The National Weather Service recommends that everyone
evacuate
to a safe
place
Jack:
You should
talk
to your supervisor aboutEXERCISE
your

EXERCISE B

of study. Many of our


say its the greatest opportunity

theyve ever had.


HOMEWORK
FOR BOOK 18 LESSON
3
for our radio listeners

We have a very important news 1


tonight. A strong 2

complete the necessary application steps required to enter

appointee

danger
probable

him by calling (500) 555-1234

between 8:00 and 5:00.

graduates
evacuation

Capt Handy.

You can 9

program

Fill in the blanks with words from the box.

. We have 7

a student record for you. This is where your letters of

6 11

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

HW-29

First Printing 2011

2 ALC student text organization: Evaluation exercises


EVALUATION EXERCISES FOR BOOK 18 LESSON 1

Book Quiz Preparation

EXERCISE A

Evaluation exercises (EE) for each lesson


are located at the back of the book. The
EE pages offer various types of exercises
that reinforce the objectives of the four
main lessons. They also provide a means
for instructors to check student mastery
of each lessons objectives.

1.

Select the best answer.

Calvins looking for a job as an airline pilot. Hes already


experience and pilots license.

the necessary

a. acquired
b. appointed
c. designed
2.

Ed has completed all of the required training in automobile repair. Now, hes
mechanic.
a. an ineligible
b. a political
c. a qualified

3.

Daves interested in designing and building machines. Hell probably get a


degree in
.
a. biology
b. chemistry
c. engineering

4.

EXERCISE A

5.

Select the best answer.

Lets drive to the

and go swimming in the ocean.

6.

The accident caused a lot of

to my car.

a. hazard
b. danger
c. damage
3.

The sun
a. flashes
b. strikes
c. rises

4.

My father

The police are


a. warning
b. flashing
c. setting up

6.

2.

3. You can buy a new car


barricades on the flooded streets.
a. all of a sudden
b. now that
c. on the other hand
.

4.

Two days of heavy rain caused


a. sleeting
b. flooding
c. hailing

EXERCISE A
you have a good job.

1.

7.

3.

of the

a. point
b. share
c. detail
.

a. disabled
b. ineligible
c. personal

EE-7
Now we are sure. The
wedding will

take place
May. Jan and Ben only knew each other for a week before they got married.
5. inKim:
.
Sue: Wow. That was
a. blind
b. deaf
c. sudden
6.

We walked along
a. exercise
b. the tree
c. the street

7.

Youre not allowed to

BOOK 18 LESSON 3 EVALUATION EXERCISES

The initial exercises in each


EE lesson approximate both
the reading and listening portions of the book quiz.

it open.

After they sell the business, each of the three owners will get a
several
money.employees.

.
Lets go to Masons Restaurant. The food is great and
service
4. the
Ralph
uses is
a wheelchair
because hes

a. mainly
b. definitely
c. personally

the students in the class.

a. spoil
b. control
c. remind

a. excellent
b. definite
c. sudden
BOOK 18 LESSON 2 EVALUATION EXERCISES

Select the best answer.

A good teacher must be able to

2. The door handle was stuck, but I was able to


employees about their careers.
a. fire
b. force
c. attach

One of a managers jobs is to

5. Ken is opening his own business. He needs to


in the downtown area.
a. hire
b. point out
c. get rid of
6.

EE-1

BOOK 18 LESSON 1 EVALUATION EXERCISES

EVALUATION EXERCISES FOR BOOK 18 LESSON 4

on taking long vacations?

a. fire
b. observe
c. advise

a. reports the daily conditions


b. repairs damaged buildings
c. teaches biology
7.

Do you know the companys

you in your job.

a. behavior
b. policy
c. employer

Robert is a weatherman. He

people to some

b. name
c. reach

Select the best answer.

1. This computer training will really


in the east and goes down in the west.
a. concern
b. benefit
c. agree

a. warned
b. wished
c. barricaded
5.

The President of the United States has the authority to


government positions.

EVALUATION EXERCISES FOR BOOK


18 LESSON 3
a. design
EXERCISE A

us not to play near the road.

The Air Force Academy is the newest US Service Academy. It was


in 1954.
a. voted
b. motivated
c. established

a. flood
b. coast
c. barricade
2.

occupation is

a. social
b. primary
c. academic

EVALUATION EXERCISES FOR BOOK 18 LESSON 2


1.

Delia occasionally writes magazine articles, but her


managing a travel agency.

EE-13

any weapons on an airplane.

a. persuade
b. carry
c. remind

BOOK 18 LESSON 4 EVALUATION EXERCISES

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

EE-19

19

First Printing 2011

NOTES

20

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

First Printing 2011

3
Using the ALC Instructor Text
Scope & sequence chart
The introduction
Student text vs. instructor text
IT notes

21

First Printing 2011

3 Using the ALC instructor Text: Scope & sequence chart


Planning & Review Made Easy
The second page of the preface contains a helpful scope & sequence
chart, which highlights each of the objectives for the book. This quick
reference guide appears in both the IT and the ST. Instructors can use
the information to plan lessons or quickly search for an objectives
appearance. Students can use the chart as a study guide.

ssons

nce, Le

eque
pe & S

15

Skills

c&
rite topi
d and w
Rea
G
ook
n idea
B
rence
phrase
ai
ns
fe
m
C
un
in
tio
L
no
nc
A
lect
Fu
+ adj. /
to jog
nyms
en & se
It + BE t a good idea
List
tify syno e)
lary
no
to iden
Vocabu
r and
n
fo
inut
Its
ca
m
sk
S
A

ing (1 ns
ve
ght.
ce
gi
ad
Lesson
vi
ni
re
to
ad
at
t
ed
no
give
estio
e
Tim
th and
nt / Why
er 6 qu
Fit for lif
plete a
on heal
Why do /suggestions
& answ
to com
rcise
ce
advice
Exe
n a text
fitness
ng advi
ro
Sca
st
r
fo
t
t
tter
ar
be
Die
ch
ad
H
c&
axation
rite topi
rfect
Rel
d and w
Past pe
Rea
to
ain idea tify synonyms
m
ve
si
as
BE-p
bits
n & iden essages
Present s present ha
Sca
m
expres
e & take
ess
sk for
Giv
to expr ity
raphrase fer
s A d give
to
t
om
st
go
ss
rite a pa
ie
ce
an
ave
ry cu
ne
H
W
ta
n
or
ili
io
xt in br
n
M
at
te
io
US
rite a
inform ilitary
obligat
ssive
ur tesies
Rew
t progre
and co
about m and
form
ons
t perfec
iti
s
as
ad
P
om
tr
ion
cust
tary
Mili
es
informat
ivileges
cour tesi
d fill in
hts & pr ranks
Rig
Read an
r
nd + about a person
e
r office
ru
io
nc
ge
re
en
S
n/
fe

/pro
ct in
es
+ noun + noun/pron/
d & sele y synonyms
and grad
Prefer
Rea
tif
r than
n to iden
to/rathe
about
Sca
Ask
s
e.
s
m
nd
ffe
es
ny
ru
pr
co
ute)
to
ge
d ex
e
a to
& an
th
te
an
g (1 min
to
er
s
in
ef
ce
I pr
king to
Lets go
ed read questions
preferen
Tim
efer wal
6
r.
pr
I
te
er

ea
sw
th
ges
& an
messa
ent
ther
driving.
er tainm d an
e & take in briefer
tive + ra
Ent
Giv
to-infini nitive
xt
an
+
te
s
r
a
es
fe
e
tr
fi
rit
Pre
ac
An
bare in im rather
Rew
than +
actor
form
er to sw
ga
I pref
rviewin ian
n.
ru
Inte
ic
an
th
mus
young
(than) swim.
rather
Would ther ski than
gh
Id ra
b + enou in.
jo
e /adver
c&
Adjectiv old enough to
rite topi
d and w
Hes
Rea
ea
id
s
n
nce
es
ai
re
pr
m
ex
ct infe
le to to
d & sele y synonyms
Be unab bility
Rea
identif
t
pa
to
ou
ca
n
in
+
ab
any
Sca
Ask
tonyms
/ too m
press
rms
and an
and ex y and Too much nt noun
mputers
base fo
cars.
lit
Using co
nounce ives
capabi lity
(non)couare too many
Pro
at
bi
r
re
te
pu
and
d deriv
The
incapa
n
se
an
io
ra
-t
Com
ph
ith
ra
e
noun w
rite a pa
hardwar
W
Verb to
to write
tware
n a text in a char t
?
-sion
Sof
Sca
ion
mputers
at
co
t
rm
ar
fo
in
Sm
es
us
ho
Smar t

o
16: Sc

tructures

ical S
rammat

cabula
Review
s all vo
5 review
Lesson

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4.

GUAGE

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AMERIC

ii

22

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

COURSE

A complete listing of scope &


sequence charts for Books 124
is in Appendix C of this book.

First Printing 2011

3 Using the ALC instructor Text: The introduction


Course Information & Teaching Tips
Novice instructors or those new to the ALC, 2nd Edition, will find an informative, levelspecific introduction to the course in the IT preface. The introduction is followed by
suggestions for classroom management and practices. Additionally, descriptions of the
most common types of ALC exercises, along with teaching strategies appropriate to the
particular level, are located at the end of the preface and referred to often in the IT notes.

Introduction
The American Language Course (ALC) is an
Speakers of a language community use
English-language program designed for students
language functions when they interact with
who need to understand and communicate in English
one another. Activities in this book emphasize
in vocational and professional contexts. Its books
interactional strategies for communication
are intended for intensive language instruction. In
that a foreigner or second-language learner
There areare
many
factors
the classroom; therefore, it is up
the ALC, grammar and vocabulary
taught
andthat can enhance
mustlanguage
master in order to English
performoutside
in the target
learning.
A
skilled
instructor
can
play
a significant
to the teacher
to create such opportunities in the
explained thoroughly, and all four language skills are
language
with competence
and self-assurance.
caninclude initiating,
classroom.
To help
developed systematically. role in the learning process. Instructors
These
maintaining,
andfacilitate authentic language use,
manipulate the language learning environment
to
employ
strategies and
like the following on a daily basis.
closing conversations;
communicating
create optimal conditions for learning.
Classroom
responding
to intentions,
and day
beliefs;
wishes,
Begin each
mingling with students,
About the ALC program
management includes factors rangingand
from
the appropriately
behaving
in face-to-face
practicing
greetings,
and
engaging
small
NOTE:
Ofteninthe
mosttalk.
opportune time to teach a
Introducing
a lessons theme
Each of the six ALC levelsphysical
builds on
the previous
layout
of the classroom to the
methods,In each lesson, exercises targeting words pronunciation is before students see it. If
interaction.

Provide
time
for
students to converse informally
ALC
30-40 new(rather
vocabulary
one to develop basic skillspractices,
in the areas
listening, theEach
andofprocedures
instructor
uses
tointroduces
thelesson
process
of communication
than
you
practice
a
vocabulary
repetition drill with books
with
each
other
in
English.
words.
Usually
these
focus
on
one
particular
theme.
speaking, reading, and writing.
The course
employs
successfully
achieve
lesson objectives.
the linguistic product) teach learners how
thelives
onlyand
clue students have is an oral one.
Askinabout
studentsclosed,
personal
Before beginning
a vocabulary
section,
lead
athe
warmtraditional methods of language
teaching
as an eclectic
to successfully
communicate
English.
The ALC
presents
curriculum.
It
Thus,
the
confusion
that
often
arises as a result of
opinions.
To dotried-and-true
this, focus onESL
topics
and current
up discussion
of the topic.
Focus
students
attention
well as more recently developed
communicative
The ST
usesofvarious
exercises
By focusing
language
incorporates
practical teaching techniques
from on the acquisition
the spelling of a word STEPS
is eliminated.
Any WORDS OR SENTENCES
DRILLING
events
in
which
they
areseeing
interested.
on any accompanying
illustrations.
The
pictures
approaches. Dialogs, student-centered
activities,
and activities
repeatedly.
These
include matching,
functions, students
develop
the ability
toand
use
a variety of methodologies.
The suggestions
effect
derived
from
prior
familiarity
with the word
discussion
serve
to stimulate
and students
will
audio and video recordings,
computer-delivered
true-false,
gap-fill,
labeling,
interest
Encourage
to categorizing,
discuss their learning
thewill
same
interactional
skills
that
native
speakers
1. Tell
students: Listen.
provided
on the following pages detail
practices
and
is
also
eliminated.
Take,
for
example,
a
military
give students
an opportunity
tomanage
useexperiences.
vocabulary
interactive multimedia instruction
(IMI),
and otherlanguage
alphabetizing,
questions,
completing
Talk about
language
difficulties
use, and
they learn to
theiranswering
ownthey
procedures
for effective
teaching.
rank. If students only hear kernel with
noindividual
meaning words, say the word.
2. For
already know.
It will also
provide
little
background
supplemental materials enhance the instruction.
charts
and
graphic
organizers,Let
etc.them
The offer
IT also
have
experienced.
advice
conversations
in the
targetathey
language.
attached, they will repeat a close approximation
Gesture for students to repeat. Listen to
with
the
topic.
Each book is designed for approximately 30 hours of information for students unfamiliar
occasionally
recommends
other
exercises
and
for
solving
language
problems
that
classmates
Exercises working with language and academic of it. However,
if
they
hear
kernel
but
see
colonel,
them
saying the word. Reinforce correct
The
typical
ALC
student
classroom teaching. The books are made to be used If students have difficulty grasping
activities
describes
do them. The
encountered.
theand
meaning
of how to
skills are also interspersedhave
throughout
the
many students will say coh-loh-nel, even
though by saying the word again.
pronunciation
in sequence, and each book
builds
on thetend
preceding
following
provide
ALC
students
to be highly
motivated,
careera new
term,
keep
in mind
meaningpages
is often
best short,it step-by-step
lessons.
These
aimthat
to develop
and
increase
differs
from
the
model,
but
very
likely
because
3. For statements, say each sentence with
one to promote cumulativeoriented,
languageadult
acquisition.
instructions
for many of the exercises and activities
learners. Most
have previously
conveyed
by showing
and differences
proficiency
insimilarities
listening,
speaking,
reading, and instructions
of language transfer from their own language.
For
Giving
classroom
falling intonation.
For questions, say
occurring
frequently
in the ST. (Instructions that are
attended
courses
undergone
rigorous
trainingitems. Here
between
vocabulary
are some
other
The ALC incorporates four
components
of and
language
writing.
The materialClassroom
allows
students
to develop
thisbereason,
it is recommended that pronunciation
ofwith rising intonation.
instructions
should
simple,
each question
self-evident,
such as those
for matching
andclear,
truea wide variety
of divergent
fields. Their
prior
effective
ways
of
getting
meaning
across.
learning in its curriculum:invocabulary,
grammatical
practical academic skills
universal
to any raisingnew
vocabulary
be
practiced first withGesture
books closed,
and
brief.
Repeating,
your
voice,
and
overfor students to repeat. Listen
false statements, are not included here.)
experience
may include academic
or practical,
structures, language functions,
and skills.
Show
an item.
language
situation and
appropriate
for confusion
future
and anxiety.
then withAsthem
open. If students subsequently
explaining
cause
and
a rule,
to their sentence. Reinforce correct
professional(individual
or vocational, physical or mental
The lessons present vocabulary
vocational
a word while reading, the
instructor by saying the sentence
Draw
the item or
in academic
contrast towriting.
another
item. what you mispronounce
pronunciation
Demonstrate
want
students
to
do.
training.
While
no
learner
arrives
at
the
classroom
words as well as phrases) that the learner needs
Oral drills
can remind them that they said it correctly
Demonstrate.
again.before.
blanktoslate,
this is especially
noticeable with
Spell individual words out loud when students
to understand and useasina order
communicate
Drillsa can
beordivided
into twoCorrecting
main types: repetition
convenient
Text
to ALCisstudents.
to bring
superior
errors
The
Illustrate
size
or angle Instructor
with
scale
grade.
4. Have all students repeat in chorus until
say
they
dont understand
them.
effectively in English.regard
Vocabulary
presentedThey tend
drills
and
transformation
drills.
In
repetition
drills,
cognitive
abilities
and vast prior
knowledge
and
performance
is satisfactory. Then,
instructor
textofiswords
available
each
ALC to
book. Itto The
ALCs
goal is tobyhelp language learners
become
An
Present
groups
inafor
category.
in contexts appropriate
for learners
studying
Tell
students
pages
andwithout
exercises
students
simply
repeatturn
what they
hear
experienceenvironments.
to the language learning
environment.
follow
the
instructor
how to mostusing
efficiently teach
theletters
proficient
in English.
aimthe
is same procedure and drill with
in professional and vocational
whenever
possible.In other words, the
tells
Provide
an antonym.
changing thenumbers
word or and
sentence.
Transformation
individual
students.
course.
These
texts
contain
complete
answer
keys
ALCincludes
studentsmilitary
are very likely to be able to
to develop
the skills
The ALCs program also
drills
students
totime
change
theforsentence
in a people need to communicate
require
Provide
realistic
limits
completing
for
Provide
a synonym.
sure
to
that
exercises
and copy(Be
masters
foremphasize
transparencies.
consciously
draw on
previous educational
and
effectively
and
comfortably
in English. In order to
topics and specific military
vocabulary.
This
minorthan
way.the
Students
orally produce
transformed
activities.
Tell as.)
students
exactlythe
how
long
they
Choral drills are used because students feel more
the word
is similar to rather
same
Since
training
experiences
thethey
newcontain answers, access to these books
develop
these
abilities,
will be times when
significant feature sets
the ALC
apart fromwhen learning
sentence;
the
teacher
reinforces
their
production
have totocomplete
an activity, and adhere toby
thattherecomfortable
practicing in a group; however, on
In
the
ALC,
we
use
the
term
vocabulary
mean
not
should
be
carefully
controlled.
The
instructor
language.
Thus,
ALC
instructors
should
be
mindful
the
focus
needs
to
be
on
proficiency
ability to
other language curricula.
repeating
correct
formstudents
again. There
are various
timethe
limit.
If
most
are unable
to finish, occasion(the
a drill wont work right the first time. If
only
single-word
butfor
also
(words
texts
have
beenitems,
written
thecollocations
inexperienced,
of
this
potential
background
and
make
learning
communicate
ideas
fluently),
and other times when
Grammar is carefully and systematically
types
of
transformation
drills:
person-number
extend
the
limit
for
a specified
amount of time.
a word, sentence, or dialog line causes difficulty,
that
often
go
together),
such
as
coffee
cup
or
heavy
non-native English instructor as well as the more
by
the
focus needs totense
be on accuracy (the ability to
sequenced so that themeaningful
learner continually
substitutions,
singular-plural
transformations,
and the group is unable to repeat in chorus even
rain,
as well as lexical
and idiomatic
usage,
experienced
teacher.phrases
Explanations
of grammar
speak with
few errors as possible). As a result,
interweaving
course content
with students'
builds on previously acquired
knowledge.
transformations,
patterned response
drill,aschain
after youve modeled a second time, stop the choral
e.g.,points
How are
do you
do? Once
has classroom
been
Teaching
language
intended
to givevocabulary
novice instructors
error
correction
or
constructive
feedback will vary,
personal
lives,
interests,
and
career
or
academic
The structures presented are forms a language introduced, provide pronunciation
drills, cued
response,
and directed dialog repetition.
production and conduct the drill with individuals.
with
the
sufficient language to talkJust
about
teaching
English
depending
on the goal of a particular activity.
aspractice
vocabulary
and
grammar
are taught,
learner needs to master in goals
order to speak and
Once students are able to repeat individually, give
For all drills,
keep these
general guidelines in mind.
newwith
terms.
colleagues and supervisors.
In addition
toshould
classroom
language
be
taught.
In
the
ST,
write standard English. Grammar
and and associations between
making charts
connections
them another opportunity to repeat it in chorus.
METHODS
ERROR CORRECTION
student
Maintain
a stimulating
pace
that OF
students
the activities provided in the
texts,
the
exercise
headings
provide lots
ofsoinstructional
tables help to direct the learners
attention
to
students'
prior knowledge
and new information.
dont get
however,
dont
speak
so rapidly
instructor
texts contain
suggestions
fororbored;
ateacher
variety
STEPS
INTRODUCING
NEW
VOCABULARY
Indicate
where
the errorNOTE:
is, butWith
let the
student
long
sentences, backward build-up is
vocabulary
talk. Encourage
students
significant information. Illustrations elucidate
that and
they
cant
keep the
up. headings.
of supplemental individual,
and
teamwork
correct
it.
effective. This technique entails having students
to partner,
read
understand
In addition,
difficult grammar points.
1.
With
student
books
closed,
conduct
that enhance learning,
provide
realistic
Encouraging studentactivities
interaction
repeat
phrases
the end of the sentence to the
Demonstrate
rather
than explain.
Keep
provide
students
with language
asktwo
for
help,
e.g.,correct
toGive
or three
answers,
andfrom
let the
repetition
drills with the new
language
situations,
the words.
classroom.
beginning.
Always
maintain the pronunciation that
as brief as possible.
Speaking is essential to language
learning.
Students and enliven
student select the one he
or she wants
to use.
instructions
Repeat, please.
2. With books
another
each
phrase
has
within
that particular sentence. The
need opportunities to engage in meaningful
and open, conduct
Always
have
students
listen
first
before
you
Please
spell that word. If a student has not been able to answer a
drill with the new
vocabulary
demonstrates backward build-up.
authentic communication, i.e., the kindrepetition
of language
require them to repeat.
question, give your ownfollowing
answer asexample
a model;
iii
BOOK 12 PREFACE
Speak
more
slowly.
before beginning any
other
activity.
typically used in real-life situations toitems
accomplish
then, with
ask the
question again.
Dont repeat the prompt in unison
your
EXAMPLE: I want to go home early in the morning
Say again? new
real-life tasks. Students will not always
havestudents
access find and underline
3. Have
students. the
Listen to what they
are saying.
the day
tomorrow.
Repeat
the content of what
the after
student
said, but
words in the text as you read the dialog
say it
correctly.
Say
and gesture with your
hand
when
or paragraph aloud. (It
mayAgain
be necessary
TEACHER: tomorrow
you
want
them
to
repeat.
Reword a question to which a student has given
to write the specific words occurring in
viii
AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE STUDENT: tomorrow
anadequately
inappropriate response.
the choral drill has been
the text on the boardtoWhen
help students
TEACHER: after tomorrow
mastered, move on to individual
Let drilling.
other students provide correction.
recognize them.)
STUDENT: after tomorrow
If students cannot master your choral drill,
TEACHER: the day after tomorrow
model problematic words or phrases again.
STUDENT
: the day
after tomorrow
Let them be successful before you move to
x
AMERICAN
LANGUAGE
COURSE
individual drilling.
TEACHER: in the morning the day after tomorrow
STUDENT: in the morning the day after tomorrow

Classroom management

Classroom practices

Teaching techniques and procedures for exercises

xii

AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

23

First Printing 2011

3 Using the ALC Instructor Text: ST vs. IT


The Student Text
Each lesson contains several sections that introduce vocabulary, grammar,
skills, and language functions. Each section contains the presentation of one
or more objectives followed by exercises to practice the objective(s).

The language area


heading* and a
specific title mark
the beginning of each
section of a lesson.

Vocabulary
YES

NO

Is your home safe?

Mark your answer with a check in the box.

A. Do you ever use electric appliances near water?


B. Can you see the wires inside any of your power cords?
C. Does the electricity in your kitchen often go out?
D. Do you ever unplug appliances by pulling the cord?
E. Do you fix electrical problems in your home yourself ?

Subheadings separate the exercises


in each section and
provide instructions
aimed at the students
language level.

F. Have you put any power cords under carpets, through


doorways, or next to hot appliances?

EXERCISE A

Match each question above with its explanation below.

Number 1 is an example.

Example answers help


clarify instructions.

1. Dont unplug or carry an appliance by its cord because it can damage


the cord.
2. Dont use cords in which you can see the metal wires showing through
the plastic. The insulation is there to protect you. If you touch an
uninsulated wire, you could get hurt by an electric shock when the
electricity flows through your body.
3. Dont leave cords in high traffic areas. The cords can easily get
damaged through people stepping on them.
4. Dont plug too many appliances into outlets on the same circuit because
it can cause the electricity to shut off. Also, a short circuit in your
homes electrical wiring or in an appliances wiring can cause the
power to go out. A short often happens when the electrical current
doesnt flow where its supposed to.
5. Dont touch an appliance if it falls into water or gets wet. Water is a
very good conductor of electricity, and you may get an electric shock.
6. Dont work on the wiring in your home if you are not an electrician.
Always rely on a professional to do the job.

New vocabulary
is bolded.

99

BOOK 17 LESSON 4

*Language area headings





24

Vocabulary
Grammar
Listening
Speaking (also Pronunciation)

Reading
Writing (also Punctuation)
Dialogs (functions or speaking skills)
Performance Check (for review)

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

First Printing 2011

3 Using the ALC Instructor Text: ST vs. IT


The ST Reduction in the Instructor Text
A reduced version of each ST page with the answers included is reproduced in the
IT, so the instructor and students are always on the same page. The IT margins contain additional instructional information relating to the objective(s).

Answers are not


provided in exercises
which require personalized answers, such as
in this activator.

Vocabulary
YES

NO

VOCABULARY
Is your home safe?

NEW VOCABULARY
cord
to damage
wire
to protect
uninsulated
shock (n)
through (prep) (by means of)
short circuit
wiring
short (short circuit)
current
conductor
electrician

Mark your answer with a check in the box.

A. Do you ever use electric appliances near water?


B. Can you see the wires inside any of your power cords?
C. Does the electricity in your kitchen often go out?
D. Do you ever unplug appliances by pulling the cord?
E. Do you fix electrical problems in your home yourself ?
F. Have you put any power cords under carpets, through
doorways, or next to hot appliances?

Answers appear in
a different font from
examples for easy
identification.

EXERCISE A

Match each question above with its explanation below.

Number 1 is an example.

F
C

A
E

1. Dont unplug or carry an appliance by its cord because it can damage


the cord.
2. Dont use cords in which you can see the metal wires showing through
the plastic. The insulation is there to protect you. If you touch an
uninsulated wire, you could get hurt by an electric shock when the
electricity flows through your body.
3. Dont leave cords in high traffic areas. The cords can easily get
damaged through people stepping on them.
4. Dont plug too many appliances into outlets on the same circuit because
it can cause the electricity to shut off. Also, a short circuit in your
homes electrical wiring or in an appliances wiring can cause the
power to go out. A short often happens when the electrical current
doesnt flow where its supposed to.
5. Dont touch an appliance if it falls into water or gets wet. Water is a
very good conductor of electricity, and you may get an electric shock.
6. Dont work on the wiring in your home if you are not an electrician.
Always rely on a professional to do the job.
99

BOOK 17 LESSON 4

Presentation

EXERCISE A

Allow students to answer the questions


in the questionnaire individually. If
necessary, explain the meaning of cord
by showing the students one in the
classroom. Point out that an electrical
cord has a plug that fits into an electrical
outlet. Discuss their answers to the
questionnaire as a group. If students
answer yes to any of the questions,
discuss why this behavior might be
dangerous.

Answer alerts in the instructions


BOOK 17

LESSON 4

Number 1 is an example.
Students see the answer in the ST.

Books open
Written cue
Written response
Individual

Use the questionnaire at the top of the


page to complete this exercise. Instruct
students to read the warning and select
the question that the warning addresses.
After checking the exercise, model the
pronunciation of the vocabulary in the
margin. Elicit and clarify the meaning
of new words using context as much
as possible. Encourage students to give
their opinions about the information
given in the exercise.

The IT notes in the


side and bottom
margins contain
important information for the instructor.
The next five pages
demonstrate how instructors can use the
IT notes to plan and
prepare their lessons.

99

Answers may vary.


Slight variations are possible;
answers usually appear in the IT.
Answers will vary.
Several answers are possible;
sample answers may appear in the IT.

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

25

First Printing 2011

3 Using the ALC Instructor Text: IT notes


The Table of Contents Page
The IT notes in the margins enable instructors to maximize their planning
time. Each lesson begins with a table of contents page, which contains important information about the specific objectives and content of the lesson. It
also provides tips and guidance for the overall preparation of the lesson.

LESSON 3 OVERVIEW
RESOURCES: Entertainment section of
newspapers, posters, movie magazines,
pictures of operas or plays, or any
other entertainment item that will help
demonstrate the vocabulary.
Additional material required for teaching
this lesson is located in the appendices.
Identify the following material before
beginning the lesson.
APPENDIX J LESSON RESOURCES
16L3 #1
Messages
p. J-21
16L3 #2
Timed reading
p. J-23

Lets go to the theater.


VOCABULARY:

All kinds of entertainment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59


Local actress in town this weekend . . . . . . . . . . 60
Acting couple will perform together on stage . . . . . 61

GRAMMAR:

Which city would you rather visit? . . . . . . . . . . . 64

SPEAKING:

Giving messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66

VOCABULARY:

All about musicA radio talk show . . . . . . . . . . 68

GRAMMAR:

Which do you prefer? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74

DIALOGS:

Asking and talking about preferences . . . . . . . . . 77

GRAMMAR:

Are you tough enough to be a Marine? . . . . . . . . . 78

READING:

Making inferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Reading faster for better comprehension . . . . . . . 82

PREPARATION: Copy and cut the 4


messages of 16L3 #2 into separate
strips before the lesson. The number of
copies to make depends on the number
of students.
For recommended teaching techniques,
refer to the preface of this text.

57

BOOK 16 LESSON 3

Objectives
Pronounce intelligibly and use
in discourse the words, phrases, and
expressions listed on the preview page.
Recognize and respond suitably to
vocabulary italicized on the preview
page, which will not be tested, but which
may appear on book quizzes.
Inquire about and express
preferences.
Use would rather (+ optional than
construction) in affirmative statements,
affirmative yes/no and information
questions, and affirmative and negative
answers to express preference.

Use prefer in the following patterns


in affirmative statements, affirmative
yes/no and information questions, and
affirmative and negative answers to
express preference:
prefer + noun/pronoun + to/rather
than + noun/pronoun
prefer + gerund + to/rather than
+ gerund
prefer + to-infinitive + rather than
+ bare infinitive
Use an adjective or adverb + enough
(+ optional to-infinitive phrase) in
affirmative and negative statements,
affirmative yes/no questions, and
affirmative and negative answers to
express sufficiency.

Listen to a word, determine which


syllable receives primary stress, and
circle the corresponding number. (Audio)
Listen to a text 60-150 words in
length (about 20-45 seconds), and select
its topic from 2 or more choices. (Audio)
Listen to a text 60-150 words in
length (about 20-45 seconds), and write
its topic.
(Audio)
Listen to a text 60-150 words in
length (about 20-45 seconds), and select
its main idea from 2 or more choices.
(Audio)

(continued on next page )


BOOK 16 LESSON 3

26

Lesson overview guides


teacher planning with suggestions for lesson-related
realia to bring to class. Also,
all lesson resources, such as
listening texts or transparency masters, are listed.
Preparation guidance is offered when applicable.

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

57

Lesson objectives appear


at the bottom of the page
in the order of vocabulary,
function, grammar, then
skills. Skills objectives
continue at the bottom of the
next page.

First Printing 2011

3 Using the ALC Instructor Text: IT notes


The Preview Page
The second page of each lesson is called the preview page. It serves as a handy planning reference
for teachers and as a study guide for students.

The two vocabulary


objectives apply to
each vocabulary presentation of the lesson.

Additional words
from the lesson appear
in alphabetical order.

New vocabulary items are


listed alphabetically by
part of speech.
VOCABULARY
OBJECTIVE: Pronounce intelligibly and
use in discourse the words, phrases, and
expressions listed on the preview page.
OBJECTIVE: Recognize and respond
suitably to vocabulary italicized on the
preview page, which will not be tested,
but which may appear on book quizzes.

FACILITATIVE VOCABULARY
audience
band (musical group)
box office
combine
event
kids
knowledge
sonata
swan

Examples highlight
the grammar and function of the lesson.

Preview

Whats new in Lesson 3?

NEW VOCABULARY
Nouns

actor
actress
adventure
award
ballet
comedy
concert
drama
drums
guitar
humor
instrument
musical
musician
opera
orchestra
performance
piano
play
preference

role
row
stage
symphony
talent
theater
type (of)
violin

Other words

Verbs

act
award
cant stand
dislike
hate
perform
play
prefer (to)
quit quit / quit
would rather

antique
classical
close (to)
either
enough
furthermore
humorous
kind
likewise
modern
musical
neither
rather than
scary
serious

NEW GRAMMAR STRUCTURES

LANGUAGE FUNCTION

Id rather see a comedy than a drama.

Ask and talk about preferences.

I prefer swimming to jogging.

Would you rather take the train than


the bus?
Do you prefer the train to the bus?
Which do you prefer, the train or the
bus?

Paul didnt study enough to pass the test.

Id rather take the bus than the


train.
I prefer the bus to the train.

Homework or Audio in
parentheses indicates the
recycled skills objectives
which occur only in
the homework or lab
activities for the book.

58

Listen to a text no more than 150


words in length (no more than 45
seconds duration), and write its title.
(Audio)
Listen to a short dialog (2-3
exchanges) and select the correct
inference.
(Audio)
Orally pass on spoken and written
messages.
Take the part of a participant in
a dialog containing a maximum of 5
exchanges: first, listen to a recording of
the dialog; then, respond to oral prompts
in the recording.
(Audio)

Read a key word and a row


containing a maximum of 6 additional
words, and circle each word identical to
the key word (time restriction: 3 seconds
per row).
(Audio)
Read pairs of phrases within a
limited time, and identify the pairs
as being the same or different (time
restriction: 2 seconds per pair). (Audio)
Read a key word and a row
containing a maximum of 5 additional
words, and circle the word with the
same meaning as the key word (time
restriction: 3 seconds per row). (Audio)

AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

Read pairs of words or phrases


within a limited time, and identify the
pairs as being synonyms or antonyms
(time restriction: 2 seconds per pair).
Read silently a text approximately
200 words in length within a time of
no more than 1 minute, and select the
answers to 6 comprehension questions
with 70% accuracy (4 questions asking
for factual information and 2 for
inferential or general understanding).

Read a short text and select the


correct inference.
58

AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

27

First Printing 2011

3 Using the ALC instructor Text: IT notes


Objectives, Presentations, & Exercise Keys
The target objective for each section of a lesson and suggestions for its
presentation appear in the IT notes. Each exercise which follows has a
corresponding abbreviated key located in the bottom section of the page.

Grammar, skills, and function objectives appear near


the sections main heading.

GRAMMAR
OBJECTIVE: Use to be + an adjectival or
noun phrase after the linking verbs seem
and appear in affirmative and negative
statements, affirmative yes/no and whatquestions, and affirmative and negative
answers to indicate a state or condition.

Grammar

He appears to be a business man.

He

to be

worried.
in a hurry.
a business man.
running to his plane.

We often use to be after seem and appear to make guesses about something.

EXERCISE A

Presentation notes introduce the


objective and its focus or theme.
They also provide background information and references to related
objectives in the ALC. Suggested
procedures, along with step-by-step
instructions and examples, follow.

appears
seems

Match the question and answers.

1. What appears to be the problem


with the tour bus?

a. Yes, she looked like she


was running a temperature.

2. Did Roger seem to be too busy to


help us ?

b. Well, well miss lunch


every other day.

3. Did Jan seem to be sick yesterday?

c. No, I didnt see any others.

4. What seems to be the matter with


the computer?

d. Yes, his desk was covered


with papers.

5. Does Alex appear to be angry?

e. It has a at tire.

6. Did there appear to be any more


trains arriving at that time?

f. Im not sure. The screen


just went black.

7. What seems to be difcult


about the new schedule?

g. Not to me. He looks like


hes quite calm.

8. Did Mark appear to be tired


yesterday?

h. I think so. He fell asleep


during the meeting.

A key* provides
quick guidance for
the presentation of
each exercise.

16

Presentation
Another way to talk about perceptions
is to use appear or seem + to be +
a noun phrase or adjectival phrase.
A noun clause cannot follow to be
in this grammatical structure.
Open books and focus on the image
of the man next to the paradigm. Ask
the students, Who do you think he
is? What do you think is happening?
Accept any logical guesses and write
them on the board. Do not expect
correct use of the target structure yet.
Review the paradigm and ensure that
students understand what can follow
to be in this grammatical structure:
noun phrases and adjectival phrases.
16

*The information in the four lines of the exercise key


always appears in the same order.
Conditions for the activity Books open, Books closed
Type of cue Visual, Oral, Written cue
Type of student response Oral, Written response
Student participation Individual, Choral, Pairs, Group

28

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

Point out that seems to be cannot be used


in a sentence the same way as seems like,
which was covered earlier in the lesson.
Returning to the image, guide
students to produce correct sentences
using the target grammar based
on the guesses written earlier.
Write these on the board.
NOTE: Before simple adjectives, to be

may be omitted. However, to focus on


the target grammar and prepare for the
book quiz, insist on its inclusion.

AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

EXERCISE A
Books open
Written cue
Written response
Individual

After matching, tell students to underline


the words that follow to be in the
question column. Point out that none are
clauses; i.e., none contain a subject and
its verb.

Additional
procedural inAMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE
formation often
follows the key.

First Printing 2011

3 Using the ALC instructor Text: IT notes


Vocabulary, Extra Material, & Notes
Each vocabulary presentation is accompanied by a listing of
target words found in the text. Additional material and helpful
notes support many of the presentations and exercises.

New vocabulary is
listed in order of first
appearance next to each
vocabulary heading.

Oral questions and


drills, answers to certain exercises, or short
listening texts appear in
the IT margin near the
corresponding presentation or exercise.

NEW VOCABULARY
actress
to perform (to act)
stage
play (n)
award (n)
performance (a public presentation)
to act (to perform)
scary
furthermore
to award
to perform (to carry out a task; to
execute a duty)
to prefer
would rather
row
actor
theater

COMPREHENSION QUESTIONS
1. Who is Barbara Blair? (A local
actress who has won many awards
for her perfomances.)
2. Where can we watch her perform?
(In movies, TV programs, and plays.)
3. What kind of movie was The Return
of the Red Death? (A scary one.)
4. Why was Barbara named Woman of
the Year? (Because she performs
jobs in the city that help poor
students go to college.)
5. Ms. Blair has performed in both
movies and plays. Which would
she rather do? (She would rather
perform in plays than in movies.)

Vocabulary

Local actress in town this weekend


Barbara Blair is a local actress who has performed
in movies, on TV programs, and on the stage in plays. In
her short career, she has already won many awards for
her performances.

Blair acted in her first movie, Return of the Red Death,


in 1999. She won the Best Movie Actress Award for playing
a dead woman who came back to life in that very scary
movie. Two years later, she received televisions annual
Best Actress Award. Furthermore, the New York Actors
Club awarded her the 2007 Woman of the Year Award
because she had been performing many different jobs
without pay in the city to help poor students go to college.
The actress prefers performing on stage to acting in movies. Movies may pay
better, but she would rather perform in front of people. When Im on stage, she
says, I can make a connection with the people in the audience, especially with those
who are sitting in the first two rows. Often her husband, actor Robert Blair, is in
the first row with their two children.
The actors are both in town this weekend. Theyll be performing in the same play,
Whos at the Door? at the Carver Theater downtown beginning Saturday night.
EXERCISE

Match each vocabulary word with its meaning.

1. actress

a. to like one thing instead of or more than another

2. play

b. a line of seats in a theater or stadium

3. theater

c. the area in the theater where actors perform

4. scary

d. plays are performed in this building


e. in addition; besides

5. stage

6. to perform

f. a woman actor

7. furthermore

g. frightening

8. to prefer

h. to act on stage, TV, or in movies; to do (a job or duty)

9. row

i. something a person receives for doing a good job

10. award

j. a story performed by actors on a stage

60

Notes alert instructors


to areas of potential difficulty and provide additional details for advanced
classes. They also provide
longer explanations and clarifications especially helpful
to novice or non-native
instructors of English.

Presentation
This text describes a fictional actress and
discusses her career.
After students have finished reading, use
the comprehension questions above to
ask about the text.
Review the vocabulary as described in
the preface.

To act has a meaning similar to to


perform in the sense of actors and
actresses in plays, but it has another
meaning which is quite different: To act
also means to behave in a certain way,
as in After hearing the news, Mike acted
strangely. This definition is covered
in the fourth vocabulary presentation
in this lesson, All about music.

AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

EXERCISE
Books open
Written cue
Written response
Individual

Refer to the preface for suggestions


about checking answers.

NOTE: Two definitions for to perform

and to act are covered in this lesson.

One definition of to perform refers to


what actors, actresses, musicians and
singers do on the stage (and in movies).
The other definition means to carry out
a task, as in Lt Gold performed his job
well. Both definitions are covered in the
text on this page.
60

CULTURAL NOTE: In the past decade,


the gender-neutral word actor has been
used more and more frequently to refer
to both male and female theatrical
performers.

Cultural
notes, which are sprinkled
throughout the ALC, provide additional information
of interest for instructors to
share with students.

AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

29

First Printing 2011

3 Using the ALC instructor Text: IT notes


Appendix Guides, Exercise Headings, & More Teaching Ideas
Visual cues for exercises and appendix references help instructors find
information quickly. Suggestions for changing and extending the exercises
allow instructors maximum flexibility with a minimum of planning time.

EXERCISE E

The appendix guide


indicates the location
of supplementary
material.

Ask your partner questions and complete the chart.

If your partner answers yes, continue with questions about when and where.

Have you ever been in a ?

No

Yes

When

Where

1. hailstorm
2. ood
3. hurricane
4. tornado
EXERCISE F

EXERCISE F
Text Location

Item Number

Appendix J

18 L2 #1

Prepare an oral weather report that answers the questions.

Use the information card your teacher gives you.

p. J -7

PREPARATION: Copy and cut out the


weather report cards before the lesson.
The number of copies to make depends
on the number of students.

1. What are the general weather conditions?

Exercise headings provide a


visual reference to an exercise
and its corresponding procedural
and/or supplementary material.

2. Are the conditions favorable or unfavorable?


3. Is there any severe weather?
4. If you had time, would you visit this place?

Adaptation suggestions contain ideas


for modifying the
exercise.

54

EXERCISE E

Lesson resource pages in the appendix are numbered and labeled


Circulate and monitor students accurate
of the vocabulary as well as their
to reference the lesson, page, anduse
grammar and pronunciation.
appendix guide in the IT.
Books open
Written and oral cue
Written and oral response
Pairs

Weather report cards 18L2 #1


54

Lesson 2
Page 54
Exercise F

Base Esperanza, Antarctica

Kuwait City, Kuwait

Mostly sunny,
High temperature 4F
Low temperature -15F
Chance of snow
Warning: severe cold overnight, stay
indoors

Clear and sunny


High temperature 113F
Low temperature 87F
Visibility 6.2 miles
Winds 20 MPH

Paris, France

Austin, TX

Cloudy and rainy


High temperature 67F
Low temperature 47F
Strong thunderstorms probable
Take precautions when driving

Cloudy
High temperature 75F
Low temperature 59F
Severe weather warning: expect
storms with large hail and lighting

Rio De Janeiro, Brazil

Honolulu, Hawaii

Chance of rain 75%


High temperature 73F
Low temperature 69F

Sunny and pleasant, rain unlikely


High temperature 88F
Low temperature 76F

30

Damage to cars
and homes likely
OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN
LANGUAGE
COURSE

AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

ADAPTATION: For a more realistic

EXERCISE F

activity, if internet access is available,


print out weather reports from online
weather web sites to use instead of the
cards in the appendix.

