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THE EFFECTS OF MODEL REINFORCEMENT ON ADOLESCENT BOYS

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Therefore, while this study did not demonstrate gross behavioral model effects,
it is clear that the behavior of the model, at least in the RM group, was influencing
the behavior of the Ss.

SUMMARY
This study attempted to evaluate the susceptibility of emotionally disturbed
adolescent males to modeling effects. While no gross behavioral modeling was
demonstrated, a disinhibitory effect on response latency was observed that suggested the importance of more subtle modeling effects than had been previously
considered.

REFERENCES
1. BANUUHA,
A.

Behavioral modification through modeh procedures. Iii Krasner, L. and
Ullmann, L. (Edu.). Research in BeJlcwior Mdijicrrtim. New !fork: Holt, Rinehart and Winston,

1965.
2. FERGUSVN,
G. Sldislical Anal sis in Psychology and Education. New York: McCraw-Hill, 1966.

3. MARSCHAK,
M. Imitation anlparticipation in normal and disturbed young boys in interaction
with their parents. J. elin. Psychol., 1987,W,421-427.
D. Imitat,ive behavior of disturbed and nondisturbed children
4. WALTERS,R. and WILLOWS,
following exposure to aggressive and non-aggressive models. ChzM Develop., 1968, 39, 79-89.

A TALK WITH (OR LISTENING TO) CARL JUNG
T. S. KRAWIEC

In 1954, after a stiiit as a Fulbright lecturer in
t, m family and I charted our return to
i % n i J States to include stop at Rome of the
distinguished laborato+w of psycholoy in
Europe, as well as meetin with some o their
learned professors. I n c i u s in this itinerary
was a stop in Zurich, Switzerland.
Prior letter communications indicated that it
would be impossible for me to visit wtth Carl
Jung because he was away from his residence.
When we arrived in Zurich, 1 made 8 d to the
Jungian Institute and found that Dr. Jung was
not really connected with this eatabhhment.
However, there was a message to the effect that
he was in town.
The following day, I received a @ from a
representative of thls institution, askm me to
dro by his house after lunch, which I did! Later,
as ?was entering the lobb of our hotel, the deak
clerk informed me that
was a @ for me
and would I accept it? This I did, and in m n c e
the call was to the effect that I was to meet m t h
Carl Jung in his residence, the following afternoon at 4 P. M. (Apparently I was screened.)
The followin day, after a boat trip on Lake
Zurich to Car! Jung’s.how, I found myself
knocking at the door, whch was opened by a very
attractive young lady. Upon presenting my

dere

name, I ww ushered in and was asked to follow
her to the third floor. A knock upon the door
evoked a loud “Enter.” The room turned out to
be a sumptuous study, the walls of which were
lined with books. A booming voice said to me:
“You don’t mind if an old man does not riy”,
to which I promptly replied: “Of course not.
He offered me a cigarette while he relit hia
cigar and asked me to sit down. Then from the
clear he said: “What the hell is the unconscious?”, to which I replied like a flash: “If you
do not h o w , then I am sorry I can’t help you.”
His reeponse was a loud roar, and the remark
“I just wanted to find out what kind of a psychologist ou are.” Then he proceeded to tell
me that I
Egypt, a Moslem country in which
people truly act out their beliefs, and that I was
to a country where people talk about
~%%fefs.
The rest of the time was spent
listening to him talk about his experience in
Egypt. Soon the time came to an end, for there
was a knock on the door and another visitor for
Carl Jung.
about this experience, what a
pro%%3ung
turns out to be when we consider the 1969 phenomena 80 f uently encountered in the United States,%ere people
just talk,so few listen, and so few act.

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