Books open
Written cue
Written and oral response
Individual

If necessary, model a weather report for


the place you are in. Be sure to answer
the 4 questions in the box.
Give each student a weather card from
Appendix J and allow them enough time
to prepare a short, oral weather report.
Permit students to make notes and use
them while giving their reports.

Additional activity
Tell students to take notes on their peers
reports. After each report, ask specific
students comprehension questions. Use
the weather cards from the appendix to
formulate questions.

Additional
AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE
activity suggestions
provide ideas for extending practice of the
objective beyond the
exercise in the book.

First Printing 2011

4
ALC Objectives
The selection process
Enabling & terminal objectives
Systematic recycling
Continual reinforcing

31

First Printing 2011

4 ALC Objectives: The selection process


Language objectives are the foundation of the entire ALC program
and central to the design of the course. They specifically state what
the student is expected to know and be able to do with the language
after a unit of instruction. The presentation of each language
component corresponds to a specific objective that appears in the IT.
The exercises which follow the presentation allow students to practice
the objective and fulfill its requirements.

Although the ALC, 2nd Edition,


is much different in appearance
and content from the first edition, the objectives in both are
essentially the same, with few
exceptions.
(See Appendix D for further information on the ALC revision.)

Each DLIELC graduate will


have specific, varying needs
based on the individuals FOT
requirements.

Various enabling objectives cover each of the four language


components in every ALC lesson. Enabling objectives are the
building blocks necessary to accomplish terminal objectives. Terminal
objectives are based on the expectation of student performance at the
end of a course of instruction. In the development of the first edition,
a set of terminal objectives in the skills areas of listening, speaking,
reading, and writing were established. Enabling objectives for each
of the skills areas, as well as for vocabulary, grammar, and functions,
were then defined to support the accomplishment of the terminal
objectives.

Selection of Enabling and Terminal Objectives for Skills


in the ALC
DLIELC curriculum developers, using input from the Interagency
Language Roundtable, created a prototype of the DLIELC Generaland Specialized-English graduate, who usually attends a US military
follow-on training (FOT) course conducted in English. The needs
of this composite graduate, which are listed below, were first used
to generate the terminal skills objectives and then to develop the
enabling skills objectives, which appear in the lessons.

Listening
receive training in the form of a lecture, briefing, demonstration,
class report, and instructions
follow classroom dialogs and discussions, conversations, requests
for information on standard forms, and military courtesies
understand warnings, announcements, informal messages, and the
listening part of FOT examinations

Speaking
give briefings, class reports, technical instructions, warnings,
and informal messages
participate in classroom dialogs and discussions as
well as conversations
observe military courtesies respond orally to FOT examination
questions
32

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

First Printing 2011

4 ALC Objectives: The selection process


Reading
Appendix E provides a more
detailed list of the terminal
objectives. See Indexes for the
ALC (789) for a complete listing
of all ALC objectives (terminal
and enabling).

receive training through technical materials and instructions


get information from charts, tables, graphs, diagrams, and maps
comprehend notes, captions, labels, standard forms, military
reports, informal messages, warnings, and the reading part of
FOT examinations

Writing
take notes
prepare class and military-format reports
complete charts, tables, and standard forms
take messages
respond in writing to FOT examination questions

Selection of Enabling Objectives for Vocabulary, Grammar &


Functions in the ALC
Vocabulary. ALC vocabulary objectives were selected from various
word frequency lists that range from the general to the semi-technical.
a core list from the original ALC texts
the Thorndike-Lorge word frequency list
The Basic Words and General Science List by C.K. Ogden
Word Frequencies in Technical Instruction by American Institutes
for Research (AIR)
a semi-technical vocabulary list from DLIELCs Specialized
English curriculum
Vocabulary objectives were also chosen to correspond to the function,
grammar, or skills of a lesson.

Grammar. ALC grammar objectives were selected from a


comprehensive inventory of grammar items, which was developed
by DLIELC curriculum writers. This inventory represents the major
and minor grammar points in the English language. The most useful
items were selected from the inventory and presented in sequence,
beginning with the simple and leading to the complex.

Functions. The primary source of ALC function objectives is a


comprehensive inventory of language functions from ESL textbooks
dealing with teaching communicative competence. Student level,
vocabulary level for the lesson, and, above all, student needs based on
FOT requirements were taken into consideration in the selection of
the functions for each book.
OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

33

First Printing 2011

4 ALC Objectives: Enabling & terminal objectives


Enabling (Lesson) Objectives vs. Terminal (Course) Objectives
Terminal objectives in the ALC describe what a typical DLIELC
graduate should be able to do in each of the four skills areas upon
completion of General and Specialized English. The terminal
objectives include skills which are necessary to successfully
participate in follow-on training. They are the final goal of the course
whereas enabling objectives are the goal for a particular lesson
and the stepping stones to the fulfillment of terminal objectives.
Therefore, only enabling objectives are presented in the lessons.
Hundreds of enabling skills objectivesalong with all of the enabling
grammar, vocabulary and function objectivessupport the terminal
objectives. Enabling objectives build upon each other in a step-by-step
progression throughout the ALC. Additionally, as the levels progress,
several previously mastered objectives often appear in combination
to enable the completion of a higher-level objective. Along the way,
certain enabling skills objectives begin to contain portions of the
terminal objectives, as illustrated below.

Enabling Objectives in Action


This diagram maps the progression of several enabling writing
objectives which support one terminal writing objective across Levels
IIV. The four pages which follow show examples of these objectives
and demonstrate how the ALC curriculum strategically builds up to
the attainment of the courses terminal objectives.
B4L3

punctuate
a text
B21L4

B8L2

edit
a text

sequence
a text

B17L2

write
a text

Terminal
Objective:
Write class assignments
in military format, as well
as the following styles:
descriptive, narrative,
and expository.

B16L4

combine
sentences

34

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

B12L2

combine
sentences

First Printing 2011

4 ALC Objectives: Enabling & terminal objectives


Enabling Objectives Terminal Objective
The examples here and on the next two pages show how enabling objectives build upon each other to reach one aspect
of a terminal writing objective: writing a narrative.

Book 4 Lesson 3
Students learn how to use basic
punctuation.

Book 8 Lesson 2
Students organize and rewrite sentences in paragraph order.

Enabling objective
Listen to a 2050 word paragraph;
then rewrite the unpunctuated written
version, dividing it into sentences and
supplying capital letters, apostrophes,
question marks, and periods
as required.

Enabling objective
Write a paragraph with logically
sequenced sentences after reading
its sentences in random
order.

Writing
Punctuation

Identifying and using punctuation marks

PUNCTUATION MARK
This is a period.

1.

EXAMPLE

Sequencing and writing a paragraph

Look at the sentences. Put them in order and write the paragraph.

Im very tired.

This is a question mark.

Are you tired?

This is a comma.

John and I are tired, too.

Lets eat at Tonys Snack Bar.

Karen said, Okay, Jane. Your house or mine?

Jane and Karen are in the same Spanish class.

Jane said, Karen, lets study for the test together.

Jane said, At your house, Karen. We studied for the last test
at mine.

Jane and Karen are in the same Spanish class. Jane said, Karen, lets

This is an apostrophe
(for contractions and to
show ownership).

EXERCISE A

indent
paragraph

study for the test together. Karen said, Okay, Jane. Your house or mine?
Jane said, At your house, Karen. We studied for the last test at mine.

2.

Read the paragraph and label the punctuation marks.

apostrophe
Karl is from Germany. He doesnt speak
English. Hes a new student at the language school.

After their visit, Ned said, I like your mothers house.

Mark and Ned visited Marks mother at his sisters house.

Well then, Ned said, your sister has a very nice house.

Mark said, Oh, that house isnt hers. It belongs to my sister


and her husband.

period

He began his English class last week. He goes to his


class on weekdays for 6 hours a day. Does he like it?

comma

question
mark

Mark and Ned visited Marks mother at his sisters house. After their visit,

Yes, he does. He knows that English is a very good

Ned said, I like your mothers house. Mark said, Oh, that house isnt hers. It

language to know for the job he has now.

belongs to my sister and her husband. Well then, Ned said, your sister has

Terminal objective

a very nice house.

Write class assignments in military


format, as well as the following styles:
descriptive, narrative, and expository.
BOOK 8 LESSON 2

68

63

AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

35

First Printing 2011

4 ALC Objectives: Enabling & terminal objectives


Writing skills progression
These examples show how two enabling skills objectives, combined with recycled grammar and vocabulary objectives, build upon and complement each other
as the task of combining sentences becomes increasingly more challenging.

Book 12 Lesson 2

Book 16 Lesson 4

Students use conjunctions to


combine sentences.

Using higher-level vocabulary


and grammar, students combine
sentences into a paragraph.

Enabling objective
Write a sentence with two independent clauses by combining
a pair of related sentences.
Writing

Enabling objective
Write a text in briefer form by
using embedding or synthesis.
Writing

Connecting 2 sentences

Combine the sentences with and, or, but, or so.


EXAMPLE:

Susan retired from her job when she was 62.


Her husband kept working.

Susan retired from her job when she was 62, but her husband
kept working.
1. Tom refused to drive on the slippery road. His wife did, too.

Tom refused to drive on the slippery road, and his wife did, too.
2. Pat didnt get the job. Shell have to look for another one.

Pat didnt get the job, so shell have to look for another one.

Julie is a teacher.
Julie works at DLI.
Julie rides with me to work.

Lt Mann stays in good shape.


He lifts weights.
He runs.

Julie is a teacher
WHO works at DLI
AND rides with me to work.

Lt Mann stays in good shape


BECAUSE he lifts weights
AND runs.

EXERCISE B Combine each group of sentences with words in the gray boxes.
EXERCISE A Combine the sentences using the words in parentheses.

Some words may be used several times. Then combine the sentences to write a paragraph. A
dot () Do
marks
group
sentences
not each
change
the of
verb
tenses. that can easily be combined. The first one is written for
you. Answers will vary.

1. John drinks coffee. John eats breakfast. John arrives at work. (and, before)

People liveJohn
around
the world.
havebreakfast
been drinking
coffee
1200 years.
drinks
coffee People
AND eats
BEFORE
hefor
arrives
at work.
People drink coffee in the morning. Then they go to work.

3. Andrew decided to enlist in the Air Force. Paul didnt.

Andrew decided to enlist in the Air Force, but Paul didnt.

People drink coffee. It tastes good. It helps them stay awake.


2. Col Jones was the officer. He was the commander of the base.
There are
types
coffee.
People
Hemany
retired
lastofyear.
(who,
but)enjoy many types of coffee.
Some coffees are very dark. Some dark types of coffee are strong. Other types

Col Jones was the officer WHO was the commander of the base,
BUT he retired last year.

4. Are you going to college? Will you get a job?

of coffee are light. Some light types of coffee are weak.

Are you going to college, or will you get a job?


5. Tina likes little children. She wants to teach at an elementary school.

Coffee is a traditional refreshment. People still like it. People still drink it today.
3. We have to wait for the doctor. We can read a magazine. We can watch TV. (so, or)

We have
to wait for the doctor, SO we can
read a magazine OR watch TV.
that
before

Tina likes little children, so she wants to teach at an elementary school.

which

Are you going to the party tonight, or have you decided to stay home?
7. Its raining this morning. It should clear up this afternoon.

and
but

because

4. Allen is the man. He lives in the mountains. He doesnt like fishing.


He doesnt like hunting. (that, but, or)

6. Are you going to the party tonight? Have you decided to stay home?

People
whoislive
the world
drinkingBUT
coffee
Allen
thearound
man THAT
lives have
in thebeen
mountains,
hefor
doesnt like fishing

ORPeople
hunting.
1200 years.
drink coffee in the morning BEFORE they go

Its raining this morning, but it should clear up this afternoon.


8. Did Al select a technical career? Did he choose a career in education?

Did Al select a technical career, or did he choose a career in education?


60

Combining sentences to write paragraphs

Terminal objective

AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

5. LtPeople
Star got
a new
assignment.
LtitStar
had good
finished
hisitcourse.
to work.
drink
coffee
BECAUSE
tastes
AND
helps
Lt Star
had There
gone on
them stay
awake.
areleave.
many(after,
typesand)
of coffee THAT people enjoy.
Lt Star
got aare
newvery
assignment
his course
Some types
of coffee
dark ANDAFTER
strong,hed
BUTfinished
other types
AND gone on leave.
of coffee are light AND weak. Coffee is a traditional refreshment

WHICH people still like AND drink today.

93

BOOK 16 LESSON 4

Write class assignments in military


format, as well as the following styles:
descriptive, narrative, and expository.
94

36

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

First Printing 2011

4 ALC Objectives: Enabling & terminal objectives


Bringing it all together
The activity for this writing objective recycles skills, vocabulary, and grammar objectives*
from previous lessons to support the process of writing an original paragraph. This higherlevel enabling objective fulfills one aspect (writing a narrative) of the terminal objective.

Book 17 Lesson 2
Students bring together what they have
learned to write an original paragraph.

Writing

Enabling objective

A narrative paragraph

When you write a paragraph


choose a topic.

Write a paragraph on a topic after going


through pre-writing steps.

write down ideas that you can use in your paragraph.


write a main idea sentence.
organize your ideas by putting them in order.
begin to write.
I. CHOOSE A TOPIC: Farmer Floyds Job

n idea

e mai
plete th

n
ce. The

senten

ntence

write se

S. Com
R IDEA
Step 2.
E YOU
s from
GANIZ
ur idea
yo
IV. OR
g
in
r, us

job.

yd has a
rmer Flo

in orde

Fa
first
second
third
fourth

II. WRITE DOWN IDEAS.

fifth
sixth

Look at the pictures above, and consider Farmer Floyds daily work activities.
Share your ideas with the class.

seventh
Check

ement

rb agre

ect-ve
for subj

nse.

rrect te

and co

e main

Write th
RAPH.
ences.

PARAG s in your sent


E THE
ea
V. WRIT connect the id
to
below
while
when
finally
after
first
until
before
t
nex
since

idea on

the

ards
afterw
who
that

e of the

se som

.U
first line

which
but
or

III. WRITE A MAIN IDEA SENTENCE. Use your classmates and your own ideas.

words

Main idea: Farmer Floyd has a(n)

job.

so
and
because

47

BOOK 17 LESSON 2

*Recycled enabling objectives in


this activity include

Terminal objective
48

Write class assignments in military


format, as well as the following styles:
descriptive, narrative, and expository.

SE

UR
UAGE CO

AN LANG

AMERIC

topic & main idea


sequencing
embedding/synthesis
organizing ideas with a semantic map (IT suggestion)
farm vocabulary
connectives

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

37

First Printing 2011

4 ALC Objectives: Enabling & terminal objectives


Taking it a step further
Guiding students to edit their own writing is the next step in helping them successfully write
class assignments in military format. By providing a checklist of error types to be aware of,
the sample pages below increase students ability to self-monitor their own writing.

Book 21 Lesson 4
Students practice editing an example
letter before writing and editing their
own.

Writing

Editing your writing

Looking in depth

Enabling objective

After youve written a text, you should edit it for mistakes in

punctuation (periods, commas, apostrophes, and question marks)

Edit a text for mistakes.

subject / verb agreement


verb tenses
spelling and capital letters
singular and plural nouns
Read the letter below. Find and underline ten mistakes in the letter. Then correct the mistakes.

Dear Fred,

E A

CIS
EXER

Write

to a
letter

friend

How are you I hope that everything is going well for you and your family Im writing
to thank you again for the wonderful time you showed my wife and me when we was
visiting Philadelphia We will never forget the historical sights and the great restaurants
Do you remember wehn we went to the art museum and I lose my wallet? Then we
couldnt remember where we parked the car! It were a crazy time
Weve been working a lot here in Arizona At least the weather has been nice Ive been
very busy at my job, but it look like Ill get a promotion this year Anyway, I hope that
you guys can come here to visit us soon Wed love to have you, and I think that youll
really like Arizona there may not be as much history as in Philadelphia, but the weather
is great There are many thing that we can do Keep in touch I hope to hear from you
soon
Your friend,
Barney
110

elow

CISE

EXER

rt b
e cha
Use th

s you

a
h box
ff eac

ko
Chec

riods,

on (pe

ati
Punctu

t / verb

bjec
2 Su

for
look

as,

comm

istake

d of m

kin
each

phes,
apostro

and

rks)

n ma
questio

ent

Terminal objective
tters

ital le
nd cap

ga

ellin
4 Sp

it you

to ed

agreem

ses

rb ten
3 Ve

111

ouns

lural n

nd p
gular a

5 Sin
Book

38

AmERiCAn LAnguAgE CouRsE

r.
r lette

n4

sso
21 LE

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

Write class assignments in military


format, as well as the following styles:
descriptive, narrative, and expository.

First Printing 2011

4 ALC Objectives: Systematic recycling


Previously Presented Objectives Reappear in Later Books
The objectives of the ALC are designed to introduce students to increasingly challenging materials and tasks, with one lessons content building upon previously gained knowledge and abilities. This sequential design, which includes the systematic recycling and continual reinforcing
of objectives, occurs throughout the course and is a key feature of the ALC.
The series of examples on this and the next page, which follows the recurring theme of medicine, shows the recycling of some of the previously presented words from several books.

doctor*
Level I
Book 5 Lesson 1
Vocabulary introduced in
Level I reappears in later
vocabulary presentations,
as demonstrated on the next
page. Once a term is introduced, it is deliberately recycled in a variety of other
objectives and new contexts. Language acquisition
is enhanced when students
receive this repeated exposure to the material they
have already studied.
The new vocabulary in this
section of Book 5 is also
part of a skill objective.

Dialogs

sick*

Doctor, Im sick.

Mark:

Whats wrong, John? Are you


sick?

John:

I dont know. My throat is sore.

Mark:

Go to the doctor. He can give you


some medicine.

John:

Okay. Thanks, Mark.

throat

hurts
Dr. Smith:
John:
Dr. Smith:

John:

medicine
Dr. Smith:

Your throat is very red.


Youll need some medicine to
help you.

John:

How many days must I take


the medicine?

Dr. Smith:
John:

Hi, John. Whats the matter?


Hi, Dr. Smith. My throat
hurts.
Oh. I saw a lot of sore
throats today. Youre not the
only one.
I know. My friend Tom has a
sore throat. He hurt his arm,
too.

Take it for two weeks and


youll be well again.
Thanks a lot, Doctor.

*These terms are recycled


from lower books: doctor
BOOK 5 LESSON 1
(B1L2) and sick (B2L1).

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

39

First Printing 2011

4 ALC Objectives: Systematic recycling


sick

Level II
Book 11 Lesson 1

hurt

MEDICAL APPOINTMENTS
There are four different kinds of medical
appointments that people usually need
to make. A receptionist at a doctors
office will answer the phone and talk to
the patient to find the best time for the
appointment.

Words that students learned


in Level I reappear here to
support a more in-depth
presentation on the theme
of medicine. This recycling of previous vocabulary makes learning new
terms more efficient and
enjoyable.

REGULAR APPOINTMENTS

When patients call to see the doctor


because they are sick, they usually need
an appointment that is about 20 minutes
long. The doctor will ask them questions
about how they feel or which parts of
their body hurt. Hell ask about their
problems and symptoms; for example, he
may ask about fever, or temperature,
headache, and stomachache.
CHECKUPS

After the first appointment, patients


sometimes need to make a second
appointment for a checkup. In this

problems
EXERCISE B

throat hurts
Vocabulary

sick

Going to military sick call

medicine

Thirty minutes later, SSgt Cole arrives.


SSgt Cole: Hello, Donald. Are you ready to go?
SSgt Stone: Yes. I have my ID, and the clinic has my medical records. Do I need
anything else?
Take some tissue to wipe your runny nose. You look pretty bad. You
must feel terrible. Maybe you have the flu. Are you running a fever?

SSgt Stone: I dont think so, but I might have allergies. This city has so many
different trees and flowers which are blooming right now. I have
another big problem, John. I have to attend the graduation party for
the trainees tomorrow, and I feel terrible.
SSgt Cole: Youre getting too excited, Donald. Calm down. Ive always received
very good care at the clinic, and I know that you will, too. The doctors
will prescribe the medication you need. Im sure youll get some
pills or tablets that will make you feel better.

fever

40

BOOK 15 LESSON 4

ANNUAL PHYSICALS

A patient may also call to make an


appointment for an annual physical.
Patients have an examination like this
one time a year. The exam takes more
time than a regular appointment. The
receptionist schedules two hours for the
physical because the doctor has to check
all parts of the body and do many tests.

symptoms
EMERGENCIES

Patients sometimes need to see a doctor


immediately because they are very sick,
or they were in an accident. Often,
emergency patients go immediately out
of the doctors office to the hospital. For
very bad emergencies, the patient should
call 911, and not the doctors office.

fever

Yes, he does many tests.

Level III
Book 15 Lesson 4

doctor

SSgt Stone: I hope so.

doctors

Read the text. Answer your instructors questions.

Does the doctor do


any tests for an annual
physical?

Staff Sergeant Stone is getting ready to go to the medical clinic because he


doesnt feel well. His throat hurts, his nose is runny, and his eyes are swollen. In
fact, he almost cant open his eyes
anymore. Hes also very dizzy, so hes
been lying on the sofa most of the
morning. He took two aspirin when he
4
got up, but they didnt help. Until he sees
the doctor, he doesnt want to take
another drug. Hes sure that the doctor
will prescribe the best medicine for his
symptoms.
Military sick call is at 0700. Because
SSgt Stone feels too ill to drive, he
doesnt want go to the clinic by himself.
He decides to call his good friend, Staff
Sergeant Cole, to help him get there.

symptoms
SSgt Cole:

appointment, the doctor just checks that


the patient is well again after the first
problems end.

problem
87

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

As the theme of medicine


expands, students are exposed to a wider variety of
language usage. However,
these new itemsAMERICAN
appear
LANGUAGE COURSE
alongside numerous recycled structures, functions,
and vocabulary which the
learner has encountered
often enough to make them
automatically recognizable
and comprehensible.
The words highlighted here
are a sample of the now
many familiar terms, structures, and functions previously presented.

First Printing 2011

4 ALC Objectives: Continual reinforcing


Providing Many Opportunities to Work with New Objectives
Most ALC objectives are reinforced in exercises and supplementary materials throughout a block of instruction. Reinforcing, or the repeated appearance of an item in various parts of the lesson, allows students multiple opportunities to practice and use a particular word, structure, function, or skill.

The introduction and initial reinforcement of an objective


The examples here and on the next two pages demonstrate how one objective
vocabulary term is introduced and then reinforced throughout one lesson.

Vocabulary

Going to military sick call

Staff Sergeant Stone is getting ready to go to the medical clinic because he


doesnt feel well. His throat hurts, his nose is runny, and his eyes are swollen. In
fact, he almost cant open his eyes
anymore. Hes also very dizzy, so hes
been lying on the sofa most of the
EXERCISE A Match the beginning of the sentence with the best ending.
morning. He took two aspirin when he
got up, but they didnt help. Until he sees
Use
information from the text that you just read.
the doctor, he doesnt want to take
another drug. Hes sure that the doctor
1. SSgt Stones medical records are
a. two aspirin, but they didnt
f
will prescribe the best medicine for his
help.
symptoms.
i
2. SSgt Stone doesnt think
b. the medication and care he
Military sick call is at 0700. Because
needs.
SSgt Stone feels too ill to drive, he
g
3. SSgt Cole told SSgt Stone
c. to the clinic by himself.
doesnt want go to the clinic by himself.
He decides to call his good friend, Staff
c
4. SSgt Stone doesnt want to go
d. he might have allergies.
Sergeant Cole, to help him get there.
a
5. SSgt Stone took
e. tissue to wipe his nose.
Thirty minutes later, SSgt Cole arrives.
ook
esson
h
6. Military sick call begins
f. at the clinic.
SSgt Cole: Hello, Donald. Are you ready to go?

15 L

The word medication is first introTake some tissue to wipe your runny nose. You look pretty bad.bYou 8.
in context.
must feel duced
terrible. Maybe
you have the flu. Are you running a fever?

SSgt Stone: Yes. I have my ID, and the clinic has my medical records. Do I need
d
7. SSgt Stone thinks
anything else?
SSgt Cole:

The doctor will give SSgt Stone

New vocabulary,
including the word
g. to calm down because
he was
medication,
is imtoo excited.
h.
at
0700
at
the
clinic.
mediately practiced
controlled
i. inheahas
the flu.
matching exercise.

e
9. SSgt Stone needed a
SSgt Stone: I dont think so, but I might have allergies. This city has so many
different trees and flowers which are blooming right now. I have
another big problem, John. I have to attend the graduation party for
the trainees tomorrow, and I feel terrible.
EXERCISE B Write T for true and F for false.
SSgt Cole: Youre getting too excited, Donald. Calm down. Ive always received
very good care at the clinic, and I know that you will, too. The doctors
1. SSgt Stone is going to sick call because hes ill.
T
will prescribe the medication
medication you need. Im sure youll get some
pills or tablets that will make you feel better.
2. If something is swollen, its larger than usual.
T
SSgt Stone: I hope so.
3. One symptom of the flu is a fever.
T

BOOK 15 LESSON 4

4. SSgt Stone felt very dizzy, so he stood up.

5. A doctor cant prescribe drugs.

87

6. SSgt Stone needed to wipe his runny nose.

7. The medicine in some pills and tablets can make people feel better.

8. SSgt Stone doesnt think he has allergies.

9. People usually get better with good care from their doctors.

88

AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

41

First Printing 2011

4 ALC Objectives: Continual reinforcing


Vocabulary

Reinforcement in later exercises

Receiving lab results and a prescription

As SSgt Stone waits for his lab results, he decides to go to the bathroom. He
looks at himself in the mirror and notices that his eyes are still swollen.
Afterward, he goes back to his seat in the waiting room.
A young airman in the next seat has a sprained ankle which is very swollen.
SSgt Stone remembers the operation he had on his own ankle. The doctor had to
operate to fix it and make it strong again. SSgt Stone hears a woman say, Quiet
down, dear. Her child is crying loudly because shes bleeding from a cut on her
arm. The mother is trying to calm her upset daughter as they sign in. She continues
to quiet her as they wait. Sh, dont cry, honey. Youll be all right.

Later in the same lesson the word mediThe clerk calls SSgt Stone back to the examination room. The doctor comes in with
the results from the laboratory.
cation
is recycled in
Dr. Thomas: I have good news. We wont have to operate.
SSgt Stone: What?
another
vocabulary
Dr. Thomas: Calm down, sergeant. Its a joke. Nothing appears terribly wrong with
you. You just have allergies.
presentation.
SSgt Stone: What am I allergic to?
Dr. Thomas: I dont know. We need to do
some more tests to find out.
For now, the nurse will give
you a shot. It wont hurt
much, and itll make you feel
better. Ill also give you a
prescription for some
medication
medication that should help.
In fact, I take it myself. Take
one pill every morning.

Once a new word is introduced, it is practiced in a variety of activities and exercises.


This process requires students to struggle
with both meaning and form, and ultimately,
to master and begin using the term actively.
Objectives from each lesson are reinforced
at least once in Lesson 5, the homework,
and/or the EE pages.

HOMEWORK
Lesson 4 FOR BOOK 15 LESSON 4

Homework

SSgt Stone: Okay. Do I need a few days of bed rest?

EXERCISE A

Dr. Thomas: No. Just go home and lie down for a while, and take the first pill.
Thats all the treatment you need.

1.

In the two exercises which


follow, the word medication is
reinforced while its relationGood. I didnt want to go and have fun all by myself. Now go sign
out. I want to leave.
ship to other new vocabulary,
penicillin and drug, is also
practiced.

SSgt Cole: Well, what did the doctor say?

2.

SSgt Stone: He said that I have allergies. Lets go to the pharmacy. I need to get
a prescription filled. Afterwards, I need to go home and lie down,
but Im going to that party tomorrow!

BOOK 15 LESSON 4

1. How did you injure your ankle?

2. Are you allergic to penicillin?

is tomorrow.
Our
The 25th wedding
returned the results
to the doctor immediately.

3.

reception
a. lab
barbecue
b. shot
anniversary
c. tablet
4.

Theres
is no
at school
0700. tomorrow. Its a

3. What injuries do you have?


4. How did you get a pulled muscle?

5. Where do I sign in?

6. Is that blood on your shirt?

7. Whats your social security number?

g. I sprained it when I stepped


on a rock and fell down.

8. What do you have in that bottle?

h. I lifted a heavy box and hurt


my back.

EXERCISE B
a. calm down

b. by himself

theto
Marines
after
I finish
school.
bananas,
I dont
buy high
them.

every four
Take
this give patients
Hospitals
thehours. they need to get well.

6.

medication
a. medication
flu
pharmacy
b. care
operation
c. injury
7.

You must
the gate.
SSgt
Clarkshow
cantyour
put ID
on to
histhe
boots. Hisatankle
is too

guest
a. swollen
clerk
b. allergic
guard
c. dizzy

Lesson 4 EE

The word is visible as part of the prompt


in the first item, and it is the correct answer in a later gap-fill item.
BOOK 15 LESSON 4 HOMEWORK
114

b. tablet
.

a. sneezing

7. Military personnel must sign in for


.
b. the flu

8. Tom got a pulled


lifted his television.

a. record
b. medication
medication
.

a. dizzy
5. Medical personnel often work in a
.

when he

EXERCISE F

a. bone
b. muscle
9. Use a cloth to

b. swollen

your boots.

a. wipe

Fill in the blanks with words from the box.


sprained

pulled

flu

prescribed

laboratory

pharmacies

mirror
medication

social security number

penicillin

b. injure
10. Another word for sick is

a. ill

1. The first medication


medication didnt help, so the doctor

prescribed

another kind.

b. drug

pulled

2. I had to stop exercising for a few days because I


90

HW-23

AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

a. sick call

b. prescribing

4. A sprained ankle is usually

a. blood

2. One symptom of allergies is

3. Another word for drug is

6. Another word for pill is

IBecause
want toIm
a. join
ill
b. march
dizzy
c. scrub
allergic

d. In the book at the clerks


desk.
e. A pulled shoulder muscle
and a swollen thumb.
f. Its 000-44-3322.

Choose the best answer.


.

Lesson 5

5.

a. Yes, I cant take that


medication.
medication.
b. Yes, I cut my hand on some
glass.
c. Some pills for my allergies.

1. Another way to say alone is

broom,
mop
pharmacy
iron,
polish
medication
medication
dorm,
allergyboot

a. ride
The clinic
b. holiday
Prescription
c. visa
Sick call

b. dorm

a.
b.
c.

Match each question to the correct response.

a. clinic

We
a good
clean
the barracks.
four
hours.
Theneed
patient
took his and every to

97

EXERCISE A

in a safe place.

a. museums
drug
b. documents
lab
c. continents
muscle

SSgt Stone meets SSgt Cole in the waiting room.

SSgt Cole:

Circle the best answer.

A
person should
Penicillin
is a keep
. all important

AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

a muscle.

laboratory

3. The doctor called me after he got the tests back from the

4. Some people believe that theyll have seven years of bad luck if they break
a

42

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

mirror

5. Doctors often prescribe

penicillin

for their patients.

6. All workers in the US must have a social security number .


7. Many

pharmacies

in the US have drive-thru service. This means

that people can get their medicine without leaving their cars.
8. Jacob fell down on the ice and

sprained

his ankle.

First Printing 2011

4 ALC Objectives: Continual reinforcing


EXERCISE C

Reinforcement in broader contexts

Prepare a role-play about medical problems.

doctor in the examining room

soldier in the examining room

Ask your patient questions.


You want to find out about the
patients symptoms.

You took two aspirin this


morning for a headache. Now
you cant breathe very easily,
and your eyes are swollen.

1A
1B
The word medication is further reinforced
grammar,
skills, and function activiGivein
thecertain
patient some
advice.
Answer the doctors questions.
ties in the lesson. Students experience the word in new contexts
astothey
practice
Listen
the advice
he or she other
gives.
lesson objectives. Reinforcing new vocabulary in grammar objectives
of the same lesson
is limited, but sometimes certain terms naturally
correspond to soldier
the target
structure.
clerk at the clinic
at the clinic
soldier comes into the clinic,
You were cleaning the barracks
Finally, reinforcement of objectives alsoAsigns
occurs
incall,
theandALC
materials:
lanin for sick
tells supplementary
when you fell down and
hit your
you about his or her medical
knee on the floor. Now you cant
2A multimedia
2B
guage laboratory activities, interactive
instruction,
and
video
activities.
problem. Ask more questions.
put any weight on your knee.

Function, Lesson 4

3A

In this role-play,
students use the new
word productively
and freely.

Then tell the soldier that the


doctor will be in the room in a
few minutes.

Tell the clerk what happened,


and answer the clerks questions.

pharmacy clerk

soldier at the pharmacy

A soldier comes in and requests


a prescription. Ask about any
allergies the soldier might have.

A doctor just gave you a


prescription for penicillin, and
you want to get it filled.

Fill the
Write three sentences with information from Exercise
B. prescription, and
instruct the soldier on how to
Use a time word from Exercise A.
take the medication.
EXERCISE C

1.
2.
3.
EXERCISE D
EXAMPLE:

trainee in the hospital


emergency room

Tell the emergency room doctor


about your symptoms, and
answer the doctors questions.

S: Mary takes her medicine nightly.


EXERCISE E
EXAMPLE:

BOOK 15 LESSON 4

S: He has weekly guard duty.


EXERCISE F

monthly

magazine.

month / monthly

3. The nurse was late with the

yearly

4B

Three other people you saw this


morning had the same
symptoms.
Give a prescription and some
advice on how to get better.

hourly

month

week / weekly

month / monthly

2.

year

5. She goes to Houston for a special treatment once a

weekly

a.
b.
c.
d.

medications.

hour / hourly

year / yearly

night
night / nightly

Reading Skill,
8. John has been sick, so he visits the clinic
Lesson 4 Homework

daily
day /daily

Understanding of the term


medication, and other reinforced words, helps students
figure out the inference.

109

.
Ggotrammar
, Lesson
4
tired of talking.

come from another


country.
Students
practice
left Jane and Tims house late.
want
more
dessert.
forming an adjective to
Justmodify
ten minutesmedications.
ago, a car which was going too fast didnt stop at the

intersection and hit another car. Everyone heard the sounds of tires stopping
quickly and glass breaking. Afterwards, the two drivers couldnt get out of their
.
cars.
The people on the street ran to see if the drivers were okay. Both drivers
were hurt, so one man made a call on his cell phone.
What will probably happen next?

shot for his allergies.

7. Phillip works at the laboratory every

Use the information in the text to select the inference.

Jane and Tim live in San Antonio, Texas. They had company over on Friday
night. Jane fixed a nice meal while Tim showed their guests the house and
the yard. After dinner, the guests showed Jane and Tim pictures of their
families and their small town. The guests talked about the ways their town
was different from San Antonio. They also talked about the trouble they were
having with the language and new traditions. Everyone enjoyed the evening.
The guests probably

year / yearly

4. The pharmacy fills her prescription every

BOOK 15 LESSON 4

1.

Fill in the blanks with the correct form of the words.

2. How much money does he earn

6. He gets a

Ask the trainee some questions


about his or her symptoms.

Change the sentence you hear using an -ly adjective.

I
T: Sam has guard duty every week. What kind of guard duty does heEXERCISE
have?

1. Im reading a

doctor in the hospital


emergency room

This morning you started


feeling dizzy, and your stomach
started hurting.
Change the sentence you hear using an -ly4A
adverb.

T: Mary takes her medicine every night.

3B

Answer the clerks questions,


and listen to the instructions.

a.
b.
c.
d.

.
.

3.

Someone will have an operation.


Someone will sweep up the glass.
The drivers will get out of their cars.
An emergency vehicle will arrive.

All the doctors and nurses arrived and washed their hands very carefully.
Everyone checked the machines to be sure that they worked. The nurses laid
clean tools on a small table near the doctor. Then they gave the patient some
111
strong medication. The patient was asleep at 9:00, and they were ready to
begin.
What does this paragraph describe?
a.
b.
c.
d.

a patient asking questions during an examination


doctors and nurses getting ready for an operation
nurses recording medical information for doctors
medical personnel taking a patients blood pressure

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE


BOOK 15 LESSON 4 HOMEWORK

43
HW-29

First Printing 2011

NOTES

44

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

First Printing 2011

5
ALC Vocabulary
Overview & objectives
Word list
Lesson themes
Lesson activators
Objective terms
Recognition & other types of terms
The diamond symbol
Flash cards
Exercise types

45

First Printing 2011

5 ALC Vocabulary: Overview & objectives


Vocabulary Overview
ALC vocabulary consists of high-frequency terms, military and semi-technical
terminology, and words that support the functions.
Each lesson contains approximately 3545 vocabulary items. Vocabulary objectives are reinforced throughout the lesson, as well as in Lesson 5, homework,
evaluation exercises, IMI, and lab and video activities. Moreover, vocabulary is
purposefully recycled in higher books whenever possible.

VOCABULARY
OBJECTIVE: Pronounce intelligibly and
use in discourse the words, phrases, and
expressions listed on the preview page.
OBJECTIVE: Recognize and respond
suitably to vocabulary italicized on the
preview page, which will not be tested,
but which may appear on book quizzes.
FACILITATIVE VOCABULARY
actor
actress
Arizona
Colorado
Colorado River
comedy
Florida
importance
Japan
leader
paintings
president
San Francisco
you bet

The vocabulary
objectives are found listed
on the preview page of
the lesson. The two objectives remain the same for
each vocabulary presentation in the ALC.

Preview

Whats new in Lesson 3?

NEW VOCABULARY
Nouns

a while
Africa
Antarctica
application
Asia
Australia
continent
death
document
Europe
history
holiday
life / lives
museum
North America
orders

photograph (photo)
reason
ride
South America
visa
Verbs

apply
die
earn
leave left / left
notice
order
postpone
require
was / were going to

LANGUAGE FUNCTION

Henry was going to play baseball,


but he couldnt find his glove.

Ask about and express plans to travel.

Its noisy here. Lets go somewhere else


to study.

60

Read a text 150-500 words in length


and write its topic.
Read a text 150-500 words in length
and write its main idea.
Read silently a text on a general
or semi-technical topic that is 50250 words in length, and give an oral
summary of its content.

OVERVIEW OF THE

alive
around
by air
dead
in addition to
overseas
take a photograph
unusual
unusually
usual

GRAMMAR STRUCTURES

Janes working until 7:30 p.m.


Does anyone else want to work late?
No, no one else wants to.

46

Other

Read silently a text 125-150 words


in length within a time of no more than
1 minute, and select the answers to 6
AMERICAN comprehension
LANGUAGEquestions
COURSE
with 70%
accuracy (4 questions asking for factual
information and 2 for inferential or
general understanding).

Where are you going for your


vacation?
Im going to Australia.
Why did you postpone your trip?
We were going to visit family, but we
decided to go to San Francisco
instead.

AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

Write information in a chart or table


after extracting the necessary data from
a written text. (Some data may already
be entered in the form.)
(Homework)
Complete a paraphrase based on a
previously read or heard text less than
100 words in length using key words and
phrases.

First Printing 2011

5 ALC Vocabulary: Word list


Vocabulary Reference for the Book
Appendix A contains an alphabetical listing of all objective and recognition
vocabulary presented in the book. The part of speech is given for clarity or
when more than one form of the word occurs in the book. Each word is followed by the lesson (14) in which it first occurs for easy reference.

APPEN
A

DIX A

Word L
is

academ
ic
academ . . . . . . . . . .
......
y
......
acquir . . . . . . . . . . .
D
e ....
.
......
......
...... 1
advise
damag
......
.1
......
e
.
......
agree
......
danger . . . . . . . . . . .
..
.
......
......
......
...... 1
agreem . . . . . . . . . . .
......
deaf .
......
.3
......
ent
.
.
......
.
......
all of a
......
...... 2
definit . . . . . . . . . . .
.
......
su
e ....
.
......
...... 3
along (a dden . . . . .
......
...... 2
design
.3
......
dv)
......
.4
(n) (v)
......
along (p
......
......
......
detail
.4
rep) . .
......
..3
......
..
anthro
......
......
......
disabil . . . . . . . . . . .
pology
......
..1
ity . . .
......
......
...... 4
appoin
......
......
disable
......
t
.4
......
.4
d
......
appoin . . . . . . . . . . .
......
disagre . . . . . . . . . . .
..
te
......
..
......
e
...... 1
appoin e . . . . . . . . .
...... 4
disagre . . . . . . . . . . .
tment
.1
......
.4
......
ement.
......
......
as . .
......
drizzle
.
......
......
.1
.
B
(n) (v) . . . . . . . . . . .
......
......
E
...... 3
......
..1
......
.
......
......
barrica
econom
...... 3
..1
de (n)
ics . . .
.2
(v)
be accu
either
......
stomed . . . . . . . . . .
... or . .
......
......
be use
......
......
elect .
d to . . to . . . . . . . .
.2
......
......
.1
......
......
benefit
.
.
......
eligible
......
..2
......
(n
.
......
.
......
benefit )
......
...... 1
employ . . . . . . . . . . .
..
......
(v
.
......
......
...... 2
biology ) . . . . . . . . .
...... 1
em
.
.
.
p
.
.
.
lo
3
.
.
.
yee
......
......
......
.1
blame
......
.....3
......
employ . . . . . . . . . .
.
..
......
er
......
blind (a . . . . . . . . . . .
.....
...... 3
employ . . . . . . . . . .
......
d
.3
ment.
......
...... 1
both .. j) (v). . . . . . .
......
......
enginee
.a
.
......
......
.3
r.
...... 4
bring/b nd . . . . . . . .
......
enginee . . . . . . . . . .
.
rought/
.
..
C
......
ri
brough . . . . . . . . . . . 4
...... 3
establi ng . . . . . . . .
t back
.1
sh . . .
.1
......
campa
.
.
......
....4
evacua
......
ign . .
te . . .
.
......
......
candid
......
...... 1
evacua
......
ate . . .
......
tion .
.1
......
......
cant b
......
......
excellen
..1
......
e ....
.
......
.2
t ....
......
......
carry
F
......
......
..1
......
..
..
......
......
chemis . . . . . . . . . . .
fact . .
...... 2
..
tr
......
......
.3
...... 3
chief (a y. . . . . . . . . .
.
favora
......
.
d
......
ble . . .
......
...... 4
chiefly j) (n) . . . . . . .
......
......
fire . .
.
......
.
......
..
.2
...... 1
childhoo . . . . . . . . . . .
......
flash (n . . . . . . . . . . .
.3
......
d. . . .
..2
......
) (v) . .
......
coast .
......
.
fl
.
......
......
ood (n)
......
.3
......
3
.
(v
......
......
) ....
......
commu
fog . .
.....2
......
......
.4
n
......
......
......
concern icate . . . . . . .
......
foggy
.
.
.
.
.
.
2
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
......
......
.
......
concern
...... 2
....4
force (n . . . . . . . . . . .
......
ed . . .
.
......
......
)
conditio
......
......
...... 2
....3
force (v
......
n....
......
.
)....
.
consid
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
. . . . . .2 2
....3
forecast
......
......
eration
.
.
,4
......
......
......
control
forecast . . . . . . . . . . .
......
...2
......
(n) (v).
.
/foreca
......
convin
......
G
st/forec . . . . . . . . . . . 4
..
ce
......
ast . .
.2
...... 4
could h . . . . . . . . . . .
.
.
g
......
et/got/g
.
ave . .
......
2
......
...... 4
couldn
get/got otten off . . . .
......
t
.3
/gotten
......
......
curren be . . . . . . . .
rid of
......
get the
..4
t ....
......
.
p
3
......
......
......
gradua oint . . . . . . .
.....
......
.3
te . . .
......
......
......
...... 3
..1
......
.3
......
..1
BOOK 18

Words which occur in the lesson


with multiple meanings or parts
of speech are denoted in Level III
and above with a number inserted
.
in a diamond

APPEND

IX A

A-1
Students
can use this list, consolidated from the
four preview pages of the book, to quickly test
their knowledge of the new vocabulary.

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

47

First Printing 2011

5 ALC Vocabulary: Lesson themes


Vocabulary in Context
Vocabulary is presented contextually, using one or more themes to create a cohesive, genuine,
and logical means for students to examine and acquire new words. Inclusion of a wide array of
military and high-interest general and cultural topics, along with some semi-technical themes,
helps ALC instructors meet the needs of their international military students.

Vocabulary

A NATO press briefing

Press briefing by Deputy Spokesperson James Piras June 15

Vocabulary

Materials Lackland Air Force Base recycles.

Good afternoon, ladies and gentleinternational luncheon on Wednesday.


men of the press. Lackland
Im pleasedAir
to see
all Base
This
gathering
be at
Force
is ainformal
large military
basewill
in San
PLASTIC
of you here today.
Lets get
startedThe
withLackland
the Brussels
Continental
Restaurant
Antonio,
Texas.
Recycling
Center
does anat
todays briefing.
will working
be preceded
a meeting
important job for people noon.
livingItand
on by
base.
The
A military
base
Let me begin
with the of
schedule
the Office
of there
Security
in
thousands
peopleof whoofwork
and live
useearlier
many
the NATO Secretary
General.
As you every
the day.
day. That
different
materials
Aftermeeting
people takes
use place
theseat
materials,
theyhim
throw
away
or recycle them.
know, his position
requires
to them
NATO
headquarters.
Although the
travel frequently. The
Nextbase
week,collects
hell meet
Secretary
General
will participate
hundreds
of pounds
of different
materialsin
with officials from
European
Union
the meeting,
he will
be unable
to attend
thatthe
people
throw
out. The
Recycling
Center
divides
the
An invitation to a wedding
in Brussels. After
that, hellmaterials
be travelingby type,
the luncheon.
recyclable
washes them, and then sells
The airplane
is on materials
an AirofForce
base.
them
civilian companies.
ItThe
collects
paper,
to the new country
of to
Freelandia.*
commander
thelike
Allied
Joint PAPER
glass,
plastic,
rock, andinstone.
Even though
Freelandia
is metal,
not in rubber,
Force Command
Italy may also be
NATO at the moment,
this visitamount
will be of material
attending recycled
the NATObymeeting,
but there
The largest
the Lackland
a very special Recycling
occasion. ItCenter
will beis the
has been
no are
official
statement
yet. We
cardboard.
Boxes
made
of cardboard,
Collecting family pictures
first formal meeting
expectpaper,
that an
announcement
tomorwhich isbetween
a very NATO
heavy, strong
that
is usually brown
in color. Almost
everything
that
AFB
buys comes
and the government
of Freelandia.
row
willLackland
confirm this
information.
in
a
box.
That
is
why
more
than
half
the
material
Lackland
The Secretary General will brief the
Ladies and gentlemen, thats all
recyclesand
is cardboard.
Freelandian president
other govI have for now. If you have questions,
ernment officialsThe
on Recycling
future military
Im
happy
to recycled
answer them
at this time.
Center
sells
most
materials
to
This is a gate
at Lackland
AFB.
Hunting and fishing in the great outdoors
civilian
companies
training. We hope
that this
new nationoutside the military. The materials
GLASS
can join NATOthese
in thecompanies
near future.buy
Im most often are recycled paper, glass
?
w
kno
you
much
plastic
bottles,
empty metal
olddo
rubber tires, and
Howcans,
sure you have and
questions
about
this trip,
d for?
take the items Oand
them
stanuse
but please savenewspaper.
them for theThese
end of companies
the
1. What does NAT
to
make
other
things.
For
example,
iron,
which
is aestrong,
a
offic
briefing.
2. Where is the main
You promised to take me on vacation.
hardSecretary
metal, is used
by factories to make
ted? machine parts.
Before the
General

Vocabulary

Vocabulary

Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Till


Vocabulary
and

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Dailey


invite you to the
wedding ceremony of their children
Vocabulary
Alice and Timothy
The celebration of love will be
on Saturday, the tenth of June
two thousand and six
Vocabulary
loca
at three oclock in the afternoon
thematerials
b
ently
The Lackland
Center
cant
sell
some
is pres
leaves for Freelandia,
officials Recycling
from
3. Who
of NATO?
General
Stetson Park
retary
because
civilianforcompanies
them.
Ammunition,
Secuse
These arecant
barracks.
These
buildings
NATO countries
will gather
an
things
of the
someThe
which is made of are
metal,
oft are
them.
Recycling
big. is
Men
and
women
are
in
the
Wha
4.one
8120
First
Street
s? this metal is
NATO doe
Center cuts it into barracks.
very small pieces.
Then,
METALSan Antonio, Texas
* Freelandia is not a real country.
ber nations
used to make ammunition again.
5. How many mem
e?
nam
you
can
Reception afterwards
Certainly, the Lackland Recycling Center does very
Officers Club, Lackland Air Force Base
important work for the people who live and work on the Air
The word family means more than just the parents and children who live
Force Base. It also makes sure the base doesnt throw out
Dinner
7:00
together under one roof. Family also means a group of people with the same

BOOK 17 LESSON 3

material that someone may be able to use again.

BOOK 13 LESSON 2

63

relatives. These are grandparents, aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, and cousins.
d
This is a room in the barracks. The
Relatives are also people who belong to the family by marriage.
room is small. The woman is on her bed
e
in her room in the barracks.
EXERCISE A With a partner, ask and answer questions about the invitation.
Many families like to remember
33
important times with pictures, or
photographs.
When a new baby comes into
They must
be Alices parents.
the
family,
when the baby grows into a child
Whos
getting
married?
Who are Mr. and Mrs. Till?
f
g
and then into a young adult, when the young
28
AMERICAN LANGUAGE
COURSE
adult
graduates from school and then
marriesthese are the times parents want
to remember
with
photographs.
Theres
Pam: Jim,
I hope
you remember
your promise. You said that we could take a
vacation
Itsfamily
time to make plans.
usually at least
one this
person
in every
h summer.
BOOK 15 LESSON 2

BOOK 10 LESSON 4

whoJim:
takes and
collects
familys you
photos.
Youre
right.the
I31promised
thatAwed take a trip this year. Would you like
to go
abroad
this summer,
or would you like to travel in the States?
big collection
of family
photos
is a wonderful
EXERCISE A thing
Match
the
letter
of
the
picture
to
its
word.
Write
the letter.
Pam:
I would like to go abroad, but I dont
think
weve put aside enough money
to have!
to do that. Airline fares will be too expensive. I might enjoy going to a city
in the US where Ive
1.
rabbit
5. never been
deer before, maybe San Francisco or Seattle.
What do you think?
2.
fishing rod
6.
shotgun
89
Jim: A trip to Seattle sounds like a great idea. Weve never been there. We could
take some tours and
sightseeing on our own. And you know,
3.
pistol
7. do some
rifle
baseball is a popular sport there. We might be lucky enough to see a
4.
duck
fishmuch I love baseball.
Mariners game. You8.know how
Pam:
BOOK 12 LESSON 4

Jim:

Lets turn on the computer. We ought to look online for information.


93
There must be plenty of websites that can help us plan
a trip.
Okay. Lets start looking.

BOOK 14 LESSON 4

48

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

95

First Printing 2011

5 ALC Vocabulary: Lesson activators

Vocabulary

ities in the

rtun
Career oppo

es

armed forc

r you?
ary offe
it
il
m
e
h
t
ore!
What can
ies and m
it
n
u
t
r
o
reer opp
Great ca
d in the
to be statione
ound the
countries ar
r
he
ot
or
S
U
world

The chance

education
pay for your
higher
a
r
study fo
and time to
degree
otion that
ties for prom
Opportuni
best
ur
yo
do
to
push you
all
surance for
Medical in
milies
fa
r
ei
th
d
an
personnel
which
r retirement
A chance fo
time for a
gh
ou
en
u
leaves yo
er
second care

Money to

a career
d training in
in the armed
ce
oi
ch
ur
field of yo
forces

Guarantee

ts,
g assignmen
d
an
,
ng
ni
ai
excellent tr
ties
important du

Finding Out What Students


Already Know

BULARY
NEW VOCA
ty
ni
rtu
po
op
chance
d
be statione
training
armed forces
t
assignmen
duty
promotion
personnel
retirement

The IT notes offer various ideas


for vocabulary presentations that
activate students prior knowledge
and warm them up to the topic.
Such activators, as the
one shown
this
cabulary on
vo
et
rg
ta
e
.
build
student
confidence
clarity, th
of bolded
Forhere,
ized instead
page is italic
by providing opportunities for
communication and personalization of the material. Students
benefit from instruction which
incorporates the use of warm-ups.
Elicitation of what the students
already know makes the task of
vocabulary acquisition more focused, efficient, and enjoyable.

Interestin

these
ribe some of
ents can desc em the opportunity
ud
st
t
ou
give th
owledge ab
career fields, em.
ents' prior kn
y
Draw on stud e. On the board, write an
talk about th
to
ic
lleted
rv
as
cabulary
military se
ts read the bu
's objective vo
e
Have studen ad silently to
Presentationosed, conduct a
of this lesson r useful terms that com
e
th
in
he
cl
information
well as any ot scussion.
ice in your
With books
t military serv ns like
g the di
themselves.
ou
rin
ab
du
on
up
of the
si
us
s
tio
es
disc
book
onunciation
tries. Ask qu
ts open their
Model the pr ted above, and have
students' coun
Have studen vertisement. Its text
lis
ry
la
dually.
g:
e ad
new vocabu
the followin
ry?
ly and indivi
and look at th a military recruitment
to the milita
repeat choral
in
ts
en
om
go
S
fr
u
U
ud
e
st
yo
ed
th
d
of
dividual
is deriv
Why di
us branches
for
discuss the in
let. The vario
ice a career
ith the class, d how this kind
like this to
af
rv
W
ts
le
se
le
af
ry
le
ta
ili
sy
glos
Is m
text an
military send ol student in the US in
bullets in the can appeal to the young
you?
ery high scho em for military service.
vertising
in the
ev
ad
ay
g from high
of
st
u
yo
will
ur
uit th
en graduatin cation of
How long
order to recr rpose of the leaflet to yo
en and wom
ifi
m
ar
cl
er
pu
ide furth
military?
scuss the
Explain the
school. Prov needed.
country
have them di military
ur
en
yo
Th
as
.
in
ts
ry
ne
la
en
yo
US
stud
vocabu
Does ever e in the military?
which show
photographs, g a variety of different
have to serv
to
in
do
ve
l
ha
ne
r,
on
on
lle
rs
rs
pe
ntro
does a pe
air traffic co
?
How long
3
jobs (such as master, etc.). If your
armed forces
ad
lo
rve in your
c,
se
ni
ha
?
ec
ry
m and a follow-up:
ta
suggests two vocabulary
activators
ili
m
ur
yo
en be in
Can wom
SSON 1
BOOK 14 LE

This IT

polling the class with1 some questions related to the theme


ON
OK 14 LESS
using the BO
pictures
in the advertisement
discussing the appeal of the ad after practicing vocabulary

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

49

First Printing 2011

5 ALC Vocabulary: Objective terms


Types of Vocabulary in the ALC
The four categories of vocabulary in the ALC are objective, recognition,
facilitative (also nonobjective), and instructional. The examples on these two pages show
how students and instructors can identify different types of vocabulary.

Objective vocabulary
Required for student recognition, production, and response in class and lab
Reinforced throughout the lesson, review sections, and supplementary materials
Testable on the book quiz

VOCABULARY
OBJECTIVE: Pronounce intelligibly and

use into
discourse
the words, phrases, and
The labels pointing
the word
expressions listed on the preview page.
attractive show how
objective terms
OBJECTIVE: Recognize and respond
to vocabulary
are distinguishedsuitably
in the
IT anditalicized
ST. on the
preview page, which will not be tested,
but which may appear on book quizzes.

Preview

Whats new in Lesson 1?

NEW VOCABULARY
Nouns

Verbs

appearance
beard
blonde
brunette
character
characteristic
demand
glasses
judgment
mustache
observation
personality
quality
redhead
trait
trust

demand
deny
depend on
rely on
share
trust

handsome
hardworking
honest
irresponsible
lazy
mean
messy
middle (mid)
neat
reliable
responsible
selsh
stingy
unfriendly
unselsh
wavy

FACILITATIVE VOCABULARY
to agree
bomb (n)
to bring out
Adjectives
buddy
attractive
command (n) (an order)
bald
cruise (n)
blond/blonde
to disappear
furry
clever
to guide
curly
in common
demanding
pet (n)
dependable
project (n)
dishonest
NEW VOCABULARY proverb
elderly
Other
truthful
attractive
Best friends : Liz and Molly
unlike
friendly
if
brunette
generous
wavy
whether
blonde (n)
gray
My
best
friend
is
the
one
who
brings
out
the
best
in
me.

Henry
Ford
redhead
character
reliable
Liz and Molly
to rely on
LANGUAGE
FUNCTION
GRAMMAR
STRUCTURES
My best friend Molly NEW
and I are
almost opposites
in physical appearance,
but we are
stingy
very similar in our personalities.
Molly
is an attractive
brunette with Make
wavy observations
brown
and judgments about
generous
It smells like
someone
is cooking.
hair and brown eyes. Im
a blondelike
with
blue eyes and very light skin. I people
used toand
be objects.
a
to trust
It sounds
music.
redhead, but I changed my hair color a few years ago.
honest
Kara Quinn is 24 years old.
She seems to be a very good teacher.
I think that its Mollys
The dog appears to be dangerous.
Shes in the air force.
character that makes her
book was written in 1905.
special. Her thoughts, This
beliefs,
She seems to enjoy her work.
and the way she acts Joe
towards
has a three-car garage.
In my opinion, shes an excellent
others show her good character.
airman.
Molly has some wonderful
qualities. For example, shes
very reliable. If she says that
EXERCISE A
shell do something, she does
AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE
1. Liz and Molly look alike.
it. I can always rely on her.2
(Correction: They dont look alike.)
Shes not stingy either. In fact,
2. Liz thinks that Molly is pretty.
Mollys quite generous. She
Listen
words in
Read pairs of phrases within a
3. Molly has straight brown
hair.to a text 30-300shares
with other
length
(20-90
seconds)
and
selecteverything
from
limited time and identify the pairs
(Correction: She has wavy hair.)
people
and
doesnt
mind
if theythe
borrow
things. Shes
intelligent, too. She thinks
2-4 choices information not included in
as being
same her
or different
(time
4. Liz has light colored hair.
fast,
learns
quickly,
and
usually figures
out solutions
to problems
by herself. I can trust
the text.
(Audio) restriction:
2 seconds
per pair).
(Audio)
5. Liz thinks that Molly is a great
Molly because shes very honest, never tells others my secrets, and always tells the
Listen for numbers in atruth.
dictated
text to have
her
Outline
information in a graphic
person.
Im lucky
friendship.
andknows
write Molly
the numbers heard.
(Audio) organizer after reading a text on the
6. If Liz needs help, she
topic.
will help her.
Scan a text within a limited&
amount
time (60-90 seconds) and
Write a paraphrase of an original
7. Molly tells other people
herof
friends
secrets.
write answers to 2-5 previously read
text about 100 words in length after first
OVERVIEW
AMERICAN
LANGUAGE
COURSE
EXERCISE
A
Listen
to your
T for
true and
(Correction:OF
SheTHE
never
does
that.)
questions.
reading
theteacher.
originalCircle
text and
retelling
it F for false.

Listed in
regular print
on the IT preview page

Listed in regular print


in the IT margin when
it appears for the first
time in the lesson

Vocabulary

Bolded or
otherwise highlighted in the ST
presentations

H F

50

8. Molly was probablya very


Readgood
silently a paragraph on a1.
student.

general or semi-technical topic that is


100-200 words in length, and give2.an T
oral summary of its content.

orally one or more times.


F

5.

Write a message after hearing a


recorded
or recited conversation
F
6. in T
F
which information is conveyed that must

First Printing 2011

5 ALC Vocabulary: Recognition & other types of terms


Recognition vocabulary
Required for students to recognize, produce, and respond to in class and lab
Not testable on the book quiz, but may appear in test items
The labels pointing to want ad(s) show how recognition terms are distinguished
in the IT and ST.

NEW VOCABULARY
(reading across)
want ad
to lease (v)
classified
section
real estate
transportation
pet
public
to advertise
advertisement

Listed
in italics
in the IT
margin

VOCABULARY
OBJECTIVE: Pronounce intelligibly and
use in discourse the words, phrases, and
expressions listed on the preview page.
OBJECTIVE: Recognize and respond
suitably to vocabulary italicized on the
preview page, which will not be tested,
but which may appear on book quizzes.

Vocabulary

Classified ads in the newspaper

Local Want Ads


BUY, SELL, & LEASE IN OUR CLASSIFIED ADS
Real Estate

Transportation

Houses for Sale................. 8 D


Real Estate Services ........ 9 D
Land ...................................10 D
Apartments for Rent ....11 D
Houses for Rent .............13 D

Autos...................1D
Trucks .................................. 5 D
Other ................................... 6 D
Vehicles for Lease ............ 7 D

Jobs

Preview

Career Training ................15 E


Professional ......................16 E
Sales ....................................17 E
Health Care .......................18 E
Jobs Wanted.....................20 E

Whats new in Lesson 2?

Other

NEW VOCABULARY
Lost & Found ....................15 F
Pets .....................................16 F
security
Farm Animals
...................16 F
advertisement (ad) Tickets & Shows
..............18 F
transportation
Public Notices
.................20 F
air conditioning
utility
Nouns

Bolded or
otherwise
highlighted
in the ST

The Star
Tuesday
April 22
Section D

To advertise,
call 555-2121
or go online
www.the.star

Miscellaneous
Appliances ....................15 D
Computers ....................17 D
Furniture ........................19 D
Guns ................................20 D
Jewelry ...........................20 D
Yard & Garden .............21D

Other words
Advertisements
Listed
in
start at available
$2 per line.
central
italics on
the
Theclassified
Star
want ad
previewduepage
excluding
of the IT
only
EXERCISEVerbs
A Scan the newspaper
section
above to answer the questions.
fairly

argument
court
FACILITATIVE VOCABULARY
district
EXERCISE
A
cable
efficiency
advertise
coat (a layer)
ANSWERS
furnished
electricity
1. In which
newspaper sections (A, B, C,
etc.) can you find want ads?
argue
convenience
including
garbage
1. Sections
E, and F
consider
Leave him alone. (Dont
botherD,him.)
2. Whats another word for ad?
off
garbage disposal
exclude
advertisement
light (consisting of2.a small
portion of
3. How much
it cost/ to
advertise in
the newspaper?
perfect
gas
fightdoes
fought
fought
healthy food: a light
3. lunch)
$2 per line
private
heating
list
furnish
4. What are
some examples of real estate?
4. houses, land, and apartments
medium (steak)
public
lease
include
5. in the Other Section
5. In which
ad section do you look to see
what plays are showing downtown?
miscellaneous
unfurnished
paint
lease
pond
6. page 20D
pet
paint
nstructional
vocabulary
6.
On
which
page
can
you
find
advertisements
for diamond
rings?
rental
7. dogs, cats, birds, etc.
privacy
wonder
safety
7.
What
kinds
of
animals
would
you
find
in
the
Pets
Section?
8. motorcycles, boats, planes,
realetc.
estate
satellite
9. real
estate; to find placessection
to rent
8. What other types of vehicles might appear in the Transportation Section?
seasonal
acilitative
ocabulary
spicy
9. Which ad section do people who are moving look at most? Why?
teenager
to find (to consider)
NEW GRAMMAR STRUCTURES
LANGUAGE FUNCTION
to leave (to make: It leaves me tired.)
Ask for and give information relating to the
Could you tell me if theres a mall near
to take (to like: I take my tea sweet.)
renting of apartments and houses. AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE
here?
38
well done (steak)
Im not sure if theres a mall near here.
Would you be available to show me

This category includes words used


for instructions. Students must recA limited number of additional words found in
ognize and respond to them in class
vocabulary, grammar, and function sections are
and lab. These terms may appear in
listed on the preview page (IT only) as a courtesy
the instructions on book quizzes.
to instructors. These wordsDoare
clarified
in
conExamples
include select, rewrite,
the
house
after 3:00 tomorrow?
you know where the post office is?
EXERCISE
A
Presentation
I
have
no
idea
where
it
is.
Yes,
I
have
an
opening
at
4:30.
text, but are
not intended to be taught.Books
They
are
match, summarize,
scan, etc. Terms
open
This text is meant to resemble the table
John drinks his coffee black.
Is
there
an
extra
charge
for
pets? grammar, such as
Written cue
contents
for the
classified ads
section skills
not foundofon
book
quizzes.
Certain
activiused to describe
Oral response
of a newspaper.
Besides the regular deposit, theres
ties also contain additional words in context,
but
passive voice or modals, do not apGroup
also a pet deposit of $300.
NOTE: Because there are multiple fonts
Check understanding of the vocabulary
they do not
appear
this list.
pear on book quizzes.
and sizes
in thisin
presentation,
the new

vocabulary is both bolded and italicized.


Instruct the students to scan the text.
Then ask them the following questions.

1. Who uses this part of the 34


newspaper?
2. What kinds of things can you find in
of the newspaper?
Write a paragraphthis
on section
a topic after
going through pre-writing
steps.
3. Have you
ever used want ads
yourself
? Why?
Write a text in briefer
form
by using
embedding or synthesis.
(Homework)

in this presentation as the class


completes Exercise A.

NOTE: Public Notices, in the category


called Other, give information about
government and private business
AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE
contracts, real estate issues, and general
OVERVIEW
OFshould
THE know
AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE
information
that the public
about because they may wish to act on it.

51

First Printing 2011

5 ALC Vocabulary: The diamond symbol


Multiple Treatments of Vocabulary
Preview

Whats new in Lesson 4?

NEW VOCABULARY
Nouns

aluminum
battery
charge
circuit
conductor
copper
cord
current
electrician
energy
flow
generator
insulation
insulator
power
product
production

protection
screw
screwdriver
shock
short circuit (short)
switch
wire
wiring
use

through
Verbs

attach
charge
conduct
damage
flow
generate
go out went / gone out

insulate
power
produce
protect
run (operate) ran / run
switch off
switch on
twist

On the preview page in Level III books, a numalerts students and instrucbered diamond
tors to words with more than one meaning or
part of speech as presented in the lesson.

Other

electric
electrical
insulated
powerful
through
uninsulated

l
tric bil
ur elec
on yoFUNCTION
LANGUAGE
y
e
n
o
ave m Confirm or verify information.
ow to s
HDirk.
Wendys here, and so is
Is it true you can die from an any
Wendys here, and Dirk is too.
p
electric shock? er Com
Pow
Greg wont go, and I wont either.
Local
them?
Greg wont go, and neither will I. Your Does that mean we should turn off
h using
the power before we work
from
e throug
rwith
e
u
g
yo
a
s
en
es be changed every
electricity? on wh
The carsA
oilM
should
d night?
ed
GRAMMAR STRUCTURES

abulary

through

Voc

LARY
OCABU
NEW V
)
)
(n
power (adj) (finished
through
to run
use (n) l
a
electric
energy te
la
to insu
)
flow (n t
u
to go o
electric off
h
it
to sw c n
er)
o
insulati )
t the oth
(v
ide, ou
to flow (prep) (in 1 s
h
throug d (adj)
insulate

turn
l day an
pliances
itioner al re hot water?
leave ap
air cond
o
Do you
eater or
es no m
er
th
l
ti
un
Do yo
shower
e
th
?
in
ay
stay
any
ney aw
Do you
row mo
d yes to r
like to th
nswere
fo
Do you
if you a oney to pay
t
u
B
away.
the m
money ctricity and our use of
throw
y
le
ergy.
94
LANGUAGE COURSE
reduce
likes to re wasting e u canAMERICAN
e
d on en
n
o
o
yo
ou
,n
u spen
,
y
e
o
w
y
rs
s,
lo
y
u
n
e
e
o
Of co
uesti
ons b
f mon
other q the suggesti e amount o
of the
th
l
u follow er and lower
o
e usua
y
If
.
it
w
ad of th
r
ical po
F inste g it in a wate
0
2
1
electr
t
ce
ter a
ppin
at redu
ter hea tank by wra
a
th
w
ts
e
Run th sulate the
al fauce
owers.
In
ll speci sinks and sh
140F. lanket. Insta
your
to
b
r
r
te
te
hea
ot wa
Water
w of h
ezer at se
Heater
the flo
the fre
o
F and , open and cl
8
3
t
a
r
ir
igerato much cold a ose the door
fr
re
r
u
o
cl
o
Keep y void losing to ossible, and zen water in
erator
a
o
e
sp
Refrig
0F. To as quickly a ttles full of fr t them in th
zer
s.
u
o
r
& Free
o
d
the o eep plastic b r goes out, p power return
K
e
e
tightly. er. If the pow cool until th
od
ez
the fre help keep fo
to
food or
fridge
to heat at in the
e stove
he
e
th
th
n
o
ff
ho
use the
pans
. Switc
ts and
ing beca
over po more quickly utes of cook en the oven
e
C
v
to
S
ter
t op
min
Electric
. Do no ill lose heat.
boil wa the last five
a while
r
w
&
oven fo l stay hot for g because it
n
il
%.
Oven
oven w e its operati
l by 20
il
h
w
ergy bil
door
our en the walls
y
ce
u
n red
ugh
kes
tion ca easily thro and that ma
w
insula
e
e,
Proper d cool air flo ulated hom rder. Keep th
s
a
an
er.
Warm of a poorly in ioner work h F in summ
8
f
it
7
o
d
and ro
air con
ter and
in win
ater or
Air the he ture at 68F
ra
e
p
ioning tem
Condit eating
&H

3,000 miles.

eh
We need to shorten our work day.
u run th

Two of the three


treatments of
through which occur
in this presentation
are listed separately
and clarified in the
IT margin.

NS
UESTIO
LARY Q
U
B
ished?
A
n
fi
C
VO
eans
word m
h
ic
h
1. W
h) (adj)
ork or
(throug
ns to w
rd mea
o
w
t
a
y
2. Wh te? (run)
r energ ine
opera
h
word fo
nother make a mac
a
is
t
a
3. Wh an be use to
c
t
a
th
(power)
power r,
work?
f some
think o as, sun, wate
u
o
y
n
g
4. Ca es? (wind,
sourc y, etc.)
top
it
ns to s
electric
at mea
word th t)
a
d
in
u
in one
5. F
g. (go o
s to go
workin
t mean hrough)
a
th
rd
a wo
ther. (t
6. Find and out the o
side
(prep)

through

In the above presentation, each occurrence of the word through is bolded, or


similarly denoted,
as new vocabulary.
SSON 4

Vocabulary questions
target some of the
more difficult words,
including through and
its two meanings.

the
n discuss
and the up report
t,
rs
fi
y
ro
e
g
ntl
text sile ns. Have each . If they disagre
in
io
ctricity?
suggest tion to the class y should expla
le
e
e
v
e
c
nt to sa
their se suggestions, th differently.
LE
importa
BOOK 17
3. Is it or why not?
with the what theyd do
uct
e
v
sa
y
h
d
nd cond
The third treatment of through (prep) (byW are some ways to
why an
bulary a
a
c
o
v
w
t
uss ne
y is
nd
4. Wha icity?
tiona later
Disc ciation drill.
lectricit
the
means of) Pappears
books a
f evocabulary
resentanin
electr
nun
stions in
en their bles a flyer
theme o wing general
p
ro
e
o
p
th
ts
a
,
n
e
o
lary que
d
o
m
u
u
ll
ss
b
se
st
a
le
fo
c
re
e
a
e
e
o
is
v
e
v
rv
a
h th
presentation
lesson.
pag
nse
In thof the
the
ugh th
H
d throug
nces, co
that this
Ask ht margin.
Go thro
presente lectrical applia its.
tell them tility company. raph with your
s that
per rig
p
u
u
e
c
g
u
r.
s:
ir
e
ra
c
a
ic
y
a
es noun
p
fl
al
top
from
describ ity. It refers
a list of
electric
nd first the rest of the
ic
a
g
d
tr
s
n
in
c
n
a
it
,
le
io
c
n
ic
E
s
li
tio
ad
quest
y electr ical describes
NOTE:
ords
pic by e hold appliance
. Then re
r work b
bulary w
ce the to
se
students
make o teristics. Electr s which are
Introdu electrical hou room, laundry
ew voca duction and 1
n
e
th
n
c
f
n
o
3
to chara tegories of nou y.
the intro
commo e kitchen, bath the board. Ask
e other
NOTE:
th THEthAMERICAN
ca
on
icit
rlined in of the flyer; th
r
e
tr
52
OVERVIEW
LANGUAGE
COURSE
e
.
m
d
c
e
n
n
rg
le
o
u
e
la
m
used in OF
h
re
n
a
ed wit
in com
.
tc. Write
ft colum
concern
room, e what they have y on the board
in the le s are bolded.
it
rd
ups.
o
ro
w
g
4
w
students word electric uestions:
e
n
ss into e appliances
e
q
e the cla
Write th the following
th
for?
95
Divid ach group 1 of to reread the
ctricity
le
e
se
Then ask
e
u
em
n
e
th
w
ig
t
o
ss
sk
n
d
A
A
e
re
r.
fe
What els
the flye
e be dif
95

First Printing 2011

5 ALC Vocabulary: Flash cards


Visual Vocabulary Reinforcement
In Level I, a check mark on the preview page of the IT indicates vocabulary with accompanying flash cards.
Also, a list of flash cards available for
each lesson is in theVOCABULARY
appendix.
OBJECTIVE: Pronounce intelligibly

In Level II, flash cards


designed
to
and useare
in discourse
the words,
phrases, and expressions listed on
advance fluency with
function,
gramthe student
text preview
page.
mar, and conversation cards. Flash cards
OBJECTIVE: Recognize and respond
elicit one- and two-word
responses as
suitably to vocabulary italicized on
the preview page, which will not be
well as target sentences.

tested, but which may appear on book


quizzes.

Whats new in Lesson 2?

NEW VOCABULARY
Nouns

Verbs

Other words

Air Force
answer

answer

at [place]

ask
belong to

big
inside
our

barracks
base

Base Exchange (BX)


bed

building
bulletin board
bus
bus stop
commissary
dining hall

Flash cards are available for words


marked by the symbol .
FACILITATIVE VOCABULARY
activity
Army post
buy
clothes
drinks
easy
first aid
flag
food
gate
help
information
magazines
medicine
million
newspapers
Operations Building (OPs) B2 2:17

lab

Preview

dispensary
hospital
library

outside
small
their
thousand
where
whose
your
1,000 500,000
one thousand
ve hundred thousand

mess hall
A picture
appears on one side of
ofce
each question
card and the vocabulary item
on theroom
other. The book, lesson, and
schedule
snack
bar

card number
are on both sides of
each NEW
cardGRAMMAR
for easy
sorting.
STRUCTURES
USEFUL PHRASES
Wheres Joe?
Hes at the mess hall.

Excuse me, please.


Thank you, sir.

Whose classroom is this?


Its our classroom.

26

AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

B2 2:17

Repeat a dialog containing a


maximum of 5 exchanges, and
utterances of no more than
10
B2 2:17
syllables each, after a model, using
the appropriate stress, intonation, and
rhythm.
Recite a dialog containing a
maximum of 3 medium or 5 short
exchanges, and utterances of no more
than 10 as
syllables,
Certain terms, such
lab,after
arerepeating
rethe dialog after a model, using the
cycled for practice
withstress,
new
vocabappropriate
intonation,
and
ulary and/or therhythm.
function,
grammar,
Select a word from among
4 choices
seeing the word
or skills exercises
in aafter
lesson.
(printed) on a flash card for 1 second.

Create correctly written sentences


using a substitution table with
interchangeable alternatives in each
frame.
(Homework)
Create correctly written sentences
using a correlative substitution table
in which choices in early frames
restrict choices in later frames.
Identify the common sound /z /
shared by words read aloud.
Intelligibly pronounce the sound
/z / in a substitution drill, as in

Write and say plural forms that


end in either the /s / or the /z / sound.
Identify stress patterns in spoken
words, and write them under a
graphic representation of the stress
pattern.
B2 2:5

T: Hes a pilot. (doctor)


S: Hes a doctor.
T: Hes a pilot. (isnt)
S: He isnt a pilot.
B2 2:20

26

AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

53

First Printing 2011

5 ALC Vocabulary: Exercise types


Exercises to Practice Comprehension

Vocabulary

The ALC offers a variety of means for


checking student comprehension. Sometimes
questions appear in the ST, other times only
in the IT. Students can work in pairs, groups,
or individually; questions can be answered
orally, in writing, or both.

Address

http://www.dliweatherman.dli/denver/today

DLI Weatherman
Choose a city

Today

Weekend

Denver, CO
Right Now: 37F
High: 42
Low: 25

/
EXERCISE A

The rain will change to snow in the afternoon.

10-day Forecast

Maps

Video

Weather Fact: The largest hailstone on


record measured 7 inches in diameter.
Thats a circumference of 18.75 inches!

Today

Tonight

* / * /
* / *

* * *
* * *

Tomorrow

The Johnstown Flood: Wave of Water Destroys Town

Read the store ads.

After a warm rainy


Cold temperatures will
Temperatures will
One ofmorning
the worst
floods
in US history
in the
mid to
continue overnight
withSome increase
around 48F,
thunder.
people to
realized
right
happenedlow
in40s,
Johnstown,
winter willPennsylvania,
lows reaching
25F.
but conditions
wont
away
what had happened.
After
a night
in 1889. return
This flood
was responsibleDrivers
for canofexpect
as temperatures
to rains, the
improve.
A new
line of A
heavy
dam had
broken.
over 2,200
deaths,
and itthe
destroyed
raildrop
throughout
day.
run into some
snow
storms isatmoving
into per
wave
of water traveling
40 miles
roads, factories,
most to
The rain and
will change
and ice on the roads.
area.
ball
hourthe
and
at Golf
times
upsized
to 60
of the other
in by
sleet buildings
and then snow
Take precautions while feet hail
probable byeveryearly
highis destroyed
ilver Dollar
24 / 7
Clarks
the town.late afternoon. Look
driving because ice isnt thing
evening.
in itsProtect
way. your
People
Discount Store
Supermarket
Department Store
Johnstown
out for is
ice located
on the roads
always visible on the
putting
underwas
triedcar
toby
run,
but it
there
Were open 24 / 7.
Why pay more?
Clarks weve
at the crossing
of two
rivas driving
conditions
roads. Allow extra time nowhere
some type
of The
cover.whole
Also
to go.
Shop here for the
Everything costs a
got everything for
ers. Afterbecome
several
days of
unfavorable.
for travel.
bring
andin
plants
event
waspets
over
only 10
best variety of fruits
dollar. Nothing more,
the home and family.
very heavy rain, both rivindoors. A low of 38F is
minutes.
and vegetables
nothing less.
Youll find all you
ers slowly rose over their
Itforecast.
took five months to
in town.
We save you money.
need here.
banks and began to flood
clean up all of the flood
the
city.
Besides
the
water
damage.
People from all
WESTERN BANK
Short Cuts
Long & Tall
e
magthe
that had been rising for
over
US and from other
much da
Over 6' tall?
nd the
e was so understacountries
days, there was a problem
sent food and
er
We cut it like you
Your friendly
th
ason
More than
t
a real to help the people
want it. Not too
neighborhood bank.
that the people who lived One re
d clothing
le didn
180 lb? Were
e peop
cast an ational
short and not too
Come to us for all
United see.was becaus tween a fore e US N
in the 50city
and improve
condiAMERICANthe
LANGUAGE
COURSE
rncouldnt
te
the mens
es
be
t
w
th
long. Haircuts for
your banking needs.
os the fference
day,
the mid oremiles
e has seof Johnstown. Even
tornadup
clothing store
di
e in Fourteen
nce that eather Servic tion
M
d
adults and children.
Were here for you.
who liv
ados. there
ch an
W
of thae dam warning. SiJohnstown, c1889
for you.
river,
all of this help, it took
People ed to torn
watwith
partwas
l
r
ia
to
he
fic
us
e
ot
e
up
s werwater of a big lake.
any heldnd
eduresthe city again. Since
back
fiveofyears
to build
itionthe
States ar e than in that
ng proc coming
65, co
er
warnitime,
of
that
Johnstown
has experienced
Town Square
occur th April 11th, 19Around 4 p.m. on the rainy day of
people
le
My Photo Sh p
rnolds ym
On
inform floods,
to 30th, the people of Johnstown
, peop
other
none have been as
owbut
osMay
Cafeteria
N
ad
world.
.
rn
os
to
eans of 1889.
mflood
tornad

ra
ect for
heard
a
loud
noise
that
sounded
like
destructive
as
the
ch
pe
rf
at
m
pe
w
t
Good, healthy,
We sell cameras, film,
the te
know a itions are righ
Need to lose a few
develop: the Midwest
home-made food. Stop
and more. Learn how
pounds? Want to get
that cond ado. A warntures in e high 80s and
in for breakfast, lunch,
to take great pictures
stronger? Well help
a to
r or
EXERCISE
B Mark each statement T for true
Frn
for false.
th
e is a
g
fo
er
in
in
e
th
er
supper, or one of our
in
our
weekly
ow
w
bl
The Great Storm of 1900:
Texas Coast Hit Hard
eans
you do both.
ds were r from
ing m and everyone
delicious desserts.
photo classes.
the win humid aiMake
the false statements true.
y,
m,
tornado,
ver. Toda
ixed
Most people who live in Galveston,
evacuation. They stayed ininwartheir
which m air
ld take co both TV
ou
h,
ut
sh
so
Texas call the hurricane of 1900 The
homes. One of these people was
theGasper cold, dryT
1. The flood killed over 2,200 people.
ashes on ople of
fl
s
w
e
ne
pe
Great Storm. It was one of the most
Wallop, a local businessman. w
The
day
ith th
north.
o warn
s
om the F pril, 2. The people didnt know that the rivers an
d radi
hazard
were
rising.
ing fr
severe and deadly hurricanes ever to
before the storm hit, Mr. Wallop
told
a
com
ssible
y in A
the po these are com
n that da ruck the
strike the US.
The hurricane
began off from the
reporter
he ran into, I wish O
they
EXERCISE B Answer
questions
with information
store ads.
F
st
e
lik
3.
People
knew
that
there
was
a
problem
with
the
dam.
os
ad
storms
cover.
the western coast of
would leave us alone.
48 tornI This includes
ngerous e time to find
da
t.
n
n,
es
w
he
F
ga
or
w
id
the African continent
really dont think
m
next to the
dam.
M that of Michi 4. Johnstown is located
visible
there is
than
os are in
states
ana,
1. Where can you
go to
lunch?across6. Which store sells things for the home?
ing, so
and
it eat
traveled
the storm will be th
ase bad
by more was
y tornad
utes
ois, Indi
e hitdam
broke
ey in the afternoon.
veral min
FACT: Man
a, Illin meTtowns5.werThe
on
the Atlantic Ocean
as they say. I left
Iowthe
WEATHER
ay take se .
es and m tornados
So
m
It
liv
o.
.
hi
in
2. Which store sells
groceries?
7.
Where
can
you
save
money?
rm
O
fo
d
seen
to Galveston, Texas,
other times theyansaid
T cost 6. ho
theysounded like
the of water
be
he
The
wave
from
the
dam
thunder.
T
en
n
s,
ca
ur
o.
to
wh
ad
ey
mage
elve
e torn
which is located near
before th
we had to go. This on
time,
only tw million in da than 270
3. Where can you buy film?
8. What kind of store is Long & Tall?
The wave
great. In er F$200 7.
Houston on the Gulf of
Im not leaving. Sadly,
Moretravelled at 60 miles per hour.
ov
d roads. e injured.
ain.
caused
es, an
Mexico.
Mr. Wallop was wrong.
ss
er
T
w
ne
cles ag
4. Which store has
cheap prices?
9. Who sells soap and detergent?
si
8. 15
The
00 town was destroyed in only ten minutes.
bu
ree arti
homes,
At that time, it was
When the hurricane
lled and
g the th
in
were ki
n
le
t
an
op
T
not hair
easyfortoadults?
forecast
9. Damage from the
floodsctook five months to clean up.
5. Which place cuts
10. Where can you get womens shoes?hit on the 8th peof
Midwes
chart by
own
te the
exactly which direcSeptember, the force of
Johnst
Comple
ston
ve
C
al
G
tion a hurricane would
the wind was 130 miles ERCISE
X
travel, so people could
per hour, and the cityE
35
BOOK 18 LESSON 2
Galveston, c1900
?
appen
not be sure about the
quickly filled with 15
32
AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE
did it h
danger until the hurricane hit them.
feet of seawater. Most of the buildings
Where
.
died
On September 7th, a hurricane warnin the city were totally destroyed, but
people
ousand
ing was given for Texas, Louisiana,
the biggest cost was the loss of lives.
Eight th
d.
and the west coast of Florida.
Over 8,000 people died during the 1.
de
oo
.
fl
million
city was
People were warned to evacuate
storm. To this day, people who live in
er $200
2. The
was ov
those areas and move to safer places
Galveston have never forgotten The
.
repairs
cost of
130 mph
away from the coast. But most people
e
Great Storm and the destruction that
er
h
T
ov
3.
ds was
in Galveston didnt listen to the call for
it caused.
the win
.
of
ed
e
rc
fo
mag
4. The
were da
ctories
and fa
EXERCISE A Answer the following questions about the text.
lroads
e 80s.
th
5. Rai
in
as
ture w
Write short answers.
red.
tempera
URSE
ere inju
UAGE CO
6. The
ople w
AN LANG
AMERIC
dred pe
n
u
h
5. People were told to evacuate.
1. What kind of storm hit Galveston?
Fifteen
7.
Where were they told to go?
a hurricane

Town Square Shopping Center

Comprehension questions
for this presentation appear in the IT notes.

Pairs ask and answer the questions provided about the ad.

2. When did the storm happen?

in 1900

3. Where did it come from?

from Africa

4. Where is Galveston located?

near Houston

34

54

These comprehension exercises, all from the


same book, follow three vocabulary presenta6. How much of a warning were
people given?
a day tions on natural disasters. Such variety keeps
7. How high did the floodwaters rise?
the students both challenged and engaged.
15 feet
away from the coast

36

AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

First Printing 2011

5 ALC Vocabulary: Exercise types


Exercises to Practice Word Meaning
The ALC contains both a wide array of traditional exercises as well as
more innovative ways to practice vocabulary meaning. See the IT preface
for more examples of common ALC exercises.

e sen

Read th

ISE D

EXERC

3
7
4
8
1
6
2
5

rder.

rrect o

the co

Sequencing exercises

A TIR
ANGE

ample.

This exercise practices


both word meaning and
comprehension.

CH
HOW TO
e jack.
with th
ground
e
th
e
le abov
ic
h
ve
e
e tire.
Raise th
the spar
uts on
n the n
at tire.
Tighte
d the fl
an
ts
u
e trunk.
gn
into th
e the lu
flat tire
e trunk.
Remov
d
an
,
from th
jack
,
ck
ch
ja
n
d
e wre
tire, an
Put th
, spare
nd.
ch
ou
n
gr
re
e
s th
t the w
the car.
tire hit
Take ou
under
til the
e jack
icle un
d put th
the veh
tire an
ts.
u
at
n
Lower
fl
e
e
th
place
ts on th
and re
the nu
vehicle
Loosen
on the
are tire
sp
e
th
Put

r 1 is an

Numbe

em in

, put th

Then
tences.

ex

Cloze exercises

ph.

a loud
heard
. They
in road
ta
n
ou
on a m
a
ISE E
aveling
hey had
EXERC
were tr
right. T
e he had
d Tom
to the
ly
ad wher
Bob an
ck
,
ro
ui
e
ay
q
th
rd
and
de of
Yeste
si
k
e
ed
th
un
rn
tr
to
hicle tu
vehicle
e
The ve
ed the
ened th
sound.
ob mov
Tom op
.
e
re
tire! B
H
ti
t.
e
flat
blanke
ange th
an old
Then,
d to ch
on top.
ch, and
flat lan
e tools
e wren
enough
jack, th
d put th
w
e
an
th
t
a
,
icle fe
anke
e tire
the veh
e old bl
the spar
with th
jack up
removed
extra
ground
e
th
to
began
h the
covered
ts and
tire wit
Lastly,
the nu
the flat
trunk.
d
loosened
to the
replace
e tools
th
Bob
e
ed
with
d. H
turn
n
re
re
ti
ou
d
e
gr
th
up an
off the
inflate
urried
inches
. Bob h
and
to rain
repair
began
rage to
tire. It
ga
a
drove to
d Tom
Bob an
.
air
and
Listen

te the

comple

paragra

Students read a gapped paragraph


as they fill in the missing words
by listening to the complete script
read aloud by the instructor.

67

BOOK 10

LESSON

EXERCISE C

Match the picture with the place where you can buy it.

What else can you buy there? Write two more items next to each places name.
Number 1 is an example.
a

Matching exercises
Students can quickly test how well
they know new words with this type of
exercise. Lower books make use of pictures
to help students learn concrete terms. Higher
books rely on students prior knowledge
of the language to choose the correct
definition or logical answer.

1. discount store

2. supermarket

3. clothing store

4. photo shop

5. department store

6. cafeteria

EXERCISE D

paper and notebook

Write the words for the pictures and definitions.

1. evening meal

supper

2. place to park cars parking lot

7.

up

shop / go
shopping
OVERVIEW OF 3.THE
LANGUAGE
COURSEupstairs 55
to buyAMERICAN
things
4. lots of choices

variety

5. to make a choice

decide

6. place with stores shopping center

mall

8.

down
downstairs

First Printing 2011

5 ALC Vocabulary: Exercise types

to
t word
e correc

te the

comple

ce.

senten

.
is poor
visibility bility
early.
ing up
the
an / visi
if
to wak
m
e
er
ed
iv
th
m
wea
usto
ldnt dr
cc
ou
ck
a
sh
ru
/ st
1. You
hes
?
omed to
t
0500, so
accust
forecas cast
work by
to be at
e
e / fore
th
as
h
ad
to
ic
on
en
rr
e.
ba
2. D
u list
ive her
idnt yo
ult to dr
ella? D
ly diffic
ur umbr
e it real
eres yo
can mak
3. Wh
.
fog
n
conditio tion
g
g / fog
t
condi
mornin
lightnin
in grea
bility /
4. The
s
si
it
vi
,
ot new
EXERCISE D Complete the sentences with the correct word.
car is n
gh this
.
n thou
5. Eve
lightning ing
hazards
1. You must watch out for all possible
when driving.
see
/ lightn
roads.
under
s if you
th
or
ountain
hazards / coasts
do
m
e in
es on
.
6. Mov
us curv
weather
ro
ge
n
da
foggy
for
barricades
2. The police put up
to close the road to traffic.
ch out
ble
at
ra
e
W
s
vo
ik
er
fa
tr
barricades / dangers
/S
e pref
7.
.
foggy /
out for
ther. H
an area
Watch
nny wea
ace in
hest pl
warned
t like su
the children not to go into the neighbors yard.
3. I
the hig
t doesn
at
M
8.
evacuated / warned
strike
.
n
/ strike
the box
will ofte
drizzle
s from
struck
htning
4. No hurricanes
the US in 2006.
e word
9. Lig
with th
s
ce
struck / forecasted
n
sente
drizzle
te the
Comple
hazardous
facts
man
5. Policemen and firefighters have
jobs.
ISE B
weather
EXERC
ly
hazardous / invisible
unlike
ble
favora
r
flash
class.
of lightning?
6. Did you see that
thunde
Grays
in Mr.
flash / thunder
her.
likely
facts
the leat
r
fo
od
sting
isnt go
barricaded
Main Street for the parade.
7. The police
y intere
le
an
zz
ri
m
d
ned
wished / barricaded
ve lear
This
May.
1. We
ing.
g wet.
exas in
for sail
e gettin
ow in T
forecast
will sn
shoes ar
vorable
8. Rain was
for the whole weekend.
y
it
fa
M
at
th
2.
I want.
y
e
D
el
C
ar
lik
flooded / forecast
s
un
the new
ndition
Ill get
ther co
at
ea
3. Its
W
th
.
F.
eezy
set up
likely
ound 25
9. Mary helps people
new checking accounts at the bank.
and br
sunny
tures ar
4. Its
set up / rise
w. Its
tempera
ro
d
or
an
g.
m
in
ow
ys to
is com
sting sn
birthda
storm
is foreca
5. My
that a
man
URSE
dicates
EXERCISE E Match the words with the correct meaning.
weather
UAGE CO
often in
e
AN LANG
h
er
T
6.
AMERIC
thund
of
d
n
u
so
d
1. severe
a. cant be seen
7. The
Write th

ISE A

EXERC

Gap-fill exercises

Typically, students choose from two


or more options, shown on the left,
or a word bank, shown below, in
this type of exercise.

2.

tornado

b. to get higher or go up

3.

evacuation

c.

46

power of wind or water

4.

to rise

d. very bad, dangerous, or strong

5.

invisible

e.

to want something to happen

6.

force

f.

the act of leaving an area because of danger

7. to wish
EXERCISE A

g. type of dangerous storm with strong winds


Select the answer with a meaning similar to the underlined words.

1. 2We are expecting hail tomorrow.


BOOK 18 LESSON

5.

a. cold rain
b. lightning
c. balls of ice
2.

a. visited at his house


b. called by phone
c. met by chance

Take precautions when you are


using sharp tools.

6.

7.

I have an unfavorable opinion of


him.

Watch out for grammar mistakes.


a. See after
b. Look with
c. Be careful of

EXERCISE B

Ill go outside when the sleet


stops.
a. snow storm
b. freezing rain
c. blowing wind

a. bad
b. easy
c. changing
4.

He had a visible injury.


a. able to be seen
b. able to be cleaned
c. able to be touched

a. Relax
b. Be careful
c. Be regular
3.

I ran into my friend yesterday.


37

8.

Its probable that well have a test


tomorrow.

Listen and write the words into the category they belong.

FAVORABLE

56

This is another type of exercise


which provides students with
a quick means for testing their
understanding of new vocabulary.
Multiple choice is also the format
for items on the book quizzes.

a. usual
b. likely
c. necessary

Be prepared to explain why you chose a particular category. Answers will vary.

BOOK 18 LESSON 2

Multiple-choice exercises

BOTH

Categorization exercises

UNFAVORABLE

51

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

Students explore word relationships


with this type of activity, presented
in varying formats throughout the
ALC. Here students must understand the meaning of each word
they hear and place it in the proper
area of the Venn diagram.

First Printing 2011

5 ALC Vocabulary: Exercise types


Exercises to Show Vocabulary Usage
In Level III, students are challenged to expand their working
vocabulary and accuracy of word choice as they complete
collocation and word-building exercises.

Collocation exercises
Using English naturally is an
important focus for intermediate
students. Collocation exercises
expose them to words that typically occur together.

EXERCISE D
1.

2.
watch

kick

kick

1.

goal

practice
doubt

player

SOCCER
team

EXERCISE D

Noun

coach

Write the new phrases you can make with the words above.

lose

a match
a match
a match

2.

throw

a ball

3. a soccer

find

a ball

a soccer

keep

a ball

a soccer

practice
player
team

play

a match

kick

a ball

a soccer

coach

tie

a match

lose

a ball

a soccer

stadium

Verb

Adjective

1.

discipline

to discipline

2.

gathering

to gather

3.

display

to display

4.

government

to govern

5.

nation

6.

protection

to protect

7.

indication

to indicate

8.

participation

to participate

EXERCISE E
EXERCISE F

In pairs, complete the chart with the correct forms.

Number 1 is an example.

stadium

lose

win
watch

keep

BALL

tie

EXERCISE E

3.

throw

find

MATCH
play

Vocabulary expansion, through


showing students how to create new words from the roots
and affixes they have already
learned, is the focus of this
exercise.

Cross out the word that doesnt go with the center word.

lose

win

Part-of-speech exercises

disciplined

national

In pairs, use words in the chart above to fill in the blanks below.

Write sentences with the new phrases above.

Number 1 is an example.

1. I went to soccer practice at school yesterday afternoon.

1. A good soldier is a

disciplined

soldier.

2. Officials from six

nations

are here.

3. Do you know all the laws that


govern
driving in this city?

2.

gather
4. All employees must
Friday at 3:00 for a short meeting.

3.
4.

indicate

5.

A row of disciplined soldiers


8

AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

5. Please
the bus stops on this base.

6. Department stores are already

displaying

7. The job of firemen is to fight fires and


8. All students should
68

participate

protect

every

on the map all of

Christmas gifts in May!


people from them.

in classroom discussions.
AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

57

First Printing 2011

5 ALC Vocabulary: Exercise types


Exercises to Promote Interaction

Vocabulary

Students actively work with new semitechnical vocabulary in this student-centered


activity. Pairs use cutouts from the appendix to build a circuit as they read through
the step-by-step instructions, shown on the
right, in the vocabulary presentation.

Make your own circuit

First, make sure you have all the paper cutouts in the Parts List. See Appendix J. Then follow
the directions using the paper parts.

Make a switch in the off position:


1. Use the screwdriver and the first screw (S1) to attach
the piece of metal across the wood. The metal piece
should be loosely connected to the wood on the left side.
PARTS LIST
wood piece
battery
wires (A, B, & C)
screwdriver
metal piece
2 screws
light bulb & base
electrical tape

2. Attach the second screw (S2) to the wood. Put it near the
end of the metal piece on the right side of the wood. The
metal piece and S2 should be able to touchbut dont
make them touch yet. These parts are the switch.

Connect the wires of the circuit:


3. Use the tape to attach one end of Wire A to the negative
() end of the battery. Twist the other end of Wire A
around S1.
4. Attach one end of Wire C to the positive (+) side of the
battery, and the other end to one side of the light bulb
base. (For protection against an electric shock, there
should be good insulation on both wires.)
5. Attach Wire B to the other side of the light bulb base.
Twist the other end of Wire B around S2.

Turn the light bulb on:


6. Use a pencil to move the loose end of the metal switch
so that it touches S2. When the metal is touching both
screws, the circuit is closed, or complete, and the light
bulb will go on.

Students check their circuits and


label the parts (new vocabulary)
in this exercise.

A
RCISE

EXE

e parts

es of th

e nam

Write th

battery

Circuit parts
toactivity
cut 17L4 #4
Circuit
Lesson 4
out and assemble
Page 111

)
S2

Check

ISE B

the wo

We can th:
ings wi
attach th

rew
a sc
tape

ed word

underlin

oduce an
These pr
:
l charge
electrica
ttery
a ba
tor
an insula
nerator
a ge
heater
a water

wire
tton
a bu

ist:

tw
We can

wire
rope
th
clo
wood
6

e
These ar gy:
of ener
products

e good
These ar ectricity:
5
rs of el
conducto
cloth
r
wate
rubber

heat
light

er
copp

wiring
y

tricit
elec
112

ith each

go w
rds that

Circuit cutouts

ver
screwdri

screws

EXERC

111

iece

al p

met

h(
witc

S1

wear
We can
n:
r protectio
these fo

s
boot
es
glov
ses
glas
hats
hard

SE

UR
UAGE CO

AN LANG

AMERIC

A word-association exercise
to check the understanding
of other vocabulary in the
presentation follows.

BOOK 17 APPENDIX J

58

conducts the current to the light bulb through


its base. The electricity then charges the thin
wires inside the bulb. This charge produces
heat in the wires. The product of that heat is
light. The current continues to flow to Wire C.
Wire C conducts the energy back to the
positive (+) side of the battery. This completes
the circuit.

BOOK 17 LESSON 4

wires

lb & bas

light bu

S1

al tape

electric

How does a circuit switch on a light?


The battery produces an electrical
charge. The wires conduct the charge around
the completed, or closed, circuit. The switch
is used to open and close the circuit. That
means the electrical current flows from the
negative () end of the battery through Wire
A to the switch. The current then continues to
flow through the switch to Wire B, which

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

S2

J-45

First Printing 2011

6
ALC Grammar
Overview & objectives
Structure list
Activators
Progression of exercises
Progression of objectives

59

First Printing 2011

6 ALC Grammar: Overview & objectives


Grammar Overview
The ALC grammar objectives deal with structures students will need for effective communication in a variety of contexts. Structures often support the lessons
skills or its function, which also provides a relevant context for building fluency.
Typically each lesson contains three to four grammar objectives, which are reinforced throughout the lesson and supplementary activities. Most of the basic
grammar structures and major verb tenses of English appear in Books 118.

GRAMMAR

Grammar

OBJECTIVE: Use was/were going to


in affirmative and negative statements,
yes/no and information questions, and
affirmative and negative answers to
express an unfulfilled past intention.

Using was / were going to for past intentions

Did everyone do the things they planned to do last weekend?

, but we

Jim was going to

but it

We were going to

but I

I was going to

Grammar
objectives are located in the IT margin near
the main heading of each
grammar section. They also
appear on the first page of
the lesson in the IT.

GRAMMAR - PART 1
OBJECTIVE: Use the present gerund
as the subject of a sentence and the
object of a preposition in affirmative
yes/no questions and information
Use this
questions, and affirmative and
negative statements/answers.

Grammar

grammar
talk about plans in the past that changed.
SIGN UPto
NOW!
e-palzone.com

EXERCISE A

Using gerunds as the subject of a sentence

E-PAL ZONE @ e-palzone.com

HOME
FINDto
E-PAL
LOG IN
LOG OUT
Match
the NEW
twoUSER
columns
make complete
sentences.
E-PAL ZONE: Looking for an Internet penpal?

LIST OF HOBBIES

1. I was going to
pickstudy,
hobby

a. but she changed her mind.

Tell us your hobbies, and well match


you with someone.

b. but it rained.
c
Certain grammar
objectives are bro3. We were going to swim,
c. but he hurt his arm.
b
ken down into two
f
4. It was going to be a long briefing,
d. but they missed their son.
GRAMMAR
2
parts. The black type
a - PART
5. Mary
wasnt going to go to the party,
e. but I fell asleep.
Grammar Using gerunds after prepositions
indicates
the focus
Presentation
d
6. The Smiths werent going to call,
f. but we finished early.
use the modal
was/were going to to
of theWe
section,
while
66
AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE
talk about something that was planned
but didn't
occur
because either we did
the gray
type
shows
Dear Grandma Rose,
something else or something happened
that the
other
I apologize for not writing you sooner, but I havent
NOTES: The word instead can be used
to prevent
the portion
activity from occurring.
EXERCISE A
had any free time. I look forward to having more time
at the end of many of the sentences
Books
open
Readin
the another
question prompt at the top
is treated
since Ive finished
my assignment
at work. You know
modeled here to emphasize what was
Written
cuework very carefully. Ive
of the page. Then ask students to look at
that I care about
doing my
done in place of what was planned.
section
of
the
lesson.
Written
response
been worried about not completing my work on time
the picture sentences below it. Call on
2. Jim was going to lift weights,
GLEN

RITA

I love to climb. Climbing rocks is

Listening to music, watching movies,

difficult, but I really enjoy it. Running

reading, writing, and traveling are

and swimming are also sports that I

things that I enjoy. Learning new

like. Doing all those sports keeps me

languages, cooking, and dancing are

healthy. Moving my body is a lot of


OBJECTIVE: Use the present gerund
as the subject of a sentence fun.
and the
Not moving my body is dull.
object of a preposition in affirmative
Sitting quietly to read or watch TV
yes/no questions and information
questions, and affirmative and
isnt pleasant for me.
negative statements/answers.

my favorite hobbies. Taking a walk in

the forest relaxes me, but climbing and


swimming make me nervous. Not
exercising doesnt worry me.

EXERCISE A

ANSWERS
1. Are running and swimming sports
that you like?
2. Is not moving your body dull for you?
3. Is sitting quietly pleasant for you?
4. Does taking a walk relax you?
5. Do climbing and swimming make
you nervous?

EXERCISE A

Study the chart, then underline the gerunds in the text above.

With your teacher, transform the sentences in the chart into questions.

GERUND (SUBJECT)

(other words)

Running and swimming


Not moving

VERB
are

my body

is

(other words)

sports that I like.


dull.

Instead cannot come


Sittingat the end ofsince it quietly
isntIm excited
pleasant
for showing
me.
takes aIndividual
long time.
about
it
sentences when the
cancellation of
theboss
Taking
a walk
me.
to my
because itsrelaxes
really good.
Have
students
do
the
matching
and
the planned eventClimbing
was out
the person's
andof
swimming
makeweeks
meofnervous.
I plan on taking several
leave, and Ive
work
partners
as in Jim was going to godecided to spendcompare
part of mytheir
vacation
with with
you. Im
The ALC has previouslycontrol,
presented the
aI also
final
check.
A gerund is made from happy
the baseabout
form of
abefore
verbyou.
+ ing:
following
I was going to cook dinner,
but uses
we of gerunds:
fishing, but it rained.
seeing
look
forwardMake
to doingsure the
be + ing = being
do + ing = doing
swim + ing = swimming
7: As the object of the preposition
students
that the
went out to a restaurant Book
instead.
some farm work,
caring fornote
the animals,
andmodals
fishing. used in
Often
people
answer
was/were
going
for to show use, as in I use a sink for
You know that Numbers
Im fond of relaxing
in6nature.
5 and
are
negative.
They're
66
AMERICAN
LANGUAGE
COURSE
Jim was going to go fishing,
but
it
washing
dishes.
to questions with a short answer, forOf course Imalso
looking
forward toof
eating
your
examples
plans
infresh,
the past that
rained.
Book 9: With apologize example
for, as in The
home-cooked food.
Im
afraid
to tell you
the things that
did
not
happen
because
else
waitress apologized for spilling the tea.
of the
progressive
verb
forms, it issomething
not
EXERCISE A
We were going to watch Book
TV, but
I
I usually eat forhappened.
lunch atthere
work!
IllBE
tellverb
youbefore
all the
because
is no
you going
to call your mother?
10: Following certainWere
verbs such
Books open
it,
and
it
is
in
the
subject
position
read
a
book
to
my
child
instead.
news
when
I
come
next
week.
as enjoy, finish,
like, mind, start, and
OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN
LANGUAGE
COURSE
Written cue
(as opposed
the verb position)
in
Yes, I was going
to, but I fell asleep.
Model
thetointonation
and
as in She enjoys dancing.
Love,the phrasing
Written and oral response
Personalize the grammarstop,
presentation
sentences.
This lesson begins with a fictitious web
Individual,or
then group
of
the
sentences
as
students
repeat after
Gina
by asking students for examples
of Zone, a place to find Internet
Spelling rule: For short verbs ending in
site, E-Pal
Review the chart with the group. The
you.
consonant-vowel-consonant, double the
pen to
pals.
entries for Glen
and Rita
activities that they were going
doThebut
Yes,
I was, main
but points
I fellare:
asleep.
final consonant before adding -ing: runuse subject gerunds to describe their
didn't. Write the examples on
the board.
running, swim-swimming, cut-cutting.
A gerund is formed by adding -ing to
hobbies and interests.
volunteers to suggest complete sentences
for each of the three examples. Answers
Presentation
may vary. Some possible answers
are

60

Review the tabs and headers for

the base form of a verb. It functions as a

Ask students to underline all gerunds

First Printing 2011

6 ALC Grammar: Structure list


Grammar Reference for the Book
Appendix B contains an alphabetical listing (by part of speech) of all
grammar objectives presented in the book. Each entry shows the structure, an example, and the lesson (14) in which it occurs.

DIX B

APPEN

OF
PART H
SPEEC

LESSO

re List

OR
N
WORD NCE PATTER
SENTE

Structu

TURE

STRUC

h
Suffix:
oun wit
ive to n
Adject
-ness

a
, I felt
e game
After th s in my legs.
es
weakn

3
ement
disagre
I had a wife.
y
with m
4
ent
an
Suffix: oun with -m
e wom
n
hats th as speaking
T
Verb to
Affix
)Iw
auses
(whom ay.
ctive cl ich
rd
ive adje
wh
to yeste
Restrict (m), that, or
2
ho
e, Id
with w
Clause
ore tim
I had m .
If
t
ore
presen
study m
1
xpress
ses to e
e
If-clau nditions
t that w
co
portan
Its im ether.
unreal
Clause
g
owing
work to
use foll
oun cla
That-n patory it =
hat)
tici
ive + (t
the an
1
Clause
+ adject
It + BE se
ll and
u
a
both ta
Jim is
noun cl
or
.
cher n
strong
nctions:
the tea
ve conju
Neither nts were on
orrelati and
C
de
ction
the stu
both but also
Conjun
time.
not only or
3

either
coming
nor
nt you ht?
re
a
y
neither
h
ig
W
rty ton
the pa
n
3
n to
rmatio
rmatio
ve info
Negati s to seek info
ther
n
your fa
ve
Didnt
questio
r?
a
Negati
in
st ye
n
stions
retire la
Questio
1
no que
ent
ve yes/
e had
Negati on of agreem
me if w
d
e
ti
a
e
sk
v
ct
a
Jim
expe
.
Negati
mework
n
any ho
ation
Questio
inform
d
e
rt
o
Rep
ns
ed
questio
Report
ch
e
e
Sp

Affix

B-1

BOOK 18

IX B

APPEND

Students can use this convenient listing


of structures from the book to quickly
review and prepare for the book quiz.

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

61

First Printing 2011

6 ALC Grammar: Activators


Context and Interaction
The grammar presentation establishes an authentic context for the target structure.
It also provides numerous samples for students to interact with in multiple ways.
Instructors who choose to take an inductive approach by using these ready-made
contexts will find their students more actively involved in their own learning.

Grammar

What shou

ld Chris ha
ve done di

fferently?

Chris,
you should
nt have
tried to pl
ay with a
broken leg!

I should ha
ve
known the
cast was
too weak to
protect
my leg.

Yesterday

You ought
to
have real
ized
youd injure
the
other leg.

I could ha
ve
made anot
her
goal, Matt!

The context for grammar presentations is


set up with simple
images and dialogs.

The

grammar bullet
alerts students to
important details about the
objective.

Matt

Chris
Should ha
ve and ough
t to have in
Should no
troduce ad
t have intro
vic
e
ab
du
out finished
ces a finish
Could have
actions in
ed action in
means ther
the past.
the past th
e was a ch
at was a ba
oice or a po
d idea to do
ssibility of
.
something
else in the
EXERCISE
past.
A Compl
ete the char

subject
1.

You

2.

You

3.

4.

t with word

s from the

modal +
have + pa
st partici

ple

dialog abov

e.

other word

to play with
youd injure

have

the cast wa

a broken le

g.

the other le

g.

s too weak

another go

al!

Questions in the
IT guide students
to work with the
meaning of the
grammar and help
the instructor do
some concept
checking.

BOOK 18 LE
SSON 4

An interactive
paradigm allows students
to figure out and put
together the structure
themselves from the
examples in the activator.

62

95

True/False Comprehension Statements


1. Yesterday, Chris played soccer with a broken leg.
(True.)
2. Matt thinks that it was a bad idea for Chris to play
soccer. (True.)
3. Chris realized that he might break his leg. (False.)
4. Chris feels like he made a mistake. (True.)
5. Chris doesnt think that it was possible for him to
make more goals. (False.)

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

First Printing 2011

6 ALC Grammar: Progression of exercises


From Perception to Practice and Production
Students first work with context and the basic meaning of the target grammar in the
presentation and the initial exercises. Then they start examining the fundamental characteristics of the structure through paradigms and form-based exercises. Later exercises
provide opportunities for students to communicate using the new structure. The examples
here and on the next two pages illustrate this progression of grammar exercises.

Grammar

Examining the target structure


Students work inductively with
the grammar by seeing and interacting with multiple samples and situations. Among the earliest exercises,
part of the focus is on recognition
of the structure in context.

Using as + adjective + as to express equality

A and B have the same weight.


They are equal in weight.
A is as heavy as B.

C and D dont have the same weight.


D is less heavy than C.
D is not as heavy as C.

Use as + adjective + as to compare 2 people / things that are the same in some way.
Use not as + adjective + as to compare 2 people / things that are different, to say that
one is less than the other.

EXERCISE A

Read the statements and say if you agree or disagree.

If you disagree with one, change the statement to make it true in your opinion.

STATEMENT
1. Food in the US is as delicious as food in my country.
2. American coffee isnt as strong as coffee in my country.
3. My pronunciation is as good as my teachers pronunciation.
4. An airplane is as dangerous as a car.
5. Grammar isnt as important as vocabulary.
6. Life today is as easy as life in the past.
7. Cats arent as interesting as dogs.
Karen

Lila

Sam

Paul

8. Watches are as expensive as cameras.

as + adjective + as
Lila

is

Sam

is not
isnt

as tall as

Karen (is).
she (is).
her.*

20

AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

Paul (is).
he (is).
him.*

We can use object pronouns me, you, her, him, us, or them instead of repeating a
name.

EXERCISE B

is as sweet as

2.

is as hard as

3.

are as dangerous as

4.

arent as salty as

5.

isnt as sharp as

6.

isnt as big as

7. Dogs are

cats.

8. Coffee is

tea.

9. Children arent
10. Snow isnt
BOOK 14 LESSON 1

Experimenting with meaning

Complete the sentences with your own ideas.

1.

Students work with carefully


crafted exercises that encourage
them to experiment with the
meaning of the target structure as
they examine its parts.

.
.
.
.
.

adults.
ice.
21

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

63

Brian began using computers at work. He


immediately enjoyed working with them. They
helped him work faster and better. He thought of all

of ways they could be useful. Soon, he started


First Printingkinds
2011
thinking about buying a computer for his home.

First, he read a book about computers. After that,


he began shopping for a computer. He didnt stop
shopping until he found just the right one.
When Brian is at home, he likes sending e-mail to
friends and family. He also likes receiving e-mail.

6 ALC Grammar: Progression of exercises

Sometimes, he has 15 to 20 e-mails to read after he gets home from work. Brian
usually doesnt go to bed until he finishes answering every e-mail.
enjoys

Brian

Controlled exercises

Controlled exercises have only one correct answer and tend to focus on form.
Semi-controlled exercises allow for
some variation and creativity. Both of
these types of exercises help instructors
spot problem areas quickly. In addition,
students get practice with the individual
grammatical elements in order to more
easily recall the structure for later automatic use.

receiving

doesnt enjoy

Add -ing to a verb to make a gerund. Gerunds can be objects of these verbs:

begin

enjoy

EXERCISE A

finish

like

mind

VERB

GERUND

1.

began

using

2.

enjoyed
started
began
stop
likes
likes
finishes

working
thinking
shopping
shopping
sending
receiving
answering

3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

Examining the
parts of a target
structure

48

AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

EXERCISE B

Fill in the blanks with were or other past forms.

Number 1 is an example.

1.

2. You
3.

We

4. They
5.

He

6. She

were

you

wish
(that)

(drive)

we

could speak

(can speak)

they

didnt have

(not have)

A controlled
he
were
wishes
transformation
she
werent

could buy

Im not used to going to the gym

so early.

B: What does Ida wish her dad

theyre used to working on

8. They wish the DI

that kind of engine.

3. Its January and the Smiths have just moved to Alaska from Florida.

Theyre not used to the weather

4. Weve studied English for years, so (we / speak)

wouldnt make

9. Everybody wishes they

in Alaska yet.

were used to speaking

it.

5. Anna has never owned a car. (She / take a bus) Shes used to taking a bus

would

would help

didnt work

48

Unscramble the questions. Ask & answer them with a partner.


You

Are

are

you

used to

a vacation in winter

going on vacation

1. Are / to / you / American food / used / ?

Are you used to American food?


2. you / used / Are / a lot of noise / to / ?

Are you used to a lot of noise?


3. used / going to sleep / are / When / you / to / at night / ?

When are you used to going to sleep at night?


4. What / used / are / doing / to / on weekends / you / ?

What are you used to doing on weekends?


BOOK 18 LESSON 2

64

This exercise guides students to


craft interrogatives. The questions then form the basis for
meaningful exchanges between
pairs of students, who answer
with personalized responses.

57

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

(will).
(will help) her with?

(not make) them get up so early.

6. At my old job, I worked from 0600 to 1400. My new job is from 1500 till 2400.

Im not used to the new schedule

(can move) away.

(live) instead?

didnt have to pay

10. Brad hates his job. He wishes he

(will retire) soon.

(be) leaving?

could move
lived

7. A: Idas dad wont help her. She wishes he

2. The experienced mechanics can repair airplane engines quickly because

(come) earlier.

would retire
were

6. A: My towns too small. I wish I


B: Where do you wish you

(have) blond hair.

(can buy) a larger house for our family.

B: Why does Nick wish his boss

1. For years I went to the gym every day at 0900. Now I have to go at 0600, but

(be) a rich doctor.

came

3. The mailman comes at 5 p.m. I wish he

Use the noun or a gerund of the verb in parentheses. Number 1 is an example.

(When)

so much work.

leaving now.

(not be)

had

2. Sally has brown hair. She wishes she

5. A: Nick wishes that his supervisor

EXERCISE C

perfect English.

a younger man.

(be)

were

1. Im a poor medical student. I wish I

Complete the sentences with BE (not) used to.

(I / not / the new schedule)

a sports car.

Complete each sentence with the past verb or modal.

4. We wish that we

(They / not / the weather)

healthier.

(be)

drove

Use the words in parentheses. Number 1 is an example.

Formation
of the
negative

(they / work on)

stop

Write the verbs and gerunds that are together in the text.

EXERCISE C

(I / not / go to the gym)

start

Number 1 is an example.

As shown here and on the next page,


ALC exercises run from fully controlled
to semi-controlled to opened-ended.
Likewise, within an exercise itself, items
progress from easier to more difficult.

EXERCISE B

e-mail.

(not have to pay) taxes.


(not work) there.

AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

First Printing 2011

6 ALC Grammar: Progression of exercises


Open-ended exercises

EXERCISE F

Complete each sentence with the modal of your choice.

Number 1 is an example.

Most grammar lessons wrap up with interactive, personalized exercises which focus
on communication. These exchanges motivate students to create with the language
because they are asked to draw upon their
own experiences as the authentic context
for practicing the target structure.

If the condition is met


would
might

this will happen. (100% sure)


means

maybe this will happen. (50% sure)


this can happen because of ability or possibility,
OR there is permission for this to happen.

could

1. If I lost my ID card, Id look for it / I might be upset / I couldnt get on base

2. If I suddenly had a large amount of money,

3. If I found someones keys in the street,

4. If I werent in the military,

5. If everyone spoke the same language,


6. If families could have only one child each,
7. If we didnt have computers,
8. If we didnt have cell phones,
I wish she
wouldnt spend so
much money.

??

Mall
Directory

I wish hed
make up his
mind.

EXERCISE G

Shoes
Clothes
Jewelry
Restaurants

1. What would happen if

.
.

?
?

3. What would you do if

4. What could you do if

What would happen


if the weather
became very hot all
over the world?

Complete each sentence with a suggestion for a change.

1. We have too much homework. We wish the teacher wouldnt

2. What might happen if

Use wish + would / wouldnt when you want someone to change a behavior.

EXERCISE D

Complete the four questions.

Then ask and answer the questions with a partner.

Personalized
responses are
encouraged in
both of these
exercises.

It would become
terribly difficult to
grow food.

2. I dont like the clerk. I wish he wouldnt


Semi-guided
Jerry gets a lot of work. He wishes the manager wouldnt
oral3.4. pair
work
The meetings are held very late. They wish the boss would

41

BOOK 18 LESSON 2

.
.

EXERCISE B Complete the sentences with must + phrases from the box.
5. Anns neighbor plays his stereo too loud. She wishes hed

Use each phrase only once. Number 1 is an example.

EXERCISE E

Complete the questions yourself. Then ask your partner.


be very sad

EXERCISE F

home
Check thefeel
box tired
only when the answer is Yes. Later, reportbe
onestaying
Yes answer
totoday
the class.
be a holiday
be moving
Do you wish you be going away
not fit well
not understand it
1. were

Of all the students in your group

short.

1. who has traveled the farthest to get to this school?

2. Im
werent
1.
sorry, caller. Al Green doesnt live here. You? must have the wrong number .
2.
3. Karl
had awas just promoted to major. His parents ?
3.
4.
4.
5.
5.
6.
6.

2. who can run the fastest?

3. who can swim the farthest?

Today
because no one has to go to school today.
knew how to
?
Capt Ank wishes
She cant solve the math problem. She
.
she could call her
could
?
family
more
often.
The movie shes watching
because
shes
crying.
didntworked
have tohard all day. They
?
They
.

7. Youre walking very slowly. Your shoes

4. who has climbed the highest?


5. who
Of all the vehicles in the world

6. which one can go the fastest?

49

BOOK 18 LESSON 2

8. The Smiths

since Mr. Smith got a job in a different state.

9. John called to say he felt very sick, so he

7. which one can fly the highest?

10. Kate borrowed my suitcases. She

Talk about these questions in groups. Then, report to the class.

Write your own questions for Number 5 and Number 10.

feel very proud of him


Yes
have the wrong number
Lt Kim wishes
?
he werent so

8. which one can fly the furthest without extra gas?

for her vacation.

9. which one can go the deepest in the ocean?


10. which

EXERCISE C

With a partner, give your best guess with must.

1. Sgt Franks gets the best test score every week.

Who has lived


the longest?

Sgt Franks
must study
every day.

2. The officers are gone, but its only 2 p.m.


3. My car wont start.

Im 23.

Im 35.
Im 32.

4. Theres a line of people to see that movie.


5. Jane always wears red shoes.

Why?

6. That suitcase is too heavy to lift.

He must be
very smart.

7. Jim doesnt want anything to eat.


8. Carol looks upset.
9. The office is very hot.
10. Your cell phone suddenly stops working while
youre talking on it.
BOOK 14 LESSON 3

Openended oral
practice

83

Group interaction and form


practice through a survey
28

AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

65

First Printing 2011

6 ALC Grammar: Progression of objectives


The Treatment of Related Grammar Objectives
Several of the more difficult grammar concepts appear in segments across several
books. The examples here show how the ALC introduces, reinforces, and expands the
structure and usage of perfect tenses in six different presentations from three books.

Grammar

The initial presentation

Present perfect progressive: have been + verb -ing

Choose a verb from the box and write it under the picture it describes.

Students receive their introduction


to the perfect-tense concept inductively through contextualized
activators and examples.

shopping
cooking
washing
working
traveling

He has been

He has been

Book 11 Lesson 1
Present Perfect Progressive

Book 11 Lesson 1
Present Perfect
(Part 1)
Grammar

Who has been

The present perfect: have been and have had

Jim:

Hi, Dan. Im sorry Im late. How long have you been here?

Dan:

Ive been here for only ten minutes. Are you ready for our trip to Florida?

Jim:

Yes, Ive been ready since yesterday. But this morning I realized I need to
take my car to the garage.

Dan:

Really? You havent had that car for very long.

Jim:

No, I havent. Ive had it for just four months, but the car isnt new, you
know. I want to get new tires before we leave on our trip because Floridas
so far.

Dan:

Thats a good idea. I should get new tires for my car, too.
How long have you had your car?

Dan:

Ive had it since 2003, but I never bought any new tires for it.

have

been

here for ten minutes.

had

the car since 2003.

(not)
He / She

has

the dishes.

I / We / You / They

have

He / She / It

has

They have been

(not) been

22

Jim:

I / We / You / They

She has been

EXERCISE A Read the sentences. Write T for true and F for false.
EXERCISE
B Comp
are the past
1. Dan was waiting
for Jim.
tense and
the presen
t perfect ten
PAST
se.
2. Jim has been there for ten minutes.

verb + -ing

AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

Grammar
paradigms show the patterns of acceptable structural
combinations. They also serve
as a quick study reference and
offer a means of analysis and
comparison of structures.

The action
started
PRES
and ended 3. Everything
is ready for the trip now. ENT PERFECT
in the past.
The action
started in the
past
4. Dan will drive his car to Florida.
now

5. Jim bought his car four months ago.


AprMayJun

and continu

eJu6.
Jims
lyAug
Septcar is new.

now

es to the pre

sent.

AprMayJun

eJulyAugSe
pt
Jim boug7.ht Dan has had his car since 2003.
his car in Ma
y.
8. Dans car has not had new tires
he bought it.
Jimsince
has ha
d his car for
four months
Use the pre
.
se
9. ntDan
bought
perfe
ct to his car in 2003.
on
, and may

talk about
something
that began
o the future
in the past,
.

continue int

is still go
AMERICAN LANGUAGE
COURSE
ing

10

EXERCISE

Read the sh

ort paragrap

hs. Underlin

Jim

rbs in them.

66

now.

bought
has had

Timelines illustrate the meaning


and usage of the present perfect
tense in contrast with the simple
past tense.

e all the ve

has

his car

in May.
for four mo

nths.

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

since May.
1. Right no
w, it is 1 p.m
. in the aftern
11 a.m. He
oon. Dan we
is still there
nt to the sh
. He has be
opping cen
en at the sh
ter at
2. Jim had
opping cen
a truck las
ter for two
t year. He ha
hours.
s a new car
3. The ship
no
w.
He
has had it
is in the oce
for four mo
an. The sailo
nths.
rs have been
4. Mr. Wilso
on the shi
nw

First Printing 2011

6 ALC Grammar: Progression of objectives


Coordination of related grammar objectives
As students broaden their knowledge of the
present perfect tense in Book 12, the timeline and paradigm from Book 11 (compare
with previous page) are reintroduced and
presented with a wider array of verbs. The
timeline is then adapted in the second lesson
to illustrate the expanded grammatical usage
and meaning of the structure.

Grammar

Read the newspaper article and underline the verbs.

OFFICER OF THE WEEK


FORT SAM HOUSTON, Texas Lieutenant Colonel Robert
Gray was 22 years old when he decided to become a military
officer. He joined the US Army on July 4, 1984. He has been
in the Army for 20 years.
LTC Gray began his military career at Fort Sill. In 1986,
he moved to Germany for three years. Since 1989, he has
served in five other countries. He went to Command and
General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth five years ago.
He has been a lieutenant colonel since last year.
In May of this year, he came to Texas. He has lived at Fort Sam Houston
EXERCISE
B Wr
for four
months.
Since
he arrived, he has worked as a Deputy Inspector
ite the
verbs from
ThGeneral.
the
e first verbHe and his wife have enjoyed
articlenew
meeting
people
here.
in the
in each col
corre
umn is an
ct column.
example.

Book 12 Lesson 1

PA ST
PR ES
Answer these questions about
theEN
newspaper
article.
T PE RF EC
T
wajoin
1. When did LTC Gray
s the Army? July 4, 1984

EXERCISE A

Present Perfect
(Part 2)

Book 12 Lesson 2

20 years has been

2. How long has he been in the Army?

Yes, he is.

3. Is he still in the Army?

Germany

4. Where did LTC Gray live in 1986?

Present Perfect
(Part 3)
Grammar

Using the present perfect tense

5. When did LTC move to Texas?


6. Where does LTC Gray live now?

Using the present perfect tense

This is Jans suitcase. What do you know about Jan? Check () the boxes. Then underline the
verb in each sentence.

I / We / You / They

have

He / She / It

has

in May
Texas / Fort Sam Houston

(not)

lived

in Texas for two years.

Use have + past participle to form the present perfect tense.


22

AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

EXERCISE

Compare the

PAST

past tense

The action
started
and ended
in the past.

and the pr

esent perfe

ct.

PRESENT

The action

PERFECT

started in the

past...

now
AprMayJun

pt

In May, he

know

dont know

1.

Jan has been to many countries.

2.

Jan visited Paris last year.

3.

Jan has been to Egypt.

4.

Jan flew to London last week.

5.

Jan has flown to other countries.

6.

Jan went to Egypt last month.

7.

Jan has seen London.

8.

Jan saw Paris in June.

9.

Jan visited Rome last year.

es to the pre

AprMayJun

sent.

eJulyAugSe

moved to Te

xas.

He has lived

now

and continu

eJulyAugSe

pt

in Texas sin

ce May.

BOOK 12 LES
SON 1

23

10.

Jan has seen Egypt.

EXERCISE A

Study the charts.

PAST

PRESENT PERFECT

The action started


and ended in the past.

The action is important,


not when it happened.
?

now

last year

Rome

Rome

Jan visited Rome last year.

50

now

Jan has visited Rome before.

Use the present perfect to talk about a past action when the time is not important.

AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

EXERCISE B

Use the present perfect to complete the sentences.

Use the verb in italics. Number 1 is an example.

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

Ted:

The Hills went to California on vacation.

Jay:

They

Jim:

The movie will start soon. Dave and Kathy arrived early.

Bob:

Wheres Greg? He

Kay:

Roger got three letters today.

Tim:

He

Lea:

Mary took her car to the mechanic this morning.

Bill:

She

Pat:

Tina read the book for English class quickly.

Joe:

Jane

Ray:

Joan didnt go to the doctor yesterday.

have gone to California on vacation often.

has

has

already

not

arrived

gotten

yet.

almost a dozen letters.

OVERVIEW
OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE
it to the mechanic many times this month.

has taken
has

not

read

the book yet.

67

First Printing 2011

6 ALC Grammar: Progression of objectives


Expansion of a familiar grammatical concept
Timelines and paradigmsmodified to
illustrate the past perfect and past perfect
progressive tensesreappear and expand the
perfect-tense concept in Level III.

Book 16 Lesson 2
Past Perfect Progressive

Book 16 Lesson 1

Grammar

Past Perfect

What had he been doing?

Carl had been playing soccer for 30 minutes

Grammar

now

The past perfect: had + past participle

Check () your answers on the chart.

when he fell and hurt his leg.

When class started today, I had already

True

False

eaten breakfast.
had a cup of coffee.

subj.

had (not)

been

verb + ing

(time)

(simple past clause)

He

had

been

playing

(for 30 minutes)

(when he fell).

sent an e-mail.

taken a shower.
run five miles.
read the newspaper.

EXERCISE A

watched a movie.

1. Shed been swimming

a. until the DI told them to stop.

2. Gary got in an accident

b. so her hair was wet in class.

3. Lindas eyes were red

c. before they had their first game?

4. Jimmy got a stomachache

d. for that company?

5. Had they been practicing a lot

e. because shed been crying earlier.

6. How long had he been working

f.

7. Had you been waiting a long time

8. The soldiers had been marching


for hours

g. because he hadnt been driving


carefully.

PAST PERFECT
I had already eaten breakfast

SIMPLE PAST
when class started.

0700 hours

0800 hours

Now

The past perfect is for an action that was completed before another action in the past.
EXERCISE A

Match the 2 clauses to make complete sentences.

1. Until I graduated from college,

a. their plane had already taken off.

2. Wed just finished basic training

b. because shed just cleaned it.

a 3. By the time they got to the airport,

c. Id never had a full-time job.

g 4. Peter hadnt ever killed an animal

d. Debra had never used one.

b 5. Anitas room looked nice last week

e. he noticed his wallet was missing.

d 6. Before her mother bought a camera,

f. when our families came to visit.

Contracted form:

EXERCISE

Fill in the bla

14 Some answers ha
ve adverbs.
Us

le. Number

(adverb)

hadnt

We can put ce

rtain adverbs

1. When yo
u calle

between the

eaten

begun

flown

written

ridden

been

sent

ever

two parts of

4. The game
5. Until An
n

ss until he

had begun

by the time

begin
went to Sp

ain, she d never


flo

6. John loo
ke

rday becaus

7. Diana had
always

written

letters by ha

always write

hadnt ever

not ever rid


e
9. Sue had st
udied
10. We hadn
t had

EXERCISE

not have

til he visite

t, so she kn

time to fin

11. The wo
rried paren
ts had sent
son arrived
.
send

ish packing

ew all the

answers.

when the tax

i arrived.

dozens of e-m

been / Where

ails before

lliams

rned down

new library

doing

en / Stacy

k & answer

opened?

until he go

t sick?

iting

In pairs, as

you?

when it bu

before the

ing / Lt Wi

Williams been

when I saw

/ in the hous

in the house

ying

1. Where
had

puter.

r friend?
end?

u been stud

2. What ha
d

e got a com

fore the tes

party for he

all last week

acy been vis

d Joes ranc
h inLANGUAGE
Texas.
OVERVIEWbe OF THE AMERICAN
COURSE

study

studying /

Who had St

a horse un

a surprise

had / been

s been living

d / Who / be

up all night

nd until sh

ridden

puter?

eks test?

en / had

e Smiths /

/ What / do

7. visiting
/ ha

ts.

be

the old com


for last we

rking out

d the Smith

What had Lt

eat.

found our sea

e he d been

using

w long / be

Where had yo

6. had / be
en

overseas.

never fly

ur car

d you been wo

How long ha
5. you / ha
d/

m vacation.

we finally

to maAMERICAN
ke quesLANGUAGE
tions. COURSE

studying

ur car / Ha

working on yo

w long / th

got back fro

wn

d awful yeste

studied

to go out to

rking on yo

t / you / Ho

to bed.

invited me

our new bo

not meet

been
been

How long ha

4. living /
Ho

rfect verb.

just go
dinner, you

3. working
ou

the past pe

ht, I d just gone

he
she

Had you been

had

d me last nig

2. After I d alr
eady eaten
already ea
t
3. We hadnt
me

Had
had

2. you / be
en / wo

gone

le.

Linda / Ha
d / been
Had Linda
been plann
ing

mple.

le

met

rrect order

is an examp

1. planning
/

1 is an exa

+ past pa
rticip

just
already
always
never

had
had not =

rds in the co

nks with ha

d (not) + pa AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE


st particip
les from the
e contraction
box.
s when pos
sib

HAD

He had been eating = Hed been eating.


He had not been eating. = He hadnt been eating.

. Number 1

How long

before the bus arrived?

h. because hed been eating too


much candy.

Put the wo

rt to help you

44

7. After Al had promised to pay the bill, g. until his dad took him hunting.

SE C

68

Match the two columns to make complete sentences.

Use the cha

The EX
past perfect clause can go before or after the simple past clause.
ERCI

8. Carl

We can use the past perfect progressive to talk about a past action that was taking
place before (and sometimes until) another action in the past.

before she
questions

your paren

you been do

in the past

ts been living

returned las

t night?

perfect pro

when they

gressive.

first met?

ing before
you joined
3. What kin
the militar
d of assignm
y?
ent had yo
began this
u been doing
course?
before you
4. How lon
g had you be
en studying
your prese
English be
nt teacher?
fore you me
t

46

AMERICAN LAN

GUAGE COURS
E

First Printing 2011

7
ALC Skills
Overview & objectives
Subsumed skills objectives
Integrated skills activities
Speaking skills progression
Listening skills progression
Reading skills progression
Writing skills progression

69

First Printing 2011

7 ALC Skills: Overview & objectives


Overview of Listening, Speaking, Reading, & Writing Skills
ALC skills are academic and real-life language skills students need to easily participate
in an English-speaking environment. Additionally, ALC skills are specifically tailored
to complement military training, with a special emphasis on study skills, such as note
taking. Many skills, though complete in themselves, build up to or are recycled in more
complex skills. Such higher-level skills often require the ability to perform several
preliminary skills first (see pp. 3537). Facilitative vocabulary and structures increase
in frequency as skills texts become more challenging. However, use of such above-level
language is carefully controlled and contextualized based on the requirements of a particular objective. Approximately 812 skills objectives appear in each lesson.

Speaking

SPEAKING SKILL
Practicing pronunciation

OBJECTIVE: Listen to the base form of


a word and a second word derived from
it which has a change in stress and/or a
vowel reduction, and accurately repeat
both forms after the instructors model
with appropriate stress and reduced
vowels.

Listen to your teacher pronounce the words. Then repeat them.

EXERCISE

1. ACcident

acciDENtally

2. introDUCE

introDUCtion

3. CELebrate

celeBRAtion

4. prePARE

prepaRAtion

5. inVITE

inviTAtion

6. apPLY

appliCAtion

7. reDUCE

reDUCtion

8. sign

SIGnal

In addition to appearing in
the IT margin near the main heading,
skills objectives are listed on the first
two pages of each lesson in the IT.

Read the sentences with a partner. Use correct word stress.

1. The man LISTENING


accidentally went
through the red light and caused an accident.
SKILLS

Listening

OBJECTIVE: Listen to a text 60-150


2. The first two
pages
of each
lesson
is theseconds),
introduction. These pages introduce
words
in length
(about
20-45
students to
new
words
and
select
its and
topicgrammar.
from 2 or more

Identifying the topic, main idea, and title

Listen. Then select the topic, main idea, and best title.

choices.
3. My favorite celebration is on December 31st. I love to celebrate the new year.
1. The topic of the text is
.
4. If you want
to prepare for
a career
in the
military, you need to
hardof the first airplanes
OBJECTIVE:
Listen
to a text
60-150
a. study
the cost
and plan words
ahead.in
When
you
have 20-45
good preparation,
future. of the US Air Force
length
(about
seconds), youll have
b.a good
the beginning
and select its main idea from 2 or more
c. people in the US Air Force
5. I invited John
to the party, but he didnt get the invitation ind.thepilot
mail.training
choices.

6. You need to fill out an application for a travel visa. If you2.apply


Theseveral
main idea of the text is
.
OBJECTIVE:
to a youll
text noreceive
more the visa in time.
weeks before
you travelListen
overseas,
a. The first plane carried only two people.
than 150 words in length (no more than
b. The Wright brothers made the first plane for the US Air Force.
45 seconds
duration),
selecttry
thetobest
7. Many heavy
people with
health and
problems
reduce their weight. Doctors
c. The US Air Force started as part of the US Army.
title from
2 or more
choices.
say that weight
reduction
makes
people healthier.
d. There were only two instructors in the US Air Force.
8. The cars flashing turn signal was a sign that the driver 3.
wanted
turn
The to
best
title for the text is
.
right.
a. The Army Signal Corps
b. Learning to Fly an Old Plane
Texts Location
Item Number
c. Up, Up, and Away!
Appendix J
B14L1 #1
d. The Early
77 Days of the US Air Force
BOOK 15 LESSON 3

When a
section contains more than
one skill objective, each one
is listed in the IT margin
EXERCISE
Listen. Then select the topic, main idea, and best title.
Ask students if they
can figure out
EXERCISE
Presentation
near
the
main
heading.
the rule for words that end in -ion. (The
This activity helps students recognize
1. The topic of the text isBooks open
.
and practice stress-pattern shifts in verbs
which change to nouns by adding -ion
or -al.

stress falls on the next-to-last syllable.)

Written and oral cue

a. soldiers,
sailors, airmen,
and marines
Oral response
Have students take turns
correctly
b. the US Military Reserve
Choral, then pairs
pronouncing each pair of
words with a
c. the American president
partner.
d. weekends in the military
Model the sentences, and have students

Have students silently read the word


lists. Then pronounce each pair of words
70as studentsOVERVIEW
OFModel
THE AMERICAN
repeat after you.
pronunciation, and point out that the
stressed syllable changes in pitch and is
longer and louder. Remind students that
paying attention to correct syllable and
word stress will greatly improve their

repeat after you. Then pair students up,

2. The
main idea of the text
is
. take turns reading the
and have
them
LANGUAGE
COURSE
a.
b.
c.
d.

sentences
pronunciation.
Students take pilot
trainingwith
aftercorrect
graduation.
Havealso
them
each degree.
sentence at least
US military students
getread
a college
once.
Women go to the US
Air Force Academy and become officers.
The military reserve is part of the US military forces.

First Printing 2011

7 ALC Skills: Overview & objectives

Each specific skill objective in the section is


listed in the IT margin
near the corresponding
initial activity.

Skills in the main heading


indicates that more than
one type of skill objective
appears in the section.

READING SKILL

Skills

Scanning and Paraphrasing

OBJECTIVE: Scan a text within a limited


amount of time (60-90 seconds) and
write answers to 2-5 previously read
questions.

Read the text and the questions. Then wait for your teachers instructions.

nd

A good frie

Two groups of people50 men and


50 womenwere asked to select the
qualities that a good friend should
have. They used the list to the right.

is funny.
likes spor ts.

can be trusted

.
is attractive

good listener?
listener four
2. Which group chose is a good
times more than the other group? women
3. Which quality shows the greatest difference
between mens and womens choices?

EXERCISE

WRITING SKILL
OBJECTIVE: Write a paraphrase of an
original text about 100 words in length
after first reading the original text and
retelling it orally one or more times.

likes sports

4. Which quality did both groups select the least?


5. Which group selected humor the most?

Item Number
17L1 #2
p. J-5
Graph to scan

Appendix J

can be trusted.

1. Which quality did 100% of people in both


groups select?

Text Location

tener.

is a good lis

is attractive

EXERCISE

women

Text Location

Write a paraphrase of the text that your instructor gives you.

Read the text 3 times. Then, retell the text to 3 different people. Lastly, rewrite the text below.

Item Numbers
17L1 #3
p. J-7
Paraphrase example

Appendix J

17L1 #4 a - b
p. J-9
17L1 #4 c - d p. J-11
17L1 #4 e - f p. J-13
Paraphrasing texts

PREPARATION: Copy the 6 texts a-f


with word banks on the back, and cut
out before the lesson. The number of
copies to make depends on the number
of students.

Many
skills activities have
accompanying
materi23
als in the
appendix.
EXERCISE

BOOK 17 LESSON 1

Reading Presentation
When scanning, students read quickly to
find specific information. Scanning has
been practiced since ALC Book 7.
Read the bolded text and the
survey list. Ensure everyone
understands the context. Give students
enough time to read the 5 questions.
Tell them they will have only 90
seconds to scan a graph in the appendix.
Then they will answer the 5 questions.
NOTE: Explain that when they are

answering questions, they should skip


any that they cant answer right away.
They can return to the skipped ones if
time allows.

BOOK 17

LESSON 1

Direct students to find page J-5. Let


students start scanning as you begin
timing 90 seconds. When the time is up,
tell them to return immediately to the
questions to answer as many as they can.
Check the answers. Then let students
flip back to the appendix to find any
information they may have missed.

Writing Presentation

Books open
Written cue
Oral and written response
Pairs and individual

Distribute one text card to each


student. Point out that each card has a
word bank on the back to use.
Ask students to read their text
silently 3 times.
Direct them to pair up with another
student to paraphrase their text orally.
Emphasize that they can refer only to the
word bank for this step. Students must
switch partners to tell their paraphrase to
3 different people.

Paraphrasing has been practiced since


ALC Book 12. Begin with a review
of paraphrasing: A paraphrase is a
restatement of an original text in another
persons ownOVERVIEW
words. Work with
OF the
THE AMERICAN
COURSE
InstructLANGUAGE
students to write
their
example in Appendix J if necessary.
paraphrases using only the word bank.
23

71

First Printing 2011

7 ALC Skills: Subsumed skills objectives


Grammar

Skills Supporting Other


Objectives

GRAMMAR
Were studying tag questions, arent we?

Toms calling his friend Kyle to see if hes going to watch a basketball game.

Certain skills are incorporated


into grammar, vocabulary, or
function sections. These subsumed skills objectives either support or complement the primary
objective of the section. Most are
recycled skills which typically
do not need a separate presentation. Likewise, subsumed skills
exercises do not have a separate
heading; however, the objective
appears in the IT margin, near the
respective exercise.

Tom:

Youre going to watch the Air Force game


tonight, arent you?

Kyle:

Yes, I am. It starts at 7:30, doesnt it?

Tom:

No, I think it starts at 7:00. Our guys


havent lost yet this year, have they?

Kyle:

No, they havent. But theyre playing Army


tonight, and Army hasnt lost yet either.

Tom:

I guess this game wont be an easy win for


Air Force then, will it?

Kyle:

No, it wont, but that means it should be a


good game.

EXERCISE A

OBJECTIVE: Use affirmative and


negative tag questions and affirmative
and negative answers to ask for and
respond to a confirmation or verification
of information.
OBJECTIVE: Use affirmative and
negative tag questions, asking for the
expectation of agreement; respond with
affirmative and negative answers.

Fill in the blanks with tag verbs from the dialog above.

Negative Tag Question .


og
the dial
ning to
arent
ile liste
1. Youre going to watch the game,
you?
g wh
ad alon
s.
Re
H
question
CISE
the tag
ER
of
s
EX
starts
rndoesnt it?
2. It
at 7:30,
ion patte
+ Affirmative clause

ILL
s
ING SK
ntence
SPEAK E: Pronounce seonation, and
ess, int
JECTIV

at

snt it?
ning, wa
, isnt it?
is mor
is office
tside th
d.
cold ou
weeken
ettyQuestion
+ Affirmative
is
pr
Tag
th
s
r
ce
g. It wa
d be ni
freezin
it woul
is. Im
u?
id that
s, it lost,
yo
sa
Ye
e
havent
rt
ar
:
3. Our guys
have
they
?
po
d,
Sara
ather re
weeken
n this
The we
it was.
ton agai
g
Yes,
willgoing to Hous
travelin
ne:easy
4. This game wont be
win,
it?
Jaan
SE I
ull be
t
EXERCI
But yo
ure no
home.
at
pe so. Yo
x
ho
la
I
?
to re
he
CES
Sara: by a negative tag. A negative
ingclause
es
EN
go
An
affi
rmative
clause
is
followed
is
followed
do

NT
st
s,
ju
SE
die
not. Im
by an affirmative tag.
never stu
No, Im
you?
1. He
)
Jane:
, wont
(Falling
with ?negative words such as none, never,
xt week etc., is followed by an
A clause
s.
nenothing,
esnt he
in Dalla
ewherehave arrived, have they?tin
mguests
, do
affi
rmative tag. For example, None of so
the
ee Algnever came,
ncing
da
e with
es
a big m
lik
ll agre
did he? Nothing is missing, is it ? No bones were broken,
e gotthey?
evwere
2. Tom )
W
tener wi correct.
ll.
wi
I
the lis
(Rising
ent is
u?
: Yes,
expect
yo
ra
u
t
yo
Sa
en
ur statem
en
ing, ar3
69 in that yo
BOOK
17ad
LESSON
ation wh certa
re
on
of
int
e tired
e not
falling
underlined in the
dialog.
Ensure they
.
3. Your )
en your
ns, use
pattern
questio intonation wh
(Falling
nationhow the verb in the main
understand
e?
Inyotag
the into
e rising
was sh
u. Us
check clause changes to its opposite in the tag
Open books and read thece
roleanofd Tom
t there,
en s
nt
y wasn
se
ar
e
M
while
a
volunteer
reads
the
role
of
Kyle.
question. Review the first bullet, which
4.
to th
) With books closed, ask students tag
Listen Air Force and Army are
(Rising
I dialog,
(In the
summarizes this general rule.
ey?
questions ofyegeneral
interest,
e.g., EXERCISE
t, had th
capitalized when they are team names.)
t you? bullet. Ensure
eaten
Review
second
dntweathers
didn
The
nice today, isnt it?
ha
got, the
Model appropriate intonation without
5. They Lt
You for understand that a clause
students
)
Kim
isnt
here
today,
is
he?
ng
(Risi
drawing attention to it yet.
Intonation
?
we?
we
nt
containing a negative word but an
nt
do
Lt Long, you
like
soccer,
dont
you?
ve
7,
ginatfollowing
will be covered
pages.
fore, ha
tin
be
ee
m
affirmative
verb
requires an affirmative
et
a
m the tag questions on the board as
eWrite
e have
W
6. Wev )
Direct the students to underline the
tag question, as in He never eats fish,
you speak. The last one should
be about
(Falling
he?
tag questions in the dialog.
does he?
ldntpresentations
Rising
outhe
sports to lut
lead
into
sh
e,
ng
lli
Fa
ould sa
topic.
sh
7. He
Rising
EXERCISE A
ng)
ng
(Risi
lli
st

Fa
te grammar:
Show the parts of the
theirtarget
Books open sing
nt take
Before 7.
class, write statements on
Ri
s woclause
1.stuthe
main
with an affirmative
dent
ng cue
Written
separate slips of paper and their tags
Falli
8. The or negative verb
Written response
4.
?
on other8.slips.Pass one statement and
theyquestion
lltag
2.
the
itself
with
the
wi
y,
Individual
toda
one tag to each student. The 2 slips
)
opposite
verb
1.
(Falling
should not match.
Let students mingle
Let students complete5.the paradigm
9.
to the words they
to be 9
to match statements with tags.
by referring back
pposed
2.
e are su

er
Th
6.
9.
URSE
e?
er
th
UAGE CO 69
BOOK 17
LESSON
3
ent
N LANG
s, ar
AMERICA
3.
student
)
(Falling
Notice

the inton

ld in th

co
clause
Negative
: Its
Jane

OB
te str
propria
with ap .
juncture

Presentation

Additional activity

Speaking subsumed under grammar


Students practice proper pronunciation
of tag questions in two exercises which
complement the grammar objective.

72

H
ERCISE

EX

en
Books op itten cue
wr
Oral and oral response
ch
Oral and n pairs
s,
the
student
p,
Grou
to your

Vocabulary

og
the dial
tion.
Read propriate intona
e
ill of th
using ap
tition dr
g
t a repe s practice usin
uc
nd
Co let student
dialog to tonation.
in
og
in
the dial dents
correct
ad
re
s
itor stu
e student
Hav rculate and mon
Ci
.
irs
s.
pa
n pattern
intonatio

NEW VOCABULARY
to shut off
to shut down
air conditioner

Whats Next?

Read the article and write the topic and main idea. Answers will vary.

SE I
EXERCI
en
Books op
Oral cue ponse
res
Written
group
n twice.
al, then
e margi
Individu
ces in th

ta
e senten
conduc
Read th
answers,
ecking
After ch drill.
n
io
tit
repe

The Home of the Future?


This weeks Whats Next? article
is about a new home owned by Tom
and Linda Turner. They just finished
building the smart house of their
dreams. Its a modern house thats
filled with computers
to make their lives as
convenient as possible.
Tom and Linda
installed new appliances that look like
the usual kind you
can buy at any appliance store. But their
appliances are unusual machines, thanks to
the computer chips inside them. For
example, they have a refrigerator that
lets them know when they are out of
food items like milk and butter.
Computers operate the whole
house. If Tom wants to shut the
lights off, he says, Lights off! and
the computer obeys. Computers also

72

manage the temperature in each room


of the house. If the house is too warm,
the computer shuts the heating down
and turns on the air conditioner.
Even the outside of their house
is run by computers.
The garden computer
keeps the Turners
yard looking great
by checking the lawn
and turning the water on when the grass
needs it. The water
then shuts itself off
when the ground is
wet enough.
Tom and Lindas
house is a modern machine inside and
out. It allows them to relax while their
house does the work.
Next week we will take a trip to
the office and find out how the newest
computers have made the workplace
better.
by C. Hohm

Writing subsumed under vocabulary

chohm@XtremeHomes.build

WRITING SKILL

Topic: the Turners house

OBJECTIVE: Read a text 150-500 words


in length and write its topic.
OBJECTIVE: Read a text 150-500 words
in length and write its main idea.

Main Idea: The Turners have a modern house that is run by computers.

99

BOOK 16 LESSON 4

Presentation
This presentation approximates an
article from an architectural magazine or
newsletter.
Before opening the book, ask students to
describe their vision of the ideal house.
Then elicit some ideas about what the
house of the future should be like.
Have students open their books and
read the text, underlining unfamiliar
words.

72

Then let them read the article again


and write the topic and main idea.
Answers will vary. Circulate and help.
Have a few students read their answers
aloud to model the variety possible.
Accept logical, grammatically correct
answers.

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

Put them in pairs so they can


discuss their words and try to determine
meaning together.

BOOK 16 LESSON 4

Practice pronunciation of the new


vocabulary. Elicit and clarify meaning
through context when possible.

Have a class discussion about other


possible technological advances in the
homes of the future.

99

SE

UR
UAGE CO

AN LANG

AMERIC

The recycled objectives of finding the


topic and main idea support students
comprehension of the vocabulary
presentation.

First Printing 2011

7 ALC Skills: Integrated skills activities


All Four Skills in One Activity

# 4a - b
17L1speaking,
Skills are categorized into the language areas ofkilistening,
reading, or writing based

l
l
n1
riting s many objectives
on the final outcome of the objective.WHowever,
a combination of
Lessorequire
g e 23
skills. The example on this page demonstrates the presentationPaof
one
objective
which intesing
araphra
P
grates all four skills into the target activity of paraphrasing. Most students must accomplish this
important and difficult skill in both Specialized English Training (SET) and in FOT.
hen his
n
Airma
killed w . His
n
s
a
w
w
o
t
n
k
pilo
nam
An Un
2, a US
in Viet
y,
In 197
down
t
militar
o
e
h
h
s
was
d by t
e
e
h
n
t
ifi
t
f
la
o
n
p
Reeading
, speaking,
air
A
be ide
Tomb
e
t
h
n
t
.
ld
in
u
o
rest
n, D.C
o
o
t
t
body c
g
n
and
listening
e
in
s
h
as
as cho
near W
ho had
so it w
iers w
Soldier
ld
o
n
s
w
rs,
r
o
Students
read a paragraph
er wa
Unkn
e othe
in earli
h thre
n
it
io
ar.
w
t
a
W
y
c
n
ifi
silently
several
times.
t
a
It la
e
n
r
e
id
e Ko
ithout
ified
tUsing
and th
n
e
s
died w
id
r
a
s
only
the
key
words
ntist
orld W
ter, scie
tenant
u
la
both W
s
ie
r
L
a
e
provided, each student
irst
y-six y
was F
moved
Twent
ody. It
ilitary paraphrases
b
m
e
s
the text orally
t
h
o
t
ter,
ay their
the pil
ssie. La
72 to s to three other students,
9
la
1
B
e
l
c
e
g sin
Skills
Scanning and Paraphrasing
Micha
waitin
a
d been
7L1 #4listen individually.
a
1who
h
o
h
ily, w
Read the text and the questions. Then wait for your teachers
minstructions.
fa
is
h
ar
rest ne
d
body to men and
s
Two groups
of
people50
A good frien
ie
s
s
Bla
s.to select the
e
y
50 womenwere
asked
-b
tener.
lis
d
A
is a good
l gooa good friend should
finathat
qualities
nam

iet
r
illed V
k
o Soldie
t
o
l
d wtn
x
i
eo
o
p
g
b
n
e
2
n
c
lo
7
I
e
k
.
ny
b
9
s
1rd
is fun
Writing
a
ed
tatee Un
ell
1. Which quality did 100% of people in both
Sew
icabn ofs th offered to s ts identifi
eorm
laslikkesasp
Am
or ts.
A
s
ia
T
i
s
t
h
n
s
t
o
u
can
be
trusted
n
9
groups select?
After
the oral paraphrasiefie4dil 1867. When Rarssfor sevsecniemilli nt
e
draectinTveth. ia
t
isiatt
o
unt
n
siexd Syteate US govleyrnme gsoodby
2. Which group
chose
is
a
good
listener?
four
s
B students use
tUynit
Rus
ing activity,
n
e
e
i
w
e
h
a
t
t
t
m
a
women
,
o
t
a
times more than the other group?
ard ear f nited S
s ska t
m oSveewd na
eU
the key words again to
soldierAla ars, William
ugh
th t th
3. Which quality shows the greatest difference 3
d
e
. Altho
ll
d
o
n
d
e
e
i
m
s
s
a
m
b rgain
o
a
likes sports
c
l
write
own
paraany
d
e
o
r
betweentheir
mens and
womens
choices?
B
m
o
,
g
t
l,
L officia
as a
untry
o
w
c
it
e
e
h
s
t
ecau
. They
phrases
large
is attractive
4. Which
quality did of
boththe
groups select the least?
dation
buy it b
uld en
n
4a
o
e
w
m
o
e
m
s
17L1 #
rcha
eless, s
is reco
s
text.
h
u
t
women
s
d
the pu
n
in
5. Which group selected humor the most?
a
e
aga
ld
have. They used the list to the right.

can be trusted.

th
were
was co
. But
people
Alaska
Icebox
t
s
a
by
d
h
r
d
t
a
e
ed
Sew
llow
elievyou.
EXERCISE
Write a paraphrase of the text that your instructorbgives
call it
gold, fo
o
a
t
n
n
e
n
e
h
a
e
g
e
ad b
y bbelow.
d. W
Read the text 3 times. Then, retell the text to 3 different people. Lastly, rewritetthe
hetext
laska h
the lan
A
t
h
g
g
in
u
bo
buy
ice and
d that
4b
17L1 #
realize
his adv
e
o
t
n
o
d
y
e
r
e
n
e
v
t
e
O
ral
proficiency
s
,
li
a
lask
ment
nd in A
govern
ter fou
la
J-9 of this
s
a
The speaking portion
oil, w
ion.
million
is
c
e
B
en oral
d
v
e
activity approximates
the
s
good
l
l
e
IX J

ND
7 APPE

BOOK 1

BOOK 17 LESSON 1

s
n
1867 interviewy(OPI).
proficiency
bargai
a
i
u
s
b
s
u
d
R
ende
eless
Therefore,
ate
and us
ecomm instructorsccould
r
d
l
o
49th st
d use the various
oil
instparagraph cards
Sewar
ple aga and speakinggacold and
William
eolistening
p
for
y
ened
t listOPI
countr
n
e
e
tivities
to
offer
practice.
h
m
t
n
e
23
gover
enlarg
x
n
o
o
b
ecisi
ds Ice
good d
Sewar
OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

4b

17L1 #

73

SE

E COUR

ANGUAG

AN L
AMERIC

First Printing 2011

7 ALC Skills: Speaking skills progression


Pronunciation & Dialogs in Level I
Practicing the basic sounds of English and participating in short dialogs are emphasized in
the first level. While pronunciation activities tend to be strictly controlled, dialog practice
moves from repetition and recitation to guided, yet original exchanges among classmates.

Book 2
Lesson 2
g the
guishin

Distin

iation
Pronunc

nd
hat sou
ords. W

ese w
ten to th

Lis

ay

sd
Wedne

z/?
s/ or /

hear, /

do you

zero

te the

.T

LE:

EXAMP

Zack

those

please

bstitu
hen su

Listen

ISE A

Ms.

isnt

Zook

EXERC

d /z/

s /s/ an

sound

the pa

word in

ctor
t. / do

Dialogs

studen

es a
says: H
Teacher
es a
H
:
ys
t sa
Studen

Book 6
Lesson 4

ce.

enten
ttern s

doctor.

.
echanic
Hes a m
rber.
es a ba
2. H
ot.
es a pil
3. H
udent.
es a st
4. H
n.
es a ma
5. H
acher.
es a te
6. H
ok.
es a co
7. H
y.
o
b
es a
8. H
ther.
fa
es a
9. H
rgeant.
e
Hes a s

Asking about vacations and trips

Mr. Jackson: How was your vacation?

1.

nic
mecha
barber
pilot
t

studen
man

teache
cook
boy

father

nt

sergea

E B

IS
EXERC

PLES:

EXAM

10.

Mr. Swenson: It was great.


Mr. Jackson: Where did you go?
Mr. Swenson: First to Lake Tahoe, and then to San
Diego to see Bruce.
Mr. Jackson: Why did you go to Lake Tahoe?
Mr. Swenson: Because many people said that it was
very nice. It really is a great place for
a vacation.

gative

ke a ne

ma
n. Then

Liste

EXERCISE A Look at the chart and fill in the information.


rd.
ew wo
h the n
My favorite places and activities
nce wit

sente

City

ctor.
es a do

Restaurant

:
Teacher
t:

Studen

:
Teacher
t:

Studen

r.
a docto
He isnt
.
ic
n
cha
me
Hes a

Hotel
Beach

.
echanic

am
He isnt

Sport
RSE

GE COU
LANGUA

AN B
EXERCISE
AMERIC

Exchange charts with a partner and ask questions. Use why.

Why do you like the


beach at San Diego?

30

I like it because its


warm and sunny.

Skills and functions


Often speaking skills are closely
related to the function of the lesson,
as seen in the example to the right.

74

96

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

First Printing 2011

7 ALC Skills: Speaking skills progression


Book 7
Lesson 2

Speaking in Levels II and III


Students use the language in
meaningful, relevant ways to
express everyday communication needs. One goal for skills
presentations is for students
to experience realistic situations they might encounter in
follow-on training or in the
English-speaking community.

Dialogs

asting

d contr

ring an

Compa

d Judy.
sters?
ulie an
e two si
s are J
v
e
a
m
h
a
u
n
yo
taller
Their
Say, do
Julie is
e twins.
Jim:
es. But rent clothes.
Theyr
y
.
e
o
e
d
I
lu
e?
Yes,
diffe
and b
Tim:
the sam
n hair eyre wearing
y look
l.
ve brow
ey
Do the
oth ha make sure th yre at schoo
B
.
o
t are th
n
Jim:
the
ays
and
r. Wha
ell, yes and they alw e same when
e siste
n
W
o
:
st
Tim
k th
udy,
had ju
than J t like to loo
ulie.
ght you
on
than J very
t I thou
They d
scores
is
em, bu
th
w
o
her test e does. Julie both
kn
ig
h
I
k
ts
li
e
in
Judy
I th
he g
n Ju
Jim:
hool. S er books tha en Julie and
sc
?
in
e
k
d
g
h
o
li
n
very go and reads lo tball team. W
gs.
udy is
nt thin
Well, J likes to read ys on a baske Judy.
Tim:
o
t differe
n
la
ls
a
p
a
e
th
e
Sh
er
good a
Sh
h
e
s.
ig
r
rt
y
h
o
e
s
re
t sp
, but th
good a e always sco
ething
uli
at som
play, J
th good
o
b
e
r
hey
I see. T
.
t.
Jim:
e topic
ts righ
uss th
es, tha
Y
:
s. Disc
te
Tim
o
n
te
ry
and wri
e libra
1 topic
and th
select
ssroom
artner,
a
p
cl
a
r
u
h
Wit
5. Yo
erday
ook
ISE
ate yest
know
EXERC
als you
ers you
wo me
ch
a
T
te
.
ntry
6
sh
s
esson
our cou
o Engli
nt place
ns in y
1. Tw
o differe
o seaso
w
tw
T
and a
in
.
7
r
watch
weathe
like to
2. The
rt you to play
o
rs
e
sp
th
A
8.
ur bro
ou like
Giving messages
o of yo
sport y
3. Tw
nds
ie
fr
r
u
o of yo
4. Tw
RENT
Listen to your teacher read a message. Write answers to the questions.

B
L

16
3

Speaking

DIFFE

1. Can you make an appointment now?

:
For
Forcustomer
customer
TOPIC
service,
service,press
press 1.
1.
For
Forbilling
billing
information,
information,
press
press2
2

no
2. When is the doctors office open?

8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

SAME

Realistic situations

3. When are they closed for lunch?

noon to 1:30
EXERCISE A

Follow the teachers instructions. Divide into groups of 3.

54

Student 1 reads a message only to Student 2, who takes notes, then passes it to Student 3.

A
sport:

B
time of performance:

basketball
day of the week:

7:00 in the evening


ticket price for an adult:

$16.95

Wednesday
time of game:

ticket price for a child:

$7.50

8:00 p.m.
C

temperature now:

museum address:

70F
humidity:

200 Main Street


closed on:

low
high temperature:

90F
66

RSE
In these examples, studentsAN are
GE COU
LANGUA
AMERIC
given opportunities to be progressively more creative with their
speaking after they see examples
of the target objective. Most students will find themselves in the
humorous situation shown on the
left. Speaking often continues to
be tied to the function of the lesson, as shown above.

Mondays
free day:

Sundays
AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

75

First Printing 2011

7 ALC Skills: Speaking skills progression


Book 19
Lesson 1
Speaking
I.

Speaking in Level IV
Speaking activities focus on
sentence stress and intonation
patterns which enable students
to sharpen their pronunciation
skills. In addition, Level IV
introduces guided discussions
in which students are asked
to come to an agreement on
solutions to practical problems.
This type of group problemsolving activity is used by the
military for training purposes.

Using stress to emphasize content words

Listen and repeat.

Listen to your instructor read the short dialogs. Then repeat them, using stress correctly.

A: Is the list complete?

B: No, it isnt
2

A: Is he your brother?
B: No, hes my friend

A: Is the cat a male?


B: No, its a female

A: Have they left yet?


B: No, theyre still here

We stress certain words to let the listener know those words are important. These
words are content words: nouns, verbs, adjectives, or adverbs. Many times, but not
always, this content word is the sentences last word.

II.

Mark stress and practice.

With a partner, mark the stress in the short dialogs. Then practice the dialogs using the
correct stress. Your teacher will do the first one with you as an example.

A: Is it going to rain?
B: No, there arent enough clouds

A: Will the coffee keep him awake?


B: Yes, hell be awake for hours

A: Do you have any fuel for the fire?


B: Yes, we have some wood

A: Did the boy drown?


B: Yes, he drowned in the lake

A: Can we drop by your house?


B: No, Im at the office now

Book 19 LEsson 1

Speaking

Participating in a group discussion

Discuss the situation below with your group. Write down what you decide to take and why.

You and your friends are going on a


four-day camping trip in the woods
You have checked the weather
forecast for your trip and know it
will be very cold at night and warm
in the daytime Youll be camping
far away from any highways, and
no one lives in the area Youll have
to walk many miles to reach the
location where you plan to camp
The woods where youll be are
home to many plants and animals
19
Each person brought
a backpack
The tent, sleeping bags, food,
water, and extra clothes have been
divided between you to make all the
backpacks weigh the same After
packing, you realize there is room
left for five more items Decide
together which five you should take

Possible items to take


ashlight

first aid kit

mirror

laptop computer

knife

newspaper

shovel

compass

gun

matches

can opener

soccer ball
toilet paper
camping stove

Book 19
Lesson 2

Item

Reason

1
2
3
4
5

Book 19 LEsson 2

76

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

33

First Printing 2011

7 ALC Skills: Listening skills progression


Listening in Level I
Students get practice in simple, everyday
listening situations that often target other
skills, such as punctuation or sentence
stress. Other areas of focus include following instructions, using total physical
response (TPR) activities, and answering
simple comprehension questions.

Listenin

re does
Mary li
b. Wh
ve?
at are
her frie
c. Wh
nds na
en did
mes?
h
e
r
friends
d. Wh
arrive?
at did
they h
a
v
e
for din
1.
ner?
a. Wh
en did

he buy
b. Wh
the car?
at colo

r is the
c. How
car?
many d

o
ors doe
d. Wh
s the ca
ere did
r have
he buy
?
the car?
2.
a. Wh
e
re
d
id he g

b. Wh
o last y
en doe
ear?

s Ted fl
c. Wh
y?
o does
h
e
travel
d. Wh
with?
at plan
e does
he fly?
3.
a. Wh
ere do
Nancy
b. Wh
and Jo
at work
hn wan

did the
t to go?
c. How
y do?
would
they li
d. Ho
k
e
to trav
w much
el?
money
do they
4.
have?
a. Ho
w is th
e weath
b. In w
er in T
hat sea
exas?

son do
c. Wh
es the
ere doe
weathe
s
the we
r chan
d
.
W
a
ge?
ther ch
Sample
Script
(from
the IT)
hicListening
h seaso
ange a
n is nic
lot in o
e in Te
ne day
xas? to dinner
?
B. Jans friends are coming
at her

2. Ted is a pilot. He flies on weekends with


his wife. They like to travel by plane together.
Last weekend they flew to Los Angeles. They
left on Friday and returned on Sunday. Theyd
like to go to New York next week.

EXAMPLE:

Listen. Write the numbers you hear.

4
3

Paragraph A.

EXERCISE B

10

Paragraph B.

10

2 40

Liste

ning fo
Read th
r spec
e questi
ific info
There
can be ons. Then list
rmatio
more th
en to a
n
an one
p
for each aragraph. Sel
ect the
paragra
q
u
p
es
h
.
ti
Number
EXAMP
on
LE:
1 is an s the paragra
examp
ph answ
a. Wh
le.
ers.
e

Sample Listening Script (from the IT)

EXERCISE A

Book 6
Lesson 2

house. She went to the commissary and


bought 4 chickens, 10 pounds of potatoes,
and some vegetables. She bought some
apples to make 3 pies. She got 1 gallon of
juice and 2 pounds of coffee. Jan likes to
cook for her friends.

Listen. Then write the paragraph with correct punctuation.


AMERIC

AN LAN

do you like to walk i do its good for you all you need are good shoes
take a friend with you you can talk and walk at the same time walk
together every day youll feel good

GUAGE

COURSE

Do you like to walk? I do. Its good for you. All you need are good
shoes. Take a friend with you. You can talk and walk at the same
time. Walk together every day. Youll feel good.

Multiple objectives in one section


Three listening objectives appear in
one section of the lesson in this example. Students practice listening to
answer specific questions, identify
numbers, and punctuate a paragraph.

BOOK 6 LESSON 2

41

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

77

First Printing 2011

7 ALC Skills: Listening skills progression


Listening in Levels II and III

Book 11
Lesson 1

Activities include listening to


progressively more complex
texts for general comprehension
and specific tasks, such as making inferences, identifying topic
and main idea, and taking messages. Word-level tasks include
listening for primary stress in
Level II. As Level III progresses,
listening tasks are often integrated with other skills.

Listening

Listen to each dialog and select the best inference for it.

1.

The man is ______.


a.
b.
c.
d.

2.

a.
b.
c.
d.

Listenin
Listen

pecific

on
formati

in

PLE
EXAM
e has a
h airlin
ic
h
W
?
1.
e
g
n
a
gate ch
lines
Sky Air
s
a. New
Airline
rk
o
Y
b. New
lines
ir
A
l
a
on
c. Nati
should
h
ic gate now?
2. Wh
o to
g
le
p
o
pe
9
a. Gate
6
b. Gate
16
c. Gate

keeping healthy
finding a doctor
getting checkups
exercising every day

2.

a.
b.
c.
d.

pay phones
local calls
telephone calls
wrong numbers

MBER 2?

CASHIER NU

exit
a. near the
shoes
b. near the
tools
c. near the

Recycling and expanding objectives


3.

a. how to study for a test

b. how to
memorize
new words
Listening
for
specific
information and
c. how to write test questions
d. how objectives
to review lessons both appear in
inference
a. Sunday
Levels II and III. First, students practice
b. Tuesday
c. Thursday
such objectives with simple texts, above.
E?
OR
OF THE ST
THE NAME
3. WHATS
TO?
TENING
In
the
next
level, many of the objectives
LE LIS
Mar t
ARE PEOP
BOOK 11 LESSON 1
a. Workers
1. WHAT
ow
sh
t
ar
dio
M
a. a ra
reappear
with
more complex texts, below.
b. World
ow
ket
?

E CLOSED

OR
Y IS THE ST
2. WHAT DA

ar
c. Wood M

S?

1. HOW

a.
b.
c.
d.

ers.

1. WHERES

THE WIND
FAST ARE

s per hour
a. 100 mile
s per hour
ile
m
0
11
b.
s per hour
ile
m
5
c. 11

M
THE STOR
2. WHEN IS
?
TO ARRIVE
EXPECTED

tes
a. in 4 minu
tes
b. in 14 minu
tes
c. in 40 minu

OULD BASE
3. WHO SH
T?
L CONTAC
PERSONNE

ily
a. their fam
dents
b. their stu
rvisors
c. their supe

b. a TV sh
CD
c. a book on

WILL
2. WHEN

ES OPEN?

THE STOR

tes
a. in 20 minu
tes
inu
m
2
in
b.
tes
c. in 12 minu

S
STAURANT
NY NEW RE
3. HOW MA
?
MALL HAVE
DOES THE

Sample Listening Script (from the appendix)

a. 6
b. 60
c. 16
4.

2. Attention, attention. This is not a drill. The


weather station at Lackland Air Force Base is
LE
100 PE
reporting
that
a OP
storm
with rain, ice, and winds of
THE FIRST
WHAT WILL
?
RECEIVE
VEmiles
RI
100
per
hour
is coming from the northwest.
AR
O
WH
e foodstorm is expected to arrive in about 40
a. freThe
t cards
b. gifminutes.
All personnel who live close to the base
ck music
c. romust
leave immediately. All others must report to
RSE
Building 2424. AllGUA
base
GE COUpersonnel should contact
AN LAN
AMERIC
their supervisors
for further instructions. Repeat.
This is not a drill.

32

78

Mr. B: Ill take it. Are these


the keys?

Listen to each paragraph and select the best topic.

1.

the answ

noun
to 4 an

1. Ms. A: For $35 a day,


you can drive more than
300 miles.

were late
had a flat tire
had an accident
were lost

EXERCISE

g for s

. Select
cements

in a store
at a gym
for a magazine
in a restaurant

Sample Listening Script


(from the IT)

The man and woman ______.


a.
b.
c.
d.

Book 17
Lesson 1

staying home
planning a vacation
buying a plane ticket
renting a car

The man and woman work ______.

3.

in
Listen

Making inferences and selecting topics

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

First Printing 2011

7 ALC Skills: Listening skills progression


Listening in Level IV

Listening

Listening comprehension is
supplemented and reinforced
through activities that give higher level practice in following and
relaying messages, instructions,
and conversations. Students
interaction with oral texts is
deepened through practice in
note-taking and summarizing.
Participation in guided discussions also opens new avenues
for comprehension practice.

Listen to your teacher read a text. Then select the true statement.

Selecting the true statement

1. Traveling overseas requires no medical physical.


2. International travel is fun and requires very little preparation beforehand.
3. If you take a pet with you, international travel is quite expensive.
4. You may need to get a shot if you plan to visit certain countries.

Book 23 Lesson 2
Students determine
which statement is true
based on an oral text of
30-300 words.

Listening

Book 19
Lesson 3
Skills

Circle the main idea after listening to a text.

Students listen to a text


(150-300 words) and
circle the main idea.

56

AmERiCAn LAnguAgE CouRsE

a Eleanor Roosevelt helped African Americans in the US


b The First Lady is an important part of the government
c Eleanor Roosevelt changed what the First Lady can do

EXERCISE

Listen to your classmates perform role-plays.

Then answer your instructors questions.

We should visit
Washington DC on
July 4th That would
be great!

Ive already
been there on the 4th
I dont want to go
again

Id rather go to
New York There are
more interesting things
to do there

Students listen to a roleplay and answer their


instructors questions
about what was
discussed.
78

AmERiCAn LAnguAgE CouRsE

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

79

First Printing 2011

7 ALC Skills: Reading skills progression


Reading in Level I
Reading skills objectives begin with reading and reciting various dialogs as well as identifying words with similarities and differences. By the end of the level, students begin to practice
study skills and examine text organization through note taking and outlining. Students are also
exposed to various reading strategies early on, such as in the scanning skill shown here.

Book 5
Lesson 4
EXERCISE F

Write have to questions about these statements.

Pvt Hill had to go to the hospital this morning because he broke his toe.

have to go to the hospital


1. Did Pvt Hill ________________________________________________
?
he have to go this morning
2. Where did __________________________________________________
?
did he have to go to the hospital / did he break his toe ?
3. When ______________________________________________________
did he have to go to the hospital
4. Why _______________________________________________________
?

Drinks

Pvt Hill doesnt have to wear a cast, but he has to wear a special shoe.

rger
Hambu
hes
Sandwic
cheese

.6__________________________________________________
6. What
?
he have to wear
tea does

1.75
.25
ham 2
2.50
heese
ham & c
.75

fries
French
y
f the da
Soup o
cup

5
Pvt Hill will havefto
a special
shoe for three weeks.
eeuse.5
cof
juic

.85
7. Will e_______________________________________________________
?
he have to use a special shoe
8. What will __________________________________________________
?
he have to use for three weeks

ts
Desser

ie
Apple p
with ic

1.25

You will see the menu for 8 seconds


1.85per question to find the answers. Then write the
answers.
e cream

.75 are there?


1. How many sandwiches

1.25

Salad

9. How long ___________________________________________________


?
will he have to use a special shoe

m
.95
Ice crea la/chocolate
il
Scanning
a menu
Reading
n
a
v

1.00
1.75

bowl

5. m
Does
he.7have to wear a cast / he have to wear a special shoe ?
ilk _______________________________________________________

2.50

Fruit

Three.
2. How much does a cheese sandwich cost?

$1.75.
3. Can you buy slices of chocolate or vanilla pie for dessert?

No.
4. How much is a piece of15fruit?
1

75.
ter B5L4

GUAGE

AN LAN

AMERIC

cy mas
ansparen
SE Tr

COUR

BOOK 5 LESSON 4

Setting a foundation of basic skills


Even in the earliest books, students practice language skills in authentic contexts that
lead to real-life application. Scanning is a valuable academic skill that students will
later apply to charts and texts in the ALC and in their follow-on-training materials.

80

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

93

First Printing 2011

7 ALC Skills: Reading skills progression


Reading in Level II
Reading to understand text organization continues with box-outlining (see p. 84) and text sequencing activities. Improving reading is addressed through activities that help students understand topic, main idea, inference, and referents. Many of these activities complement similar
listening tasks. At the end of the level, students begin to read with the goal of summarizing.

Reading

Alexander Graham Bell and the first US telephone


ISE A

EXERC

e topic

Write th

at is
1. Wh

ph 1?

agra
c of Par
the topi

l
ham Bel

er Gra

Alexand

at is
2. Wh

Bell the

teacher

at is
3. Wh
Scotland. He went to school in London, England. Later, in 1871, he

Book 8
Lesson 4

moved to the United States. He was a teacher and also an inventor. He

made things. These were new things that people could use, and
Alexander Graham Bell made them for the first time.

hear. Because these people couldnt hear, they usually couldnt talk.

Bell was a teacher. He taught deaf people. These people could not

Bell taught them how to use a new language. This language used the
lips, tongue, and throat to make sounds. In 1872, Bell began a school
for the deaf. Later, his school was part of Boston University. At that
11

time, Bell was also a professor at Boston University. He taught there.

13

think about using electricity to send sounds. Then in 1874, he started

Years earlier, when Bell was just eighteen years old, he began to

to make a telephone. He worked hard on it for two years. On March 10,


1876, his invention worked. On that day, Bell used his telephone. He

15

said to his friend, James Watson, Watson, come here! I want you. A
year later, Bell started the Bell Telephone Company.

17

110

AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

ISE F

EXERC

write a

er and

s in ord

ntence

se
Put the

ent to

he w
all boy,

ph.
paragra

in
school

d.

Scotlan

a sm
ada.
to Can
States.
l moved
United
d.
to the
e
Englan
m
ca
hool in
, Bell
sc
71
to
18
in
e went
Then,
older, h
as
w
e
when h
and.
Later,
went to
in Scotl
ll boy, he
in 1847
.
as born
s a sma
Bell w
England
n he wa

When

he was

, Bel
In 1870

4
5
3

in
school
and. Whe
in Scotl
went to
tates.
in 1847
nited S
older, he
U
rn
s
e
a
bo
w
th
s
Bell wa
when he
came to
. Later,
71, Bell
nd
18
a
tl
in
in Sco
. Then
school
Canada
oved to
, Bell m
In 1870
1

ISE G

EXERC

3
1
6
2
5

s in
ntence

se

lephone

E B

IS
EXERC

Select

n idea

the mai

71.
tes in 18
.
ph 2
ited Sta n University eak.
Paragra
sp
the Un
to
to
os
B
ed
of
roat to
l mov
part
and th
a. Bel school was
tongue, language.
,
ps
ls
li
el
new
their
b. B
a
se
u
le
e
op
pl
c. Peo taught deaf pe
l
d. Bel
3
n.
agraph
r. Watso ars.
2. Par
r was M
ye
one.
ls helpe hard for two e first teleph in 1877.
el
B
d
a.
on thg. e Company
l worke
spokmeeanin
hon
b. Bel made andrd
ep
el
s
T
l
o e Bel
l
e dwth
thte
s ar
c. Bgel
uesst
ntextd.to Bell
the co
D Use
tland.
E
co
IS
gh, S
.
EXERC
dinbur ference
rn in E
re
l was boC Pronouldn
el
B
.
1.
Bell
E
wor
e
IS
C
th
R
a
to
to
E
EX came in
fers
ld line 2, He re
a.
worIn
w things
.
the 1.
to ne
b. left
rs
y
fe
it
re
.
rs
em
ople
Unive
deaf pe ne 5, th
Boston
.
taught 2. In li hear
e
to
H
rs
2.
ere refe
could 11he
b
le whoIn liulndn
e t , thar
el.l
.
a. peop le w
3.ho co
sounBds
on
ndto
fers
rese
eto
b. peop
H
y
,
er, Wats
it
14
ic
e tr
lielnec
ells help
e
In
us
4.
to B
ted to
rs
fe
an
w
re
e
3. H
16, you
b
er In line
a lett5.
a. in a line
s.
ference
b. over
rrect in
the co
select
d
an
s
ntence
e se
4
d thON
Rea
8 LESS
don.
ISE E BOOK
l in Lon
EXERC
oo
h
sc
to
l went
.
h
1. Bel
is
gl
En
spoke
family.
a. He dnt have a
h.
di
b. He dnt like mat
l.
di
e
oo
h
H
c.
his sc
d
ke
li
nguage.
d. He
new la
dents a
u
st
too.
is
guage,
ght h
n
u
la
ta
e
l
n th
2. Bel
to lear language.
anted
e
w
l
th
el
know language.
a. B
l didnt
b. Bel knew the new French.
nds.
l
as
nd sou
c. Bel language w
y to se
ectricit
ls
d. Bel
using el
t
ou
k ab
to thin
l began
nds.
e.
ud sou
3. Bel
t like lo e a telephon
dn
di
e
to mak
a. H
it.
d
te
an
to
w
s.
n do
b. He anted Watso United State
w
e
c. He dnt go to th
di
d. He

111

One text with many tasks

d write

order an

3?

1.

agraph

c of Par

the topi

Bells te

Alexander Graham Bell was born on March 3, 1847, in Edinburgh,

ph 2?

agra
c of Par

the topi

agraph

the par

the US.

ny in
e compa
Several
skills objectives and activities are linked to one text in these
gs.
in
.
th
h
y new
of water
Then,
on top The text is challenging for students at this level, but they
ade man examples.
el
m
av
d
tr
uld
t of an
co
gh
at
ou
th
Bell th
st boat
ade a fa
the US.
will
chances to read, skim, scan, and ultimately underone in have multiple
, Bell m
teleph
rplane.
In 1917
e first
early ai
th
e
ad
d on an
, he m
ke
or
76
w
18
stand
itplaythoroughly
as they complete the accompanying exercises.
ell
In
er.
ayer, B
cord pl
a record

Put the

d the
e starte

lephon

first te

SE

UR
UAGE CO

AN LANG

AMERIC

112

e re
work on
first
After th
gan to
de the
, he be
, he ma
.
in 1886
In 1876
the US
Later,
things.
pany in

4
new
com
e many
r,
lephone
nd mad
rd playe
first te
ght of a
ed the
the reco
rt
ou
er
ta
th
ft
s
l
A
el
B
, he
d
yer.
ul
en
a
pl
co
Th
.
rd
S
at
U
th
a reco
t boat
e in the
work on
de a fas
telephon
began to
Bell ma
In 1917,
1886, he
.
in
ne
r,
a
pl
te
La
air
an early
ked on
Bell wor
.
of water
p
to
travel on

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE


113

81

First Printing 2011

7 ALC Skills: Reading skills progression


Book 14
Lesson 1

Reading in Level III


Reading

Texts become increasingly


challenging as students use and
improve their skills in summarizing, scanning, making inferences, passing written messages
(e-mail), and reading faster.

Summarizing a text orally


The California Gold Rush

A man named Sutter found gold in California in 1849. This caused many people
to rush, or go there quickly, because they all hoped to find gold and get rich. A few of
them got rich, but most didnt. Instead, they became businessmen, farmers, and
ranchers.
The gold hunters, or miners, started many small towns, but the towns didnt last
when the miners stopped looking for gold and went back home. These empty towns
became ghost towns with empty buildings, wind, and dirt. Later, the people who
stayed in California built other towns that lasted.
Today, the state is rich in farm and ranch land and a wide variety of businesses.
Not everyone who looked for gold in California found it, but those who stayed found
a land thats as good as gold.

Facilitative words and structures


are present but limited in these
carefully crafted texts.

Many people went to California to


find gold in 1849, but not many people found it.
Many small towns died and became ghost towns
after the miners left. The people who stayed became
farmers, ranchers, and businessmen. They built
other towns, and now the state is rich with
businesses, farms, and ranches.

Book 18
Lesson 5
EXERCISE K

EXERCISE

A First for Women Soldiers


Lieutenant General Claudia Kennedy was the first woman to receive the rank of
three-star general in the US Army. Kennedy, now retired, was a professional in the
US Army for 30 years and has lived a very interesting military and civilian life.
Kennedys father was in the US Army, so Claudia traveled a lot when she was
young. She grew up in Frankfurt, Germany, and later went to college in the US.
After she received her degree in 1969, she joined the US Army as a second
lieutenant.
During her army life, Kennedy had assignments in different countries. She was
stationed in Germany, South Korea, and the US. Lieutenant General Kennedy
retired in 2000.
Readin
gbusiness.
skill She has done
Today Ms. Kennedy lives in the US and has her own
B1in8Lher
many important things for the US Army and continues to help the US
5 #1
civilian life, too.
Lesson
5
Page 12 COURSE
28
AMERICAN
LANGUAGE
6
Timed
Reading

Read a text and answer questions.

Listen for instructions. Your teacher will tell you when to start.

1.

The Navajo Code Talkers

a. were enlisted in the Army


b. fought in Europe
c. were soldiers in World War II
2.

What was the Code Talkers primary job?


a. to give and get information
b. to repair radios
c. to give orders

3.

Why was Navajo the perfect choice for a military code?

a. Very few people outside of the US could speak or understand Navajo.


b. The code talkers had the necessary training to make codes.
c. Code talkers took part in every Marine battle in World War II.
4.

Where might you see Code Talkers today?


a. in the Pacific area
b. in a military parade
c. on the battlefield

5.

Which of these statements is true?

Reading
more
a. Code Talkers were taught to plan strategies.
b. US
Marines were
trained to speak Navajo.
and
reading
better
c.

The Code Talkers already knew the Navajo language.

This
reading
text, shown on
Whattimed
is the main
idea of the text?
The Navajo
code was
never broken. J challenges
thea.b. right,
from
Appendix
The Code Talkers were an important part of the US military in
World War
students
to II.practice strategies they have
c. The Navajo Code Talkers served in the US Marines in the Pacific
from 1942 tolearned
1945.
previously
to increase their reading speed and accuracy. They test their
comprehension of the text in the
above exercise.

6.

Read the text. Give an oral summary of it to a partner.

Code
Talker
Th
s
of Nati e Navajo Co
de Talk
ve Am
ericans
ers we
World
re a sp
who se
War II
ecial g
.
rv
Their m
secret
ed as U
roup
in
a
S
This in formation ab in duty was to Marines du
ring
out the
formati
se
nd and
battlefi
on was
strateg
rece
eld ove
ie
u
r the ra ive
decisio s, give orders sed by the U
S fo
dio
ns
,a
Marine about the w nd make oth rces to plan .
ar. Cod
er imp
battle
e
o
in the
Pacific Talkers took rtant
The Co
area fr
part in
de Talk
which
om
ers
ev
is
design called Navajo used their o 1942 to 1945 ery
ing a se
.
wn nati
. It wa
s a perf
cret m
v
the wa
e
la
n
ilit
guage,
ect cho
r,
ic
speak very few peo ary code. At
the beg e for
ple insi
or und
erstan
inning
de or o
imposs
d Na
utside
of
ib
the
necess le to break. O vajo, which
made th US could
ary tra
n
ly
th
ining to
e Code
e
explain
co
d
e
Ta
almost
be able
the me
to use lkers had the
aning
of
th
Th
messag e Code Talke the message is difficult co
s to oth
de and
rs tran
es with
er peop
slated
to do th
great sp
tho
le.
is
military kept the secr eed and with usands of m
il
o
u
e
in
t
t
e
in
a
rr
formati
better
or. The itary
code w
p
o
ir
osi
n sa
as
ability
honore never broke tion to win th fe and put
na
th
d today
e
as nati nd the Code war. The Na e US
vajo
onal he
Talkers
roes.
are stil
l

Word C
o
126

82

AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

unt: 20

BOOK 18
APPE
OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN
LANGUAGE
COURSE
NDIX J

J-13

First Printing 2011

7 ALC Skills: Reading skills progression


Reading

Reading in Level IV
Reading activities challenge
students to manage information
in lengthier general texts.
Understanding textual
organization is deepened by
reading tasks that examine levels
of information from broad to
detailed.

Olympic results: Scanning a graph

Use the information in the line graph to answer the questions below.

Olympic Record Times in the 100 Meter Sprint


kEy

time (in seconds)

womens records
mens records

years in which an olympic record was set

Reading

Finding and using guide words

1
2
golf

gnat
gnat small flying insects that often bite
go went, gone, going : 1. to move on a course
<go slow> <went by train> 2. to move out
of or away from a place, leave, depart
<went from school to the party> 3. to take a
certain course or follow a certain procedure
<soldiers go through the chain of command
> 4. to extend from point to point or in a
certain direction <the road goes to the lake>
5. die <he went in his sleep> 6. to function
in the proper or expected manner : run <the
motor wont go>
goal 1. the end point of a race 2. the end
toward which effort is directed, aim 3. a: an
area or object that players in various games
attempt to advance a ball towards to score

points b: the act or action of causing a ball


3
to go through or into the goal c: the score
resulting from the act
goalkeeper a player who defends the goal
4
in various games (hockey, lacrosse, soccer,
etc.)
goat an animal related to the sheep but of
5
lighter build and with backwardly arching
horns, a short tail, and usually straight hair
gold a yellow metallic element used in coins
6
and jewelry
golf an outdoor game played on a large
course with a small hard ball and a set of
clubs, with the goal being to hit the ball into
a small round pocket in the ground

What was the womens record time in 1960?


What was the time of the first Olympic record in the mens 100 meter sprint?
In what year was the womens time around 11 5 seconds?
How many years did the 1968 mens record last?
What is the fastest Olympic time for women?
By approximately how much did the mens record decrease between 1896
and 1900?

Book 21 LEsson 1

Guide words are located at the top of a dictionary page. They show the first and the
last words on the page.

EXERCISE A

Write the guide words. Use the glossary in Appendix A, Part 2.


Left guide word

Book 21 Lesson 1

Semi-technical texts and


graphic organizers such as
diagrams, charts, graphs,
etc., are introduced in
Level IV.

Right guide word

1 fatal
2 disappoint

Reading

3 someday
4 stay away from
Reading tim

5 bite

1:00

6 lenient

1:10
1:20

Book 19 Lesson 1
To promote self-directed
learning, students are
exposed to selective
dictionary skills.

Words / Min
330
287
251

1:30
AmERiCAn
LAnguAgE
222 CouRsE
1:40
200
1:50
182
2:00
167
2:10
154
2:20
143
2:30
134
2:40
125
2:50
118
3:00
111
3:10
105
3:20
99
3:30
94
3:40
90
3:50
86
4:00
82
4:10
79
4:20
76

Lesson 1

SCORE PE
R LESSON
Lesson 2
Lesson 3

B23L1 #2

Less
pages 29, 55 ons 1-4
, 85
Reading rat , 111
e chart
Lesson 4

Book 23
Lesson 1
In addition to
lengthening
timed readings,
the means to calculate and chart
reading speed
are presented.

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

83

First Printing 2011

7 ALC Skills: Writing skills progression


Writing in Level I
Students learn the fundamentals of good writing in English, from spelling and sentence punctuation to basic paragraph organization. Such skills
provide the foundation for the writing assignments in future lessons.

Book 5
Lesson 1
Writing

Book 6
Lesson 2

Skills

Listen to a paragraph. Then write the paragraph with capital letters and punctuation.

Writing

robert hurt his leg at a soccer game he didnt go to the doctor the next day his
Completing a box outline
leg was very sore he went to bed and took medicine the next day his leg was very
sore again then robert went to the doctor his leg is well now
Read each paragraph and complete the outline.

Robert hurt his leg at a soccer game. He didnt go to the doctor. The

Many families in the US eat three meals a day. These are breakfast, lunch,

and dinner. For breakfast, a lot of families have toast, eggs, or fruit. For lunch, they
next day, his leg was very sore. He went to bed and took medicine. The next
have a sandwich, soup, or a salad. For dinner, many families have meat and a
day, his leg was very sore again. Then Robert went to the doctor. His legvegetable. Some families have dessert after dinner.

is well now.

Meals

EXERCISE A

Listen and fill in the blanks.

Ted went to the doctor last ____________.


He had a ____________
throat. His
week
sore
head ____________.
He was ____________.
The doctor looked at his ____________.
hurt
sick
throat
the medicine and went to bed.
The doctor gave Ted ____________.
medicine Ted____________
took
throat ____________
Now he is ____________.His
well
doesnt hurt.

breakfast

lunch

toast

sandwich

meat

eggs

soup

vegetables

fruit

salad

dessert

dinner

A restaurant menu has many different foods. You can choose what you like
from these foods. For soup you can order chicken soup, vegetable soup, or tomato
soup. For meat you can order beef, chicken, or lamb. For vegetables you can order
I learned many things in class today. First, we learned about parts
of
carrots, green beans, or corn.

EXERCISE B

Listen and write the paragraph.

the body. Second, we said the new words. Next, we asked and answered

Menu

questions. Then, we studied ordinal numbers. Last, we read and wrote.


soup

Early exposure to organized writing

BOOK 5 LESSON 1

23

Students move from punctuating sentences to entire paragraphs in the first level. Cloze activities,
BOOK 6 LESSON 2
dictation, and outlining, as shown here, allow
students to work with models of well-organized
writing early in their English studies.

84

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

meat

vegetables
carrots

chicken

beef

tomato

lamb

corn

vegetable

chicken

green beans

47

First Printing 2011

7 ALC Skills: Writing skills progression


Writing in Level II
Students gain more experience with paragraph organization through objectives which
focus on sequencing, using connectives, and taking notes. Semi-controlled exercises
allow students to work with and put together simple models of organized writing.

Book 9
Lesson 3
Writing

Book 10
Lesson 4

Writing paragraphs

Match the phrases to form sentences. Write a paragraph with the sentences. The first sentence
is done for you.

1.

Writing

Dear Annie,

1. My wife got a lot of money

a. a big TV.

Writing a paragraph

Read the paragraph first. Then, rewrite it by adding one item from each numbered column to
the space with the same number. Not all choices are correct.

2. I want to buy

b. how we spend the money?

3. She wants to go

c. for her birthday.

4. Who should choose

traffic
d. on a trip to Hawaii. business
company
Guessing Husband

My wife got a lot of money for her birthday. I want to buy a big TV.

jobs
adults
occupations

fun
green
interesting

opened
started
enjoyed

back
trunk
wheel

excited
famous
popular

Starting an Ice Cream Business

She wants to go on a trip to Hawaii. Who should choose how we spend

Ben and Jerry started making ice cream many years ago. They started their 1
because they werent happy with their 2 , or the work they were doing. They wanted
to do something that was 3 . With a little money from their savings accounts, and
some money that they borrowed, they 4 an ice cream shop. Their ice cream business
started small. At first, they sold their ice cream from the 5 of Bens car. But in just a
few years, Ben and Jerry were selling their ice cream all over the country. Today,
Ben & Jerrys * ice cream is very 6 in the US.

the money?

2.

Dear Husband,

1. First, you should remember

a. both of these things.

2. Then, check how much

b. its your wifes money.

3. You could try to do

c. which one to do first.

4. Your wife should choose

d. the two things cost.


Annie Avis

First, you should remember its your wifes money. Then, check how much
the two things cost. You could try to do both of these things. Your wife
should choose which one to do first.

63

BOOK 9 LESSON 3

BOOK 10 LESSON 4

105

Putting paragraphs together


In these examples, students grapple with
meaning at the sentence level to construct
cohesive and logical paragraphs.

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

85

First Printing 2011

7 ALC Skills: Writing skills progression


Writing in Level III
As students begin more creative and expansive writing assignments, the elements of good writing are illustrated in sample
paragraphs and related readings. Objectives include taking written
messages, taking notes in outlines, editing for tense changes, paraphrasing, summarizing, and writing original paragraphs.

Book 14
Lesson 1
Writing

Working with paraphrases

Book 18
Lesson 2

How is a paraphrase different from a summary? How is it the same?


In a summary ...

In a paraphrase ...

you give the main idea


and the most important
information from the text.
your text is shorter than
the original.
you dont show your opinion.

you rewrite all of the


Organizing a text using a visual map
information in your own
words.
same
your text is about the
Listen
to a text. Then complete the flowchart.
length as the original.
you
dont
show
your
opinion.

Example:

Writing

Arrive early
The US Coast Guard
The US Coast Guard is the smallest of all of the armed forces. Since
it began in 1790, it has been important for the safety of US coasts, the
ocean waters near land. Coast Guard personnel help people who fall out of
their boats or get stuck on the water during bad weather. They also help
keep water animals safe from danger. When ships or boats have large leaks
or fail to operate, the Coast Guard is also there to help. The Coast GuardPaper
is
ticket
a small part of the military, but it guards the coasts of the US in many
important ways.

Summary
The US Coast Guard is the smallest armed force, but it is very
important. It began in 1790. The Coast Guard helps people and water
animals that are in danger. They also help ships and boats that have
problems.

Stand in line
for an agent

Paraphrase
The US Coast Guard began in 1790. It is the smallest of the armed
services, but it is very important. The Coast Guard keeps the US coasts safe
from danger. It is there to help when boats or ships have leaks or do not
operate well. Another job for the Coast Guard is to give help to people who
are having problems with their boats. Finally, the Coast Guard can help
keep water animals safe. These are some of the many ways that the Coast
Guard is an important part of the US military.

Creating original paragraphs


BOOK 14 LESSON 1

Classroom discussion and analysis, graphic


organizers, and style reminders (demonstrated here) and step-by-step processes
(see p. 37) serve as guides to help students
42
begin to organize their own writing.

86

get
boarding
pass

31

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

E-ticket

Go to a special machine

Check in baggage

Go through security
control

Go to the gate
and wait

AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

First Printing 2011

7 ALC Skills: Writing skills progression


Writing in Level IV
A large variety of writing activities combined with reading activities enhance students ability
to write cohesively at the paragraph level. Accordingly, students regularly work with texts to
complete note-taking and outlining tasks. Likewise, practice using the writing process (prewriting, content organization, editing, etc.) supports students improvement in writing.

Writing

Book 24 Lesson 3

Writing a paragraph from notes

Students follow pre-writing steps


by taking notes, identifying a
specific topic, and organizing
their notes into an outline.

Examine the sample notes, outline, and paragraph.


Sample:

Step i. chose a topic and write notes.

NOTES:

EXERCISE
Sample:
You might
not use all of
your notes,
but you might
also think of
more ideas
to add as you
develop your
outline and
paragraph.

Sample:

Pick a topic, write notes, and organize them into an outline.

Write your paragraph in the homework pages for Lesson 3.


Step ii. Organize your notes into an outline with a more
precise topic.
I. Chose a topic and write notes.

NOTES:

Step iii. write a paragraph with a main idea sentence


from the outline.
Organize your notes into an outline with a more precise topic.
Owls are birds with three characteristics that make themII.excellent

night hunters. First, they have unusually good night vision, which
Topic:
is due to their large eyes. Next, they have excellent hearing, which
permits them to precisely locate whatever theyre hunting in the
dark. Finally, their feathers have special shapes and dark colors;
therefore, owls can fly silently and are almost invisible.
90

Samples
are provided
before students are asked to
write their own notes, outline,
and paragraph.

AmERiCAn LAnguAgE CouRsE

III. Write a main idea sentence. Then, use the supporting details from the outline
to write a paragraph (Exercise K in Homework).

Book 24 LEsson 3

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

91

87

First Printing 2011

NOTES

88

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

First Printing 2011

8
ALC Functions
Overview & objectives
Progression by level

89

First Printing 2011

8 ALC Functions: Overview & objectives


Function Overview
Functions are what people do by means of the language, such as asking permission,
apologizing, declining, etc. Each lesson contains one function, which requires students
to recall and combine the vocabulary, grammar, and/or skills of the lesson in order to
communicate in real-life settings. Additionally, many of the exercises which support
functions are similar to certain tasks required in the oral proficiency interview (OPI).

FUNCTION

Dialogs

Talking about travel plans


Mary:

Beth, where are you going on vacation?

Beth:

Well, we were going to go to Florida to see


my brother, but hes going to be out of town.

Lt May:
Lt Dean:
Lt May:
Lt Dean:
Lt May:
Lt Dean:
Lt May:

EXERCISE A

Mary:

Are you postponing the trip?

Beth:

No, were thinking about going to San


Francisco for a few weeks instead.

Mary:

San Franciscos a beautiful city. I was there


last year.

*
Lt Dean:

OBJECTIVE: Inquire about and express


present and unfulfilled past intention
about travel plans.

ask if a friend announced plans for a trip


or just received travel orders. Circulate
to assist as necessary. Possible questions
are provided below.

Someone told me you got orders to Japan.


Thats right. Im leaving in a month.
Will your family be able to go with you?

As a class, have groups share their


questions. Elicit corrections for
question-word order, vocabulary, and
spelling. Put students in pairs to have
them practice asking the questions they
just made. To conclude, talk about the
places they wanted to go and why.

No, not immediately. Theyll leave as soon as


I find an apartment.
How long is your assignment?
Three years.
Thats a long time! Are you looking forward to it?
You bet. Its our first trip overseas. My wife and the kids are excited.

EXERCISE A

Write questions that ask about travel orders or a trip.

EXERCISE A

1. Where

2. Were you going to

3. When

4. What

5. How long

6. Will you

7. Are you

As with
all other ALC objectives, functions
81
BOOK 15 LESSON 3
usually have an activator as part of the presenanswer
the following comprehension
tation.Presentation
Model dialogs and exercises
provide
questions:
Thesewith
2 dialogs
provide
models for they will need
students
the
expressions
Where was Beth going to travel?
asking and answering questions about
to successfully
functions(Florida)
both in
travel plans. Theaccomplish
1st is a conversation
between 2 friends who discuss a change
Did she go? (No)
classroom
role-play
situations
and
in
Englishin travel plans. In the 2nd, 2 military
Why did she change her mind? (Her
officers
talk
about
ones
orders
for
an
speaking
environments.
brothers going to be out of town.)
overseas assignment.

90

Where is she going instead? (San


First read the page title aloud:
Francisco)
Talking About Travel Plans. Tell
Has Mary ever been to San
students to look at the photos to see if
Francisco? (Yes, last year)
they can identify what they show (San
Where would you like to go on
Franciscos Golden Gate Bridge and
vacation thisCOURSE
year?
historic
buildings inOF
Japan).
OVERVIEW
THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE
Let students practice this dialog
Have 2 students read the first dialog
in pairs, switching roles after the first
aloud. Randomly call on students to
reading.
BOOK 15 LESSON 3

The
function objective is
Books open
Written and oral cue
listed
onoralthe
first page of the
Written and
response
Groups,
IT,
andthenitpairs
appears next to the
In small groups, have students
main
heading
titled they
Dialogs.
brainstorm
typical questions
might

SAMPLE QUESTIONS
1. Where are you going?
2. Were you going to visit your family
in California?
3. When are you leaving?
4. What will you do there?
5. How long will you be there?
6. Will you take your family with you?
7. Are you looking forward to the
assignment?

For the second dialog follow the


procedure given for Dialog 1. To check
comprehension, ask questions such as
the following:
What are the 2 lieutenants
discussing? (Lt Mays orders)
Where will Lt May be stationed?
(Japan)
When does he leave? (In a month)
Will he be able to take his family
with him? (Yes, as soon as he finds
a house.)
How long is the assignment? (3
years)
Is Lt May looking forward to the
new assignment? (Yes)
Where would you like to be
stationed if you had the choice?
81

First Printing 2011

8 ALC Functions: Progression by level


Functions in Level I
Book 6
Lesson 2

Learning how to handle survival


topics, such as ordering food in a
restaurant, using the telephone, or
shopping for clothes, helps students
use the language in meaningful ways
right from the start. Even at this
basic level, the tasks require students
to communicate creatively and interactively to meet the objective.

Dialogs

Ordering food and drink in a restaurant

Listen and repeat these dialogs.


Dialog 1:

Dialog 2:

S1: Would you like to order now?


S2: Yes, Id like fish and French
fries, please.

S1: Would you like to order some


dessert?
S2: Yes, Id like a piece of pie.

S1: Would you like something to


drink?

S1: Im sorry. We dont have any


pie. Would you like something
else?

S2: Yes, Ill have tea.

S2: OK. Ill have some vanilla ice


cream.

S1: Anything else?


S2: Not right now. Thank you.

EXERCISE

S1: Anything else?


S2: No, nothing else, but please
bring the check right away.

Write a dialog between a server and a customer in a restaurant.

Use the menu. Practice your dialog with a partner. Perform it in front of the class.

S1:

Main dishes

Dinner Menu s
Soup

e
Beef and ric
tatoes
Beef and po
d rice
Chicken an
d vegetables
Chicken an
ench fries
Fish and Fr

4.25
4.25
4.75
3.75
4.25

1.00
1.25

Vegetable
Chicken

Salads

.75
1.25
.90

Dinner salad
Large salad
Fruit salad

cream
Vanilla ice
ice cream
Chocolate
Apple pie
Cherry Pie

.50
.75
.75
1.50

Tea
Coffee
Milk
Juice

1.25
1.25
1.50
1.50

S1:
S2:

Drinks

Desserts

S2:

S1:

48

stomers
rite your cu

order here.

d and how

Write the foo

AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

.
much it costs
Check

584

Functions with lesson vocabulary


and speaking skills
Tax
Total

Thank you..
Come back soon
49

ON 2
BOOK 6 LESS

The function of giving and taking


orders for food and drink incorporates the vocabulary of the lesson
and two speaking skills objectives:
repeating and reciting dialogs.

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

91

First Printing 2011

8 ALC Functions: Progression by level


Functions in Level II

Dialogs

Function topics expand through


the level, moving from more
complicated survival situations
to some high-frequency abstract
contexts, such as expressing and
inquiring about possibilities and
decisions.

Making small talk

Book 10
Lesson 4

Tim:

Its good to see you, Vera. How are your parents?

Vera:

Theyre fine. And hows your brother?

Tim:

Hes doing well. He just got a new job.

Vera:

Oh, really? What kind of work does he do?

Tim:

Hes a salesman. He sells computers for a big company in California.

Vera:

Thats great! Hows the weather there?

Tim:

Its beautiful. Its sunny and warm most of the time.

Vera:

Sounds wonderful. Please tell your brother hello from me.

EXERCISE A

Read the sentences with a partner.


Talking about the family

Hows the family?

EXERCISE D

Complete the short dialogs with a partner.

2.

3.

Shes fine, thanks.

I spoke with my daughter yesterday.

Did she have good news?

How are they?


swers.
tions and an
es
qu
e
th
on an airplane
B Match
Talking about the weather
EXERCISE
I see youre reading the new
son feeling?
urDallas?
yo
Hows the
weather
in
Its r?
pleasant right now.
s
ow
H
1.
business magazine.
Yes, it has some great articles.
he
d
rainy weat
u like this
Do you like
this
hot
weather?
Yes, its good weather for swimming.
do yo
ow
H
2.
h
Are you on vacation?
No, .
a job?
When will
I dont know
you havechange?
? exactly.
Doweather
3. the
e
Oh, really? What do you do?
I.
u like to do
rk would yo
of wo
nd
ki
Is it colder
here
or
in
your
country?
Its
colder
in my country.
t
ha
W
4.
f
ght.
Thats interesting.
Yes, I enjoy my work.
d me last ni
rents calle
pa
y
M
5.
a
on? occupations
rking about
at a party
Talking
e you wo
6. What ar
c
today?
ow
sn
ll
Hi, (name) . Its nice to see
Hello, (name) . Good to What
see you,
too.
k it
Im a salesperson. I sell cars.
Do you thin
7. do?
b do you
new baby?
you again.
Hows your family?
fe and the
are your wi
Hows
your
work?
Not good. Im looking for another job.
ow
H
8.
g
Theyre . I got some very good
news from my yesterday.
Oh? Whats the good news?
What kind of job do you have?
Im
u? driver.
tell ayotruck
to
ws
ne
have good
uds.
Did theyon?
What are you
Im
a truck.
a. working
Well, .
Thats great!
so many clo
erepairing
ar
e
er
th
d
cold an
ry
ve
s
it
b. Yes,
Lets get together sometime.
Okay, .
cle.
this old bicy
c. Im fixing
102
AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE
.
in line at the supermarket
ks
an
th
r,
tte
d. Hes be
w.
no
ht
rig
I think its going to rain.
Oh, no. I didnt bring my .
out of work
company.
e. No, Im
er of a big
on.
the manag
Thats too bad. Where did you park?
I didnt come by car. I came .
be
to
sit them so
e
lik
f. Id
come and vi
well. Please
en.
g
rd
in
ga
do
e
th
Really? ?
Well, .
bo
y vegetabl
g. Theyre
ather for m
Its good we
it.
d
in
m
.
.
t
h. I don
STUDENT 1

1.

EXERCISE E

your job
your family
the weather

ogs.

e short dial
C Read th
EXERCISE
Respond to information with:
ren?
are the child
1. S1: How
Thats interesting.
k.
sic
e
ar
e
S2: All thre
Thats wonderful!
ar it.
sorry to he
Thats too bad.
S1: Oh, Im

Im sorry to hear it.


I see.
Okay.
Really?
Oh?
104

I visited my parents last weekend.

STUDENT 2

Practice making small talk with people in your class.


Talk about:

Functions with lesson

?
t do you do
2. S1: Wha
paper.
ws
ne
a
n
S2: I ow
?
S1: Really

ew?
s your neph
3. S1: How
ted.
ua
ad
gr
ally
S2: He fin
AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE
t!
ea
vocabulary
andS1grammar
gr
s
at
: Th

In these examples, vocabulary aboutBOfamily


ON 4and
OK 10 LESS
jobs along with grammar (impersonal it) from
the lesson come together as students learn how
to strike up everyday conversations.

92

Fine, thank you. And yours?

Hows your wife?

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

ndon?
ather in Lo
was the we
4. S1: How
y.
da
y
er
ed ev
S2: It rain
too bad.
S1: Thats
mmer?
is hot in su
it always th
tter.
5. S1: Is
ho
s
it
es
d sometim
S2: Yes, an
y.
nt sa
S1: You do
job?
u
yo have a
6. S1: Do
right now.
out of work
Im
o,
N
:
S2
S1: I see.
103

First Printing 2011

8 ALC Functions: Progression by level


Functions in Level III
Students continue to build on and experience both concrete and abstract language topics, with the addition of discussing various types of military customs
and courtesies. Functions continue to be presented as student-centered activities.
Additionally, they provide opportunities for students to combine the language
elements they have acquired in the lesson and use them in realistic settings.

listening

Listening

skill

read
role-play or
: Listen to a
OBJECTIVE ich one speaker warns ,
wh
blems
a dialog in
danger or pro ices to
le
sib
pos
another of
from 2-4 cho
an answer
hange.
and select
about the exc
a question

Listen to a

1.

TEXT #1
g
LISTENING
are considerin
children and here are some
If you have
l,
imming poo
st,
sw
getting a
k about. Fir
thin
to
d
es
nee
ed at all tim
things you
d to be watch
en
children nee around a pool. Childr w
are
when they
they dont kno
pool even if
a
er
have a
ent
l
wil
o, you must four feet
Als
im.
sw
ich is
how to
the pool wh
e
fence around and the fence must hav et
high or more, ice can give you a tick y
pol
best wa
the
,
a lock. Local
ally
Fin
l
doesnt.
or a fine if it n safe is to install a poo
ldre
to keep chi
alarm.

TEXT #2
ay,
LISTENING
very hot tod
going to be
fing
OK guys, its give you a quick brie
to
t.
ng
g in the hea to
so Im goi
rkin
wo
of
s
rt
on the danger outside today and sta out
are
zy, get
diz
e
First, if you
om
he or bec
ter,
get a headac cond, drink lots of wa
Se
utes. Also,
of the sun.
every 15 min
ally,
at least 1 cup take breaks often. Fin
Any
to
dont forget sodas, and heavy food.
,
avoid coffee , lets get to work!
OK
questions?

warning and

Listening to

efings

warning bri

.
for each item
rect answer

select the cor

1
warning?
topic of the
beach
g safe at the and rivers
a. stayin
ing in lakes
b. swimm and swimming pools
en
c. childr
ce is true?
ich senten
warning, wh
bly safe.
g
din to the
he is proba
2. Accor
ter a pool.
w to swim,
t know ho w to swim will still en turn six.
esn
do
ld
chi
y
ho
t know
a. If a
before the
esn
im
do
sw
o
to
wh
w
b. A child should be taught ho
en
.
c. Childr
if you
ticket or fine
y receive a
ol
3. You ma
tect your po ht
dog to pro
nig
a. use a en use your pool at
r pool
ldr
around you
b. let chi
ked fence
have a loc
ldren safe
nt
do
c.
y to keep chi
wa
st
be
the
g, what is
the briefin
4. From
I. Choose
a topic.
?
ols
ning?
around po
topic of the warUse one from
2 the box or think
im.
1. What is the
them to sw
a. Teach ol alarm.
e program
rcis
exe
an
po
s
a. star ting
b. Get a im at night.
high temperature
sw
b. working in which are healthy
c. Dont
s
c. eating food
Fire
the sun
uld get out of
r says you sho
Barbecuing
2. The speake .
if you
Taking medicine
dizzy
a. star t to feel
n medicine
b. have take
Riding a bicycle
et stomach
c. have an ups
n you are
you drink whe
h water should
3. How muc ide in high temperatures?
working outs
What is the

Book 18
Lesson 2

Dialogs

utes
Write
15 min
ryII.
a. 1 cup eve
day
b. 15 cups per h hour
eac
ons
gall
5
c.

Giving warnings

of your own. Write it in the topic box below.

Guns
Exercising
Driving a motorcycle
Lifting heavy things

down your ideas.

RSE
GUAGE COU

AMERICAN LAN
58

Dont
Never
You shouldnt
Its dangerous to

Functions
with various skills
Presentation
on continues

is presentati

with the
ng texts

Th
listeni
rnings. The
ed to serve
theme of wa use
Students
of lanendvariety
ses are inta
t
in these exerci warning briefings tha
the
as models for e in the Dialog section
l giv
wil
guage
skills
to
accomplish
the
ts
den
stu
e.
on the next pag
t set of
to read the firs a normal
ts
den
stu
l
function
ofen reagiving
warnings in
Tel
d Text #1 at
questions. Th Repeat when checking
of speech.
ary.
theseratanseexamples.
Students
first
wers if necess
set of
1 for the 2nd
Repeat Step
t #2.
Texof
hear que
models
military briefstions using
ings in the preceding listening
skill objective,
above. Then
58
they practice other skills, such
as organizing ideas and writing
in the Dialogs section. Finally,
they listen to their classmates
original oral briefings and give
one of their own.

Boating
Electricity
Using power tools
Travelling overseas

Topic:

Cutting
grass

Look out for


Watch out for
Be careful with

touch the blade


let children use
the equipment

rocks

wear shoes
AgE CouRsE
iCAn LAngu

AmER

Always
Its best to
Be sure to
You should

put pets inside


use the equipment
properly

III. Prepare a short oral briefing using your ideas.

BOOK 18 LESSON 2

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

59

93

First Printing 2011

8 ALC Functions: Progression by level


Dialogs

The cause of Kens accident


Ken and Abby were walking and discussing their homework one day Ken thought
Abby was such a pretty girl that he couldnt
look away from her He was so interested in
their conversation that he didnt pay attention to where he was walking As a result, he
walked straight into a telephone pole Because hed been looking only at Abby, Ken
didnt see the pole He felt stupid, so he acted
like nothing had happened Abby laughed
gently and said, If you watch where youre
going, youll avoid a lot of accidents

EXERCISE A

Use the story above and fill in the missing cause or effect.
Cause

Effect

Functions in Level IV
Function activities incorporate the
various components of the book
(grammar, vocabulary, and skills)
and give students opportunities to
practice using these components in
a communicative way. Situations are
mostly related to general English,
although some are more militaryrelated, such as identifying the parts
of a handgun (Book 22, Lesson 4).

1 Abby was such a pretty girl that

he didnt pay attention to where he was


walking

3 He didnt pay attention to where he


was walking As a result,

EXERCISE B

Match cards to make cause and effect sentences.

Use two white cards and one gray card for each new sentence. Pay attention to punctuation.

Ken didnt see the pole

EXAMPLE:

5 He felt stupid, so

youll avoid a lot of accidents

54

ter
of wa g
lenty
ing p t for stayin
k
in
r
D
n
porta
is im healthy

Therefore,

docto
that p rs recomm
eople
end
glasse drink eigh
t
s a da
y

AmERiCAn LAnguAgE CouRsE

EXERCISE C

Write down three important events in your life.

Then think of the cause or effect of these events. Take turns sharing this information with a
partner.

Book 21 Lesson 2
For this function objective, students
manipulate various grammar
structures to express cause
and effect. The final activity is
personalized in that students are
asked to list three events from their
lives and discuss the cause or effect
of each with a partner.

Life Events
1.

When I was 18,


I wasnt sure what career I
should start As a result, my
parents told me to join the
military

2.

3.

Book 21 LEsson 2

94

EXAMPLE: I joined the military.

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

55

First Printing 2011

Appendices
A: Contents of the Indexes for the ALC (789)
B: ALC materials chart
C: Scope & sequence charts
D: ALC revision information
E: ALC terminal objectives

95

First Printing 2011

NOTES

96

OVERVIEW OF THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE

First Printing 2011

Appendix A: Contents of the Indexes for the ALC (789)


The updated Indexes for the
ALC, 1st and 2nd Editions, is
published on a CD in PDF
format (readable with Adobe
Acrobat).

The reference material in the Indexes for the ALC (also referred to as
the 789) is designed to assist ESL/EFL managers and instructors in
the administration of their programs which use the ALC. The indexes,
descriptions, summaries, and glossaries in the Indexes serve as useful
tools for identifying, locating, and focusing on various topics of
instruction quickly and efficiently.
The Level descriptions and Summary of book objectives sections
help instructors assess the expected competency level of students upon
completion of a particular level or book. In addition, the summaries
provide a brief overview of each book. By using this information,
instructors can find out what students have already studied and make
advance preparation for lessons to come. This handy listing is also
useful for locating remediation or enrichment material for students.
The Military themes index provides instructors with the location of
terminology unique to the military context.
The Function index provides the location of useful expressions and
language tasks used to communicate particular aspects of language
functions. Some of the functions parallel tasks required in the oral
proficiency interview (OPI).
The Vocabulary index lists all of the vocabulary used in the course
in alphabetical order and identifies the terms as either recognition
or objective. Each entry also contains the part of speech and a short
definition as well as the book and lesson number of its first appearance.
Symbols and affixes presented in the ALC also appear in this index.
The Grammar index is a structure list containing major classifications,
such as, nouns, pronouns, adjectives, etc., as well as designations for
linking verbs, modals, expressions, and contractions. These listings
are often followed by subdivisions which include the linguistic use or
meaning of the structure.
The Skill index lists the terminal objectives of the course and identifies
the location of every enabling skills objective which supports a
particular terminal objective. This information can be useful in assisting
entry students who are placed mid-level in the course and also for those
preparing for a performance test.
The Glossary of terms in the skill objectives provides definitions and
examples for many of the language-learning terms used in the ALC.

Overview of the American Language Course

97

First Printing 2011

NOTES

98

Overview of the American Language Course

First Printing 2011

Appendix B: ALC materials chart

Indexes for the ALC,


1st & 2nd Ed. (789) on CD

Book Quiz Kits

Flash cards

Homework and Evaluation


Exercises Booklet

Skills Assessment Kits (SAK)

Interactive Multimedia
Instruction (IMI)

LLA audio CDs

Language Laboratory
Activities Text (LLAT)

Student Text (ST)

Instructor Text (IT)

Books
16
Books
Level II
712
Books
Level III
1318
Books
Level IV
1924
Books
Level V
2530

Level I

Video Activities (DVDs) with


Instructor & Student Guides

ALC Materials* Available by Level

Included in Level Starter Packages

Can be ordered separately

* Further information on ALC materials can be found in the DLIELC catalog, which is also
published online at http://www.dlielc.edu/.

Overview of the American Language Course

99

First Printing 2011

NOTES

100

Overview of the American Language Course

First Printing 2011

This appendix includes each of the scope


& sequence charts for the second edition
books, Levels IIV. These charts outline
the objectives for each lesson. The
information allows instructors to quickly
find out what students have previously
studied or what material is coming up in
future books.

Scope and Sequence Reference


Books 124

101

First Printing 2011

ALC Book 1: Scope and Sequence, Lessons 1 5


Lesson

Vocabulary

The classroom
Vocabulary for the
classroom
Numbers 0 - 20
Alphabet A - G

Bob's a barber.
Talking about jobs
Numbers 21 - 100
Alphabet H - P
Spelling names and
words

Functions

Greeting and leavetaking


Introducing yourself
or someone else
Asking about
classroom items

Introductions
Asking the names of
other people

Is he a teacher?

American money
Alphabet Q - Z

Today is Thursday.

The time of day


Days of the week

Asking for and giving


personal data

Asking for the time


and the day of the
week

Grammatical Structures

This is a (noun).
It's a (noun).
my/your
this/that
What's this?
What's that?
What's your name?
I/you
his/her
plurals
these/those
What are these?
What are those?
What's his name?

Pronouns: he, she,


they, we, you
Negative sentences
Yes/no questions
Short answers

Yes/no questions
Long answers
Time preposition: at

Skills

Responding to
commands and
requests
Identifying syllables
Mimicking word and
sentence intonation

Responding to
negative commands
Identifying syllables
Mimicking sentence
intonation

Identifying syllables
Mimicking sentence
intonation

Identifying syllables
Identifying word
stress patterns

Place prepositions
On
In
Under

Review
Lesson 5 reviews all vocabulary and structures introduced in Lessons 1 - 4.

ii

102

american Language course

First Printing 2011

ALC Book 2: Scope and Sequence, Lessons 1 5


Lesson

Vocabulary

My family is big.

Family members
Numbers 101-999

Whose office is
this?
Buildings and
facilities on
military bases
Numbers 1,000
and above

Are you studying?

Food and drinks

It's time for lunch.

Functions

Introducing family
and friends
Describing families
Making suggestions
with Let's...

Asking for directions


and information
Using expressions
Please, Thank You,
Excuse me

Making suggestions
Ordering food from
a menu

Making suggestions
with Let's...
Money and prices
Using expressions
Numbers above
Thank you, You're
500,000
welcome
Talking about time
Expressing gratitude
It's time for...
Talking about prices

Grammatical Structures

Regular and
irregular plurals
Predicate adjectives
in sentences and
questions
Conjunctions and, or

Possessive
adjectives our, your,
their
Questions about
possessionswhose
Questions about
locationwhere

Present progressive
Indefinite articles a,
an

Present tense
questions with Who
Present progressive
questions with Who,
What, Where

Skills

Hearing and saying /z/


Counting syllables
Identifying word stress
patterns
Mimicking sentence
intonation
Recognizing letters
Reading a family tree

Distinguishing the
sounds /s/ and /z/
Identifying plural /s/
and /z/
Identifying word stress
patterns
Recognizing letters
and whole words
Scanning schedules
Classifying foods

Identifying word stress


patterns
Distinguishing the
sounds /s/ and /z/
Counting syllables in
singular and plural
nouns
Mimicking sentence
intonation
Scanning a menu
Classifying foods
Practicing stress in
compound nouns

Identifying word stress


patterns
Marking primary word
stress
Scanning schedules
Identifying phrase
stress patterns
Practice using plural
/s/, /z/, and /z/

Review
Lesson 5 reviews all vocabulary and structures introduced in Lessons 1 - 4.

ii

american Language course

103

First Printing 2011

ALC Book 3: Scope and Sequence, Lessons 1 5


Lesson

Vocabulary

He gets up early.
Student life
Daily activities
Parts of the day
Talking about food for
different meals

Taking a train
Studying English at
DLIELC
Making travel plans

Where are you from?


Countries
Months of the year
Time and schedules
Test taking

Functions

Talking about daily


routines
Making plans
Stating food
preferences

Military and civilian


personnel

Seeking information
and responding to
questions about
travel
Talking about habits
Talking about
languages

Making small talk


Talking about the
past

Im in the Army now.

Grammatical Structures

Getting to know each


other
Expressing future
intentions with want

Simple present tense


for regular verbs
Affirmative
and negative
statements
Yes/no questions
Long and short
answers

Simple present tense


for regular verbs
Who, what, where,
when questions
Yes/no questions
Adverbs of frequency

Simple past tense for


BE
Affirmative
and negative
statements
Yes/no questions
Long and short
answers
How many + BE
How many + verb

Simple past tense for


information questions
with BE
Want + infinitive
Affirmative
and negative
statements
Yes/no questions
Long and short
answers
Descriptive
adjectives

Skills

Identifying stress and


intonation patterns
Identifying categories
and items
Alphabetizing
rd
Pronouncing the 3 person present tense
markers /s/, /z/, and
/z/

Reading a travel
schedule
Identifying stress and
intonation patterns
Using questionnaires
Identifying categories
and items
Alphabetizing
Pronouncing names
of languages

Identifying stress and


intonation patterns
Recognizing words
Identifying categories
and items
Pronouncing,
discriminating, and
writing words with the
// sound

Identifying stress
patterns
Pronouncing and
discriminating words
with the // and //
sounds
Recognizing words
Identifying categories
and items
Completing a
dictation and cloze
exercise

Review
Lesson 5 reviews all vocabulary and structures introduced in Lessons 1 - 4.

ii

104

american Language course

First Printing 2011

ALC Book 4: Scope and Sequence, Lessons 1 5


Lesson

Vocabulary

Sports and games

Sports and games


Leisure activities

He's in the Army now.

Functions

Talking about sports,


games, and teams
Inviting someone to
play sports

Military personnel,
ranks, and insignia
Military time the
24-hour clock

Where are my clothes?

Clothes
Punctuation marks

Pencils in 10 colors
Colors
Seasons
Music
Shopping

ii

Requesting and
giving information
about past actions/
conditions

Asking for permission


with may and can

Shopping for clothes;


asking about clothes,
colors, and prices

Grammatical Structures

Simple past tense for


regular verbs
Affirmative
and negative
statements
Yes/no questions
Long and short
answers

Simple past tense for


irregular verbs
Yes/no questions
Information
questions

Modals
Ability with can
Permission with
may and can
Requirement or
necessity with must
Prohibition with
must not

Information questions
using What + (noun)
How much...?
Demonstrative
adjectives this, that,
these, those

Skills

Pronouncing the past


tense marker -ed
Identifying primary
syllable stress
Scanning for 1
identical word
Scanning a chart for
information
Making a graph
Taking notes/dictation

Scanning for 1
identical word, timed
Scanning for 2
identical words, timed
Identifying primary
syllable stress
Categorizing words
Making a time line

Alphabetizing words
Identifying primary
syllable stress
Identifying thought
groups
Using capitalization
Punctuating
sentences and
paragraphs

Scanning for 1
identical word, timed
Scanning for 2
identical words, timed
Alphabetizing words
Identifying primary
syllable stress
Pronouncing the
reduced syllable
Punctuating a
paragraph

Review
Lesson 5 reviews all vocabulary and structures introduced in Lessons 1 - 4.

american Language course

105

First Printing 2011

ALC Book 5: Scope and Sequence, Lessons 1 5


Lesson

Vocabulary

Whats wrong?

Functions

The body
Ordinal numbers1st
to 12th
Datesmonth, day,
year

Describing physical
discomfort

Where can I get


shampoo?

Things in the
bathroom
Ordinal numbers13th
to 100th
Morning activities

Ill take a trip.



Travel by air
Future expressions

Ill buy a gallon of milk.


Vegetables
Quantities of food

Review

ii

106

Expressing needs
Suggesting ways to
satisfy needs

Making airline
reservations

Making predictions
with will

Grammatical Structures

Information questions
using which
Pronoun one(s) in
place of noun(s)
Nouns, pronouns,
verbs, and adjectives
connected with or

There + be
Quantifiers some and
any
Possibility with can
Quantifiers a lot of,
lots of, a few, and a
little

Future with will

Skills

Labeling a diagram
Following instructions
Identifying stress
patterns
Timed scanning for
specific information
Punctuating a
paragraph
Dictation

Identifying stress
patterns
Timed scanning for
specific information,
identical phrases, or
synonyms and
antonyms
Determining topic of
paragraph
Alphabetizing words

Following and giving


instructions
Determining the true
statement
Timed scanning for
specific information
Alphabetizing words

Indefinite articles a
and an, definite article
the
Quantifiers many and
much
Questions about
quantity with how
many and how much
Necessity with have
to

Following and giving


instructions
Identifying stress
patterns
Determining the true
statement
Determining topic of
paragraph
Timed scanning for
specific information,
identical phrases, or
synonyms and
antonyms

Lesson 5 reviews all vocabulary and structures introduced in Lessons 1 - 4.

american Language course

First Printing 2011

ALC Book 6: Scope and Sequence, Lessons 1 5


Lesson

Vocabulary

How's the weather?

Functions

Different kinds of
weather
Scoring high on a
test for a good
grade

Taking a trip
Traveling
Vehicles and other
modes of
transportation
Ordering food and
drinks in a
restaurant

Sending mail
Mailing letters and
packages at the
post office
Cashing a check
at the bank
Purchasing a
money order

Let's take a vacation.


Taking a vacation
Sightseeing
Taking pictures
with a camera

Review

ii

Using I think (that)


to make predictions

Giving and taking


orders for food
and drink

Asking for and


giving directions
Indicating location
as a point of
reference before
giving directions

Asking for and


giving reasons for
actions or behavior
Talking about
vacations

Grammatical Structures

Questions with How + BE


Sentences with that +
noun clause as a direct
object after think
Affirmative and
negative statements
Yes/no questions
Information questions

Questions regarding
means of transportation
using How + action verb
Sentences using the
modal construction would
like(to)
Affirmative and
negative statements
Yes/no questions
Information questions
The indefinite pronouns
something, anything,
nothing

Sentences having an
indirect object
Affirmative and
negative statements
Yes/no questions
Information questions
Using also to connect
independent clauses

The conjunctions and to


connect like statements
and but to connect
contrasting statements
Affirmative Whyquestions and responses
beginning with because

Skills

Mark stress in a sentence


Listen for numbers
Repeat and recite a dialog
Scan for specific, detailed
information
Write dictated sentences
Complete a box outline
Punctuate a paragraph

Listen for numbers


Mark questions answered
by an orally delivered text
Repeat and recite a
dialog
Identify a paragraph topic
Mark the incorrectly
grouped word
Take notes using a box
outline
Punctuate a paragraph

Mark stress in a
sentence
Mark questions
answered by an orally
delivered text
Repeat and recite a
dialog
Identify a paragraph topic
Giving and following
instructions

Mark stress in a sentence


Mark questions answered
by an orally delivered text
Repeat and recite a
dialog
Alphabetize words
Identify a paragraph topic
Mark the incorrectly
grouped word
Mark the identical phrase

Lesson 5 reviews all vocabulary and structures introduced in Lessons 1 - 4.

american Language course

107

First Printing 2011

ALC Book 7: Scope and Sequence, Lessons 1 5


Vocabulary

Lesson

Shapes and lines

Functions

Comparing and
contrasting
Describing people,
places, and things

Understanding math

Solving math
problems
Describing parts
of a circle

American homes

A house outside
the city
An older home

Inside the house


An American living
room
In the kitchen
Adverbs of
frequency

ii

108

Describe people
and objects and
elicit descriptions

Compare and
contrast people,
places, and objects

Address a postcard
and describe a
vacation on the
card

Describe and ask


about the purpose
of specific objects
and devices

Grammatical Structures

Descriptive adjectives
preceding nouns
Indefinite adjectives
both and other

Comparative form of
adjectives -er + (than)
Indefinite pronouns
some and any
Indefinite pronouns
both and other

Questions with How


old + BE + noun or
pronoun
Superlative form of
adjectives -est

Express purpose
with Use (+ noun
or pronoun) for (+
gerund) and Use (+
noun or pronoun) to

Skills

Select information not


heard in a text
Repeat and recite a
dialog
Identify and supply
pronoun referents
Read a text by thought
groups
Complete a box outline
Write a paragraph from
a substitution table

Follow oral instructions


to draw shapes
Identify and supply
contextual referents
Identify the main idea
and topic of a paragraph

Repeat and recite a


dialog
Read a text by thought
groups
Read and follow
sequenced instructions
Supply pronoun and
contextual referents

Select information not


heard in a text
Supply pronoun and
contextual referents
Identify the main idea
and topic of a paragraph
Read and follow
sequenced instructions
Complete a box outline
Write a paragraph from
a substitution table

Review
Lesson 5 reviews all vocabulary and structures introduced in Lessons 1 - 4.

american Language course

First Printing 2011

ALC Book 8: Scope and Sequence, Lessons 1 5


Lesson

Vocabulary

Getting directions

Functions

The 4 directions
Giving directions
Measuring the
temperature

Give directions
using a city or state
map

Lets get in shape!

Getting in shape
Having fun in your
free time
Adjectives and their
opposites

Using the phone

A long distance call


Using the phone
book
Using a pay phone

Clarify ownership
using possessive
forms of nouns,
pronouns, and
adjectives

Ask for and give


help using the
telephone

Leave a message
Calling about an
apartment
Renting an
apartment
Saying time before
and after the hour

ii

Make and respond


to requests to
speak to someone
and have a
telephone
conversation

Grammatical Structures

Skills

Future with BE + going to


affirmative and
negative statements
Yes/no questions
Information questions
Comparative adjectives
better/worse (than) and
superlative adjectives
the best/worst

Present active infinitive


as direct object after
begin, forget, learn,
like, need, remember,
start, try, want
Possessive pronouns
mine, yours, hers, his,
ours, theirs

Follow oral and written


directions on a map
Repeat a dialog
Select the inference
Identify main idea and
write the topic of a text
Complete a box outline
from an oral text
Punctuate a paragraph
Write a logically
sequenced paragraph

Comparative adjectives
with more/less +
adjective (+ than) and
superlative with the
most/least (+ adjective)
Possibility with may and
might
Whom (alternative
Who) in affirmative
information questions

Using tell + indirect


object + (THAT) noun
clause (noun clause
as direct object)
in affirmative and
negative imperatives

Follow oral and written


directions on a map
Repeat a dialog
Select the inference
Complete a box outline
from an oral text
Punctuate a paragraph
Write a logically
sequenced paragraph

Repeat a dialog
Select the inference
Follow semi-technical
written instructions
Complete a box outline
from an oral text
Punctuate a paragraph
Write a logically
sequenced paragraph

Repeat a dialog
Select the inference
Identify main idea and
write the topic of a text
Follow semi-technical
written instructions
Complete a box outline
from an oral text
Punctuate a paragraph
Write a logically
sequenced paragraph

Review
Lesson 5 reviews all vocabulary and structures introduced in Lessons 1 - 4.

american Language course

109

First Printing 2011

ALC Book 9: Scope and Sequence, Lessons 1 5


Lesson

Vocabulary

Id like to open an
account.

Functions

Conduct bank
transactions

Bank accounts and


transactions
Tastes and senses

What happened?

riving
Traffic accidents

A piece of advice

Advice and
suggestions

A Trip to New Mexico


Travel by car
Gas stations
Motels
Apologies

Ask and tell about


traffic accidents

Ask for and give


advice

Apologize and
respond to
apologies

Grammatical Structures

Skills

Present progressive for


future tense
Because to connect
clauses
Linking verbs

Fill out bank forms


dentify paragraph topics
from oral text
Complete a box outline
Write a paragraph from
matched phrases
ictation
Expand sentences
Scan for information

Past Progressive
ndirect requests and
commands with ask
and tell
Reported requests and
commands
The same, different,
similar, like, and alike

Follow directions
Report auto accidents
Expand sentences
dentify paragraph topics
from oral text
Scan for information
dentify topics, titles and
main ideas of paragraphs
Write a paragraph from
matched phrases

Should for advice


Could for suggestions
Adverbs of manner with
-ly
How in questions about
manner
Review of modals

Ask for and give advice


Write a paragraph from
matched phrases
ictation
dentify paragraph topics
from oral text
Expand sentences
Scan for information
Follow directions

Adverbial that clause for


cause or reason
Verbs of mental activity
+ that noun clause
apologize for + gerund

Scan for information


Expand sentences
Write a paragraph from
matched phrases
dentify topics, titles and
main ideas of paragraphs
dentify paragraph topics
from oral text

Review
Lesson 5 reviews all vocabulary and structures introduced in Lessons 1 - 4.

ii

110

american Language course

First Printing 2011

ALC Book 10: Scope and Sequence, Lessons 1 5


Lesson

Vocabulary

Vending machines

Using vending
machines
Problems
with vending
machines
Giving
instructions

Have you met?

Functions

Grammatical Structures

Ask for and give


instructions
on how to
use a vending
machine

How + to -infinitive after find


out, forget, know, learn,
remember, show, teach,
tell, ask
Sam knows how to swim.
Adverbial clauses of time
with after, before, until,
when, and while
BE + supposed to

Shopping
Location of
shops
Polite
introductions

Greet and
introduce
people in formal
and informal
situations

Predicate adjective +
to -infinitive: afraid, glad,
happy, pleased, ready,
sorry, upset
Were ready to go.
Verb + gerund as direct
object: begin, enjoy,
finish, like, mind, start
She enjoys singing.
Prepositions of location:
above, across (from), at,
behind, below, by, in,
in back / front of, near,
next (to), on, under

Changing a tire

A flat tire
Doing a favor

Hows the family?


Family pictures
Family trees
Occupations

Make and
respond to
polite requests

Ask and answer


informal
questions about
family, job, and
weather

Simple present for future


tense

Skills

Select topic and main idea


from oral text
Follow oral directions and
fill out map key
Carry out and give oral
instructions
Write transitionals heard
Combine 2 sentences into
an independent clause +
phrase

Circle number of syllable


with primary stress
Select topic and main idea
from oral text
Write topic and main idea
from oral text
Scan text to select answers
Complete blank form
Complete outline from
written text and box outline
Use slots to complete
paragraph
Match phrases and write
paragraph

Report / inquire about


commands and requests
with say and ask
What did the officer say?
He said to stop.

Carry out and give oral


instructions
Write transitionals heard
Scan text to write answers
Read text, write topic, main
idea, select title & summary
Complete outline from
written text and box outline
Combine 2 sentences into
an independent clause +
phrase

BE + able to

Polite requests with could,


would, can, will and
responses with can, will
and cant

Circle number of syllable


with primary stress
Scan text to write answers
Read text, write topic, main
idea, select title & summary
Use slots to complete
How far to ask about
paragraph
distance and time
Match phrases and write
required to travel
paragraph
How far is it to NY? Its 60
miles. It takes 1 hour.
Impersonal it as subject
to refer to temperature,
weather, time, and
distance

Review
Lesson 5 reviews all vocabulary and structures introduced in Lessons 1 - 4.

ii

american Language course

111

First Printing 2011

ALC Book 11: Scope and Sequence, Lessons 1 5


Lesson

Vocabulary

Medical
appointments

Making
appointments
Describing
aches, pains,
and symptoms

Functions

Grammatical Structures

Call a doctors
office to make
an appointment

Present Perfect with


BE/HAVE in statements and
yes/no questions only
Ive had a car for 5 years.
Have you been sick?
How long in questions
about duration
Present Perfect Progressive
What have you been
doing?
Ive been waiting since
1:00.

Rules of the road

Getting ready to
drive
Road signs and
rules of the road

Id like a refund.

Car problems
Dissatisfied
customers

Indefinite pronouns:
anyone, anybody, someone,
somebody, no one, nobody

Skills

Circle syllable with primary


stress
Select topic of oral text
Listen to dialog & select
inference
Read 3 sentences to
determine words meaning
Read instructions to draw
image
Write dictated paragraph

Ask for and


give information
about driver
safety

Listen to text to write topic


& main idea
Listen to complete a chart
with symbols
Linking verbs become /get +

Read text to write topic &


subject complement to show
main idea
change in condition:
I get nervous before a test. Write complex sentence by
Did he become a doctor?
combining 2 sentences
Adjective clauses with that,
which, and who

Say politely
that you arent
satisfied

Too + adjective + (for / to)


to express excessiveness
for a particular purpose
The tea is too hot for me
to drink.
Verb + infinitive of purpose
I stopped to buy some
shoes.

Read text to write topic,


main idea, and title
Read text to select
summary
Read instructions to draw
image
Write dictated paragraph

Noun + suffix -y to form


adjectives meaning full of
characterized by, or like

How was the


show?
Entertainment
on TV
Movies
Restaurants
and service

Ask for and


give opinions
about television
shows, movies,
and restaurants

Could for past ability


Reported speech with told :
Did you tell Jane that you
had her book?
Yes, I told her that I had it.

Prepositions of time:
after, at, before, for, from, in,
on, since, till, to, until

Listen to peers role play


& answer questions
Read 3 sentences to
determine words meaning
Read text to write main
idea & title
Read text to select
summary
Write complex sentence by
combining 2 sentences

Review
Lesson 5 reviews all vocabulary and structures introduced in Lessons 1 - 4.

ii

112

american Language course

First Printing 2011

ALC Book 12: Scope and Sequence, Lessons 1 5


Lesson

Vocabulary

See the USA!

Travel plans
Trips to the
beach and the
mountains

Education

Functions

Decisions about
education and
jobs

Grammatical Structures

Ask about and


If + present/future/modal
If she asks me, Ill go.
express the
effect of specified Should I go if she asks?
conditions on
Present Perfect to connect
future actions or
past with present
situations
Ive studied English for
five years.
Ive studied English since
I was a child.
Ask and talk
about decisions

Time expressions: already,


no longer, yet, anymore,
any longer, still
Present Perfect for
indefinite past
Ive been to Italy.
Have you ever cooked?
Coordinating conjunctions
so & or
It rained, so we left.
Did he go, or did
he stay?

Weve added on
to the house.

Remodeling
Getting together
Using a stereo

Hunting and
fishing
The great
outdoors
30 years ago

Listen & select phoneme


Read 3 sentences to
determine word meaning
Read text & write summary
Read paragraph, answer
oral questions, take notes,
present oral summary
Underline answers to oral
questions about text

Listen to 3 words & select


the different one
Role play with peers,
listen to others role play &
answer questions
Predict meaning from
context & select definition
Read paragraph & give
oral summary
Underline answers to oral
questions about text
Combine 2 independent
clauses

Ask for and give


statements of
possibility

Listen & select phoneme


Predict meaning from
context & select definition
Emotive adjectives from

Read text & write summary


verbs with -ed and -ing:
excite, interest, bore,
Underline answers to oral
confuse, tire, frighten
questions about text
Reported speech with say: Underline important words
and phrases in text
What did you say?
I said (that) Jane was
here.

Ask and talk


about past
routines and
conditions

Used to for past routines


and conditions

Could for possibility and


conjecture

Skills

Listen to 3 words & select


the different one
Predict meaning from
Would for past routines
context & select definition
Comparative adverbs with
Read paragraph & give
-er (than): earlier, farther,
oral summary
faster, harder, higher,
Underline important words
later, lower, nearer,
and phrases in text
slower, sooner,

Combine 2 independent
straighter
clauses

Review
Lesson 5 reviews all vocabulary and structures introduced in Lessons 1 - 4.

ii

american Language course

113

First Printing 2011

ALC Book 13: Scope and Sequence, Lessons 1 5


Lesson

Vocabulary

Were sure well


win.

Functions

Todays sports
page
Interview after a
basketball game
Coach Tom

Materials people
use

Ask about
and express
certainty and
uncertainty

Finding your size


Measuring
recruits
Coats at 50% off
She drives a hard
bargain.

Lets play ball!


Basketball in
the USA
The height
of basketball
players
Staying in shape
for sports
Comparing
US & metric
measurements

Listen & select topic


Read text & give oral
summary
Read text & write
summary

Noun adjuncts / compound


nouns
shoe shop, bookstore

Skills

Listen & select topic


Read title & list info
likely to be in its text
Read title & select info
likely to be in its text
Express certainty with
certain, positive, sure
Read title & select
followed by that-clause.
questions likely to be
answered in its text
Short superlative adverbs:
early, far, fast, hard, high, Timed reading (1 minute)
& answer 6 questions
late, low, near, slow, soon,
straight
Edit a text: Underline
changes & rewrite text

Review modals for 50%


possibility, permission, &
ability (present & past)

Recycling
materials
Shopping for
jewelry
Clothing
materials
Whats your size?

Replace that-clause with so


or not.
Will it rain? I believe so.
I hope not.

Request and
Permission with could;
deny permission
response with can & cant

Grammatical Structures

Role-play buying Separable phrasal verbs


& selling clothes I'll wake you up at 6 a.m.
& accessories
Reported speech with said
& told and the modals
may, might, can, could,
be able to
Verb + -er /-or to form
nouns meaning one who
& one which
He visits often. Hes my
favorite visitor.

Ask for and


give information
about linear
measurement

How + adjective in questions


about linear measurement,
age, weight, temperature
Simple present if clause +
present (general truths)
Simple present if clause +
imperative

Listen & write topic


Listen & select types of
info in a text
Role-play with classmates
Listen, summarize roleplay
Read title & select info
likely to be in its text
Read title & select
questions likely to be
answered in its text
Timed reading (1 minute)
& answer 6 questions

Listen & write topic


Read text & give oral
summary
Read text & write
summary
Edit a text, rewrite it, &
underline the changes

Indefinite pronouns a few,


a little, a lot, any, many,
much, none, some

Review
Lesson 5 reviews all vocabulary and structures introduced in Lessons 1 - 4.

ii

114

american Language course

First Printing 2011

ALC Book 14: Scope & Sequence, Lessons 1 5


Lesson

Vocabulary

Ranks and insignia

Functions

Military career
opportunities
Military ranks &
insignia

Farms and ranches

Farms & ranches


in the US
Growing &
harvesting apples

Grammatical Structures

Regular & irregular plural


count nouns

Skills

Ask about
& report the
identification
of people
according to
name & military
rank

Listen & select topic


Listen & select main idea
Just for recent past & soon Listen & select title
for immediate future:
Read & select topic
I have just finished.
Read & write a summary
I will soon go home.
Read & give an oral
As + adj or adv + as to
summary
express (in)equality
Timed reading (1 minute) &
Matt isnt as tall as Bob.
answer 6 questions
Future progressive tense
Complete a paraphrase
We will be leaving soon.

Ask for & give


descriptions of
places

Adverbs of degree:
extremely, quite, rather,
really, so, terribly, very

Listen & select topic


Listen & select main idea
Listen & select title
Clauses with when & where Read & select topic
Complete a paraphrase
If-clauses for present or
future probability

If-clauses for indefinite past


probability

Happy birthday to
you!

Birthdays
Birthday gifts
A surprise
birthday party
An interview with
two deans

A vacation promise
Vacation plans
Using the
Internet to plan
a trip
Flying to Seattle

Make
deductions
about the
present

Gerund used as subject or


object of preposition
Swimming is fun.
Must & must not for
deduction or probability
Sam isnt here.
He must be sick.
Modal review for necessity,
lack of necessity,
prohibition, future action
or condition, general
requests

Ask about,
clarify, & report
what someone
else has said

Ought to for giving advice

Listen & write topic


Listen & write main idea
Listen & write title
Read & write topic
Timed reading (1 minute) &
answer 6 questions
Complete a paraphrase

Listen & write main idea


Listen & write title
Reported speech with said Listen & write transitional
or told and modals will,
words
be going to, must, have
Read & write topic
to, not have to, must not
Read & write a summary
Read & give an oral
Comparative adverbs
summary
better than, worse than,
& superlative adverbs the
best, & the worst

Review
Lesson 5 reviews all vocabulary & structures introduced in Lessons 1 - 4.

ii

american Language course

115

First Printing 2011

ALC Book 15: Scope & Sequence, Lessons 1 5


Lesson

Vocabulary

Be all you can be

Functions

Basic training

Ask for & give


information
about basic
training

Grammatical Structures

Adverbs of frequency
I am always on time.

Questions with how often;


Answers with adverbs of
frequency
Comparative form more
or less + adverb &
superlative form most or
least + adverb
Adding -ion to verbs to
make nouns

Lets celebrate!

Weddings &
honeymoons
Barbecues &
parties

Extend, accept,
& decline offers
for food or drink
& invitations to
social events

Willingness with will &


would
Modal review for advice;
past repeated action,
condition, or situation;
obligation; deduction;
desire; & possibility

Skills

Listen for specific info &


answer a question
Stress & vowel reduction
Role-play a military
situation
Read & select topic
Read & select main idea
Read & give oral summary
Timed reading (1 minute) &
answer 6 questions

Read & select inference


Read & select topic
Read & select main idea
Write information in a chart
or table
Complete a paraphrase

Indefinite place or location


with somewhere,
anywhere, & nowhere

Stamp collecting

A world of
stamps
Continents
Going overseas

Medical treatment

Military sick call

Inquire about
& express past
and present
intention about
travel plans

Ask about
& describe
medical
problems &
symptoms

Was/were going to for


unfulfilled past intention
I was going to watch TV,
but I fell asleep.

Stress & vowel reduction


Read & select inference
Read & write topic
Read & write main idea
Indefinite compounds with Read & give oral summary
else
Timed reading (1 minute) &
Lets go somewhere else.
answer 6 questions
Complete a paraphrase
Reflexive pronouns
Did George hurt himself ?

Listen for specific info &


answer a question

Role-play a military
Emphatic pronouns
situation
I painted the picture
Read & write main idea
myself.
Adjective complement after Read & write topic
Write information in a chart
linking verbs
The coffee tastes strong.
Complete a paraphrase
Suffix -ly for adverbs and
adjectives
daily, weekly, nightly, etc.

Review
Lesson 5 reviews all vocabulary & structures introduced in Lessons 1 - 4.

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116

american Language course

First Printing 2011

ALC Book 16: Scope & Sequence, Lessons 1 5


Lesson

Vocabulary

Fit for life


Exercise
Diet
Relaxation

US Military customs
and courtesies

Functions

Military traditions
Rights & privileges
Senior officer ranks
and grades

Lets go to the
theater.

Entertainment
An actress and an
actor
Interviewing a
young musician

Ask for and


give advice
on health and
fitness

Grammatical Structures

It + BE + adj. / noun phrase


Its not a good idea to jog
at night.
Why dont / Why not to give
advice/suggestions

Read and write topic &


main idea
Listen & select inference
Scan to identify synonyms
Timed reading (1 minute)
& answer 6 questions
Had better for strong advice
Scan a text to complete a
Past perfect
chart

Ask for
and give
information
about military
customs and
courtesies

Present BE-passive to
express present habits

Ask about
and express
preferences

Prefer + noun/pron/gerund +
to/rather than + noun/pron/
gerund
I prefer tea to coffee.
I prefer walking to
driving.

Skills

Have got to to express


obligation or necessity
Past perfect progressive

Read and write topic &


main idea
Scan & identify synonyms
Give & take messages
Write a paraphrase
Rewrite a text in briefer
form

Read and fill in information


about a person
Read & select inference
Scan to identify synonyms
& antonyms
Timed reading (1 minute)
Prefer + to-infinitive + rather
& answer 6 questions
than + bare infinitive
Give & take messages
I prefer to swim rather
Rewrite a text in briefer
than run.
form
Would rather (than)
Id rather ski than swim.

Adjective /adverb + enough


Hes old enough to join.

Using computers
Computer
hardware
Software
Smart computers?
Smart houses

Ask about
and express
capability and
incapability

Be unable to to express
incapability
Too much / too many +
(non)count noun
There are too many cars.
Verb to noun with -tion and
-sion

Read and write topic &


main idea
Read & select inference
Scan to identify synonyms
and antonyms
Pronounce base forms
and derivatives
Write a paraphrase
Scan a text to write
information in a chart

Review
Lesson 5 reviews all vocabulary and structures introduced in Lessons 1 4.

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ALC Book 17: Scope & Sequence, Lessons 1 5


Lesson

Vocabulary

Friends
Friends
Personality traits
Mans best friend

Functions

Grammatical Structures

Make
observations
& judgements

Like + noun phrase after


linking verbs
It sounds like a good idea.
To be + adjectival /noun
phrase after linking verbs
seem & appear
He seems to be angry.
Past BE-passive
Compound pre-modifiers
(number-noun)
a two-door car

The perfect home


Renting or buying
a home
Classified ads
American
teenagers

Ask for
and give
information
about renting
a place to live

Embedded Yes/No questions


with if or whether
Do you know if the library
is open?
Embedded question word
questions
I wonder where the post
office is.

Skills

Complete an outline using


a visual map
Read and give an oral
summary
Scan a text to answer
questions
Write a paraphrase
Listen for specific
information

Take and write messages


Write a narrative paragraph
Read 5 words & select the
one not related

Verb + object + adj.


complement
I prefer my coffee black.

International support
NATO
Senior NCOs
Warrant officers
Saluting the flag

Electricity
Save money on
your electric bill
Is your home safe?
Flow of electricity
Make your own
circuit

Ask for
and give
information
about
American flag
customs

Tag questions

Practice proper intonation


Read & give an oral
summary
Complete an outline using
a visual map
Embedded questions with
Read 5 words & select the
should, could, or can
one not related
reduced to a question
Write a paraphrase
word followed by a
to-infinitive
Timed reading (1 minute) &
answer 6 questions
I dont know who I should
ask. I dont know who to Listen for specific
ask.
information

Confirm
or verify
information

Positive addition with does,


too / so does
Negative addition with
neither does / doesnt
either

Although, though, and even


though for adverb clauses
of contrast or concession

BE- passive with modals for


present and future time

Scan a text to answer


questions
Timed reading (1 minute) &
answer 6 questions
Take and write messages
Write a narrative paragraph

Adjective to verb with -en

Review
Lesson 5 reviews all vocabulary and structures introduced in Lessons 1 4.

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ALC Book 18: Scope & Sequence, Lessons 1 5


Lesson

Vocabulary

US Presidents
Becoming
president
Gerald Ford
The sciences

Weather
Extreme weather
Weather forecasts

Employment
A new job
Company policies
Point of view

Memories and story


telling
Childhood
memories
Helen Keller
Americans With
Disabilities Act

Functions

Grammatical Structures

Report
information

Listen to and
give warnings

Express
agreement
and
disagreement

Talk about
past
experiences

It + BE + adjective + (that)
Its possible that well have
a test tomorrow.
Correlative conjunctions
Justins studying both
Russian and English.
Reported questions
Bob asked if he could go.
Jan asked why they left.
Present unreal conditional
If I had money, I would buy
a ticket to the game.
Wish
I wish I had money to buy
a ticket.
BE used to
Mike is used to waking up
early for class.
Negative questions
Dont you want to go?
Why didnt Mike go?
Logical impossibility
The car cant be out of
gas!
Suffix -ness for adjectives
Suffix -ment for verbs

Perfect modals
We should have gone to
the movies.
Restrictive adjective clauses
The car that we bought
was blue.
Verb + object + to-infinitive
John advised me to speak
with the boss.

Skills

Give and receive


messages
Scan a graphic organizer
and answer questions
Read a text and organize
using a visual map
Write a summary
Timed reading (2 minutes)
& answer 6 questions

Listen to a text and


organize using a visual
map
Listen to a warning and
answer questions
Listen and give a warning
Scan a graphic organizer
and answer questions

Scan a graphic organizer


and answer questions
Use intonation patterns
Read a text and organize
using a visual map
Write a summary

Listen to a text and


organize using a visual
map
Scan a graphic organizer
and answer questions
Timed reading (2 minutes)
& answer 6 questions
Give and receive
messages

Review
Lesson 5 reviews all vocabulary and structures introduced in Lessons 1 4.

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ALC Book 19: Scope & Sequence, Lessons 1 5


Lesson

Vocabulary

The family tree

First responders

A call to duty

Coming to America

Review

Functions

Our Family
History
The generation
gap

Everyday heroes
A deadly fire
Accident
prevention

NCO academies
Training briefing
Award letter

Culture shock
An immigrants
personal journal
Volunteering to
help teenage
students

Grammatical Structures

Talking about
ownership
and
relationship

Adding -s and - to show


possession
Possessive adjectives and
pronouns
Inseparable phrasal verbs
Bob ran into an old
friend.

Express
possibility and
impossibility
about past
actions and
conditions

Perfect modals may, might,


and could have (past
possibility); must have
(deduction); couldnt
have (past impossibility)
Active causative with have,
make, and get
Indefinite adjectives and
pronouns few and little

Talk about
hypothetical
situations in
the past

If- clauses + perfect modals


for past hypothetical
situations
If I had known, I would
have helped you.
Passive causative with
have and get
Nouns and verbs to
adjectives with -able and
-ible

Talk about
regrets

Wish + past perfect


I wish I had gone with
you.
Review: too and very
Review: reported present
tenses

Skills

Listen to a text and select


the topic
Repeat a dialog with
stress on main content
words
Use dictionary guide
words
Make a graphic organizer
from an oral text
Complete a chart from a
written text

Participate in a guided
group discussion
Read a warning and
answer questions
Give an oral warning after
listening to, reading about,
or observing a situation
Write a paragraph after
pre-writing steps

Listen to a text and select


the main idea
Listen to a role-play and
answer questions
Participate in a guided
group discussion
Read a paragraph and
cross out the extraneous
sentence

Repeat a dialog with


stress on main content
words
Make a graphic organizer
from a written text
Write a paragraph after
pre-writing steps

Lesson 5 reviews all vocabulary and structures introduced in Lessons 1 4.

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ALC Book 20: Scope & Sequence, Lessons 1 5


Lesson

Vocabulary

Cooking across
America

Tony Russis
show: The
Amazing
Microwave
West Coast
ingredients
Dont forget Texas!
Microwave recipes

Moving towards
peace

Review: quantifier + of
some of / none of, etc.

The ignition
system
The fuel system
The internal
combustion
engine
The transmission
system

Automotive
Systems: Part II
The cooling
system
The lubrication
system
Buying a used car

Ask for
and give
additional
information
and
comments

Passive voice with


present / past progressive
Adverbs: where else,
when else, how else,
why else
Pronouns: who else,
whom else, what else

Review: indefinite adjective


quantifiers
We have little time.
Review: unit noun + of +
(non)count noun
a jar of pickles

Force Protection
Condition
Man of peace /
Man of war
International
peacekeeping
forces

Automotive
Systems: Part I

Ask about
and express
quantity

Review: how many / much

Grammatical Structures

Functions

Handling
everyday
problems

Volition verb + direct object


(+ to be) + past participle
I want him (to be) fired.
Verb + to be (direct object)
I want to be hired.

Reported speech: past to


past perfect

Skills

Repeat a dialog with stress


on new information
Write a paraphrase
Listen / write transitions
Write notes
Participate in discussion
Use guide words
Write answers about a
dictionary / glossary entry
Select a word to complete a
text (cloze)

Scan a graphic organizer


Repeat a dialog with stress
on new information
Participate in a discussion
Write a paraphrase
Select a word to complete
a text (cloze)
Write a paragraph after
prewriting steps

Repeat a dialog with stress


on new information
Write a summary
Write notes
Participate in a discussion
Label a diagram

Nouns / verbs to adjectives


with ive / tive

Ask about
and express
reason and
purpose

Comparative / superlative
adjective / pronoun
quantifiers
So (that) + adverb clause
of purpose
Equality / inequality with
as many / much (+ noun)
+ as

Listen / write transitions


Write answers about a
dictionary / glossary entry
Write a summary
Label a diagram
Write notes

Review: adverbs of degree:


little, less, the least,
much, more, the most

5
ii

Review
Lesson 5 reviews all vocabulary and structures introduced in Lessons 1 4.

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ALC Book 21: Scope & Sequence, Lessons 1 5


Lesson

Vocabulary

An Olympic city

Functions

Becoming an
Olympic city
River City: Home
to the Olympic
Games?
River City gets
turned down.
Helpful advertisements

In the science lab

Civilian and military justice

Ask for and


make evaluations and
comparisons

Grammatical Structures

Review: comparative and


superlative adjectives
and adverbs
Review: how + adjectives / adverbs
Reported speech: past
progressive to past
perfect progressive

The US Naval Research Laboratory


Experiment: How
do submarines
work?
Laboratory
accidents
Scuba diving
equipment

The Star oil spill


The Star oil spill
trial
Military law

Express
cause and
effect

So / such + adjective /
adverb + clause of result

Skills

Scan a graph
Scan a text
Select a summary of notes
Write a summary of notes
Write answers about a
dictionary / glossary entry
Select a word to complete
a text (cloze)
Write notes from written text
Use contrasting stress

Select a word to complete


a text (cloze)
Write notes from oral text
Review: connectives of resultthus, therefore, as Read a semi-technical text
Identify cause / effect
a result, consequently
relationships
Suffix: adjective to noun
Use contrasting stress
with -ity / -ility
Determine the correct
Present perfect passive
meaning of a word
Read and identify transitional
words

Identify and
Restrictive adjective clause
describe peowith that, which, who(m),
ple, places,
when, and where
and things
Restrictive adjective clause
with whose

Determine the meaning of a


new word through context
Read a semi-technical text
Select a summary of notes
Write a summary of notes
Present gerund as subject Write notes from written text
Use contrasting stress
after anticipatory it or
Select a word to complete
non-referential there +
a text (cloze)
BE

Past perfect passive

Military authority

Review
Lesson 5 reviews all vocabulary and structures introduced in Lessons 1 4.

ii

122

Civilian control of
the military
Army career counselors
Customer complaint: The worst
flight ever

Ask for and


give recommendations
and suggestions

Present subjunctive noun


clause

Determine the meaning of a


new word through context
Use contrasting stress
Relative clause reduced to
Select a word to complete
to-infintive phrase
a text (cloze)
Present gerund or active
Write notes from oral text
to-infintive as subject
Edit a written paragraph
complement after BE
Read a semi-technical text
Determine the correct meaning of a word
Read and identify transitional
words

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First Printing 2011

ALC Book 22: Scope & Sequence, Lessons 1 5


Lesson

Vocabulary

Heroes

Law enforcement

A weekend project

ii

Building a birdhouse
Assembling the
birdhouse
Putting the finishing touches on the
birdhouse

US military firearms
Firearms and ammunition
Going to a gun
show
Americans
opinions on gun
control

Request and
offer assistance

As if and as though to
introduce adverb clauses
Alice acts as if shes
tired.
Review: present tense
and present progressive
tense

Responding to a
call
Handling an incident
The police report:
An incident
description
Military police and
local civilian police

Firearms in
America

Grammatical Structures

Review: yes / no questions

What makes a
hero?
American Life
Magazine: Personal heroes
American Life
Magazine: Heroes
in action
Hiking safety bulletin

Functions

Nouns or noun phrases


as subject complements
after verbs of choosing
The judges named Bill
the winner.

Listen, mark, and pronounce


syllable stress changes
Write words to complete
a text (cloze)
Select referents for pronouns
Conduct interviews and present information
Answer questions about a
semi-technical text

Identify and
describe
people

Listen and select the topic


Listen and write the topic
Participate in a discussion
Select referents for pronouns
Read outline and select the
Reduce adjective clauses
summary
to adjective phrases
Write words to complete
a text (cloze)
Reduce adjective clauses
to prepositional phrases Combine sentences
Sequence modifiers before Write a paraphrase
a noun

Inquire about
and express
the purposes
of tools,
devices, and
materials

Verb DO to show emphasis


I havent met Tom, but
I do know his brother.
Suffixes: noun to adjective
with -ful and -less
Review: That noun clause
as a direct object
Peggy knew that she
would be late to work.

Skills

Identify and
GET passive
label the parts Paul got fired.
of handguns,
Reported speech: present
rifles, and
firearm equip- perfect to past perfect
ment
Modal review: can, had
better, was / were going
to, and be unable to

Listen and write main idea


Listen, mark, and pronounce
syllable stress changes
Write referents for pronouns
Read outline and select the
summary
Read outline and provide a
summary

Participate in a discussion
Write a paraphrase
Edit a text for mistakes
Listen and write main idea
Write referents for pronouns
Read outline and provide a
summary

Review
Lesson 5 reviews all vocabulary and structures introduced in Lessons 1 4.

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ALC Book 23: Scope & Sequence, Lessons 1 5


Lesson

Vocabulary

Topics in science

First aid

Using maps

124

Different maps
with different
uses
Using a compass
A race against
time
Practice for battle

Which branch of
the Army do they
belong to?
Infantry: The
queen of battle
Taking aim and
hitting the target
Artillery: The king
of battle

ii

Medical treatment
in an emergency
First aid: Treatment for shock
First aid:
Treatment for
external bleeding

Infantry and Field


Artillery

Grammatical Structures

Seek and
Present / past participle as
report informaadjective
tion
Present / past participle as
object complement after
catch / discover / find /
keep / leave
Tina left the water boiling on the stove.
Review: Information questions

Matter
States of matter
Components of
matter
The atmosphere
Experiment:
Making a barometer

Functions

Conjunctions of time to
introduce adverb clauses
of time
Now that its summer,
we can go swimming.

Read a short text and underline main ideas


Select answers to questions
about a semi-technical text
Scan a diagram / map and
select answers
Scan a diagram / map and
provide answers
Practice rising and falling intonation
Read a text, answer questions, and record reading time

Give
sequenced
instructions

Participate in a discussion
Read a text and write notes to
complete an outline
Read a text and underline the
connective words
Gerund as a noun modifier Listen to instructions and
evaluate
Theres a parking
lot around the corner.
Give instructions for an assigned topic
Second person imperative
Read a text, answer ques Go three blocks and
tions, and record reading time
turn left.

Ask for and


give locations
and directions

Suffix: nouns to adjectives


with -ern
Suffix: various parts of
speech to adjectives /
adverbs with -ward(s)
Prepositions of place and
direction
Reported speech: present
perfect progressive to
past perfect progressive

Skills

Express
expectations

Modals: ought to/ should /


should have to express
expectancy
The letter should arrive
tomorrow.
Suffixes: verbs to nouns
with -ance / -ence
Review: adverbs of degree

Address an envelope
Listen and trace a route
Write paragraphs by sequencing sentences and adding
connective words
Read a text, answer questions, and record reading time
Follow a route on a map, and
write the final destination
Scan a diagram / map and
provide answers
Listen to a text and write notes
to complete an outline

Read a text, answer questions, and record reading time


Read a text and write notes to
complete an outline
Listen to a text and write notes
to complete an outline
Listen to a role-play and
summarize the conversation

Review
Lesson 5 reviews all vocabulary and structures introduced in Lessons 1 4.

american Language course

First Printing 2011

ALC Book 24: Scope & Sequence, Lessons 1 5


Lesson

Vocabulary

Amazing buildings

Aircraft

Buildings through
time
Skyscrapers
Copper

Types of aircraft
The instrument
panel
The importance of
checklists
Interview with a
retired pilot

Talking about our


earth

Enforcing
protection of the
environment
The Greenhouse
Effect
Dangers to our
earth

A Floating Hospital
Caring for the sick
A floating hospital
arrives in Haiti
A conversation with
a USNS Comfort
surgeon
The gift of sight
from the ship's eye
surgeon
The digestive
system

5
ii

Grammatical Structures

Ask for and


give factual
information

Review: Gerunds as direct


objects
I don't enjoy singing in
front of people.

Inquire about Adjectives of importance


followed by a that noun
and express
clause
concern and
fear
Review: Tag questions

Inquire about To-infinitives as direct


and express
objects
actions,
James plans to adopt a
events, and
kitten.
conditions in
Future tense using will, be
the future
going, simple present,
and present progressive
Reported speech using
past perfect and past
perfect progressive

Skills

Listen, repeat, and select


minimal pairs
Read a semi-technical text
or military report and select
answers to questions
Reducing time clauses
Practice rising and falling
Could you walk after
intonation for questions
you fell off the horse?
Could you walk after fall- Skim a text and select
answers
ing off the horse?
Read a text and write a
Suffix: nouns / adjectives to
sentence outline
verbs with -ify
Read a text, answer questions, and record reading time

Review: Gerunds in three


sentence positions

Functions

Inquire about Review: Indefinite pronouns


and make
observations Indefinite adverbs: somewhere, someplace,
anywhere, anyplace,
nowhere, no place
Verbs of perception (see
notice, observe, etc.) +
object + bare infinitive or
present participle
I noticed the man
trying to open the door.

Read a text and write a


sentence outline
Skim a text and select
answers
Read a text, select the main
idea, and write details
Read a text, answer questions, and record reading time

Participate in a guided
discussion.
Skim a text and provide
answers
Read a text, select the main
idea, and write details
Read a text, answer questions, and record reading time
Write a paragraph from an
outline or notes

Listen, repeat, and select


minimal pairs
Skim a text and provide
answers
Read a text, answer questions, and record reading time
Read a semi-technical text
or military report and select
answers to questions
Write a paragraph from an
outline or notes

Suffixes: verbs to adjectives


with -ent/-ant

Review
Lesson 5 reviews all vocabulary and structures introduced in Lessons 1 4.

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First Printing 2011

NOTES

126

Overview of the American Language Course

First Printing 2011

Appendix D: ALC terminal objectives


Terminal objectives are the final goal for the course and are the basis for all of the enabling objectives found in ALC lessons. The Indexes for the ALC (789) lists each terminal objective along with its
numerous enabling skills objectives which occur in the ALC. All enabling vocabulary, grammar, and
function objectives are also listed in the Indexes. Below is the complete list of the ALCs 29 terminal
objectives.

Listening Skills Terminal Objectives


L1. Recognize the segmental phonemes (the sound system) and the suprasegmental phonemes
(stress, intonation, rhythm, and juncture) of standard American English when spoken in
context.
L2. Identify the main point(s) and, when required, the supporting details of an oral text.
L5. Draw inferences from oral texts.
L6. Understand conversations, both informal and military, and oral messages.
L8. Understand oral instructions (academic and technical), warnings, and announcements.
L9. Understand oral presentations, including class reports, short lectures, demonstrations, and
briefings.

Reading Skills Terminal Objectives


R1. Apply decoding skills to the reading process, including identification of letters and words,
word-attack skills, and recognition of varying types of print.
R2. Skim written material for general information and scan for specific information/details.
R3. Determine word meaning from contextual clues (graphophonic, semantic, morphological,
and syntactical).
R4. Use the dictionary to find word meanings and other information.
R5. Comprehend meaning conveyed through contextual reference.
R6. Comprehend meaning conveyed through inference.
R7. Identify the main point(s) and, when required, the supporting details of a written text.
R8. Summarize written texts.
R9. Recognize and follow paragraph structure.
R10. Improve reading efficiency through the use of speed-building strategies (i.e., time pressure,
eye movement).
R11. Apply an SQ3R-type approach to written texts. (Survey, Question, Read, Recite, Review)
R12. Derive meaning from phrases/incomplete sentences in notes, outlines, captions, labels,
standard forms, and messages.
R13. Comprehend written academic and technical instructions.
R14. Comprehend written technical and semi-technical materials (including military-format
reports), charts/tables/graphs, diagrams/maps, and warnings.
R16. Determine appropriate word from context.

Overview of the American Language Course

127

First Printing 2011

Appendix D: ALC terminal objectives


Speaking Skills Terminal Objectives
S1. Produce standard American English, including the segmental phonemes (the sound system), and basic patterns of stress, intonation, rhythm, and juncture.
S2. Participate in conversations, both informal and military, and deliver oral messages.
S3. Participate in classroom dialogs/discussions.
S4. Give oral instructions (academic and technical) and warnings.

Writing Skills Terminal Objectives


W2. Write from dictation, using semantic, morphological, and syntactical clues, along with
knowledge of the standard American English sound system.
W3. Write words, phrases, and/or short sentences to complete forms, charts/tables, and diagrams, and to produce short informal messages.
W4. Produce written notes, using an appropriate style of note taking.
W5. Write class assignments in military format, as well as the following styles: descriptive, narrative, and expository.
note:

The letter-number designators are used in the Indexes to categorize each set of enabling
skills objectives under the corresponding terminal objective. Objectives L3, L4, L7, L10, R15,
S5, S6, W1, and W6 do not occur in the ALC.

128

Overview of the American Language Course

First Printing 2011

Glossary
Abbreviations

Terms & Definitions

780 Overview of the ALC (formerly Familiarization

abstract (of vocabulary; contrast with concrete)


referring to qualities, ideas, etc., not something
which can be seen or touched: justice

with the ALC)


782 Grammar for the ALC
789 Indexes for the ALC, 1st and 2nd Editions
ALC American Language Course
ALCPT American Language Course
Placement Test
B#L# for example, B10L2 stands for Book 10
Lesson 2
DLIELC (also DLI) Defense Language Institute
English Language Center
ECL English Comprehension Level
EE evaluation exercises
EFL English as a foreign language
ESL English as a second language
FOT follow-on training
GE General English
HW homework
ILR Interagency Language Roundtable
IMI interactive multimedia instruction
IPA International Phonetic Alphabet
IT instructor text
LLA Language Laboratory Activities
NALC (also NI) Nonintensive American
Language Course
OPI oral proficiency interview
PE performance evaluation
PT performance test
SAK Skills Assessment Kit
SET Specialized English Training
ST student text

academic referring to a classroom situation


achievement test a test given at the end of a
lesson, a unit, or a course of study to measure
student mastery of the material taught, such as
ALC book quizzes

acquisition the process of gaining mastery of a


language or language components

activator visual aids, a series of questions, etc.,


used at the beginning of a lesson to stimulate
background knowledge and anticipate lesson
themes

activity any of the various drills or exercises


designed to assist in learning a second language

American Language Course (ALC) all books


produced at DLIELC, but usually referring to ALC
Books 130, which are used in General English

American Language Course Placement


Test (ALCPT) a DLIELC-produced English
language proficiency test administered by foreign
military and US personnel to determine English
language course placement and progress in foreign
military schools

Appendix J Additional lesson resources which are


located at the back of the ALC

blurb see key


caption a brief text under or above a picture which
provides information about the picture

Icons

cloze exercise a structured completion exercise

grammar bullet draws students attention to

(reading or writing) whereby the reader must


supply words which have been systematically
deleted (every fifth word, all prepositions, etc.)
from a text

important information about the target structure


indicates multiple treatments of a term in
the lesson; number indicates how many different
definitions and/or parts of speech presented

cohesive describing an organized text in which its

indicates each lesson objective listed on the first


two pages of each lesson

elements are logically connected by the ideas that


come before and after

in Level I books, indicates a flash card is


available for the term
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Glossary
collocations words and phrases that naturally
occur in combination: Sam placed an order for a
new computer. In the example, place and order are
collocated because these two words are perceived
by native speakers as having a fixed or natural
association.

derive to get or receive from a source


Dialogs ALC lesson sections in which a function
is introduced and practiced

elicitation a teaching technique in which the


instructor seeks input or answers from students
before or instead of giving them the information
directly; often suggested in the IT notes

communicative (of activities) providing


opportunities to communicate in a meaningful way

concept checking a teaching strategy of asking


directed, well-thought-out questions that push
students into the idea, meaning, and nuance behind
the target language objective

embedding the inclusion of a connective word or


phrase within an existing sentence or paragraph:
Jake is the one who answered the question.

enabling objective specifies the conditions


and behavioral standards for measuring learning
which takes place by the end of a lesson or book;
intermediate step in the attainment of a terminal
objective

concrete (of vocabulary; contrast with abstract)


referring to a real, existing object: table

connectives words that link one thought or


sentence to another: however, so, before

context any words or phrases that appear before or


after a target word and help the reader or listener
figure out its meaning; contextualize to
accompany the presentation of a new language item
with a visual, gesture, situation, personal anecdote,
story, etc., in order to enhance the meaning of the
new item and create memorable associations

controlled exercise designed to focus learners

English as a foreign language (EFL)


referring to the learning of English in a country
where it is not widely spoken, such as Japan

English as a second language (ESL)


referring to the learning of English in a country
where it is commonly spoken, such as the United
States

English Comprehension Level (ECL) a


DLIELC-produced English language proficiency
test administered by US personnel only to
determine if foreign military personnel meet the
language requirements for military training in
the US

attention on some formal aspect of language with


some room for choice and error; usually directly
following the presentation of new language
and allowing for a good chance of success and
confidence

cooperative learning a teaching strategy in

evaluation exercises (EE) may be used to check


achievement of lesson objectives; located at the
back of ALC textbooks

which students work in groups and help each other


to better understand a subject

decoding making out the meaning of spoken or

exchange the lines of dialog spoken by one person


and the response of a second person

written words; deciphering

deductive approach grammar rules are first

expository referring to a type of writing which

presented and explained and then applied to


specific examples and contexts of use

facilitative vocabulary new terms (either from

describes or explains something

Defense Language Institute English Language


Center (DLIELC also DLI) the US
Department of Defense English language training
school located at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas;
offers various ESL courses and produces ESL
textbooks

130

Overview of the American Language Course

higher books or not occurring in the ALC) which


appear in a lesson because of their natural relation
to the theme, but which are not intended to be
taught; not found on the book quiz;
note: facilitative also describes the (very limited)
use of new grammar structures which have not
been formally presented

First Printing 2011

Glossary
follow-on training (FOT) professional courses
of military training which typically follow English
instruction at DLIELC and which are conducted in
English by native speakers of the language

function any of the specific and purposeful


real-world uses of language: apologizing,
disagreeing, requesting, etc.

of English; includes courses which prepare


instructors to teach using the ALC

integrated describing an activity which requires


two or more language skills components for its
accomplishment

intensive describing any course of study


characterized by frequent intervals (usually daily)
of instruction and numerous contact hours (36) as
a means of accelerating learning

gap-fill exercise a controlled exercise in which


a term or grammatical item is chosen from among
various options and inserted in a sentence to make
it correct

interactive describing an activity which requires


students to communicate and work together

General English (GE) the English language

interactive multimedia instruction (IMI)

department at DLIELC which uses the ALC as its


main curriculum

computerized activities which reinforce content


instruction in each ALC lesson and which are
designed for easy access and self-paced learning

graphophonic referring to the relationship


between writing and sound

Interagency Language Roundtable (ILR)

high frequency referring to basic, everyday terms


or structures common to the language

Indexes for the ALC, 1st and 2nd Editions


(Indexes or 789) reference resource which

the US government body whose Language Skill


Level Descriptions serve as the standard for the
Oral Proficiency Interview and as a basis for the
terminal objectives of the ALC

contains level descriptions and indexes to


objectives in the ALC as well as a variety of
glossaries; formerly titled Indexes for Levels IV

International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) a set

inductive approach students are guided to solve

intonation the patterns of pitch changes within an

of symbols that represent the speech sounds of


languages spoken around the world

problems and discover rules based upon examples;


instructor usually starts with the presentation of
a context of use with meaningful examples, then
encourages learners to perceive the pattern found
in the examples, and finally elicits the statement of
the grammar rule

inference a conclusion reached by using reasoning


or evidence (in a text)

information gap an accuracy-building pair-work


activity in which an incomplete distribution of
information requires one learner to ask the other
for details, such as dates, locations, times, etc.

objectives, explanations, and tips found in the


margins of the instructor text

juncture the transition sound, or omission of such


a sound, between words in a spoken phrase or
sentence: ice cream / I scream
for each ALC exercise which appear in the bottom
margin of the IT

to describe objectives and give instructions in the


student text; may appear in book quiz instructions:
select, unscramble, compare, etc.
a DLIELC department which offers a variety of
instructor training courses for non-native speakers

IT notes recommended teaching procedures,

key (blurb in the first edition) brief instructions

instructional vocabulary the vocabulary used

Instructor Development Branch (IDB)

utterance (the words a person says); distinguishes


types of sentences, e.g., questions versus
statements

language components (also language areas)


vocabulary, grammar, functions, and the four skills
of listening, speaking, reading and writing

Language Laboratory Activities (LLA)


audio and booklet activities which provide a
comprehensive supplement to the objectives of the
ALC textbooks
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Glossary
level ALC books are grouped into 6 levels:

words which students will be required to produce


and respond to in class and lab; deserving of
special teaching attention and subject to being
tested on book quizzes

Level

I: Books 16; Level II: Books 712;


Level III: Books 1318; Level IV: Books 1924;
Level V: Books 2530

linguistic related to the study of language

open-ended exercise an exercise intended to


elicit a creative response, both in terms of meaning
and language choice: Students ask each other for
their opinions.

low frequency referring to terms or structures


which tend to be more uncommon, specialized,
abstract, or infrequently used in a language

main idea the central thought of a paragraph

oral proficiency interview (OPI) an oral test


conducted by two trained OPI raters which assesses
a candidates ability to understand and speak in the
language as demonstrated through a series of tasks

around which all sentences of supporting


information are constructed

minimal pairs two words that have a change in


only one phoneme (sound): ship, sheep

paradigm a grammatical formula which appears


near the beginning of most grammar sections in the
ALC

morphological relating to the structure and form


of a language

paraphrasing the act of taking information from


another source or several sources and putting it
into ones own words; an important academic skill
required for research; a mid-level comprehension
task for the OPI

multiple choice describing an test or exercise


item in which there is generally only one correct
response from among two to four other possibilities

narrative describing a type of writing which tells


a story

nonintensive describing any course of studies

performance the ability to perform a certain skill


Performance Check title of ALC section at the
end of certain lessons; contains a supplementary
activity which reinforces objectives in interesting
and motivating ways; typically found in lower
books

involving infrequent and brief periods of


instruction over a lengthy span of time; typical of
English language training in academies outside
the US

Nonintensive American Language Course


(NALC also NI) the counterpart of the ALC;
presents the same objectives as the intensive
course, but organized into shorter lessons; designed
to fit into a broad program of study which leaves
fewer hours for English instruction

performance evaluation (PE) an assessment


of skills as demonstrated by students over the span
of one book some Specialized English courses at
DLIELC

performance test (PT) a skills achievement


test (no longer available) administered at the
conclusion of each level of the first edition;
designed to reveal any areas of weakness,
particularly in writing and speaking; see also Skills
Assessment Kit

nonobjective vocabulary see facilitative


vocabulary

nonresident program English language training


outside the US which incorporates the ALC
into the curriculum; note: resident programs are
conducted at DLIELC

phoneme a single sound in a language that

objective the learning outcome or purpose of a


language activity or lesson; what a student should
know or be able to do as a result of instruction

objective vocabulary the new vocabulary as


specified on the preview page of each ALC lesson;
132

Overview of the American Language Course

distinguishes one word from another, noted with


diagonal lines / /; segmental phoneme
the smallest meaningful sound in a language;
suprasegmental phoneme the pitch, stress,
and juncture which extend over the individual
sounds in an utterance

First Printing 2011

Glossary
pitch how high or low the tone of an utterance

rhythm the regular recurrence of beats which

(speech sound) is

characterizes language (also music)

preview page the second page of a lesson with an


inventory of all new language content, including
vocabulary, grammar, and functions

role-play to play the part of someone else in a


conversation or situation

prior knowledge all the information, knowledge,


culture, and memories that help a learner to
make sense of new experiences; specific areas of
information which must be retrieved in order for
a new experience to be correctly understood and
more easily learned

scanning glancing at a text quickly to find specific


information

self-contained describing the ALC materials,


which provide the instructor with everything
necessary to conduct lessons and test objectives;
describing ALC supplementary materials which
can also stand alone (interactive multimedia
instruction (IMI), language laboratory activities
and video activities)

proficiency the ability to use a language,


especially with reference to the communication
skills of listening and speaking, but also including
reading and writing

semantic relating to the meaning of language


semi-controlled exercise an activity which

proficiency test (PT) a test which measures

allows for a limited range of variation in answers

general ability to use a language; designed to


give an accurate assessment of an examinees
underlying competence as well of his or her
potential performance

semi-technical (of vocabulary) everyday words


and phrases which commonly occur within a
particular professional field and which are essential
to effective communication within that field

realia real objects used in class to demonstrate


vocabulary or learn about culture: a theater
playbill, postage stamps, food items, etc.

sequential the ordering and control of activities


(from controlled to open-ended), of skills (from
receptive to productive), of grammar (from simple
to complex), of vocabulary items (from high
frequency to low frequency, abstract and semitechnical), and so on, which underlies ALC course
design

recite to repeat something memorized


recognition vocabulary words and expressions
students need to recognize, produce, and respond
to in class; not specifically tested but may appear
on tests; appears in italics in the IT

skill the developed ability to perform tasks in

recycle to deliberately use or elicit the use of a


previously introduced vocabulary item or grammar
form in subsequent lessons as an intentional act
either by the instructor or by curriculum designers

referent the word that a pronoun or other words

listening, speaking, reading, and writing; also


referring to all or each of those four skills
study skills skills which help the learner to be a
better student: note taking, outlining, dictionary
usage, etc.

Skills Assessment Kit (SAK) a set of speaking

refer to: Jack is home because he is ill.

reinforce to strengthen understanding of recently


presented objectives in a lesson through repeated
exposure in various contexts and types of exercises

remediation the process of helping students make


improvements in their areas of weakness

and writing activities used to assess student


mastery of skills objectives before beginning the
next ALC level (currently under development for
use with the second edition); see also Performance
Test

skimming reading quickly to get the main idea of


the material

resident program (also training) English


language training conducted in the US at DLIELC

Specialized English the DLIELC department


which offers English courses focusing on student

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Glossary
preparation for FOT in aviation, medicine, diving,
etc.; Specialized English Training (SET) refers to
such courses

stress the emphasis of a syllable in a word; the


emphasis of a word in a sentence

structure any grammar form; the arrangement of


the parts that make up particular phrases, clauses,
sentences, or units of discourse

subsumed describing an objective (typically


a skill) which occurs in an exercise in support
of another objective rather than in a separate
presentation

summarize to give a brief account of the main


points of an incident or of a written passage

syntactical relating to the arrangement of words;


the structure of a sentence

synthesis combining and/or changing two related


sentences to form a single, cohesive sentence:
ate lunch. She read a book. Elena ate
lunch while reading a book.

Elena

terminal objective one of several final learning


goals or outcomes of the General English and
Specialized English curricula in the skills areas
of listening, speaking, reading, and writing;
distinguished from enabling objectives by
their more general scope; supported by the
accomplishment of enabling objectives

topic the subject of a text or conversation


total physical response (TPR) a languagelearning method in which students move in
response to commands; often incorporated into
basic-level classes

word attack relating to skills required to master


reading

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First Printing 2011

Index
1st edition Seefirst edition.
2nd edition Seesecond edition.
780 SeeOverview of the ALC and Familiarization
with the ALC.
782 SeeGrammar for the ALC.
789 SeeIndexes for Level I-V.

A
abstract 9293
academic skills 70, 80
achievement test 5
acquisition (language) 39, 4849
activators 25, 49, 62, 66, 90
activities 79, 27, 4243, 46, 51, 60, 71, 7374,
7677, 79, 81, 8384, 87, 94
See alsoVideo Activities, Language
Laboratory Activities, additional activity, and
exercise types. See alsoeach major language
components section.
adaptation (in ALC) 30
additional activity (in ALC) 30
address (DLIELCs) i, 2
advanced (level) 10
advanced professional (level) 10
ALCPT 10
alerts 25, 29, 52, 62
alphabet 15
American Language Course Placement Test
SeeALCPT.
analysis 7, 66, 86
announcements 32
answers 1, 4, 8, 2425, 29
appendices (in ALC) 1517
appendix guide 30, 71
Appendix J SeeLesson Resources.
areas
language 13, 24, 73
skill 32, 34, 73 See alsolanguage components.
assessment 5, 8, 10
assignments (writing) 3438, 84, 86
association (word) 58
attainment (of objectives) 34
audience 7
audio 45, 27 See alsolab and Language
Laboratory Activities.
authentic 62, 65, 80
availability (of materials) 2, 46

B
background information 2, 28
bar (gray) 13, 17
basic
grammar 60
skills 80
sounds 74
block (of instruction) 7, 41 See alsounit.
bolded (vocabulary) 24, 5051
book quiz 5, 810, 19, 5051, 56, 61
box-outlining 81, 84
briefing 32, 93

C
capitalization 16
captions 33
cards
flash 5, 16, 53
paragraph 73
role-play 17, 43
catalog (DLIELC) 6
categorization exercises 56
CD 4, 6
charts 8, 33, 80, 83 See alsoscope & sequence
charts.
cloze exercises 55, 84
collocation exercises 57
communication 49, 60, 65, 75, 90
communicative 78, 33, 94
components (language) 7, 8, 32 See alsoareas.
comprehension exercises 5455, 72, 7778
comprehensive 4, 7, 12, 33
concept 62, 66, 68
concrete 5, 55, 93
connectives 37, 85
context (in) 6, 41, 48, 51
contexts 8, 39, 43, 60, 62, 80, 92 See alsosettings,
environment.
contextualized 66, 70
contractions 15
controlled exercises 78, 41, 64, 70, 74, 85
conversations 32, 79, 92
course objectives Seeterminal objectives.
courtesies (military) 32, 93
creative 64, 75, 86, 91
cue 28
cultural notes 29
curriculum 12, 3234
customs (military) 93

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Index
D
Defense Language Institute English Language
Center SeeDLIELC.
demonstration 32
Department of Defense (US) 7
descriptions (ALC level) 12, 6, 10
Descriptions (Language Skill Level) 7
descriptive (writing) 3438
design 12, 79, 3233, 39
developers (curriculum) 2, 32 See alsowriters.
diagram 34, 56
dialogs 32, 62, 74, 80, 9091
Dialogs (functions section) 24, 7475, 90, 93
See alsofunctions.
diamond (symbol in ALC) 47, 52
dictation 84
discussions 32, 76, 79, 86
DLIELC i, 12, 67, 910, 18, 3234

E
ECL 910
editing 38, 8687
EE Seeevaluation exercises.
elementary (level) 10
embedding 3637
enabling objectives 32, 3435, 37
English as a second (or foreign) language 7
See alsoESL/EFL.
English Comprehension Level SeeECL.
environment 7, 70, 90
ESL/EFL i, 2, 7, 33
evaluation exercises (EE) 4, 67, 19, 46
examinations 3233
example answers 2425
examples (on preview page) 27
exchanges 6465, 74
exercise types (in ALC) 5458 See alsonames of
specific exercise types.
expository (writing) 3438

F
facilitative structures 70, 82
facilitative vocabulary 51, 70, 82
Familiarization with the American Language Course
(780) i, 1
features 1, 78
feedback 2
first edition 12, 4, 32
flash cards 5, 53

136

fluency 7, 53, 60
focus (ALC) 79
follow-on training (FOT) 78, 3234, 73, 75, 80
forms
grammar 63
quiz 5
standard 3233
functions (language) 2, 8, 24, 2628, 3234, 41, 43,
51, 53, 60, 72, 7475, 9091, 9394 See
alsoDialogs.

G
gap-fill exercises 42, 55, 56
general
English 4, 10
topics Seethemes and topics.
General English (at DLIELC) 12, 7, 9
graduate 32, 34
grammar 2, 6, 8, 1415, 24, 2628, 3234, 3637,
43, 51, 53, 6063, 6567, 72, 90, 92, 94
Grammar for the ALC (782) 6
graphic organizers 8, 83, 86
graphs 33, 83
guided (activity) 65, 74

H
headings 24, 2830, 60, 7072, 90
highlighted (vocabulary) Seebolded.
homework 4, 67, 9, 18, 27, 4243, 46
Homework & Evaluation Exercises booklet 6

I
ILR 7, 32
IMI 5, 7, 9, 43, 46
Indexes for the ALC, 1st and 2nd Editions (789) 6,
33 See alsoAppendix A of this book.
inductive 62, 63, 66
inference 43, 78, 8182
instructional vocabulary 5152
instructions 2425, 28, 3233, 51, 58, 7779
instructor text (IT) 4, 17, 2230, 32, 37, 4955, 60,
62, 7072, 7778, 90
integrated (activities/skills) 73, 78
interaction 78, 43, 58, 62, 65
interactive multimedia instruction SeeIMI.
Interagency Language Roundtable SeeILR.
intermediate (level) 10
international 1, 7, 48
International Phonetic Alphabet SeeIPA.
introduction (ALC section) 23

Overview of the American Language Course

First Printing 2011

Index
IPA 15
IT Seeinstructor text.
IT notes 89, 17, 23, 2530, 49, 54

K
key 28
kit (for testing) 5

L
lab 4, 27, 46, 5051, 53 See alsoLanguage
Laboratory Activities.
laboratory Seelab.
language See alsofunctions, objectives, proficiency,
and skills.
acquisition 39, 4849
areas 13, 24, 73
components 78, 32
proficiency 10
roundtable SeeILR.
training 9
usage 10, 40
Language Laboratory Activities (LLA) 4, 27, 43,
46 See alsolab and audio.
Language Skill Level Descriptions 7
Lesson 5 (review) 14
lesson objectives (in ALC) 26 See alsoenabling
objectives.
lesson overview (in ALC) 26
lesson resources (Appendix J) 12, 17, 26, 30, 71
Lessons 1-4 (main ALC) 13
Level I 12, 45, 7, 10, 16, 34, 3940, 53, 74, 77, 80,
84, 91
Level II 12, 45, 10, 34, 40, 53, 78, 81, 85, 92
Level III 12, 45, 10, 1516, 34, 40, 47, 52, 57, 68,
78, 82, 86, 93
Level IV 12, 45, 10, 16, 34, 76, 79, 83, 87, 94
levels (ALC, in general) 1, 10
Level V 1, 45, 10
list
structure 61
word 33, 47
listening 5, 8, 10, 17, 19, 26, 29, 32, 55, 73, 7778,
81, 93
LLA SeeLanguage Laboratory Activities.

M
main lessons SeeLessons 1-4.
management (classroom) 23
managers (program) i, 1, 9, 13
maps 33

margins (IT) 2526, 29, 5052, 60, 7072 See


alsoIT notes.
matching exercises 4142, 55
materials (ALC) 46 See alsoAppendix B of this
book.
meaning 42, 52, 5556, 6263, 6667, 85
messages 3233, 7879, 82, 86
military 4, 68, 10, 16, 3238, 46, 48, 70, 76, 9394
multimedia SeeIMI.
multiple-choice exercises 56

N
NALC 9
narrative (writing) 3438
new
grammar 6263
instructors 12, 23
material 4
vocabulary 39, 4243, 47, 5253, 56, 58
NI SeeNALC.
Nonintensive American Language Course (NALC) 9
nonintensive (language training) 9
non-native instructors 1, 29
nonobjective vocabulary Seefacilitative.
nonresident programs 6
notes
cultural (in ALC) 29
IT 8, 17, 23, 2530, 49, 54
presentation (in ALC) 28
notes (in ALC) 8, 29
note taking 33, 70, 80, 85, 86, 87
novice (instructors) 23, 29 See alsonew.

O
objectives
ALC (in general) 79
course Seeterminal.
enabling 3439
function 90
grammar 60
lesson 26 See alsoenabling.
recycling 3940
reinforcing 4143
skills 7071
subsumed 72
terminal 3237 See alsoAppendix E of this book.
vocabulary 46
open-ended exercises 8, 65
OPI 73, 90
oral 32, 54, 65, 73, 79, 90, 93

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Index
oral proficiency interview SeeOPI.
organization (ALC) 1219
outlining 8081, 84, 87
overview (of objectives) 46, 60, 70, 90
Overview of the ALC (use of) i, 12

paradigms 6263, 6668


paragraphs 3537, 55, 73, 77, 8487
paraphrasing 73, 86
part-of-speech exercises 57
PE Seeperformance evaluation.
perfect tenses 6668
performance
evaluation 10
(student) 32
test SeeSkills Assessment Kit.
personalized exercises 9, 25, 49, 6465, 94
placement 10
plan 8, 22, 25
planning 2, 67, 2627, 30
preface (in ALC) 12, 2223, 55
preparation 78, 17, 2526, 33, 61
presentation (in ALC) 28
presentation of
functions 9093
grammar 6263, 6668
listening 7778
reading 8082
speaking 7476
vocabulary 4852
writing 8486
preview page (in ALC) 27, 4647, 5053
prior knowledge 49, 55
procedural information 28
professional 78, 10
proficiency 2, 7, 10, 73, 90
proficiency test 10
program
manager i, 1, 9, 13
of study 1, 79, 32
progress 8, 10, 34, 64, 75, 77
progression (of objectives) 3442, 6368, 7487
pronunciation 24, 72, 74, 76
PT Seeperformance test.
publication (information) i, 2, 4
punctuation 16, 3435, 77, 84

range (ECL) 9, 10
ranks (military) 16
reading 2, 5, 8, 10, 17, 19, 3233, 35, 73, 8083, 87
realia 26
recitation 74, 80, 91
recognition vocabulary 47, 5051
recycling 7, 27, 36, 37, 39, 3940, 42, 46, 53, 70, 72,
78
reduced (ST pages) 8, 25
reference i, 12, 6, 89, 12, 15, 17, 22, 27, 30, 47, 66
referents 81
reinforcing 47, 1819, 39, 4143, 46, 53, 60, 79
repetition 74, 91
reports 3233
requests i, 32
requirements 7, 3233, 70
research 7
resources 1, 89, 12, 15, 17, 26, 30 See
alsoLesson Resources.
responses 9, 28, 3233, 5051, 53, 6465, 77
review 4, 7, 14, 24, 50, 61
revision 32 See alsoAppendix D of this book.
role-play 17, 43, 79, 90

138

questions 12, 29, 3233, 49, 52, 54, 62, 64, 72, 77,
79
quiz Seebook quiz.

S
SAK SeeSkills Assessment Kit
scan 51, 8081
schedule 13
scope & sequence charts 22 See alsoAppendix C
of this book.
scripts 4, 17, 55, 7778
second edition (ALC) i, 12, 45, 23, 32 See
alsoAppendix D of this book.
sections (in the ALC) 24 See alsoheadings and the
names of specific sections.
selection (of objectives) 3233
self-contained 7
semantic map 37
semi-controlled exercises 64, 85
semi-technical vocabulary 8, 10, 33, 46, 58
sequence chart Seescope & sequence chart.
sequencing 2, 3335, 37, 55, 81, 85
sequencing exercises 55

Overview of the American Language Course

First Printing 2011

Index
sequential (design) 2, 4, 7, 33, 39
SET SeeSpecialized English (Training).
settings 10, 90, 93 See alsocontexts and
environment.
situations 56, 89, 13, 63, 75, 77, 90, 92
Skill Level Descriptions 7
skills 2, 5, 78, 10, 24, 2628, 3234, 3637,
43, 51, 53, 60, 7087, 9091, 9394 See
alsolistening, speaking, reading, and writing.
Skills Assessment Kit (SAK) 5
skim 81
speaking 78, 24, 32, 70, 7375, 9091
Specialized English Training (SET) 3233, 73
speech
American 6
(part of) 15, 27, 47, 52, 57, 61
spelling 16, 84
ST Seestudent text (ST)
strategies 23, 80, 82
stress 7678
structure (grammar) 4041, 43, 6067, 70, 82, 94
student-centered exercises 9, 58, 93
student performance 32
student text (ST) 2, 4, 89, 1219, 22, 2425, 5051,
54
study
guide 22, 27
(program of) 79
reference 66
skills 70, 80
subheadings 1, 24
subsumed (objectives) 72
suggestions 2, 8, 23, 26, 28, 30
summarizing 79, 8182, 86
supervisors 1
supplementary (materials) 46, 9, 17, 30, 41, 43, 50
survey 65
survival 7, 10, 9192
synthesis 3637

timeline 6668
topic (identify) 37, 72, 78, 87
topics (themes) 12, 10, 37, 48, 9193
total physical response (TPR) 77
training 1, 79, 3234, 70, 75, 76
transformation exercises 64
transparency masters 17, 26

U
unit (of instruction) 32 See alsoblock.
US 7, 16, 32
usage 10, 40, 6667

V
Venn diagram 56
verb 16, 60, 67
video activities 6, 7, 43, 46
visual 8, 28, 30, 53
vocabulary 2, 5, 8, 10, 15, 24, 2627, 29, 3234,
3637, 3943, 4647, 4958, 70, 72,
9092, 94 See alsoobjective, recognition,
facilitative, and instructional.

W
warm up 49 See alsoactivators.
warnings 3233, 93
word-association 58
word bank 56
writers (curriculum) 32 See alsodevelopers.
writing 8, 3236, 54, 73, 8487, 93
See alsoassignments and specific types of
writing.

T
table of contents (in ALC) 1213, 26
table of contents page (in ALC) 26
tables 33
technical 78, 10, 3233, 46, 48, 58
terminal objectives 3238 See alsoAppendix E of
this book.
test 2, 5, 910, 47, 51, 55
testable 5, 5051
themes 68, 28, 3940, 4849

Overview of the American Language Course

139

First Printing 2011

NOTES

140

Overview of the American Language Course